Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy  2017

HAGBOURNE C.E. PRIMARY SCHOOL

Description: school logo with church April 2014

‘Preparing each child for their future in an ever-changing world’

CARE - COURAGE - RESPECT - RESPONSIBILITY

 

 Child Protection

and

Safeguarding Policy

In line with Keeping Children Safe in Education 2016

 

 

 

 

 

This policy was updated on 17th October 2017

 

The policy must be reviewed and updated at least every 12 months. Hagbourne CE Primary School recognises its responsibility for safeguarding and child protection.

 

 

CONTENTS 

 

PART 1  

Page No.  

1. Introduction  

Page 3

2. Terminology  

Page 3

3. Aims

Page 4

4. The role of school staff  

Page 4

      5. What school staff need to know          

Page 5

6. What school staff should look out for

Page 6

7. What school staff should do if they have concerns about a child

Page 6

8. What school staff should do if a child is in danger or at risk of harm

Page 7

9. What school staff should do if they have concerns about another staff member

Page 7

10. What school staff should do if they have concerns about safeguarding practices within the school

Page 8

PART 2

Page No.  

11. Key personnel at our school  

Page 9

12. Roles and responsibilities  

Page 10

13. Supporting Children  

Page 13

        14. Confidentiality          

Page 14

15. Supporting Staff

Page 15

16. Allegations against staff

Page 15

17. Whistleblowing

Page 16

18. Physical Intervention/Positive Handling

Page 16

19. Anti-Bullying  

Page 17

20. Health & Safety

Page 17

21. Children with Special Educational Needs

Page 18

22. Types of abuse and neglect

Page 18

23. Specific safeguarding issues

Page 19

        24. Online safety          

Page 22

25. Opportunities to teach safeguarding

Page 22

26. Allegations of abuse made against other children (peer on peer abuse)

Page 22

27. Dealing with Disclosures

Page 23

28. Record keeping

Page 24

APPENDICES

Page No.  

29. Appendix A: Definitions

Page 25

30. Appendix B: Allegations flowchart  

Page 28

31. Appendix C: Actions where there are concerns about a child  (flowchart)

Page 29

PART 1 

 

1. Introduction

 

This policy has been developed in accordance with the principles established by the Children Act 1989; and in line with the following:

 

 

The Governing Board takes seriously its responsibility under section 11 of the Children Act and duties under “working together” to safeguard and promote the welfare of children; to work together with other agencies to ensure adequate arrangements exist within our setting to identify, and support those children who are suffering harm or are likely to suffer harm. 

 

We recognise that all staff and governors have a full and active part to play in protecting our pupils from harm, and that the child’s welfare is our paramount concern.

 

Our school should provide a safe, caring, positive and stimulating environment that promotes the social, physical and moral development of the individual child free from discrimination or bullying where children can learn and develop happily.

 

This policy applies to all staff, governors and volunteers working in our school.

 

This policy has been written in line with Keeping Children Safe in Education 2016. All staff will sign to confirm they have read and understood this policy.

 

 

2. Terminology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Aims

 

 

 

 

 

4. The role of school staff

 

Our School staff are particularly important as they are in a position to identify concerns early, provide help for children, and prevent concerns from escalating.  

 

 

 

5. What school staff need to know

 

o The role of the designated lead

o Keeping children safe in education part 1

o Whistleblowing policy

o Managing allegations about staff or volunteers

o What to do if they have a concern about a child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. What school staff should look out for

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.  What school staff should do if they have concerns about a child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. What schools staff should do if a child is in danger or at risk of harm

 

 If, a child is in immediate danger or is at risk of harm a referral should be made to children’s social care and/or the police immediately. Anyone can make a referral. Where referrals are not made by the DSL, the DSL should be informed, as soon as possible, that a referral has been made.  

 

 

9. What school staff should do if they have concerns about another staff member

 

 If our staff members have concerns about another staff member then this must be referred to the Headteacher. Where there are concerns about the Headteacher this should be referred to the chair of governors. In the event of allegations of abuse being made against the Headteacher, where the Headteacher is also the sole proprietor of an independent school, allegations should be reported directly to the designated officer(s) at the local authority. Staff may consider discussing any concerns with the school’s designated safeguarding lead and make any referral via them. Full details can be found in Part 2 of this guidance.  

 

 

10.  What school staff should do if they have concerns about safeguarding practices within the school or college

 

 


 

  PART 2 

 

11. Key personnel at our school:

 

The designated senior person for child protection in this school is:  

 

Annette Crewe - Headteacher

 

Contact details:  01235 813367

 ____________________________________________________________  

 

The deputy designated persons in this school are:  

Cheryl Sanchez – Deputy head

Sarah-Jane Lewis – Senior teacher

Kathy Jolley – After School Club Leader

 

 Contact details for all:  01235 813367

____________________________________________________________  

 

The nominated child protection governor for this school is:  

Steve Forbes

Contact details:  01235 813367 then a message will be passed on.

