Spring 2019 GLS Course Descriptions

Please note that course descriptions are for reference only and are subject to change prior to the start of the semester.

Advanced Writing Studio

Approaches to Global Studies

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar

Cultural Foundations II

Cultural Foundations III

Global Cultures

Global Topics

Science

Senior Seminar

Senior Thesis

Social Foundations II

Social Foundations III


Advanced Writing Studio

AWS-UF 101-001 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Carley Moore

Global Approaches to the Semi-Autobiographical Novel

In his seminal history of cinema, A Personal Journey Through American Movies, director and film historian Martin Scorsese argues that some directors act as “smugglers” for political ideas and global issues. In this course, we will examine how contemporary novelists from around the globe “smuggle” their personal lives and political realities into their fictional novels. We will read these novels with an eye towards both analysis and craft. Students in this course will study how the contemporary best-selling literary novels work as well as write 20-30 pages of their own semi-autobiographical novel with an eye towards generating scenes and chapters, character development, dialogue, point of view, voice, setting, and radical revision.  Weekly writing workshops will guide each writer towards the best way to tell his or her story. Students will leave this course with a deeper understanding of the novel as global genre which shapes the way readers view landscapes, countries, continents, and shifting political conflicts. In addition, we’ll touch on practical matters such as finding an agent and what to expect when working with an editor and a publisher.  We’ll attend a least one reading together outside of class and invite published authors to our class to share their experiences on craft, audience, and getting published.

 AWS-UF 101-002 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Chris Packard

International Shorts

Students in this course will examine short works (stories, essays, poems, films) in their historical and material contexts.  Students will also produce their own short works (stories, essays, poems, film scripts) and will seek publication or other appropriate public venues for them. What can be read in one sitting, looked at in a glance, or absorbed during a lunchbreak differs from longer works in form, obviously, but does it also differ in lastingness? Does shorter mean more ephemeral?  Magazines, not books, feature them; film festivals, not mainline cinema distributors, feature them. They are collected and bound together, rarely standing alone on a bookshelf or in a DVD case.  In formal citations, they get jailed in quotation marks, not emphasized in italics.  By design and distribution, shorts don’t live long, yet regions claim them as expressions of fixed national identities in a given moment of time, and literary histories elevate them to gems of an epoch. What correlations can be made between regional expressions of a local culture and international forms of compressed writing and short-duration films?  How has web publishing and streaming video changed the marketplace for short pieces of writing and film?


Approaches: Sophomore Seminar

APR-UF 201-001 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Matt Longabucco

CRITICAL CREATIVE PRODUCTION

Critical Consciousness Now: Theoretical Documents and Creative Voices

In this course, we will read both historical and contemporary critical/theoretical thought about media and material culture, sexuality and the unconscious, time and technology, archives and memorials, labor and the urban landscape, race and gender, and ideology and political activism. At the same time, we will investigate hybrid creative work in the field of poetry, film, fiction, comics, and photography that is conscious of, and in dialogue with, such theoretical concerns. Students will produce a number of different kinds of texts of their own: a scholarly paper, a hybrid creative/critical project, and a personal syllabus for future exploration. In this class, you will collaborate closely with both myself and your classmates to create an active community of readers, thinkers, and writers.  

APR-UF 201-002 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Peter Diamond

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Foreign Intervention, Democracy, and Justice

Each nation sees itself as unique.  A few consider themselves exceptional because of—or so they claim—the universality of their values.  But only one, the United States, has tried to develop foreign policies that reflect such exceptionalism.  The course begins with an examination of American foreign policy from the closing decades of the eighteenth century to the end of the First World War.  We then explore American exceptionalism from a range of conceptual standpoints within the field of international political theory.   We will study the contemporary debate between liberals, realists, cosmopolitans, Marxists, and pacifists regarding foreign intervention.  More specific topics include:  the justification of defensive, pre-emptive and preventive wars; humanitarian intervention; the combatant/noncombatant distinction; direct and "collateral" harm to civilians; the justifiability of economic sanctions; extrajudicial killings, terrorism and torture.
The second part of the course examines the process of democratization, and ask whether it is possible to justify a foreign policy that promotes democratization abroad.  We will consider arguments for transitional justice in democratizing societies that are now dealing with human rights violators.  We will also explore criticisms of traditional Western approaches to human rights and democracy, particularly those from East Asia and the Middle East.  Finally, we will study the Arab uprisings that began in late 2010, examining the factors that have stymied democracy-promotion in the Middle East and North Africa, focusing particularly on digital activism.  

APR-UF 201-003 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Afrodesia McCannon

ART, TEXT, MEDIA

What Makes It Art: Theory and Practice

In this Approaches seminar in Art, Text, Media we will study theoretical and methodological texts as they interact with the literary, visual, and performing arts. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the theoretical and methodological tools they will need to investigate the arts. Emphasis falls on current theoretical approaches from the 20th and 21st century, while artistic materials may come from any period and will be drawn from student and instructor interest. The global frame of reference in the course will be present in the theoretical works and  primary artistic works. The course will develop an understanding of multiple theoretical discourses, with an emphasis on the difference, and divergence, of approaches between them. The course takes into account the particular historical and cultural contexts from which the theories arose, and assesses the implications of applying these approaches to other cultures and regions.

APR-UF 201-004 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Jim McBride

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

Confession, Torture, and the Creation of Identity

This seminar introduces students to the “linguistic turn” in 20th century philosophy by exploring the ways in which coerced confession and torture constructed the discourse of power and identity in ancient (Greece and Rome), medieval (Spain, France and England), modern (Argentina, United States) and post-colonial (Korea, China) societies.  Students will have the opportunity to study the structuralist origins of semiotics, its application by psychoanalysis, the critique of state violence by critical theory and poststructuralism, and the impact of the discourse of sexuality on coerced confession.  Western understanding of coerced confession and torture is predicated on the assumption that the body is the repository of truth.  These practices allegedly compel the body to yield its secrets.  Far from eliciting information from the victim’s body, these practices frequently inscribe the confessor’s worldview in the confessant’s consciousness and reinforce the dominant ideology.  Students will have the opportunity to analyze the semiotics of: (1) Augustine’s suppression of the late 4th century Donatist heresy; (2) the Inquisition’s persecution of Jews, Cathars and Waldensians in Spain and France; (3) the state’s “jurisprudence of torture” in France, Germany and Italy from the late medieval period through the seventeenth century;  (4) “brainwashing” and “thought reform” by Communist post-colonial regimes in Korea and China; (5) psychosexual terror in the “dirty wars” of South America during the 1970s and 1980s; (6) “enhanced interrogation techniques” by U.S. agents against prisoners in the “war against terror” at Abu Ghraib, Guantanamo and foreign sites; and (7) U.S. and international law proscribing torture.  

APR-UF 201-005 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Jessamyn Hatcher

CRITICAL CREATIVE PRODUCTION

Fashion and Globalization

This seminar examines fashion as both a product and expression of globalization. It explores fashion's contested histories; its modes of production, consumption, and address; its relationship to colonial enterprises; and its system of meaning-making. In this course, we will tackle such issues as the social uses of fashion; the fashion cycle (use, reuse, discard); the relationship between dress and the body; feminist critiques of fashion; the politicization of clothing (from ethnic dressing to green clothing); and the links between style consumption and garment production--and the relationship of all of these to the processes of globalization.
At the same time, our purpose will be to learn what analytical tools and paradigms different theorists bring to bear on a common problem, to evaluate these tools and paradigms for their usefulness, to try them out , and to develop new ones.  To these ends, the syllabus is constructed to allow us to try on a wide range of critical theories and practices on for size, and also to take into account the diversity within each body of thought and practice.

APR-UF 201-006 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Pınar Kemerli

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Dissent!: Politics, Justice, Dignity

Why do citizens rebel? When is it legitimate to break the law? When is a revolution just? What makes resistance civil? This course surveys modern theories of dissent and resistance. We will examine the characteristics, justifications, and limitations of major forms of dissent including revolution, decolonization, civil disobedience, and focus on liberal, republican, and radical perspectives on what makes such resistance necessary and just. We will also study how contemporary technological and ecological transformations have changed the forms and means of resistance and what we perceive as justice and injustice. Our goal is to acquire a historically grounded understanding of key concepts concerning dissent including conscience, independence, dignity, civility, refusal, and violent/nonviolent action, and learn to form connections between the philosophical debates we study and our contemporary political dilemmas. In addition to textual resources, the course includes analysis of several movies and documentaries including Battleship Potemkin (1925), Battle of Algiers (1966), The Trials of Muhammad Ali (2003), The Revolution Will Not Be Televised (2003), and The Square (2013).

APR-UF 201-007 | MW 2:00-3:15 | Roberta Newman

CULTURAL AND SOCIAL IDENTITIES

Language, Culture, and Subculture

The aim of this Approaches seminar is to introduce students to the theoretical underpinnings of research in the social sciences as relates to identity formations and their representations.   Focusing on the language of representation, including semiotics--the study of codes--and psychoanalysis, as well theories and methods related to ethnography and other forms of fieldwork, this course will provide a foundation for further qualitative research in a variety of areas related to identities and the ways they are represented, including sociology, anthropology, history, media studies, cultural studies, and even sociolinguistics.  Specifically, we will use theory and literature related to language, cultural practices, and ethnographic research as a lens through which to view both individual and group identities in relationship to the cultures and subcultures which produce them.  We will also look at the ways in which individual and group identities are depicted in film, journalistic account, and photography, both from the viewpoint of the fieldworker and that of the participant.

