Breast Milk

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for your baby for about 6 months and can be continued for as long as both mother and baby desire it.

What are the Benefits of Breastfeeding for Mom?

​​Breastfeeding is a wonderful gift for you as well as your baby. Many mothers feel fulfillment and joy from the physical and emotional communion they experience with their child while nursing. These feelings are augmented by the release of hormones, such as:

What Are the Benefits of Breastfeeding for Your Baby?

Breast milk provides the ideal nutrition for infants. It has a nearly perfect mix of vitamins, protein, and fat and everything your baby needs to grow. And it's all provided in a form more easily digested than infant formula. Breast milk also contains antibodies that help your baby fight off viruses and bacteria. Breastfeeding lowers your baby's risk of having asthma or allergies. Infants who are breastfed exclusively for the first 6 months, without any formula, have fewer ear infections, respiratory illnesses, and bouts of diarrhea. Overall, breastfeeding has been linked to higher IQ scores.  

What's the Best Position for Breastfeeding?

The best position for you is the one where you and your baby are both comfortable and relaxed.

What Are the ABCs of Breastfeeding?

Are There Medical Considerations With Breastfeeding?

In a few situations, breastfeeding could cause a baby harm. You should not breastfeed if:

Storage guidelines

Fresh milk:

Refrigerated Milk (Store at back,away from door)

Frozen Milk (Do not refreeze thawed milk!)

***Remember to: store milk at back of fridge, away from door/sides)

To warm milk

The cream will rise to the top of the milk during storage. Gently swirl milk (do not shake) to mix before checking temperature and offering to baby. If baby doesn't finish milk at one feeding, it is probably safe to refrigerate and offer within 1-2 hours before it is discarded.

*****Day Care settings have varying requirements for milk storage, labeling, and uses, though generally not more stringent than hospital guidelines.

Contact health care provider if: