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Mardela Improvement Plan 21-22
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School Name: School Improvement Plan 2021-2022

Wicomico County Public Schools

2021-2022

Mardela

School Improvement Plan

Liza Hastings

Table of Contents

Page #

School Summary

School Leadership Team

4

Mission, Vision, Equity and Wellness

District Mission

District Vision Points

District Educational Equity Policy

District Wellness Statement

School Mission and Vision Statements

5-7

Needs Assessment/Root Cause

Data Findings

8-9

Coordinated School Initiatives

School Initiatives 2021-2022

10-11

Summary of Priority Statements and SMART Goals

Priority Statements
SMART Goals

11-12

Focus Area One: ESSA Category - Academic Achievement/Progress: Literacy - Vocabulary

Priority Statement
SMART Goal
Supporting Data
Strategies and Effective Practices
Evidence for Reading Programs
Milestones

13-14

Focus Area Two: ESSA Category - ESSA Category - Academic Achievement/Progress: Literacy - Informational Text

Priority Statement
SMART Goal
Supporting Data
Strategies and Effective Practices
Evidence for Math Programs
Milestones

15-16

Focus Area Three: ESSA Category – Attendance

Priority Statement
SMART Goal
Supporting Data
Strategies and Effective Practices
Evidence for Math Programs
Milestones

17-18

Focus Area Four: ESSA Category – Discipline

Priority Statement
SMART Goal
Supporting Data
Strategies and Effective Practices
Evidence for Math Programs
Milestones

19-20

Focus Area Five: ESSA Category – Academic Achievement/Progress - AP/Dual Enrollment

Priority Statement
SMART Goal
Supporting Data
Strategies and Effective Practices
Evidence for Math Programs
Milestones

20-21

Appendices

ESSA Report Card 2019
Disproportionality Plan
PBIS Plan

22-31

32-43

44-45

School Leadership Team

Member

Title / Position

Liza Hastings

Principal

Amber Dorman

ILT Co-Chair/Middle School ELA

Janine Hurley

ILT Co-Chair/High School Math

Kim Nutter

Math PD Caoch

Brooke Lohr

PBIS Chair/PE

Katherine West

Literacy Coach

April Shiles

Guidance

Instructional Support Team

Amy Lane

Testing Coordinator

Social Committee

Don Abbatiello

High School History

School Safety

Chris Bozman

High School History

Instructional Support Team

Paige MacSorley

Board of Education Representative

District Mission Statement

The mission of the Wicomico County Public School (WCPS) system is to provide all students an educational foundation and a set of skills which will enable them to become responsible and productive citizens in our society.

Vision Statement

Our vision is to educate each student to his or her full potential. 

We Aspire to Be:

  • A public-school system dedicated to meeting the needs of each student, from the most gifted to the most challenged; focusing on early literacy, student engagement in authentic problem solving, innovative instruction that encourages creativity, and preparing students with 21st century skills necessary to successfully enter college or the world of work.
  • A public-school system rooted in a culture of respect, transparency, and collegiality; where trust, the quality of relationships, and empowerment are clearly understood to be the foundation for success.
  • A public-school system committed to safe schools; created through a careful balance of clearly communicated and enforced expectations and an atmosphere where students know that teachers and administrators believe in them.
  • A public-school system our community believes in – where teachers compete for jobs, employers compete for well-prepared graduates, families choose to live, and businesses aspire to relocate because of its reputation built upon the pursuit of excellence in providing an outstanding education for our community’s students. 

District Strategic Priorities

2017-2022

  • Ensure that students in Wicomico County Public Schools are reading on grade level by Grade 3.

Goal: Increase the percentage of students who enter kindergarten ready to learn from 33% to at least 38% by 2022, as measured by the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment.

  • Ensure that students graduate from Wicomico County Public Schools college and/or career ready.

Goal: Increase the percentage of students who enter Grade 9 and graduate 4 years later from 82% to at least 87% by 2022, as measured by the 4-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate.

  • Ensure a high performing workforce.

Goal: Increase the retention of first year teachers from 85% to at least 90% by 2022 as measured by the annual turnover rate.

  • Ensure that all schools are safe for student learning.

Goal: Increase positive school climate and safety by reducing the percentage of students with repeat incidents of physical aggression from 3.01% to 2% or lower by 2022 as measured by the database of recorded infractions. 

Educational Equity Policy

It is the policy of the Wicomico County Board of Education to ensure the success of each student in our school system, regardless of a student’s ability (cognitive, social, emotional, and physical), gender, ethnicity, family structure, gender identity and expression, language, race, religion, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status.

Wellness Statement

The goal of the Staff Wellness Plan is to improve the quality of health and wellness of employees by meeting their physical and emotional needs. By offering health-promoting programs such as Wellbeats, the Annual Spring 5K, as well as a multitude of programs offered through WellAware, the goal is to meet all needs - physical, emotional, financial, and social - of the employees at the school.

School Mission and Vision Statements

Our Mission Statement and Vision Statement:

We EQUIP our students to transform their world.  

We Educate our children so that they reach the goal of graduation  

We Question our children to develop their critical thinking skills.

We Uplift our children to build positive relationships and make a difference in their community 

We Invest in our children’s futures so that they can see beyond graduation.

We Promote activities in the school beyond academics to create well-rounded students.

 


Needs Assessment 2021-2022

(Sample) Data Sources

Key Takeaways

iReady

  • Students are struggling with vocabulary (multiple meaning words, connotation & denotation, greek & latin roots).
  • Vocabulary- At least 70% of 6th-8th graders were one or more grade levels behind in vocabulary.
  • Reading informational texts is also an area of need for our students.  
  • Informational Text- At least 60% of 6th-8th graders were one or more grade levels behind in informational text.

MAP

  • Grade 7- 57.14% were in the low average to low range
  • Grade 9- 44.12% were in the low average to low range
  • 60% of African American students were in the low average to low range  

Fall Assessment

  • None

Attendance

  • 7 drop-out concerns,
  • 38 students that have 5 or more absences in term 1 or term 2; 38 intervention plans

ESSA Category- On Track –

  • No issues

Discipline

  • Risk Ratio Students with Disabilities: 6.23
  • Increase in referrals in area of major offenses (bullying, drugs, fighting, and weapons)

Themes Across Data Sources

7th graders are struggling in vocabulary, informational text and math.

Many of blended virtual students were having attendance issues

Only 30% of students in grades 6-12 were proficient in vocabulary on the most recent iReady assessment; only 27% of students in grades 6-12 were proficient in comprehending informational text. 46% of students in grades 6-12 are two grade levels or more below.

Problem Statements

Sample: Students with IEPs are scoring 15% to 25% lower on the MAP assessment than students without IEPs at all grade levels.  

At least 70% of 6th-8th graders were one or more grade levels behind in vocabulary.

At least 60% of 6th-8th graders were one or more grade levels behind in informational text.

We have seen an increase in the number of students dropping out of school due to a lack of interest after COVID.

Root Cause Analysis

Attendance:

-Many of the potential dropouts are transfer students. They don’t know us or trust us, and many come to use with a bad school history. Some of these students have mental health issues. They also are coming to a small community school which is a big adjustment.

-COVID/ virtual learning has caused a problem for some of these students. When we were seeing students daily, we could monitor students better, but the 2 year break has made it difficult to maintain the personal connection for our struggling students.

- Older students went into the workforce during COVID, and getting a paycheck was an incentive to work instead of attending school.

Vocabulary/Informational Text:

-COVID disrupted instruction for two years

- Is vocabulary instruction occurring in all content areas? Are students reading informational text and applying informational text strategies in ALL content areas?

Coordinated School Initiatives 2021-2022

Bulleted list of School/District Programs/Events held at your school to support academic achievement, families, students, and staff.  Please include any specific opportunities for addressing student learning gaps.

Priority Statements and Measurable Goals

Priority Statement # 1

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on vocabulary.

SMART Goal

  • Percent of middle school students scoring at or above grade level on the iReady will increase from 29.3% to 35% in the 2021-2022 school year.

Priority Statement # 2

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on informational text.

SMART Goal

  • Percent of middle school students scoring at or above grade level on the iReady will increase from 32% to 37% in the 2021-2022 school year.

Priority Statement # 3

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on increasing the percent of students not chronically absent.

SMART Goal

  • Percent of middle school students not chronically absent will increase from 92.2% in 2019-2020 to 94% in 2021-2022.
  • Percent of high school students not chronically absent will increase from 84.9% in 2019-2020 to 87% in 2021-2022.

Priority Statement #4

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on decreasing the number of suspensions.

SMART Goal

  • Decrease the number of suspensions from 76 in 2019-2020 to 60 in 2021-2022.

Priority Statement #5

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on increasing or maintaining the percent of minority students enrolled in dual enrollment and AP courses.  

SMART Goal

  • Percent of minority  students enrolled in AP or dual enrollment course will maintain or increase from 13% in 2021-2022 to 2022-2023.


PRIORITY 1: ESSA Category: Academic Achievement/Progress, English Language Arts

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on vocabulary. This was decided as an area of need based on discussion of the iReady data at our ILT meeting.  

SMART GOAL

Percent of middle school students scoring at or above grade level on the iReady will increase from  29.3% to 35% in the 2021-2022 school year as measured by the iReady assessment.

DATA to SUPPORT GOAL: Needs Assessment

Data Source

Key Takeaways

iReady

At least 70% of or 6-8th graders are one or more grade levels behind on vocabulary according to the iReady assessment

% of Students Below Grade Level - Vocabulary

6th Grade

7th Grade

8th Grade

72

73

71

Strategies and Effective Practices 

1.0  Teachers will use vocabulary.com

1.1 Teachers will teach academic vocabulary in their content.

1.2 Teachers will teach Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

1.3 Teachers will teach multiple meaning words

1.4 Teachers will preview vocabulary before reading.

1.5 Teachers will utilize graphic organizers to teach vocabulary.

Evidence for Literacy Programs:

Grade Level

iReady is an online learning environment designed to assess students and provide individualized instruction in reading through phonics, comprehension, and vocabulary lessons.

Milestones Include dates and data source for milestones. Milestones can be for your goals or you can make them for your strategies if you intend to collect data for that strategy. Include at least two check points for the year. Update with data checks throughout the year as testing occurs.

Date

Data

Explanation & Needed Adjustments

January 2022

iReady Diagnostic Test - January - 34% proficient

This score only represents 8th grade

May 2022

iReady Diagnostic Test

PRIORITY 2:ESSA Category: Academic Achievement/Progress, English Language Arts

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on informational text.This was decided as an area of need based on discussion of the iReady data at our ILT meeting.  

SMART GOAL

Percent of middle school students scoring at or above grade level on the iReady will increase from 32% to 37% in the 2021-2022 school year.

DATA to SUPPORT GOAL: Needs Assessment

Data Source

Key Takeaways

iReady

At least 60% of or 6-8th graders are one or more grade levels behind on informational text according to the iReady assessment

% of Students Below Grade Level - Informational Text

6th

7th

8th

72

71

61

Strategies and Effective Practices

2.0 Teachers will teach organizational patterns for informational texts.

2.1 Teachers will teach text features for informational texts.

2.2 Teachers will teach READING NONFICTION strategies to help students comprehend informational text

2.3

Evidence for Literacy Programs:

Grade Level

iReady is an online learning environment designed to assess students and provide individualized instruction in reading through phonics, comprehension, and vocabulary lessons.

Milestones Include dates and data source for milestones. Milestones can be for your goals or you can make them for your strategies if you intend to collect data for that strategy. Include at least two check points for the year. Update with data checks throughout the year as testing occurs.

Date

Data

Needed Adjustments

January 2022

iReady Diagnostic Test - January - 40% proficient

This score only represents 8th grade

May 2022

iReady Diagnostic Test

PRIORITY 3: School Quality and Student Success

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on increasing the percent of students not chronically absent. This was decided as an area of need based on discussion of the principal’s attendance report  at our ILT meeting.  

SMART GOAL

Percent of middle school students not chronically absent will increase from 92.2% in 2019-2020 to 94% in 2021-2022.

Percent of high school students not chronically absent will increase from 84.9% in 2019-2020 to 87% in 2021-2022.

DATA to SUPPORT GOAL

Attendance Data

Strategies and Effective Practices 

2.0 Intervention letter at 3 days

2.1 Intervention call at 2 days

2.2 Intervention plan at 5 days

2.3Home/School Liaison, guidance counselor and grade level admin meets with students

2.4 Trusted Adult Program used to mentor students who are chronically absent

2.5 Mentor/Mentee Program

2.6 Flexible Scheduling - Blended Virtual

2.7 - Communication with student and guardian

Milestones Include dates and data source for milestones. Milestones can be for your goals or you can make them for your strategies if you intend to collect data for that strategy.  Include at least two check points for the year. Update with data checks throughout the year as testing occurs.

Date

Data

Explanation & Needed Adjustments

quarterly

PRIORITY 4: School Quality and Student Success

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on decreasing the number of suspensions.

SMART GOAL

Decrease the number of suspensions from 76 in 2019-2020 to 60 in 2021-2022.

DATA to SUPPORT GOAL

Discipline Data - DISPRO Data

Strategies and Effective Practices 

2.0 Mentor/Mentee Program

2.1 Trusted Adult program

2.2 PBIS Incentive

2.3 FAME Awards

2.4 Restorative Practices

Milestones Include dates and data source for milestones. Milestones can be for your goals or you can make them for your strategies if you intend to collect data for that strategy.  Include at least two check points for the year. Update with data checks throughout the year as testing occurs.

Date

Data

Explanation & Needed Adjustments

10/1

7 students suspended - discipline report

11/1

14 students suspended - discipline report

12/1

19 students suspended - discipline report

1/1

29 students suspended - discipline report

2/1

32 students suspended - discipline report

3/1

4/1

5/1

6/1

PRIORITY 5: Academic Achievement/Progress

In the 2021-2022 school year, Mardela Middle & High School will focus on increasing  the percent of minority students enrolled in dual enrollment and AP courses.

SMART GOAL

  • Percent of minority  students enrolled in AP or dual enrollment course will maintain or increase from 13% in 2021-2022 to 2022-2023.

DATA to SUPPORT GOAL

Enrollment Statistics - Enrollment in course and overall demographics

Strategies and Effective Practices 

2.0 PSAT to identify with AP/Dual Enrollment potential

2.1 Reach out to parents of students that have AP/Dual Enrollment potential

2.2 Guidance and Admin working with teachers with check ins to identify students who are struggling with AP courses

2.3 Scheduling AP students in their FLEX course with their AP teacher to get additional support during the FLEX period.

2.4

Milestones Include dates and data source for milestones. Milestones can be for your goals or you can make them for your strategies if you intend to collect data for that strategy.  Include at least two check points for the year. Update with data checks throughout the year as testing occurs.

Date

Data

Explanation & Needed Adjustments

Oct

PSAT

Use PSAT data to identify students with AP/Dual Enrollment potential

Semester 1

Enrollment data

Semester 2

Enrollment data

EOY

DE&AP Enrollment Report provided by county under scheduling tab in X2

Appendices:

School’s ESSA Report Card for 2019

School’s Disproportionality Plan

School’s PBIS Plan (Condensed Version)

 

Action Team Members

Action Team Members

Name

Position and Role

Phone Number

E-Mail

Room Number and Location

Liza Hastings

Principal

410-677-5142

lhastin@wcboe.org

office

Doreen Nolan

Assistant Principal

410-677-5142

dnolan@wcboe.org

Office

Mike Campbell

Assistant Principal

410-677-5142

mcampbel@wcboe.org

Office

April Shiles

Guidance counselor

410-677-5142

ashiles@wcboe.org

Guidance

Lisa Armstrong

Guidance counselor

410-677-5142

liarmstr@wcboe.org

Guidance

Cameron Ball

Dean of Students

410-677-5142

cball@wcboe.org

Office

Stage 1 Tasks

Data Collection Questions

Data Sources

EXAMPLE:

Are there notable differences in our suspension rates by race?