APR-UF 201-009 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Patricio Navia

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Reform and Revolution: Social and Political Change in Developing Countries

This course analyzes theories of social and political change and applies them to 20th and 21st century reforms and revolutions. The course will be of interest to those who want to understand what brings about social and political change and under what conditions the push for change takes the form of reform and under what circumstances it evolves into revolution. In most developing nations, political tensions result from efforts to reduce income and wealth inequality. In industrialized nations, issues of redistribution also generate tensions. By focusing on the tension between revolution and reform, we study theories of social, political and economic change and how efforts to bring about change have played out. We analyze theoretical contributions on the qualities and attributes of democracy and the policies that foster economic development and social inclusion. Students will use those theories to understand social and political evolution in developing countries since the early 20th century.
Students will be able to acquire additional analytical skills and comparative methodology that will be useful for their junior year experiences and for their fourth-year seminars. We will study theoretical contributions and analyze them in light of ongoing debates on the qualities and attributes of democracy and policies that foster economic development and social inclusion. Students will learn to understand theories, develop testable hypotheses and test them using historical data.  To conduct critical analysis, students must first understand how theories are built and how scholars apply them to real cases.

APR-UF 201-010 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Roxana Julia

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

The Global Economy: Growth, Sustainability and the Environment

Global environmental threats such as climate change and freshwater constraints have gradually gained recognition as fundamental challenges to the sustainability of past and current rates of economic growth and improvements in living standards, The concept of sustainability has entered a prominent position in both global and local discourses and has taken a center stage in the development of new policies and theories that examine the relationships between human economic affairs the planet’s biophysical limits. This course will introduce students to a set of interdisciplinary literature that addresses theoretical perspectives on the interrelationships between economic growth, human populations, their living standards, and the global environment, as well as their related policies. A considerable part of the course is dedicated to studying the sustainable development approach as it has emerged as an intellectual framework to understand the human-environment interactions as well as a normative outlook to recommend policies and set common global for a socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable world.

APR-UF 201-011 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Pınar Kemerli

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Dissent!: Politics, Justice, Dignity

Why do citizens rebel? When is it legitimate to break the law? When is a revolution just? What makes resistance civil? This course surveys modern theories of dissent and resistance. We will examine the characteristics, justifications, and limitations of major forms of dissent including revolution, decolonization, civil disobedience, and focus on liberal, republican, and radical perspectives on what makes such resistance necessary and just. We will also study how contemporary technological and ecological transformations have changed the forms and means of resistance and what we perceive as justice and injustice. Our goal is to acquire a historically grounded understanding of key concepts concerning dissent including conscience, independence, dignity, civility, refusal, and violent/nonviolent action, and learn to form connections between the philosophical debates we study and our contemporary political dilemmas. In addition to textual resources, the course includes analysis of several movies and documentaries including Battleship Potemkin (1925), Battle of Algiers (1966), The Trials of Muhammad Ali (2003), The Revolution Will Not Be Televised (2003), and The Square (2013).


Approaches to Global Studies

APRGS-UF 101-001 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Afrodesia McCannon

This course introduces some of the most influential thinkers and key-concepts of
Global Studies. “Global Studies” names the multi-disciplinary academic study of globalization. In its least contentious sense, “globalization” refers to the rapidly developing and ever-deepening network of interconnections and interdependencies that characterize contemporary life. What is hotly debated in Global Studies is less the empirical reality of globalization than its drivers, outcomes, and historical origins. Is globalization essentially an economic process or set of processes that has political and cultural implications, or a multi-dimensional set of processes for which no single social domain holds causal priority? Is “globalization” simply another word for
“Westernization,” “Americanization,” or capitalism and its attendant ideologies? Did
globalization begin in the last quarter century or several centuries ago or even several
Millennia? This course will examine answers made to these questions by such thinkers as Immanuel Wallerstein, Anthony Giddens, Arjun Appaduria, Roland Roberston, Joseph Stiglitz, John Tomlinson, and Jan Nederveen Pieterse, and introduce such key-concepts as World-Systems Analysis, Neoliberalism, Cosmopolitanism, Postnationalism, Deterriorialization, Glocalization, and Hybridity.


 Cultural Foundations II

CFII-UF 102-101 | MW 2:00-3:15 | David Larsen

Course Description TBA

CFII-UF 102-102 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Heather Masri

Course Description TBA

CFII-UF 102-103 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Martin Reichert

Course Description TBA

CFII-UF 102-104 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Molly Martin

Course Description TBA


Cultural Foundations III

In addition to the Advanced Writing Studio and Global Topics courses listed on this document, students have the option to take Cultural Foundations III or Social Foundations III to satisfy the GLS Upper Division Elective requirement. Please note that these courses include both GLS and Liberal Studies Core Program students.

