ICS Calendar Title: World-Viewing: An Introduction to Worldview Studies (Hybrid: Online/In-Person)

ICS Course Code: ICSDH 132505/232505 F18

Instructor: Dr. Gideon Strauss

Term and Year: Fall 2018

Last Updated: September 1, 2018.

1. Course Description

2. Course Learning Goals

3. Course Requirements and Description and Weighting of Elements to be Evaluated

4. Required Readings and Viewings

5. Recommended Readings and Viewings

6. Course Schedule

1. Course Description

Ubi amor, ibi oculus.

(Roughly: Where there is love, there is seeing.)

An ancient saying,
passed along by Josef Pieper and Richard Mouw

What do I love? Who am I? Where do I belong? What is the world and what do I believe about it? What opportunities and constraints do I face in my particular context? What am I to do with my life?

View five significant recent movies. Consider the responses to these movies by thoughtful critics. Read and talk through a short list of insightful writings. Reflect on your own lived experience. Explore and reconsider how you view the world in relation to these movies, writings, and reflections.

World-Viewing: An Introduction to Worldview Studies serves as a touchstone course for the Master of Worldview Studies program as a whole, providing students with an overview of the program, an initial set of frameworks and tools for finding their way through the program, and a selection of readings (about 1,250 pages) that will prime students for reflecting on the six inter-related wayfinding questions listed above. The course also introduces students to the Christian worldview tradition out of which the Institute for Christian Studies emerged.

This version of the course will take a hybrid format, with five bi-weekly in-person classroom sessions as well as weekly structured interactive online forum discussions in response to reading assignments. The in-person sessions will take place on Mondays, 6:00pm - 9:00pm (September 24, October 15, November 5, November 26, December 10). There will be no assignments due during ICS’s reading week, October 22-26, 2018. For participants doing the course for credit all outstanding work will be due by no later than January 25, 2019.

2. Course Learning Goals

  1. To gain an introductory understanding of how people make sense of their lives and find their way in the world;
  2. To become critically familiar with the practice of “world-viewing” (for example, as instantiated in the neocalvinist “Christian worldview” tradition);
  3. To cultivate personal competency in creative and constructive reflection on the big questions of life; and,
  4. To prepare the necessary ground for subsequent work in the Master of Worldview Studies program.  

3. Course Requirements and Description and Weighting of Elements to be Evaluated

  1. Written responses (as detailed in the course schedule below) to the viewing of five movies and about 1,250 pages of reading  
  2. Active participation (as detailed in the course schedule below) in the weekly structured interactive online forum discussions         
  3. Timely completion of a paper of 3,000 to 4,000 words        
  4. Description and weighting of elements to be evaluated:
  1. Timely completion of viewing and reading responses:                 50%
  2. Participation in online forum discussions:         20%
  3. First draft of paper:                 15%
  4. Final draft of paper:                 15%

  1. In this course we will use the following grading scale:

Letter Grade

Numerical Equivalents

Grade Point

Grasp of Subject Matter

Other Qualities Expected of Students

A RANGE:

Excellent: Student shows original thinking, analytic and synthetic ability, critical evaluations, broad knowledge base

A+

90-100

4.0

Profound and Creative

Strong evidence of original thought, of analytic and synthetic ability; sound and penetrating critical evaluations which identify assumptions of those they study as well as their own; mastery of an extensive knowledge base

A

85-89

4.0

Outstanding

A-

80-84

3.7

Excellent

Clear evidence of original thinking, of analytic and synthetic ability; sound critical evaluations; broad knowledge base

B RANGE:

Good: Student shows critical capacity and analytic ability, understanding of relevant issues, familiarity with the literature

B+

77-79

3.3

Very Good

Good critical capacity and analytic ability; reasonable understanding of relevant issues; good familiarity with the literature

B

73-76

3.0

Good

B-

 

70-72

2.7

 

Satisfactory at a post-baccalaureate level

Adequate critical capacity and analytic ability; some understanding of relevant issues; some familiarity with the literature

F

0-69

0

Failure

Failure to meet the above criteria

  1. You should plan to commit between 9 and 12 hours a week to completing the coursework. If you find you need substantially more time than this every week, please contact the instructor to discuss. Please also see the note at the end of this syllabus with regard to disability or health considerations that may require accommodations.