EXAMPLE:

Disciplinary database maintained by vice principal’s office.

1.  Are there notable differences in our suspension rates by race?

1.  Monthly reports pulled by principal and distributed to staff

2.  Are there outlying students within the data?  (i.e. one student who receives a large portion of referrals and suspensions)

2.  X2 Report Center

Preliminary Findings and Identified Disparity Issue

EXAMPLE:

African-American males comprise 40% of our student body but represent 82% of our suspensions.

Please see disproportionality table that we have created and update monthly.

(12/2:  African-Americans comprise 23% of our student body but represent 53% of our suspensions.)

10/22: 4% of our African-American students have 3 or more suspension days.  Less than 1% of our White students have 3 or more suspension days.

12/2:  6% of our African-American students have 3 or more suspension days.  Less than 1% of our  White students have 3 or more suspension days.

10/22: All of our African-American students with 3 or more suspension days earned suspensions for 200, 400, or 600 level incidents.  

 Our White student with 3 ore more suspension days earned a suspension for a 400 level incident.

12/2:  Reasons for suspension or African-American students with 3 or more suspension days:  Bullying/harassment, Threat to student, fighting, alcohol, attack on adult, sexual harassment

Reasons for suspension of White students with 3 or more suspension days:  Attack on student, threat to adult, drugs/controlled substances.

Stage 2 Tasks

Additional Data Collection Questions

Data Sources

EXAMPLE:

Are there patterns of disparity by grade or referring staff for African-American males in our student population? (Quantitative)

Do students or staff perceive deviation from consistent policy enforcement? (Qualitative)

EXAMPLE:

Revisit disciplinary database to extract this detail.

Conduct focus groups with students and staff to determine whether they perceive office referral practices deviating from stated policy and the impact of such practices.

1.  Are there patterns of students that repeat the same behavior to receive suspension?

1.  X2 Report Center

2.  Are there patterns of disparity in regard to administrative consequences for similar behaviors?

2.  X2 Report Center; X2

3.  

3.

Additional Findings and Disparity Issues

EXAMPLE:

75% of referrals leading to suspension among Africa-American males occur in Grade 9.  Of those, 50% result in termination of enrollment.  Grade 9 staff members express frustration with disruptive behavior that escalates to altercations between staff and students.

 

Grade 9 students report that some teachers escalate incidents involving African-American males more that their White peers.

10/25:  The bulk of our suspensions come from our 9th grade.  (alcohol, bullying – 2 students, sexual harassment, attack on adult)

12/2:  The bulk of our suspensions (9 out of 27) continue to come from our 9th grade.  (Bullying, threat to adult, fighting, attack on adult, alcohol, sexual harassment).  

10/25:  4 of the 5 9th grade suspensions were African American.  The 5th was biracial.

12/2:  Of the 9 students suspended in 9th grade, 5 identify as African American and 1 as multi-race.  50% of our sixth graders suspended are students of color (2/4); 50% of our 7th graders suspended are students of color (1/2); 50% of our 8th graders suspended are students of color (2/4); 67% of our 9th graders suspended are students of color (6/9); 50% of our 10th graders suspended are students of color (1/2); 33% of our 11th graders suspended are students of color (1/3); 0% of our seniors suspended are students of color (0/3).

10/25:  More white students are receiving referrals, but more African American students are being suspended.  The white students received referrals for 102’s, 701’s, 101’s. (Our white student with the most referrals has 7 – 701’s; 2 – 102’s; 2 – 101’s).  

12/2:  46% of the referrals were written for students of color.  54% of the referrals were written for white students.