Cultural Foundations III course descriptions can be found
here.


Global Cultures

AFRICAN GLOBAL CULTURES

AFGC-UF 101-001 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Kyle Wanberg

This course will examine the work of artists and writers concerned with representations of Africa. We will investigate ideas about African history and literature from various
perspectives, including oral stories of the pre-colonial past, legacies of colonial violence, and writing in the wake of national liberation movements. Rather than a survey of African
literatures, we will explore the artistic and intellectual movements of Négritude, Indigenism, Liberation, and Postcolonialism within works of African cultural production. The course is designed to highlight the diversity in African cultures and to challenge popular representations that all too often reduce the complex history of the continent into unpunctuated images of war, famine and disaster. Over the course of the semester we will develop a critical perspective of the influence and interconnection of diverse cultural productions of Africa.

EAST ASIAN GLOBAL CULTURES

EAGC-UF 101-001 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Davida Chang

All societies, modern and pre-modern, have similar aspirations. Using primary sources, both
full-length and excerpts, this class will explore how these were attempted in one region.
Although there will be some thumb-nail sketches of modern East Asia, this class will focus
largely on the ancient past, particularly China’s Age of Antiquity or the Classical Age (l100s to
200s BCE), and introduce students to some of the Great Books and major works of Chinese
traditional thought.  The intellectual and philosophical developments of this period influenced
China‘s later cultural and political evolutio
n, and are important in understanding some of the
assumptions of modern-day Chinese. Class objectives: One aim is for students to understand that Communism has existed in China only since 1949, and that its ideas are not the sum total of Chinese ways for ethnic Chinese on the mainland, in Hong Kong, on Taiwan, or in the Chinese Diasporas within and beyond East Asia. Another goal is to provide students with a perspective of how China’s current quest for power is part of a recurring development in Chinese history. Yet another aim is to enable students to compare and contrast Chinese and Western perceptions of common societal concerns, such as: the individual’s place in the community; the issues of good government; the challenges of moral development; what constitutes the “good life”; and what it means to be “human”. Finally, these early developments in Chinese thinking are also relevant in understanding how China’s neighbors, in varying degrees, adapted Chinese ways to their indigenous cultures. To appreciate what Japan and Korea did with the Chinese ways that they adopted and changed, it helps to know what the original Chinese models were.

EAGC-UF 101-002 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Jeannine Chandler

EAGC-UF 101-003 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Jeannine Chandler

This course introduces East Asian cultures, focusing to a greater or lesser extent on This course introduces East Asian cultures, focusing to a greater or lesser extent on China, Japan, and/or

Korea. Aspects of East Asia’s traditional and modern culture are presented by study of some of the area’s Great Books, as well as other literary, political, philosophical, religious and/or artistic works from the traditional, modern, or contemporary periods. Issues raised may include national or cultural identity in relation to colonialism/ imperialism, East-West tensions, modernism’s clash with tradition, the persistence of tradition with the modern, the East Asian Diaspora, and the question of East Asian modernities. This semester we will focus on studying the dynamics of change and/in continuity in Chinese history, including the role of the West in this process in the modern era. We will explore trends in Chinese thought and culture from the beginnings of Chinese civilization, and examine how these trends are transformed (or not) through time. While in the beginning the focus will be on early Chinese philosophies and religious traditions, the later part of the course will involve an analysis of modern Chinese political and economic policies. Emphasis will be on integrating the textual analyses of primary and secondary sources with the larger historical narrative. Students will conduct close readings of these sources and gain an understanding and appreciation for historical context. As this course is designed to foster critical

thinking and the expansion of students’ speaking, research, and writing skills, this course is dependent upon student participation in daily discussions. Students interested in China’s current and future role in global affairs will benefit from learning about Chinese culture and gaining insight into change and continuity in Chinese history.

LATIN AMERICAN GLOBAL CULTURES

LAGC-UF 101-001 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Luis Ramos

LAGC-UF 101-002 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Luis Ramos

It is often said that literature and politics are inextricably linked in Latin America. But how has literature helped shape political discourse in the region and how has politics, in turn, informed its literature and art? Drawing from a wide range of disciplines (literary criticism, history and political theory) and genres (poetry, fiction and the visual arts), in this course we will closely examine works that probe the boundary between politics and art under shifting historical conditions. We will begin by considering the origins of Latin American literature’s intimate relation to politics through works that recall the pre-colonial past or record indigenous rebellions against Spanish authorities. We will then turn to artists and writers who were instrumental in redefining the role of literature and art as revolutionary weapons or as instruments of nation-building in the independence era. Finally, we will examine works that probe the boundaries of the national body by casting a critical light on state violence in the twentieth-century. Among the leading questions that will inform class discussion: How has the political and aesthetic function of literature in Latin America changed over time? How has the intellectual historically assumed the role of agent or critic of the state? What do literature and art suggest about the relation between the state and its margins, between history and memory, and between elite and subaltern subjects?