4. Required Readings and Viewings

* Indicates books that course participants will need to purchase.

Abdurraqib, Hanif. “‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ Is Hopelessly Bad on Race.” Pacific Standard. December 17, 2017. (https://psmag.com/social-justice/three-billboards-bad-on-race)  

Appiah, Kwame Anthony. “Can we choose our own identity?” The Guardian. August 31, 2018. (https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/aug/31/who-owns-your-identity-kwame-anthony-appiah)

Beaty, Katelyn. “Why celibate LGBTQ Christians stir controversy on right and left alike.” Vox. August 16, 2018. (https://religionnews.com/2018/08/16/beaty-oped-2/)

Borrows, Bill. “Behind the barbed wire: how an extreme therapy group is saving the hardcore criminals of Folsom prison.” The Telegraph. September 8, 2017. (https://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/thinking-man/behind-barbed-wire-extreme-therapy-group-saving-hardcore-criminals/)  

Brooks, David. “The Odyssey Years.” New York Times. October 9, 2007. (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/09/opinion/09brooks.html)

Chaplin, Jonathan. “Loving Faithful Institutions: Building Blocks of a Just Global Society.” Comment Magazine, Fall 2011. (https://www.cardus.ca/comment/article/2904/loving-faithful-institutions-building-blocks-of-a-just-global-society/)  

Coakley, Sarah & SueJeanne Koh. “Prayer as Divine Propulsion: An Interview with Sarah Coakley, Part I.” The Other Journal. December 20, 2012. (https://theotherjournal.com/2012/12/20/prayer-as-divine-propulsion-an-interview-with-sarah-coakley/)

Coakley, Sarah & SueJeanne Koh. “Prayer as Divine Propulsion: An Interview with Sarah Coakley, Part II.” The Other Journal. December 27, 2012. (https://theotherjournal.com/2012/12/27/prayer-as-divine-propulsion-an-interview-with-sarah-coakley-part-ii/)

Eady, Trent. “Everything is problematic.” McGill Daily. November 24, 2014. (https://www.mcgilldaily.com/2014/11/everything-problematic/)

Fitzgerald, Adam. “Sarah Ahmed: ‘Once We Find Each Other, So Much Else Becomes Possible’.” Literary Hub. April 10, 2017. (https://lithub.com/sara-ahmed-once-we-find-each-other-so-much-else-becomes-possible/)

Framke, Caroline. “Wonder Woman isn’t just the superhero Hollywood needs. She’s the one exhausted feminists deserve.” Vox. June 9, 2017. (https://www.vox.com/culture/2017/6/7/15740804/wonder-woman-amazons-feminist)

Gerwig, Greta, director. Lady Bird. Universal Pictures, 2017. [93 minutes] (U of T Media Commons: VideoDVD 766320; St. Michael’s College Audio Visual: PN1997.2 .L339 2018 DVD SMC)

Ginzberg, Carlo. “Morelli, Freud and Sherlock Homes: Clues and Scientific Method.” History Workshop Journal 9, 1980, pp. 5-36. (http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/filmphilology/ginzburgmorellifreudholmes.pdf)  

Giridharadas, Anand. “What Is Identity?” The New York Times. August 27, 2018. (https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/27/books/review/francis-fukuyama-identity-kwame-anthony-appiah-the-lies-that-bind.html)

Grady, Constance. “2017 was the year of women’s anger, onscreen and off.” Vox. December 21, 2017. (https://www.vox.com/2017-in-review/2017/12/21/16776708/2017-womens-anger-womens-march-reckoning-handmaids-tale-alias-grace-big-little-lies-three-billboards)  

Griffioen, Sander. “On Worldviews.” Philosophia Reformata 77, 2012, pp. 19–56. (https://www.academia.edu/9790508/On_Worldviews) (other sources: ICS Library and Knox Library Periodical Collection; also available electronically: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/10084356)