 ____________________________________________________________  

 

The Headteacher is:  Annette Crewe - Headteacher

 

Contact details:  01235 813367


 

12. Roles and responsibilities

 

All schools must nominate a senior member of staff to coordinate child protection arrangements and this person is named in this policy guidance. The school ensures that the designated safeguarding lead or a deputy will be on site at all times that the school is functioning.

 

 

The Governing Board

The Governing Board of Hagbourne CE Primary School undertake the regular review of safeguarding related policies and procedures that operate in our school.

 

The Governing Board have a crucial role in monitoring and challenging staff on the effectiveness of safeguarding arrangements  

 

Our Governing Board ensure that:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The headteacher:

 

 

 

 

The school has ensured that the DSL:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deputy DSLs 

 

Is appropriately trained and, in the absence of the designated safeguarding lead, carries out those functions necessary to ensure the ongoing safety and protection of children. In the event of the long-term absence of the designated person, the deputy will assume all of the functions above.  

 

All staff will:

 

Follow the Oxfordshire Safeguarding Children Board Procedures/Local Authority guidance in all cases of abuse, or suspected abuse (these can be found at www.OSCB.org.uk).

 

We will therefore:

 

 

 

 

 

 

_attendance/safeguarding_child_protection/Keeping_Child_Protection_ Records.doc  

 

13. Supporting Children

 

 

 

Our school will support all children and young people by:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14. Confidentiality

 

 

 

 

 

 

15. Supporting Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

16. Allegations against staff

 

In our county the named Designated Officer is:  

o Alison Beasley, Designated Officer (01865 815956),  

o LADO team 01865 810603 or  

o Lado.safeguardingchildren@oxfordshire.gov.uk 

o Contact must be made with the Designated officer or one of the assistant Designated Officer’s before any internal investigation is commenced

 

 

 

 

 

 

17. Whistleblowing

 

 

 

 

 

18. Physical Intervention/Positive Handling

 

‘The Use of Force to Control or Restrain Pupils’ 2010.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

19. Anti-Bullying

 

 

 

 

 

20. Health & Safety

 

 

 

 

21. Children with Special Educational Needs

 

At our setting we recognise that children with special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities can face additional safeguarding challenges. This policy reflects the fact that additional barriers can exist when recognising abuse and neglect in this group of children. This can include:  

 

 

 

 

22. Types of abuse and neglect  

 

All school and college staff should be aware that abuse, neglect and safeguarding issues are rarely standalone events that can be covered by one definition or label. In most cases multiple issues will overlap with one another.  

 

 

23. Specific safeguarding issues

 

For clarity, Modern Slavery encompasses: sexual exploitation, forced labour, criminal exploitation, domestic servitude and organ harvesting.

 

Staff must be aware that children can be exploited in many forms which include: committing burglary, selling drugs, sexually, gang violence and initiations

http://www.oscb.org.uk/themes-tools/domestic-abuse/  

 

http://educateagainsthate.com/  

 

 

 

 o online safety                          http://schools.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/content/internet-safety-andcyberbullying  

 

 

 

 

https://www.disrespectnobody.co.uk/sexting/what-is-sexting/  and Annex A

 o trafficking                

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safeguarding-childrenwho-may-have-been-trafficked-practice-guidance  

Annex A contains important additional information about specific forms of abuse and safeguarding issues.  

 

 

24. Online safety  

 

At our setting our pupils increasingly work online, we recognise that it is crucial to safeguard our pupils from potentially harmful and inappropriate online material. As such we ensure appropriate filters and appropriate monitoring systems are in place.  

 

25. Opportunities to teach safeguarding  

 

In our school we ensure our pupil are taught about safeguarding, including online, through teaching and learning opportunities, as part of providing a broad and balanced curriculum. This may include covering relevant issues through personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), and through sex and relationship education (SRE).  

 

 

26. Allegations of abuse made against other children (peer on peer abuse)

 

Our staff recognise that children are capable of abusing their peers. In a situation where child abuse is alleged to have been carried out by another child, our child protection procedures should be adhered to for both the victim and the alleged abuser; this means it should be considered as a child care and protection issue for both children.

Peer on peer abuse can take many forms, and gender issues can be prevalent when dealing with this type of abuse this could for example include girls being sexually touched/assaulted or boys being subject to initiation/hazing type violence.

See our Managing allegations against other pupils policy.

 

 


27. Dealing with Disclosures

 

         

        If a student asks to speak to you about a problem do not promise confidentiality but explain that it may be necessary to consult a colleague.

 

Receive

Always stop and listen straight away to someone who wants to tell you about incidents or suspicions of abuse.  Listen quietly and actively, giving your undivided attention.  Allow silences when needed.  Do not show shock or disbelieve but take what is said seriously.  