Global Topics

GT-UF 201-001 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Johann Jaeckel

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Critiques of Capitalism

This course introduces students to a wide range of writings from different philosophical and economic schools of thought, all of which have one central theme in common: they have a bone to pick with capitalism. Based on a close reading of primary texts, the course investigates the following questions. How do different authors characterize the fundamental features of the social system that we refer to as capitalism? Which, if any, aspects of this system do they appreciate and which do they reject? How are different critiques informed by historical events and, in turn, how do they shape the political dynamics of different eras? Finally, how is the critique of capitalism informed by perspectives outside the main power structures and intellectual centers of the enlightenment and beyond? The first part of the course covers criticisms formulated by moral philosophers and classical political economists during the emergence of industrial capitalism in the 18th and 19th century. Readings demonstrate the linkage between theories of value and emergent disciplines in the social sciences. The second part, 1914 to 1945, focuses on analyses and arguments put forward during the chaotic pre­ and interwar period. Critics and theorists in this period help to display the difficulty of thinking through the challenges to capitalism from fascist and communist movements. The third part presents of a range of critical commentaries on postwar capitalism up to the present drawing from religious, environmental, feminist, and postcolonial perspectives.The course concludes with a comparative reading of defenses and radical critiques of neoliberalism. The team teaching approach to this course allows to emphasize both the underlying philosophical and economic commitments which inform different critical inquiries of capitalism. Historically, a variety of traditions in economic thought and philosophy have examined rules of exchange, depicted general tendencies in human labor and consumption, and expressed normative prohibitions and endorsements for various types of market practices. Our focus here, capitalism as a unique mode of economic reproduction, is no different with regard to being an object of this economic and philosophical examination. This course aims to participate in this ongoing questioning and contemporary reconstruction.

GT-UF 201-002 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Stephen Policoff

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

The Journey: From Mythic to Mundane (And Back Again)

The Journey has traditionally been presented by writers, artists, and visionaries all over the world as an archetype of inner growth, self-discovery, renewal, and spiritual revelation. From The Odyssey to The Wizard of Oz, the path one follows—and the company one keeps along the way— has been conjured up as a metaphorical construct, a symbolic stand-in for the journey we all take through life. Modern travel literature, too, abounds with assertions that discovery and revelation lurk within the darkest mood in the foulest railway station As the British critic Jonathan Raban observes, “Life, as the most ancient of all metaphors insists, is a journey; and the travel book, in its deceptive simulation of the journey's fits and starts, rehearses life's own fragmentation… it embraces the contingency of things.” This course will examine some of the multifarious ways in which the Journey has been explored and rendered by writers and artists, examining both the physical and the metaphysical aspects of this paradigm. We will consider both the mythic roots of the image as well as its more down-to-earth contemporary manifestations. Students will analyze and respond to the wide range of perspectives offered by the assigned texts, paying particular attention to recurring motifs, such as travel=quest, the journey of growing up/self-discovery, the stranger who alters our life and the narrative of false journey/self-delusion. Students will make use of an online class journal. They will research and write a short essay on a narrative, film, or other creative production relating to the idea of the Journey. As a final project, they will write, draw, film, or otherwise create a piece modeled on (or responding to) a text from the semester’s work which they found inspiring, provocative, or troubling.

GT-UF 201-003 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Joyce Apsel

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

International Human Rights

This multidisciplinary course will continue themes from Social and Cultural Foundations by exploring the history and literature of human rights and focusing on key issues on the local and global level and how they have been represented. This is a seminar and student participation in discussions based on readings is an integral part of the course. Together, we will read and analyze a number of UN Conventions, histories, testimonies and view films on subjects including war, terror, torture, disappearances and genocide.

GT-UF 201-004 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Joesph Portanova

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

Crosslisted with POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Policing Same-Sex Desire: A Legal and Social History

This course focuses upon the mechanisms for legal and social repression/ modification of same-sex desire. The policing of Same-Sex Desire has been an overt or covert part of global cultures from ancient times to the present. By studying primary and other sources on social, legal, and scientific policing students will investigate the history of the complex issues of LGBTQ rights, as well as commonly held assumptions about their own and other cultures. Students will examine interdisciplinary materials, including work of the sexologists, trial summaries and transcripts, art, photography, film and personal accounts of persecution and resistance. This course will raise questions concerning the assumptions and interpretations of this material. This course will also encourage students to re-examine through the lens of policing of Same-Sex Desire works that they have read in Social and Cultural Foundations I-III. Among the themes investigated will be the differing social/societal/legal perceptions and assumptions/ constructions of Same-Sex Desire and the effect these have had upon GLBTQ individuals, the social, legal, and scientific policing of same-sex desire, as well as resistance to this policing. Focus on global issues such as Transgender rights, AIDS, Homophobia, Stereotypes in the media, and Marriage Equality will be useful for student investigation of different legal and social approaches to these questions. Student presentations, class leadership assignments and essays on topics focusing on particular areas and issues will prepare students for further studies at the NYU campus and global sites abroad.