10/25:  All of the suspensions have occurred outside of the classrooms (hallways during transition, cafeteria during lunch, and CTE bus)

12/2:  14 of the suspension have occurred as a result of behavior that occurred inside the classroom (7 white student incidents, 6 African American student incidents, 1 biracial student incident); 16 of the suspensions have occurred as a result of behavior that occurred outside of the classroom (5 white student incidents, 8 African American student incidents, 2 biracial student incidents)

Cause(s) of Disparity Issues

Root Cause(s) of Disparity Issues

EXAMPLE:

Teacher frustration peaks after repeated incidents with students talking back in class, and the situation often evolves into significant classroom disruption.

EXAMPLE:

Grade 9 staff lack consistent classroom management skills and have limited experience with de-escalation strategies to employ during times of classroom disruption.

  1.  Our African American students received discipline for major offenses (fighting, bullying, attacks)
  1. Youth culture glamorizes aggressive behaviors like fighting and threats.
  1. Students confront each other during hallway transitions when the student to adult ratio is high.

2.Students feel empowered when their peers are around to encourage them to confront/fight.

3.  Many incidents have started via social media.

  1.  Communicating electronically rather than face to face often emboldens people to say things that they would hesitate to say in person.

4.

4.

Stage 2 Tasks

Corrective Actions(s) for Root Causes

EXAMPLE:

Provide training and personalized support to Grade 9 staff in evidence-based de-escalation strategies and routinely repeat classroom management skill building.

Educate students through morning announcements, health class, counselor lessons, administrative conferences, and assemblies on appropriate conflict resolution, bully prevention, and appropriate use of social media.

Continue to provide at risk students with peer mentors.

Measurement and Evidence of Success After Making Corrective Action(s)

EXAMPLE:

Reassess disaggregated disciplinary data quarterly and at the conclusion of the academic year for Grade 9 referrals for classroom disruption, teacher interventions, and resulting suspension rates.  Assess whether disparities have been reduced or eliminated.

Reassess disaggregated disciplinary data monthly and at the conclusion of the academic year to determine whether disparities have been reduced or eliminated.

  1.  

3.

4.

Plan for Addressing Root Causes of School Discipline Disparities

Root Cause 1: Youth culture glamorizes aggressive behaviors like fighting and threats.

                          (Produce a separate sheet for each root cause.)

Corrective Action

Person or People Responsible

Resources Needed

Evidence of Implementation

Monitor Date

Results

EXAMPLE:

Provide Training and personalized support to Grade 9 staff in evidence-based de-escalation strategies and routinely repeat classroom management skill building.

Ms. Dean; Assistant

Principal; Mr. Joy Guidance counselor

Training:  $2,000 for trainer, materials, travel; release time for training

Support:  Defined times for ongoing support with each Grade 9 staff member to monitor implementation

a. Training completed

b. Use of strategy                                                                                                                                              confirmed through supervision and grade-level meetings

Monthly throughout first semester; bimonthly for remainder of year; quarterly thereafter

Educate students through morning announcements, health class, counselor lessons, administrative conferences, and assemblies on appropriate conflict resolution, bully prevention, and appropriate use of social media.

Mrs. Shiles and Mrs. Armstrong – counselors; Mrs. Hastings – Principal; Ms. Tapman and Mrs. Nestor – health teachers, Ms. Gardner and Mr. Campbell – assistant principals; Mr. Ball – Dean of Students

Assembly paid for by PTA

Facts to share on announcements from Mrs. Shiles and Mrs. Armstrong

Health curriculum that addresses bullying and use of social media

Naviance lessons that address social media

Pictures of assembly

Information sheets and dates shared on announcements documented

Curriculum and student work

Curriculum and student work

X2 journal entries and conduct referrals to reflect administrative conferences

October 15, 2019

Quarterly

Each semester

Quarterly

ongoing

Root Cause 2:.  Students feel empowered when their peers are around to encourage them to confront/fight.

                          (Produce a separate sheet for each root cause.)

