Abstract
TRADE AND CULTURE: INDIAN OCEAN  INTERACTION ON THE COAST OF MALABAR IN MEDIEVAL PERIOD

Dr. Hussain Randathani

Director of Institute of Malabar Research and Development

Dr.Hussain K.Randathani is a historian and author of historical works on Indian History. He hails from Malappuram, Kerala state of India. He has served as Professor of history in MES College, Mannarkkad and Kunhali Marakkar Centre, University of Calicut. He has been the Principal of M.E.S. Keveeyam College, Valanchery. He is the Director of Institute of Malabar Research and Development with Dr.K.K.N.Kurup as the Chairman. He is also the Director of MES Self Financing Institutions with its head quarters at MES Medical College Campus, Perinthalmanna.

Abstract

TRADE AND CULTURE: INDIAN OCEAN  INTERACTION ON THE COAST OF MALABAR IN MEDIEVAL PERIOD

The paper, ‘Trade and Culture; Indian Ocean Interaction on the Coast of Malabar in Medieval Period’ deals with the trade and cultural exchanges between the foreigners and Malabar and preservation of  a trade culture in the area. Arab trade relation with Malabar had started from time immemorial and there existed continuous cultural exchange between the two from those times onwards. Even the Greek texts like Periplus of Erythrian Sea had reference of Nabati Arabs who frequented Malabar coast for trade in 50-60AD. Omani Arab merchants maintained close contact with the coast from first century on wards that the Omanis imported coconuts from Malabar Coast to Arab and North African lands. The paper analyses various ways through which the trade and the commodities affected the life and culture of the people and how the trade was secured through the unity of cultural diversity of the people. The spread of Islam along with trade and the missionary zeal of traders who as the agents of trade and religion, maintained the honesty and truthfulness which brought them admiration from the natives and the rajas. The paper discusses these aspects with the help of official and local records.

Key Words: Malabar, Arabs, Persian, Tamil, Makhdum