GT-UF 201-005 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Minu Tharoor

CULTUAL AND SOCIAL IDENTITIES

Crosslisted with POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Global Women’s Rights and Organizations

ALBERT Topic Title: Global Women’s Rights and Organizations

This course introduces students to important ideas, activities, debates and institutions that shape the issues and actions around Women’s Rights as they are conceived and advocated today in many parts of the world and in a global frame. Some of these rights – diverse freedoms and entitlements – are sought by both men and women; others are of particular relevance to women. The rights pertain to all aspects of lives and livelihoods and constitute the women seeking or enjoying them in their political, cultural, social and economic identities. The last century has witnessed an extensive struggle for rights across many regions: many rights have been secured, others remain tenuous or distant. Women have fought, struggled, suffered and triumphed – sometimes in small groups within local communities, but often in transnational associations, governmental bodies and international institutions. Local grievances regarding rights have global dimensions; local solutions offer global lessons. Global organizations and networks facilitated by modern technology provide solidarity amidst difference as women (sometimes joined by men) seek a rightful and rights-filled world for women, which is ultimately a better world for everyone.

GT-UF 201-006 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Regina Gramer

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

A World At War

War is all around us, all the time. War shapes us, even when we live in peace. For better or for worse, war affects every aspect of our globalized world today. Modern war has changed military strategies, societies, economies, and cultures around the world. Civilians have become the purposeful targets of war, whether in mass murder, bombings, rapes, or forced removals. Civilians have also contributed to the mobilizations for total wars, at times reaping significant benefits. In this class, we will focus in particular on World War II, the deadliest military conflict in human history. During World War II between 40 and 70 million people were killed worldwide, many more civilians than soldiers. This course will revisit World War II from a global studies perspective, exploring its most significant facets and contemporary relevance in interdisciplinary ways. We will study how and why we tell so many different stories about World War II, even the same event such as the liberation of Buchenwald. We will explore why Americans view World War II as the “Good War” while most others do not. We will look at ‘old’ topics in ‘new’ ways and discuss how our view of war crimes and perpetrators changes when we connect topics such as strategic bombing and colonialism, or colonialism and genocide. We will analyze the ways in which World War II intersected with decolonization both in terms of the soldiers who fought in the war (whether African Americans, Indians, or Frantz Fanon, for instance) and the high politics of military strategy. We will also examine those who benefitted economically from World War II and those who paid the price with slave labor and prostitution. Can justice be done? We will also learn about the legacy of World War II, in particular the ways in which civilians cope with the trauma of total war, but also the ways in which postwar states have adjusted their politics. Was World War II progressive in some aspects? We will look at both sides of this debate in relation to women, decolonization, and the environment. Last, but not least, we will revisit various different philosophical and religious justifications for “just” wars and ask what types of modifications these rationales might need after World War II. In addition, you will have a chance to study how World War II played out in your junior-year site and learn to trace the impact of World War II on your junior-year site until today.

GT-UF 201-007 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Emily Bauman

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

NGO Narratives: Global Humanitarianism: From Development to Disaster

Starting in the late twentieth century the world began to see an explosion of what are categorized as non-governmental organizations. Fueled by the collapse of the Cold War, NGO's have emerged as a major third player in an international scene dominated by governmental and corporate bodies. Now, with the UN listing 40,000 registered and with unlisted NGOs numbering in the millions, we might say that we are living in the age of the NGO. Often thought of as “shadow governments,” NGOs address some of the key issues on the global arena: uneven development, refugees and internally displaced peoples, disaster relief, war, and famine, influencing international policy as well as directly impacting how nations manage these crises. They are at the heart of an expanding transnational civil society. This course looks at the literature associated with NGOs and the NGO experience, tracing the imagined and real encounters between disparate worlds that illuminate both the NGO mission and its allure. If in the nineteenth century the protest novel was one of the primary forms of aesthetic activism, today the forms that dominate include documentary, photojournalism, benefit concerts, and above all life writing. What lies behind the humanitarian impulse and project? How does humanitarian activism impact the peoples it aims to serve? What can we learn about global inequality from the stories associated with it, both in what they mean to say and what they don’t? These are some of the questions that will focus the conversation between politics and literature that we'll engage in investigating one of the most controversial sectors in the international order today.

