GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Content Area:

Visual & Performing Arts

    Grade Level:

K

Module Title:

Visual Art

     

LEARNING TARGETS

NJ STUDENT LEARNING STANDARDS

1.1  The Creative Process:  All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and

       principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

1.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role,

      development, and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures.

1.3  Performance:  All students will synthesize those skills, media, methods, and technologies

       appropriate to creating, performing, and/or presenting works of art in dance, music, theatre, and

       visual art.

1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies pertains to all four arts

      disciplines, and is comprised of two strands related to the mode of response: A. Aesthetic

      Responses and B. Critique Methodologies. This standard addresses two ways students may

      respond to the arts, including (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of

      methodologies for critique

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

The basic elements of art and principles of design govern art creation and composition.

1.1.2.D.1

Identify the basic elements of art and principles of design in diverse types of artwork.  

Recognizing the elements of art and principles of design in artworks of known and emerging artists, as well as peers, is an initial step toward visual literacy.

1.1.2.D.2

Identify elements of art and principles of design in specific works of art and explain how they are used.  

Dance, music, theatre, and visual artwork from diverse cultures and historical eras have distinct

characteristics and common themes that are revealed by contextual clues within the works of art.

1.2.2.A.1

Identify characteristic theme-based works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art, such as

artworks based on the themes of family and community, from various historical periods and world cultures.

Visual statements in art are derived from the basic elements of art regardless of the format and medium used to create the art. There are also a wide variety of art media, each having its own materials, processes, and technical application methods for exploring solutions to creative problems.

1.3.2.D.1

Create two- and three-dimensional works of art using the basic elements of color, line, shape, form, texture, and space, as well as a variety of art mediums and application methods.

Symbols convey meaning agreed upon by a group or culture. Manipulation of the basic elements of art and principles of design for personal expression results in visual communication that may be relevant in a variety of settings.

1.3.2.D.2

Use symbols to create personal works of art based on selected age-appropriate themes, using oral stories as a basis for pictorial representation.

Each of the visual art forms uses various materials, tools, and techniques that are associated with unique verbal and visual vocabularies.

1.3.2.D.3

Employ basic verbal and visual art vocabulary to demonstrate knowledge of the materials, tools, and methodologies used to create and tell visual stories.

Knowledge of visual art media necessitates an understanding of a variety of traditional and nontraditional tools, applications, possibilities, and limitations.

1.3.2.D.4

Explore the use of a wide array of art mediums and select tools that are appropriate to the production of works of art in a variety of art media.

Visual awareness stems from acute observational skills and interest in visual objects, spaces, and the relationship of objects to the world.

1.3.2.D.5

Create works of art that are based on observations of the physical world and that illustrate how art is part of everyday life, using a variety of art mediums and art media.

Each arts discipline (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) has distinct characteristics, as do the artists

who create them.

1.4.2.A.3

Use imagination to create a story based on an arts experience that communicated an emotion

or feeling, and tell the story through each of the four arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual art).

Relative merits of works of art can be qualitatively and quantitatively assessed using observable criteria.

1.4.2.B.1

Observe the basic arts elements in performances and exhibitions and use them to formulate objective assessments of artworks in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Kindergarten Students will…

  • Recognize the qualities of line including straight, curved, vertical, horizontal, thick and thin lines in two-dimensional works of art (e.g., paintings by Kenneth Noland, Martin Ramirez, Cy Twombly etc.) and apply similar use of varied lines in original artwork.
  • Identify basic geometric shapes (i.e., circle, square and triangle) in two-dimensional works of art (e.g., prints and paintings by Jasper Johns, Jim Dine, Robert Delaunay, Paul Klee etc.) and produce similar use of shape as the focus of original artwork.
  • Identify primary colors in two -dimensional works of art (e.g., Piet Mondrian’s Compositions in Red, Blue and Yellow, DeStijl paintings by Bart Van Der Lick, Paul Cézanne still life’s, Roy Lichtenstein’s paintings etc.) and apply primary colors in original artwork.
  • Recognize artists’ use of pattern/texture (e.g., Judy Chicago's Pasadena Lifesavers series, Jasper John’s number series, Pueblo pottery, Greek vases etc.) and use pattern as the inspiration for original artwork.
  • Identify the elements of art including line weight, color and texture in famous, self-generated, and peer artwork and apply these elements to the creation of original artwork.

  • Describe the difference between shape and form in basic verbal vocabulary and incorporate basic shapes (e.g., circle, square, and triangle) in original pieces of art to support the narrative content.

  • Identify the colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple in famous artwork and peer artwork and apply them in original works of art and describe the use of color for expression.

  • Use modeling tools to create three-dimensional forms both in the round and relief.

 

  • Recognize and use line and shape to create symbols.

 

  • Use a variety of art making materials (e.g., paint, crayons, markers etc.) and color mixing to create realistic, abstract and expressive two-dimensional works of art.

  • Use the elements of design; line, shape, texture, color and space to create two- dimensional artwork based on personal symbols that is seen in everyday life (e.g., stop lights, golden arches, hearts.