Corrective Action

Person or People Responsible

Resources Needed

Evidence of Implementation

Monitor Date

Results

EXAMPLE:

Provide Training and personalized support to Grade 9 staff in evidence-based de-escalation strategies and routinely repeat classroom management skill building.

Ms. Dean; Assistant

Principal; Mr. Joy Guidance counselor

Training:  $2,000 for trainer, materials, travel; release time for training

Support:  Defined times for ongoing support with each Grade 9 staff member to monitor implementation

a. Training completed

b. Use of strategy                               confirmed through supervision and grade-level meetings

Monthly throughout first semester; bimonthly for remainder of year; quarterly thereafter

Provide students with peer mentoring and conflict resolution to teach appropriate conflict resolution skills.

Mrs. Armstrong – counselor (peer mentoring);

Mrs. Armstrong and Mrs. Shiles (conflict resolution)

Funding from principal’s fund for activities during monthly peer mentoring meetings

Attendance taken at each event

Monthly

Ongoing for counseling sessions

Root Cause 3: Communicating electronically rather than face to face often emboldens people to say things that they would hesitate to say in person.

                          (Produce a separate sheet for each root cause.)

Corrective Action

Person or People Responsible

Resources Needed

Evidence of Implementation

Monitor Date

Results

EXAMPLE:

Provide Training and personalized support to Grade 9 staff in evidence-based de-escalation strategies and routinely repeat classroom management skill building.

Ms. Dean; Assistant

Principal; Mr. Joy Guidance counselor

Training:  $2,000 for trainer, materials, travel; release time for training

Support:  Defined times for ongoing support with each Grade 9 staff member to monitor implementation

a. Training completed

b. Use of strategy confirmed through supervision and grade-level meetings

Monthly throughout first semester; bimonthly for remainder of year; quarterly thereafter

Teach students about appropriate use of social media.

Mrs. Armstrong, Mrs. Shiles – counselors; Ms. Tapman, Mrs. Nestor – health teachers

Naviance and health curricula

Curricula and student work

Semester

2.

3.  

Root Cause 4: _________________________________________________________________________________________

                          (Produce a separate sheet for each root cause.)

Corrective Action

Person or People Responsible

Resources Needed

Evidence of Implementation

Monitor Date

Results

EXAMPLE:

Provide Training and personalized support to Grade 9 staff in evidence-based de-escalation strategies and routinely repeat classroom management skill building.

Ms. Dean; Assistant

Principal; Mr. Joy Guidance counselor

Training:  $2,000 for trainer, materials, travel; release time for training

Support:  Defined times for ongoing support with each Grade 9 staff member to monitor implementation

a. Training completed

b. Use of strategy confirmed through supervision and grade-level meetings

Monthly throughout first semester; bimonthly for remainder of year; quarterly thereafter

1.

2.

3.  

 

 

 

 Mardela Middle High School

PBIS Action Plan

2020 - 2021

Tier 1 Goal: Students will Walk the Warrior Way. Designed to reduce problem behaviors and increase instructional time.

TIER

Focus

Expectations

Interventions

rewards

Person(s) Responsible

1

Conduct

Teaching the Warrior Way

Continual ongoing review of the Warrior Way in lessons and on the announcements

FAME awards, Quarterly Incentives, Terms Incentives, and Jolly Roger trip

Teachers, Administration, and other Support Staff

1

Conduct

Continued Professional Development for the Staff

Professional Development on the reasons behind PBIS and how it is implemented at Mardela

Staff is more on Board and willing to commit to PBIS

Administration and PBIS Team

1

Conduct

Student of the Month

One female and one male from each grade will be recognized as Student of the Month

Picture taken for the bulletin board, scrolling announcements, and webpage along with certificate and choice of prize

Teachers, Administration, and Students

1

Attendance

Staff will facilitate incentives

Staff will provide students with meaningful reminders of the importance of school attendance.

Staff will continue to provide the update “attendance policy” the BOE has put in place

Staff can give FAME awards to students with good attendance or who have improved attendance

Teachers, Administrators, and other Support Staff

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