GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Content Area:

Visual & Performing Arts

    Grade Level:

3

Module Title:

Visual Art

     

LEARNING TARGETS

NJ STUDENT LEARNING STANDARDS

1.1  The Creative Process:  All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and

       principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

1.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role,

      development, and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures.

1.3  Performance:  All students will synthesize those skills, media, methods, and technologies

       appropriate to creating, performing, and/or presenting works of art in dance, music, theatre, and

       visual art.

1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies pertains to all four arts

      disciplines, and is comprised of two strands related to the mode of response: A. Aesthetic

      Responses and B. Critique Methodologies. This standard addresses two ways students may

      respond to the arts, including (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of

      methodologies for critique

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Understanding the function and purpose of the elements of art and principles of design assists with forming an appreciation of how art and design enhance functionality and improve quality of living.

1.1.5.D.1

Identify elements of art and principles of design that are evident in everyday life.    

Sometimes the contributions of an individual artist can influence a generation of artists and signal the

beginning of a new art genre.

1.2.5.A.3

Determine the impact of significant contributions of individual artists in dance, music, theatre, and visual art from diverse cultures throughout history.

The elements of art and principles of design can be applied in an infinite number of ways to express personal responses to creative problems.

1.3.5.D.1

Work individually and collaboratively to create two- and three-dimensional works of art that make cohesive visual statements and that employ the elements of art and principles of design.

Contextual clues to culturally specific thematic content, symbolism, compositional approach, and stylistic nuance are prevalent in works of art throughout the ages.

1.3.5.D.2

Identify common and distinctive characteristics of artworks from diverse cultural and historical eras of visual art using age-appropriate stylistic terminology (e.g., cubist, surreal, optic, impressionistic), and experiment with various compositional approaches influenced by these styles.

Each of the genres of visual art (e.g., realism, surrealism, abstract/non objective art, conceptual art, and others) is associated with appropriate vocabulary and a stylistic approach to art-making.

1.3.5.D.3

Identify common and distinctive characteristics of genres of visual artworks (e.g., realism, surrealism, abstract/non objective art, conceptual art, and others) using age-appropriate terminology, and experiment with various compositional approaches influenced by these genres.

Criteria for determining the aesthetic merits of artwork vary according to context. Understanding the

relationship between compositional design and genre provides the foundation for making value judgments about the arts.

1.4.5.A.3

Demonstrate how art communicates ideas about personal and social values and is inspired by an individual’s imagination and frame of reference (e.g., personal, social, political, historical context).

Decoding simple contextual clues require evaluation mechanisms, such as rubrics, to sort fact from opinion.

1.4.5.B.2

Use evaluative tools, such as rubrics, for self-assessment and to appraise the objectivity of critiques by peers.

Artists and audiences can and do disagree about the relative merits of artwork. When assessing works of

dance, music, theatre and visual art, it is important to consider the context for the creation and performance of the work (e.g., Who was the creator? What purpose does the artwork serve? Who is the intended audience?)

1.4.5.B.5

Distinguish ways in which individuals may disagree about the relative merits and effectiveness of artistic choices in the creation and performance of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Students will…