Harris, Ainsley. “Stanford’s Most Popular Class Isn’t Computer Science–It’s Something Much More Important.” Fast Company, March 26, 2015. (https://www.fastcompany.com/3044043/stanfords-most-popular-class-isnt-computer-science-its-something-much-m)

Harris, Joseph. “Coming to Terms” (Chapter 1) in Rewriting: How To Do Things With Texts. Utah State University Press, 2006. (Robarts Library: PE1404 .H363 2006X)

Hoffman, Jordan. “Ex Libris: New York Public Library review – the restless mind of the city.” The Guardian. September 3, 2017. (https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/sep/03/ex-libris-new-york-public-library-review-documentary-frederick-wiseman)  

Jenkins, Patty, director. Wonder Woman. Warner Bros., 2017. [141 minutes] (Available on DVD and Blu Ray at U of T Media Commons)

Kaemingk, Matthew. “The Headscarf: Islam’s Gift to Western Democracy.” Comment Magazine, June 1, 2017. (https://www.cardus.ca/comment/article/5073/the-headscarf-islams-gift-to-western-democracy/)

Linden, Sheri. “‘The Work’: Film Review | SXSW 2017.” The Hollywood Reporter. March 11, 2017. (https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/work-984566)  

Madsbjerg, Christian. “Making Sense of the World” (Chapter 1) and “What Are People For” (Chapter 8) in Sensemaking: The Power of the Humanities in the Age of the Algorithm. Hachette Books, 2017, pp. 1–24 and 199–211.

McDonagh, Martin, director. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. Fox Searchlight Picture, 2017. [115 minutes] (Available on DVD and Blu Ray at U of T Media Commons)

McLeary, Jairus, director. The Work. Topic, 2017. [87 minutes]

Mouw, Richard J. “World-Viewing,” in Abraham Kuyper: A Short and Personal Introduction. Eerdmans, 2011, pp. 90–94. (ICS Library, Victoria University Emmanuel College: BX9479.K8 M68 2011)

Palmer, Parker J. “The Heart of a Teacher” (Chapter 1) in The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life. Jossey-Bass, 2007. (http://www.couragerenewal.org/parker/writings/heart-of-a-teacher/)

Parks, Sharon Daloz. “Becoming at Home in the Universe: A Developmental Process,” in Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Emerging Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith. Revised 10th Anniversary Edition. Jossey-Bass, 2011, pp. 46-69. (Robarts Library: BL42 .P37 2011X)

Parks, Sharon Daloz. “What Endures? The Power of Language, Image, and Metaphor” (Chapter Six) in Leadership Can Be Taught: A Bold Approach for a Complex World. Harvard Business School Press, 2005, pp. 121-145. (Robarts Library: HD57.7 .P3655 2005X)

Schall, Ellen. “Learning to Love the Swamp: Reshaping Education for Public Service.” Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 14 (2), 1995, pp. 202-220. (available electronically: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/7726715)

Scott, A. O. “Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is Big-Screen Perfection.” The New York Times. October 31, 2017. (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/31/movies/lady-bird-review-greta-gerwig-saoirse-ronan.html?_r=0)

Siegel, Tatiana. “The Complex Gender Politics of the 'Wonder Woman' Movie.” The Hollywood Reporter. May 31, 2017. (https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/features/complex-gender-politics-wonder-woman-movie-1008259)  

* Smith, James K. A. You Are What You Love: The Spiritual Power of Habit. Brazos Press, 2016. (ICS Library: BV176.3 .S48 2016; Trinity College: BV176.3 .S48 2016)

Strauss, Gideon. “The Art of Passing on Wonts.” Comment Magazine, Spring 2012. (https://www.cardus.ca/comment/article/4570/the-art-of-passing-on-wonts/)  

Turkle, Sherry, “What makes an object evocative?,” in Turkle, Sherry (ed.), Evocative Objects: Things We Think With. MIT Press, 2011 [22 pp.] (https://llk.media.mit.edu/courses/readings/Turkle-EO-conclusion.pdf)

VanDerWerff, Todd, “How to tell stories about evangelical Christians that neither mock nor glorify them.” Vox. August 18, 2018. (https://www.vox.com/culture/2018/8/18/17725556/miseducation-of-cameron-post-interview-review)

