Curriculum Expectations

Assessment Tool Expectations and the New Zealand Curriculum

Your child’s teacher has used many different ways to find out where your child is at in reading, writing and maths to make an Overall Teacher Judgement (OTJ) based on the New Zealand Curriculum. This includes, using a range of formal tests/assessments, watching your child working in the classroom, talking with them about their learning and your child assessing their own and each other’s work.

The expectation is that children are able to meet the curriculum expectations across a range of settings. This means that a child who performs 'above' the expectation on a 'written test' needs to also show evidence of being ‘above’ in their bookwork, class participation etc. to receive ‘above’ for their overall level.

What curriculum level should my child be at?

The following diagram from the NZC shows how curriculum levels typically relate to years at school. Many students do not, however, fit this pattern. They include those with special learning needs, those who are gifted, and those who come from non- English-speaking backgrounds.

Assessment tools (tests)

Below you will find information on some of the commonly used assessment tools in reading, writing and maths and how teachers use the data from these to help them make an overall judgment about your child’s performance. Keep in mind that the judgement is made on an overall picture and not any one test.


Reading and Writing

Running Records/PROBE test - reading

Teachers, particularly in the junior school, use an assessment tool called ‘Running Records’. Running records are 1:1 tests that ascertain where a child is at in reading. A running record shows how accurately a child can read the words, how well they understand what they have read and the strategies they are using to work out words they are unsure of. Running record levels correlate with a reading age, rather than a curriculum level.

For a child to be considered well below, below, at or above, the following criteria is used:

Well Below/Of Concern 

Below/Working Below 

At/On Track

Above/Already Met

More than 2 years below curriculum expectation

More than a year below curriculum expectation

At curriculum expectation

More than a year ahead of curriculum expectation

So, for example, a 6 year old child (who started school at 5 years of age*) with a Running Record level 17 - turquoise (reading age of 7 year old) is considered above the curriculum expectation on this one test. A 10 year old child reading at a 7 year old reading level, would be considered well below on this one test.

* As not all children start school at the same time or at the age of 5 necessarily, in the first 3 years of schooling, children are judged based on how long they have been at school, not age or year level. After the 3rd year of schooling, this changes to be year level based, regardless of when a child started school.

Junior running record levels and expectations

Reading

Expectations

Above

At

Below

Well below

After 1 month at school

Above level 5

Levels 1-5

 N/A

N/A

After 6 months at school (20 weeks at school)

Levels 15-16

Levels 6-8

Level 1-2

N/A

After 1 year at school

(40 weeks at school)

Levels 17-18

Levels 12-14

Levels 1-5

N/A

After 1.5 years at school (60 weeks at school)

Levels 19-20

Levels 15-16

Levels 6-8

N/A

After 2 years at school 

(80 weeks at school)

Levels 21-22

Levels 17-18

Levels 12-14

Levels 1-2

After 2.5 years at school (100 weeks at school)

Levels 23-24

Levels 19-20

Levels 15-16

Levels 6-8

After 3 years at school (120 weeks at school)

Levels 25 and up

Levels 21-22

Levels 17-18

Levels 12-14

STAR - reading (year 3-8)

The STAR reading tests are standardised assessment tools, designed to supplement the assessments that teachers make about their students' progress and achievement in reading. Students sit year level based tests. Each test assesses a range of reading skills that correspond closely to the main components of reading skills. STAR gives a stanine score 1-9 (1 being the lowest and 9 being the highest). Stanines compare a student’s score with a nationally representative sample of students in a year level.

Well Below/Of Concern 

Below/Working Below 

At/On Track

Above/Already Met

Stanine 1 and 2

Stanine 3

Stanine 4, 5 and 6

Stanine 7, 8 and 9

e-asTTle - reading (year 4-8)

The e-asTTle reading assessment is designed to be used by children from year 4-8. Please see the e-asTTle section below for an explanation of expected levels, depending on the time of the year the test is conducted.

e-asTTle - writing (year 1-8)

Teachers assess writing regularly through the use of the e-asTTle assessment tool. All children from year 1-8 are assessed against this writing tool. Children are given prompts to write about, and teachers mark the child’s unassisted piece of writing using the e-asTTle rubric. At our school, we have redesigned the rubric to be more child friendly so that children can self assess and set future learning goals. You can view the assessment rubric by clicking on this link. The rubric levels, once entered into the e-asTTle tool add up and translate to a curriculum level. Please see the e-asTTle section below for an explanation of expected levels, depending on the time of the year the test is conducted.

SSpA - Spelling Assessment (year 4-8)

This assessment tests a range of spelling skills students need to be good writers. Students sit year level based tests. Each test assesses a range of spelling skills. The SSpA test gives a stanine score 1-9 (1 being the lowest and 9 being the highest). Stanines compare a student’s score with a nationally representative sample of students in a year level.