Grade 3

  • Give examples of various types of line and line weights found in everyday life (e.g., bricks and mortar, tree branches, architectural details including roofline, windows, doors, etc.).  Use line as the predominant element in the creation of artwork.
  • Identify mechanical or geometric shapes (e.g., circle, triangle, rectangle, square and cones) found in everyday life.  Use shapes as inspiration for original artwork (e.g., New Stones-Newton’s Tones by Tony Craig, Paul Cezanne’ still life paintings etc.).
  • Identify primary, secondary, and tertiary colors in everyday life (e.g., food, the natural environment, the sky, sun, rainbows, flowers, birds etc.). Mix and incorporate primary, secondary and tertiary colors in the creation of original works of art.  
  • Identify light, dark and middle values of color that are evident in everyday life and experiment with the use of value in original artwork.
  • Recognize rough and smooth surface textures that are evident in everyday life (e.g., tree bark, sandpaper, bricks, glass, whiteboard, bar of soap etc.) and collage various found textural materials to create works of art that represent differences in surface qualities.
  • Describe how three-dimensional geometric forms (i.e., cubes, spheres, cylinders and cones) are evident in everyday life (e.g., furniture and architecture, toys, cars, the natural environment, consumer products etc.).  Utilize geometric forms as the primary element in original works of artwork.
  • Observe radial balance in nature (e.g., sunflowers, fireworks, snowflakes, sea urchins, spider webs etc.) and illustrate radial balance in original artwork.
  • Recognize proportion as a means of determining the relationship between size and scale in the natural environment and as a compositional tool for artists. Illustrate proportion in original artwork.
  • Identify repetition/rhythm/pattern found in the natural world (e.g., tortoise shells, frost crystals, surface of a pineapple, pine cone etc.).  Design and create two-dimensional artworks reflecting the use of repetition and rhythm to create pattern.
  • Recognize emphasis (center of interest) evident in everyday life and diverse works of art in various mediums (e.g., painting by Johannes Vermeer, prints by Shunkosai Hokushu, illustrations by Norman Rockwell, sculptures by Jonathan Borofsky, Duane Hanson etc.).  Create works of art using the principles of design regarding emphasis, as the primary focus.
  • Work individually and collaboratively in a medium of choice to create a cohesive two-dimensional visual interpretation of a newsworthy issue or theme of personal significance that shows the use of the elements of line, shape, form, value, texture and color in composition.
  • Discuss the characteristics of four still life images from various historical periods of visual art and create thumbnail drawings that reflect these differing styles.
  • Describe common and distinctive characteristics of artworks from the diverse cultural and historical eras using age-appropriate stylistic terminology; describe how visual literacy and visual communications surround people in their daily lives;  and use observed life situations as inspiration for two and three-dimensional art making influenced by compositional approaches from a variety of styles (e.g., cubism, surrealism, optic art, impressionism etc.).
  • Work independently and collaboratively to create two and three-dimensional works of art that use the elements of line, shape, space and color and the principles of unity to make a visual statement using common and distinctive characteristics of several genres of visual artworks (e.g., realism, surrealism, American and European folk art etc.) to create an original statement.  
  • Employ the element of line, shape/form, texture and color to create a three-dimensional artwork within the parameters of a particular style (e.g., Early American, modern, wearable art etc.) that serves a function (e.g., decoration, furniture).  
  • Use the elements of line, shape and color to collaborate on an artwork that uses color and the principles of rhythm and pattern to unify the work. (e.g., principles exemplified by Amish Quilt Andy Warhol prints etc.).
  • Demonstrate understanding of how personal and social, political or historical context influences and artists and his/her work of art.  Create a work of art based on a timeless/universal theme and compare the work with works created in different historical, political, social, or personal settings (e.g., using a theme of children’s play/types, compare a work of today with works of art from other time periods that show children at play).
  • Talk effectively about art and works of art using the proper terminology.  Describe various characteristics and other observations of works of art such as portraits, still life drawings and paintings, landscapes, and non-objective pieces, abstract, and realistic works.
  • Offer reasons to support general statements about art (e.g., various types of lines can express or show a motion, color can express a mood or feeling, texture can be tactile or visual).  
  • Use criteria to assess the formal structure of artwork (e.g., focal point, balance, unity and the type of art/portrait vs. self-portrait) and to assess the effectiveness of the artist’s use of principles of design (e.g., color value/mood, line variation, symmetry/asymmetrical, space/proportion etc.) to achieve the artistic intent of the artwork.
  • Respond to art through both objective and subjective responses based on formulated criteria (e.g., design elements and principles, art type and reason for its creation).
  • Identify various artists whose pivotal works of art have influenced a key shift in the art movement   (e.g., Cezanne’s influence on cubism with his use of geometric shapes; the impact of Marcel Duchamp on contemporary art through his introduction of ready-mades or found objects as sculpture; Edward Hoppers’ use of colors and emphasis to  influence on the art world, pop culture and cinema through is dramatic use of light and dark values; Georges Seurat's use of primary color mixology to create  pointillism etc.).
  • Create original works of art inspired by influential artists throughout history that changed the perception of art and/or altered art-making methodologies (e.g., Composition in Halftones by Piet Mondrian, Still Life with Apples by Cezanne, Ed Canna by Georgia O'Keefe).