Wacquant, Loïc. “Habitus as Topic and Tool: Reflections on Becoming a Prizefighter.” Qualitative Research in Psychology 8 (2011), pp. 81–92. (available electronically through the UTL catalogue: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/7747896)

Wilkinson, Alissa. “‘Did we even see the same thing?’ How we watched and talked about movies in 2017.” Vox. December 29, 2017. (https://www.vox.com/2017-in-review/2017/12/29/16792848/did-we-see-the-same-movie-last-jedi-three-billboards-detroit-wonder-woman-2017)

Wilkinson, Alissa. “2017's best documentaries found new ways to engage reality in a post-truth world.” Vox. December 27, 2017. (https://www.vox.com/2017-in-review/2017/12/27/16808872/best-documentaries-2017-post-truth-fiction-jane-jonbenet-ex-libris-inconvenient-sequel)  

Wilkinson, Alissa. “Lady Bird is not just one of 2017’s best films. It’s a beautiful, hilarious act of love.” Vox. November 24, 2017. (https://www.vox.com/2017/11/2/16552860/lady-bird-review-saoirse-ronan-greta-gerwig)  

Wilkinson, Alissa. “The Critic's Job and Why It Matters.” Books & Culture. March/April, 2016. (https://www.booksandculture.com/articles/2016/marapr/critics-job-and-why-it-matters.html)  

Wigg-Stevenson, Natalie. “You Don’t Look Like a Baptist Minister: An Autoethnographic Retrieval of ‘Women’s Experience’ as an Analytic Category for Feminist Theology.” Feminist Theology 25 (2), January 3, 2017. pp. 182-197. (Knox Periodical Stacks; also available electronically: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/7708377)

Wintersgill, Carla. “Ex Libris: The New York Public Library makes for a lingering, tedious tour.” The Guardian. October 20, 2017. (https://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/film-reviews/review-ex-libris-the-new-york-public-library-makes-for-a-lingering-tedious-tour/article36669997/)    

Wiseman, Frederick, director. Ex Libris: The New York Public Library. Kanopy, 2017. [197 minutes] (Toronto Public Library: multiple locations)

* Wolters, Albert. Creation Regained: Biblical Basics for a Reformational Worldview. Eerdmans, 1985. (ICS Library: BT695 .W6 2005; Robarts: BS651 .W65 2005X)

5. Recommended Readings and Viewings

Ansell, Nik. “The Call of Wisdom/The Voice of the Serpent: A Canonical Approach to the Tree of Knowledge.” Christian Scholar's Review 31(1), 2001, pp. 31-58. (ICS Library Periodical Collection and Knox College Periodical Stacks)

Bonzo, J. Matthew, and Michael Stevens (eds.). After Worldview. Dordt College Press, 2009. (ICS Library: BR100 .A38 2009; Robarts: BR100 .A38 2009X)

    Burnett, Bill, and Dave Evans, Designing Your Life. Knopff, 2016. (ICS Library: HF5381 .B7785 2016; St. Michael’s College)

Dreyfus, Hubert and Sean Dorrance Kelly. All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age. Free Press, 2011.  (Robarts Library: BL80.3 .D74 2011X)

Green, Penelope, “Really Thinking About Things,” New York Times, November 8, 2007.
(
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/08/garden/08turkle.html)

Hall, Donald. Life Work. Beacon, 2003. (ICS Library, Robarts Library: PS3515 .A3152 Z475 1993)

Hall, Donald. The Best Day the Worst Day: Life with Jane Kenyon. Houghton Mifflin, 2005. (Robarts Library: PS3561 .E58 Z74 2005)

Lane, Belden C. The Solace of Fierce Landscapes: Exploring Desert and Mountain Spirituality. OUP, 1998. (In particular the coda to chapter 3, “Mythic Landscape / Stalking the Snow Leopard / A Reflection on Work.) (Robarts Library: BV4501.2 .L31834 1998X)