GT-UF 201-008 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Mona El-Ghobashy

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Crosslisted with CULTURAL AND SOCIAL IDENTITIES

The Global Wave of Protest

In 2011, as the “Arab Spring” spread across North Africa and West Asia and Occupy Wall Street spread from New York to other American cities, journalists and scholars began to speak of a “global wave of protest” spanning the Middle East, North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Why did street protests spread to so many countries in the world, over issues as diverse as the high cost of living, election fraud, political repression, and increasing inequality? How is it that countries with such different political systems and economic conditions across different continents all witnessed masses of people filling streets, occupying public squares, scuffling with police, and sometimes toppling entrenched national leaders? This seminar explores the global wave of protest from 2000 to the present, placing it in the context of earlier transnational waves in the 20th century and examining the various social groups driving protest politics in different countries. We examine case studies from around the world, including NYU global sites Buenos Aires, Madrid, and Prague, to investigate how different approaches to the study of protest (ethnographies, comparative case studies, historical narratives, the medium of film) make a difference for how the phenomenon is represented and explained. Among the many questions and issues we will encounter, two in particular will recur: what, if anything, is distinctive about the contemporary wave of protest compared to earlier global waves; and does protest deepen or threaten democratic politics?


Science

LIVN-UF 101-001 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Genia Naro-Maciel

Living in the Anthropocene

With the explosive growth of the human population, our species has impacted the Earth to such an unprecedented extent that, for many scientists, we have entered a new geologic time period - the Anthropocene. This class investigates the geography of life, or biogeography, through global and local lenses, and over deep time. The five past mass extinctions are contextually explored in depth, after which modern topics of conservation concern such as climate change and biodiversity loss are focused on. Course topics are addressed through a mix of short lectures and active learning techniques including case studies, virtual and hands-on laboratory activities or exercises, documentaries, discussion, debate, and field trips. Students attend events throughout New York City related to critical environmental issues, and connections of course topics to Liberal Studies juniors’ global sites are emphasized. Ultimately the class covers historical biogeography, biodiversity, and climate change in an increasingly human-dominated world, and seeks to answer the questions: “Are we in the Sixth Mass Extinction”? and "Are we living in the Anthropocene?”


Senior Seminars

SCAI-UF 401-001 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Jessamyn Hatcher & Thuy Linh Tu

Design and Development: Couture/Culture (cross-listed with Social & Cultural Analysis Dept.)

Recitation sections:

SCAI-UF 401-002 | T 3:30-4:45

SCAI-UF 401-003 | F 12:30-1:45

The journey from cloth to clothing, from the hands that sew to the bodies that wear, is in most accounts a long one. The journey continues as wear (and laundering, staining, repairing, lending, and storing) eventually gives to disposal, and clothes are sent to landfill, or to encounters with new wearers. Stretching across multiple nations, modes of labor, forms of presentation, and ways of knowing, the production, consumption, use, disposal, and reuse of clothing is literally a global project. The clothing industry was, after all, among the first to become transnational, and its structures of production, consumption, use, disposal, and reuse, both material and symbolic, are among the most globally dispersed. When addressed in context of globalization, clothing tends to be posited only ever as a problem—of over-consumption, labor exploitation, environmental degradation, and the division of “the west and the rest.” But the long life cycle of clothing is also a trenchant example of how people and things are involved in relationships of attachment, entanglement, dependence, and care. The recent movement in “humanitarian design,” which seeks to “demonstrate how design addresses the world’s most critical issues,” presents the opportunity to rethink the role of clothing over its long life, as both critical problem and possible solution.

SCAI-UF 401-004 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Carley Moore

Youth in Revolt: Case Studies in Global Activism

Globalization has led to massive social, political, and economic changes around the world, and young people have often been at the center of, and at times the impetus for, those changes. Increasingly, mainstream global movements for social change have begun in youth-led subcultures and countercultures. These subcultures have provided the methodology, initial human capital, and home base from which to begin mobilization. This course will offer us an opportunity to examine a constellation of key moments, or case studies if you will, in youth and/or student-led activism around the globe in the second half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. It will also allow us to examine the idea of the subculture (an important theoretical concept in studies of globalization) in relation to larger arguments in cultural studies and global history. This course will provide us with an opportunity to consider the ways in which youth-led movements for social, political, and economic change have offered us new methodologies for thinking about social justice, activism, and revolution. Some of the questions we may consider are: in what ways and by what means have young people approached activism? What kinds of primary documents and media have young people created to aid in disseminating their message? How have young people used their bodies in these particular moments of social change? What do youth-led movements look like? How have they been historicized and written about? Finally, is there a particular, somehow unique relationship between young people and activism? We will begin the course with an investigation of the cultural and historical origins of the teenager or the teenage, so that we may better understand the emergence of the young person as a particular kind of citizen—one who is often configured as either a consumer or a rebel, one who is part of a subculture. Once, we’ve examined this vexed figure, we will move to significant moments of youth activism—moments that have been widely theorized and/or are visible in the media and/or have a particularly youthful methodology for social change: the formation of the radical student-led Weather Underground in 1970, the 1989 Student Movement in China that led to the massacres in Tiananmen Square, and most recently the Arab Spring and Occupy Movement.