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment:  

  • Formative Assessment strategies
  • Rubrics
  • Unit Assessments
  • Performance Assessments 

Equipment Needed:

  • Color Wheel poster, or printout  
  • School and town libraries  
  • Various internet websites for art education.
  • ART Supplies

  • Pinterest, Pinterest.com  
  • Artsonia, Artsonia.com  
  • The Getty Institute, getty.edu  
  • WebArt, webart.com  
  • Internet,
  • Virtual Museum Tours
  • Hand-outs  
  • YouTube videos related to art history, artists, or art creation.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

504s

  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.

At-Risk Failure

  • Projects designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student need
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities and support
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills based on student needs
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Directions written and read/explained thoroughly and in chunks
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers and other organizational aides
  • Student Success Team and implementation of RTI Interventions
  • Set goal plan with reachable goals and pathways and collaboration with parents
  • One-on-one conference with teacher to include feedback on work and progress toward meeting goals

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaborate and to create and communicate knowledge.

SOC.6.1.4.B.1 Compare and contrast information that can be found on different types of maps and determine how the information may be useful. LA.3.RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language. LA.3.RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions, and make relevant connections to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. HPE.2.2.4.A.2 Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication when responding to disagreements or conflicts with others. MA.3.3.MD.D.8 Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters. MA.3.3.G.A.1 Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories. HPE.2.1.4.D.4 Demonstrate simple first-aid procedures for choking, bleeding, burns, and poisoning. HPE.2.1.4.D.1 Determine the characteristics of safe and unsafe situations and develop strategies to reduce the risk of injuries at home, school, and in the community (e.g., fire safety, poison safety, accident prevention). HPE.2.1.4.E.4 Summarize the causes of stress and explain ways to deal with stressful situations.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 4th grade,

  • 9.2.4.A.1 Identify reasons why people work, different types of work, and how work can help a person achieve personal and professional goals.  
  • 9.2.4.A.2 Identify various life roles and civic and work‐related activities in the school, home, and community.
  • 9.2.4.A.3 Investigate both traditional and nontraditional careers and relate information to personal likes and dislikes.
  • 9.2.4.A.4 Explain why knowledge and skills acquired in the elementary grades lay the foundation for future academic and career success.

Unit 1 Overview (8 Weeks)

Unit one focuses on the Elements of Art: line, shape, color, form, space, value, and texture.


 This is a review unit that should be gone over quickly, focusing mainly on how to incorporate all the elements into artwork and process.

Elements of Art  

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 1:  

o Naming all seven elements.

o Defining and explaining all seven elements.

o Using all seven elements in an exercise that reviews previous knowledge and prepares students for new endeavors.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing the elements of art students will be able to:

Unit 2 Overview Unit two focuses on figurative studies. (8 Weeks)


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 2:  

o Explaining the difference between a portrait and self-portrait.

o Delineating how the elements of art can help strengthen their portraits.

o Creating a portrait through observation of themselves or another and their features.

o Adding depth to their portrait through color application.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing the figurative studies students will be able to:

Unit 3 Overview Unit three focuses on drawing and painting. (8 Weeks)


New information will build upon areas already learned.  

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 3:  

o Using their previous knowledge to draw a historical monument from somewhere in the world.

o Selecting the appropriate tools for painting the monument drawing.

o Applying paint to their drawing in a manner that conveys their understanding of color theory.

o Using value and their previous knowledge of light sources to create depth in their artwork.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing drawing and painting students will be able to:

Unit 4 Overview Unit four focuses on sculpture. (8 Weeks) 


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 4:  

o Defining what a sculpture is.

o Being able to describe the difference between two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.

o Using techniques learned to work with a new medium.

o Creating a sculpture.

o Adding color to their sculpture.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing the sculpture students will be able to:

Unit 5 Overview Unit five focuses on the art of relief.  (8 Weeks)


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 5:  

o Explaining what a relief is.

o Demonstrating the ability to create a relief image.

o Being able to delineate the difference between the front and the back of the relief.

o Adding color in to their relief.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing the three-dimensional relief art students will be able to:

                                                                                                                                   

 Grade 3