Well Below/Of Concern 

Below/Working Below 

At/On Track

Above/Already Met

Stanine 1 and 2

Stanine 3

Stanine 4, 5 and 6

Stanine 7, 8 and 9

Maths 

JAM (Junior Assessment in Mathematics) and GloSS (Global Strategy Stage)

The JAM assesses the achievement of a student in relation to levels 1 and 2 of The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC). The tool assesses the student in number, algebra, geometry and measurement.

The GloSS assessment identifies the strategy stage students are operating at across all three strategy domains, known as the global strategy stage. It consists of a series of strategy questions that can be administered to individual students in a few minutes.

The JAM and GloSS tests give a child a ‘stage’ that they are working on. The table below shows the expectation for students on these assessment tools, depending on their year levels.

Year 1 (after 40 weeks at school)

Well Below = N/A

Below = Stage 1 or lower

At = 2-3

Above = Stage 4 or higher

Year 2 (after 80 weeks at school)

Well Below = Stage 1 or lower 

Below = Stage 2-3

At = Stage 4

Above = Stage 5 or higher

Year 3 (after 120 weeks at school)

Well Below = Stage 2-3 or lower

Below = Stage 4

At = Stage 5

Above = Stage 6 or higher

Year 4

Well Below = Stage 2-3 or lower

Below = Stage 4

At = Stage 5

Above = Stage 6 or higher

Year 5

Well Below = Stage 3-4

Below = Stage 5

At = Stage 6

Above = Stage 7 or higher

Year 6

Well Below = Stage 4

Below = Stage 5

At = Stage 6

Above = Stage 7 or higher

Year 7

Well Below = Stage 5 and below

Below = Stage 6

At = Stage 7 (early stages of 7 is ok)

Above = Stage 8

Year 8

Well Below = Stage 5

Below = Stage 6

At = Stage 7

Above = Stage 8 (confident)

e-asTTle - maths 

The e-asTTle maths assessment is designed to be used by children from year 4-8. Please see the e-asTTle section below for an explanation of expected levels, depending on the time of the year the test is conducted.


e-asTTle

e-asTTle is an online assessment tool, developed to assess students’ achievement and progress in reading, mathematics and writing.

The reading and mathematics assessments have been developed primarily for students in years 5–10, but because they test curriculum levels 2–6 they can be used for students in lower and higher year levels.

The e-asTTle writing tool has been developed for the assessment of students in years 1–10.

The e-asTTle results correlate with the New Zealand curriculum levels and also say if a child is working at the beginning of a curriculum level (B), are proficient (P) or advanced (A). So for example, to be ‘at’ expectation, a child in year 7 will need to be at the beginning of level 4 (4B).

January - March (as at the beginning of the year)

Well Below

Below

At

Above

Year 1

NA

NA

NA

NA

Year 2

NA

<1B

1B

1P+

Year 3

<1B

1B

1P/1A

2B+

Year 4

1B

1P/1A

2B

2P+

Year 5

<2B

2B

2P/2A

3B+

Year 6

2B and lower

2P/2A

3B/3P

3A+

Year 7

2P and lower

2A/3B

3P/3A

4B+

Year 8

3B and lower

3P/3A

4B

4P+

April - June (2nd Quarter)

Well Below

Below

At

Above

Year 1

NA

NA

NA

1B

Year 2

NA

<1B

1B/1P

1A+

Year 3

<1B

1B

1P/1A

2B+

Year 4

1B

1P/1A

2B/2P

2A +

Year 5

<2B

2B

2P/2A

3B+

Year 6

2B and lower

2P/2A

3B/3P

3A+

Year 7

2P and lower

2A/3B

3P/3A

4B+

Year 8

3B and lower

3P/3A

4B/4P

4A+

July - September (3rd Quarter)                   

Well Below

Below

At

Above

Year 1

<1B

<1B

1B

1P+

Year 2

<1B

1B

1P/1A

2B+

Year 3

1B

1P/1A

2B

2P+

Year 4

<2B

2B

2P/2A

3B+

Year 5

2B and lower

2P/2A

3B

3P+

Year 6

2P and lower

2A/3B

3P/3A

4B+

Year 7

3B and lower

3P/3A

4B

4P+

Year 8

3P and lower

3A/4B

4P/4A

5B+

October - December  - (as at the end of the year)

Well Below

Below

At

Above

Year 1

NA

NA

1B

1P+

Year 2

<1B

1B

1P/1A

2B+

Year 3

1B

1P

1A/2B

2P+

Year 4

<2B

2B

2P/2A

3B +

Year 5

2B and lower

2P/2A

3B

3P+

Year 6

2P and lower

2A/3B

3P/3A

4B+

Year 7

3B and lower

3P/3A

4B

4P+

Year 8

3P and lower

3A/4B

4P/4A

5B+