Luhrmann, T.M. When God Talks Back: Understanding the American Evangelical Relationship with God. Vintage, 2012. (Robarts Library: BX8785 .L84 2012X)

Marshall, Paul A., Sander Griffioen, and Richard J. Mouw (eds.) Stained Glass: Worldviews and Social Science. University Press of America, 1989. (ICS Library: BX9423 .S63 S72; Robarts: BX9423 .S63 S72 1989)

Naugle, David K. Worldview: The History of a Concept. Eerdmans, 2002. (Selections) (ICS Library: BR121.3 .N38 2002; Robarts: BR121.3 .N38 2002X)

Rothkopf, David. The Great Questions of Tomorrow. Simon & Schuster/TED, 2017. (Robarts Library: HM831 .R676 2017Y)

Seerveld, Calvin. “Footprints in the snow.” Philosophia Reformata 56 (1), 1991, pp. 1-34. (ICS Library Periodical Collection; also available electronically: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/10084356)

Slingerland, Edward. Trying Not to Try: Ancient China, Modern Science, and the Power of Spontaneity. Crown, 2014. (Robarts Library: B126 .S6453 2014X)

Sweetman, Robert. “Sin Has Its Place, But All Shall Be Well: the Universalism of Hope in Julian of Norwich (c. 1342-c. 1416),” in Gregory MacDonald (ed.), All Shall Be Well: Explorations in Universalism and Christian Theology from Origen to Moltmann. Eugene OR: Cascade Books, 2011, pp. 66-92. (Robarts Library: BX9941.3 .A45 2011X)

Thornton, Sarah. Seven Days in the Art World. Norton, 2009. (Robarts Library: N8600 .T567 2008)

Tompkins, Kyla Wazana. “Some Notes On How To Ask  A Good Question About Theory That Will Provoke  Conversation And Further Discussion From Your Colleagues,” in Avidly, September 13, 2016. (http://avidly.lareviewofbooks.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Some-Notes-On-How-To-Ask-A-Good-Question-About-Theory-That-Will-Provoke-Conversation-And-Further-Discussion-From-Your-Colleagues-2-2.pdf)  

Tompkins, Kyla Wazana. “We Aren’t Here to Learn What We Already Know,” in Avidly, September 13, 2016. (http://avidly.lareviewofbooks.org/2016/09/13/we-arent-here-to-learn-what-we-know-we-already-know/)

Wallace, David Foster. “Federer as Religious Experience.” The New York Times, August 20, 2006.

(http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/20/sports/playmagazine/20federer.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0)

Walsh, Brian J., and J. Richard Middleton. The Transforming Vision: Shaping a Christian World View. IVP Academic, 1984. (ICS Library: BR100 .W35 1984; Regis College: BR100 .W35)

Weinman, Jaime. “Hot takes and ‘problematic faves’: the rise of socially conscious criticism.” Vox. April 23, 2017. (https://www.vox.com/culture/2017/4/20/15179232/socially-conscious-criticism)

Wilkinson, Alissa. “I’m a Christian and I hate Christian movies.” Thrillist. March 30, 2016. (https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/christian-movies-why-gods-not-dead-and-faith-based-films-hurt-religion)

Wilkinson, Alissa. “The 21 Best Movies of 2017.” Vox. July 24, 2018. (https://www.vox.com/2017-in-review/2017/12/15/16751138/best-movies-2017-streaming-how-to-watch)  

Wuthnow, Robert. After the Baby Boomers: How Twenty- and Thirty-Somethings Are Shaping the Future of American Religion. Princeton University Press, 2010. (Available at several UTL locations including Trinity, Knox and Regis colleges: BV4529.2 .W88 2007; also available as an electronic resource through the UTL catalogue: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/11345726)

Williams, Tod and Tsien, Billie, Wunderkammer. Yale Books, 2013. (Robarts Library: NA680 .W55 2013Y)

Further recommendations may be made by the instructor during the course.


6. Course Schedule

All assignments must be completed by the deadlines provided in the Google Classroom, although emergency exceptions to this requirement may be arranged by means of email correspondence with the instructor. In the absence of such arrangements, assignments not completed by the required due date will automatically lose half a letter grade.