  • Use shape, texture and color to create 3 dimensional artwork based on observation of the physical world (e.g., containers, animals, people) using a variety of media and tools appropriate to the production of the works (e.g., clay and shaping tools, cardboard, scissors and glue, wire).
  • Use the various materials, tools and techniques and demonstrate their knowledge by identifying the materials, tools and methods they have used (e.g., markers, crayons, paint, clay, brush, stamps, shaping tool, scribbling, dabbing, patterning, pinching, smoothing, building etc.).

  • After viewing a master work(s) that communicates emotion(s), describe what emotions the artwork conveys and how the artist conveys those emotions (i.e., through content/subject; through medium used; through use of line, shape, color, repetition, etc.).  Create a work of art that tells a story of that emotional response.

  • Communicate personal responses to a variety of historical works of art with common subjects or themes.  Responses will describe likes and dislikes through comparing and contrasting characteristics of the various art works.

  • Observe the basic elements of art (i.e., line, shape, and color) and principles of design (i.e., repetition, pattern etc.) and share those observations with peers in a group critique of a work(s) of art.

  • Critique a work(s) of art and give reasons for liking or disliking the artwork(s), using elements of art (i.e., line, shape, and color) and principles of design (i.e., repetition, pattern etc.) as their basis for personal observations.

  • Identify artists as creative thinkers engaged in the artistic process that  generate art through the manipulation of the elements of art (e.g., line, shape, color and texture) and who share common ideas across diverse cultures (e.g., religious beliefs/ceremonies, family life, work, play).

  • Recognize ways artists are involved in communities (e.g. architects, photographers, painters) and associate the artist with their distinct work based on the themes of family and community (e.g., everyday life, ceremonies/holidays, caring and sharing, etc.)

  • Identify the subject matter, type of artist, time, place and cultural origin of various works of art (e.g., American Indian totems, African masks, Mexican sculptures/Trees of Life, architecture, etc.).

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment:  

  • Formative Assessment strategies
  • Rubrics
  • Unit Assessments
  • Performance Assessments 

Equipment Needed:

  • Color Wheel poster, or printout  
  • School and town libraries  
  • Various internet websites for art education.
  • ART Supplies

  • Pinterest, Pinterest.com  
  • Artsonia, Artsonia.com  
  • The Getty Institute, getty.edu  
  • WebArt, webart.com  
  • Internet,
  • Virtual Museum Tours
  • Hand-outs  
  • YouTube videos related to art history, artists, or art creation.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

504s

  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.

At-Risk Failure

  • Projects designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student need
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities and support
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills based on student needs
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Directions written and read/explained thoroughly and in chunks
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers and other organizational aides
  • Student Success Team and implementation of RTI Interventions
  • Set goal plan with reachable goals and pathways and collaboration with parents
  • One-on-one conference with teacher to include feedback on work and progress toward meeting goals

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaborate and to create and communicate knowledge.

MA.K.K.CC.A.3 Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects). MA.K.K.G.A Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres). MA.K.K.CC.B.5 Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects. MA.K.K.G.A.2 Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 4th grade,

  • 9.2.4.A.1 Identify reasons why people work, different types of work, and how work can help a person achieve personal and professional goals.  
  • 9.2.4.A.2 Identify various life roles and civic and work‐related activities in the school, home, and community.
  • 9.2.4.A.3 Investigate both traditional and nontraditional careers and relate information to personal likes and dislikes.
  • 9.2.4.A.4 Explain why knowledge and skills acquired in the elementary grades lay the foundation for future academic and career success.

Unit 1 Overview (6 Weeks)

Unit one focuses on two Elements of Art, line and shape


Line  

Shape  

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 1:  

All students will demonstrate an understanding of line by:

o Defining what a line is.

o Drawing various types of lines in different directions.  

All students will demonstrate an understanding of shape by:

o Defining what a shape is.

o Naming various geometric shapes.

o Drawing various geometric shapes.

o Ability to state the number of sides each shape has.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing lines and shapes, students will be able to:

Unit 2 Overview (8 Weeks)

 Unit two focuses on the Element of Art Color. 


Exit Skills  

By the end of Unit 2:

o All students will demonstrate an understanding of color by:  

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing color, students will be able to:

Unit 3 Overview

Unit three focuses on the Principle of Art pattern.  


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 3:  

o Defining what a pattern is.

o Completing existing patterns by following the sequence.

o Creating their own pattern using lines, colors, shapes, letters, numbers, or a combination.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing patterns, students will be able to:

Unit 4 Overview (8 weeks)

Unit four focuses on motor skills through the art of collage. 


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 4:  

o Defining what a collage is.

o Demonstrating proper cutting skills and scissor safety.

o Demonstrating proper glue stick techniques and ability.

o Creating a collaged image using the techniques discussed.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing collage, students will be able to:

Unit 5 Overview (6 Weeks)

Unit five focuses on three dimensional art.


 

Exit Skills By the end of Unit 5:  

o Defining what a sculpture is.

o Noting the differences between two-dimensional art and three-dimensional art.

o Showing development of motor skills by demonstrating different techniques learned in

class.

o Creating sculptures that are balanced and stand on their own.

o Adding color to their sculpture to enhance their art.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing sculpture, students will be able to:

Unit 6 Overview (6 Weeks)

Unit six focuses on resist techniques. 


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 6:  

o Defining what a resist technique is.

o Explaining the basics of resist techniques.

o Creating a work of art that uses a resist technique.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing resist techniques, students will be able to:

                                                                                                       

 Kindergarten