 

Reassure

Stay calm, no judgements, empathise.  Never make a promise that you can keep what a child has said a secret.  Give reassurance that only those who need to know will be told.  Reassure the young person that they were right to tell you.

 

React

React to the student only as far as is necessary for you to establish whether or not you need to refer this matter, but don’t interrogate for full details.

 

Don’t ask leading questions – keep the open questions e.g. ’is there anything else you want to say?’

 

If you need to try to get more details again keep to open questions, “tell me a bit more about that”  

 

If you do ask questions remember to record the questions you ask as well as the responses the young person gives

 

Do not criticize the perpetrator; the student may have affection for him/her.

 

Explain what you will do next – inform designated teacher, keep in contact.

 

Record

If possible make brief notes about what they are actually telling you at the time.  Keep these notes, however rough they are.  If you are unable to make notes at the time write down what was said as soon as you can.

 

Record what was actually said by the student rather than your interpretation of what they are telling you,  be factual at all times

 

Record the date, time, place and any noticeable nonverbal behaviour.

 

Report

Report the incident to the designated teacher and do not tell any other adults or students what you have been told.

Never attempt to carry out an investigation of suspected abuse by interviewing the young person or any others involved.  This is a highly skilled role and any attempts by yourself could

 affect possible criminal proceedings.

 

28. Record Keeping

 

The designated teachers for child protection are responsible for ensuring that the necessary paperwork is completed and sent to the relevant people and stored in a safe and confidential place. This means that the records will be a coherent factual record of the concerns that are stored on individual children in a clear chronological order.

 

http://schools.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/sites/schools/files/folders/folders/documents/sa feguarding/Keeping_Child_Protection_Records.doc  

 

 

Front page chronologies should be used and be part of all individual safeguarding files.

 

           


Appendix A 

 

Child sexual exploitation (CSE)

 

The sexual exploitation of children and young people under 18 involves exploitative situations, contexts and relationships where young people, (or a third person or persons) receive something, (e.g. food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, affections, gifts, money) as a result of them performing and/or others performing on them, sexual activities. Child sexual exploitation can occur through the use of technology without the child’s immediate recognition; for example being persuaded to post sexual images on the internet/mobile phones without immediate payment or gain. In all cases those exploiting the child/young person have power over them by virtue of their age, gender, intellect, physical strength and/or economic or other resources. Violence, coercion and intimidations are common, involvement in exploitative relationships being characterised in the main by the child’s or young person’s limited availability of choice, resulting from their social/economic and/or emotional vulnerability. (DCSF 2009).

 

Key Facts about CSE

 

Sexual violence or abuse against children represents a major public health and social welfare problem within UK society, affecting 16% of children under 16. That is approximately 2 million children.

Good practice – Individuals 

Good practice – Organisations 

Female Genital Mutilation FGM

FGM is child abuse and a form of violence against women and girls, and therefore should be dealt with as part of existing child safeguarding/protection structures, policies and procedures.

FGM is illegal in the UK. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the practice is illegal under the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003.

 

 Other than in the excepted circumstances, it is an offence for any person (regardless of their nationality or residence status) to:  

(section 3 of the Act).  

Forced marriages (FM)

FM is now a specific offence under s121 of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 that came into force on 16 June 2014. 

A FM is a marriage conducted without the valid consent of one or both parties, and where duress is a factor Forced marriage is when someone faces physical pressure to marry (e.g. threats, physical violence or sexual violence) or emotional and psychological pressure (e.g. if someone is made to feel like they’re bringing shame on their family). This is very different to an arranged marriage where both parties give consent.

FM is illegal in England and Wales. This includes:

 

Prevent  

 

The Counter Terrorism & Security Act 2015

 

The Act places a Prevent duty on specified schools to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. The education and childcare specified authorities in Schedule 6 to the Act are as follows:

 

Schools/settings subject to the Prevent Duty will be expected to demonstrate activity in the following areas –

 

 

Sexting in schools

Flowchart for settings

http://schools.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/sites/schools/files/folders/folders/documents/b ehavioursupportservice/SextinginSchools-FlowchartofConcern.pdf 

 

Information booklet

http://schools.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/sites/schools/files/folders/folders/documents/b ehavioursupportservice/SextinginSchools-InformationBooklet.pdf  

 

Risk assessment

http://schools.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/sites/schools/files/folders/folders/documents/b

ehavioursupportservice/SextinginSchools-RiskAssessment.pdf  

 


         

Appendix B 

 

Allegation flowchart

 

If you have a concern that a person who works with children and young people may have behaved inappropriately or you have received information that may constitute an allegation you must:

 

 Please note JEM: Joint Evaluation Meeting

Appendix C

 

 

Please note the referrer should always receive feedback after a referral is made, or be involved in any ongoing meetings if the case progresses.

This policy is in line with Keeping Children Safe in Education 2016 .Updated September 2017

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