Week 1

Week starting September 10, 2018

  1. Read the Welcome Message in the Google Classroom for this course.
  2. Introduce yourself to the other course participants in the Introductions assignment in the Google Classroom (responding to the particular questions asked in that assignment).
  3. Read through the course syllabus carefully and ask any initial questions you have about the syllabus and the course in the Syllabus Review and Course Questions assignment in the Google Classroom.
  4. Read Joseph Harris and the three required Wilkinson articles that are not about the movie Lady Bird. 
  5. Watch any instructor videos that may be posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  6. Post comments to the Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  7. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 2

Week starting September 17, 2018

  1. Watch Wonder Woman.
  2. Read Framke and Siegel on Wonder Woman.
  3. Post comments to the Viewing Response and Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  4. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.


Week 3

Week starting September 24, 2018

  1. Participate in the in-person session on Monday, September 24, from 6:00pm to 9:00pm, in the ICS Boardroom at Knox College, 59 St. George St. Toronto, M5S 2E6.
  2. Read Brooks, Ginzberg; Griffioen, Ainsley Harris, Mouw, Parks.
  3. Watch any instructor videos that may be posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  4. Post comments to the Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  5. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 4

Week starting October 1, 2018 

  1. Read Coakley and Koh, Smith, and Turkle.
  2. Watch any instructor videos that may be posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post comments to the Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  4. Post responses to the questions raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 5

Week starting October 8, 2018

  1. Watch Lady Bird.
  2. Read Scott and Wilkinson on Lady Bird. 
  3. Post comments to the Viewing Response and Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  4. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 6

Week starting October 15, 2018

  1. Participate in the in-person session on Monday, October 15, from 6:00pm to 9:00pm, in the ICS Boardroom at Knox College, 59 St. George St. Toronto, M5S 2E6.
  2. Read Madsbjerg and Wolters.
  3. Watch any instructor videos that may be posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  4. Post comments to the Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  5. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.
  6. Submit first draft of paper as instructed in the First Draft of Paper assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 7

Week starting October 29, 2018

  1. Watch Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.
  2. Read Abdurraqib and Grady on Three Billboards.
  3. Post comments to the Viewing Response and Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  4. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 8

Week starting November 5, 2018

  1. Participate in the in-person session on Monday, November 5, from 6:00pm to 9:00pm, in the ICS Boardroom at Knox College, 59 St. George St. Toronto, M5S 2E6.
  2. Read Appiah, Eady, Fitzgerald, and Giridharadas.
  3. Watch any instructor videos that may be posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  4. Post comments to the Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  5. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 9

Week starting November 12, 2018

  1. Read Beaty, Strauss, VanDerWerff, Wacquant, and Wigg-Stevenson.
  2. Watch any instructor videos that may be posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post comments to the Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  4. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 10

Week starting November 19, 2018

  1. Watch The Work.
  2. Read Borrows and Linden on The Work. 
  3. Post comments to the Viewing Response and Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  4. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 11

Week starting November 26, 2018

  1. Participate in the in-person session on Monday, November 26, from 6:00pm to 9:00pm, in the ICS Boardroom at Knox College, 59 St. George St. Toronto, M5S 2E6.
  2. Read Chaplin; Kaemingk; Palmer; Schall.
  3. Watch any instructor videos that may be posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  4. Post comments to the Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  5. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 12

Week starting December 3, 2018

  1. Watch Ex Libris: The New York Public Library.
  2. Read Hoffman and Wintergill on Ex Libris.
  3. Post comments to the Viewing Response and Reading Response assignments in the Google Classroom.
  4. Post responses to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom.

Week 13

Week starting December 10, 2018

  1. Participate in the in-person session on Monday, December 10, from 6:00pm to 9:00pm, in the ICS Boardroom at Knox College, 59 St. George St. Toronto, M5S 2E6.
  2. Submit final draft of paper as instructed in the Final Draft of Paper assignment in the Google Classroom by Friday-ish.

Students with diverse learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. In particular, if you have a disability or health consideration that may require accommodations, please feel free to approach Gideon Strauss and/or Student Services as soon as possible.


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