SCAI-UF 401-005 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Adedamola Osinulu

Africa, New York: Discovering a Continent in the City
This course makes a proposition that Africa is not just a continent across the Atlantic but is a place in New York. Indeed, the sons and daughters of that immense and diverse landmass have carried the ideas that collectively constitute “Africa” across the ocean and re-planted them in the Americas for centuries. Further, the conceptualization of the continent as a place has happened beyond its geography as much as within it. Therefore, in this course, students will be asked to examine the cultural production of Africans and their descendants in New York, the pre-eminent global cosmopolis. By engaging with contemporary communities and extant places, students will be asked to cast a glance back towards the long history of interaction between the people of Africa and the city of New York. Along the way, students will systematically encounter the cultural production of Africans and African-Americans in the areas of Religion, Visual Culture, Performance, Literature, Science, and Commerce. The course will treat the city as a learning resource as valuable as any that can be encountered in the classroom. As such, course participants will frequent the city’s many cultural spaces during the semester.

SCAI-UF 401-006 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Al Piacente

Economic Democracy

We tend to think of democracy as primarily if not exclusively political, a means of organizing and running governments, parties, civic organizations, etc. But democracy, of an economic variety, is all around us if we pay close attention. Food co-ops, credit unions, cooperative apartments, even the much maligned multi-national corporation, have been and are called varieties of democracy, varieties of democracy brought into economic affairs. And if we move beyond the local, it is clear forms of economic democracy have thrived and continue to thrive across the globe from the kibbutzim of Israel to the ashrams of India, from the communes of California to the worker-owned corporations of Spain. So, what is economic democracy—does it have an essence—why would anyone seek to organize themselves economically in a democratic fashion and what are its prospects for the future? A course in three parts, the first will concern the current and the local. Each student will be required to research a variety of on-going economic democracy in New York. Under the guidance of the instructor, they will investigate the history and workings of a specific contemporary institution or organization, understand its rationale, visit a site (when appropriate) and then report back to the class on what they have found. That report will take the form of a 30-40 minute presentation where both first-person experience and more general themes, themes established by the instructor, form the core. Throughout their research, students will be required to blog with the class at least three times about what they are finding day to day. The second part of the class will resemble the first only the focus will shift form the local to the global. Each student will choose some form of economic democracy outside of New York, and preferably outside the United States, to research based upon their personal history, junior-year experience, current interests and goals for the future (here the portfolio will play a crucial role). This research will result again in a presentation, only this time around attention will focus on the impact of culture on the economic form they investigate. For instance, how does religion play a role, or not, in the theory and workings of an ashram, and how does this make an ashram relevantly different, or not, from the co-operative farm they investigated in upstate New York? The third part of the course will be the culmination of the first two as it will concern directly what has been only approached indirectly before: the justification for economic democracy and its prospects going forward. Here the broad theory and reasoning behind economic democracy, as well as its opponents, will be the focus, from Ghandi on violence to Amartya Sen and Martin Luther King on equality, from Rawls on justice to Friedrich Hayek and Robert Nozick on individual freedom.

SCAI-UF 401-007 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Bob Squillace

The World Heritage Course: UNESCO and the Politics of Tourism

The list in question is UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage roster, a collection of 780 sites around the world that have received the UN’s imprimatur as being of enduring cultural interest, part of the cultural inheritance of every human on earth.  From its origins in the 1970s, the UN’s efforts to identify, preserve, and publicize a common human cultural heritage have grown to proportions hardly imagined when a modest dozen sites were first approved in 1978.  This course will focus on the UNESCO-designated World Cultural Heritage sites, raising such questions as: how does the UN define “world cultural heritage”?  What, by its guidelines, constitutes “culture,” and how has that definition been put into practice at the actual cultural heritage sites themselves?  To what extent and in what ways does the UNESCO designation affect the way a site is managed and publicized?  How do we regard the idea of “world cultural heritage” - who owns the past, and what responsibility do we have toward it?  What are the politics involved in winning approval for a site?  If sites are indeed part of a “world heritage” rather than a national or local patrimony, who truly owns them - does our responsibility to protect and preserve them override national sovereignty when monuments are endangered by war or poverty?   Students will actively shape the course content, as the second half of the semester will focus on the sites that students choose for their major projects after a few weeks of general background texts.


Senior Thesis

SCOI-UF 401-001 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Tamuira Reid

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401-002 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Ascension Mejorado

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401-003 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Johann Jaeckel

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401-004 | MW 2:00-3:15 |  Peter Valenti

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

SCOI-UF 401-005 | MW 2:00-3:15 | Joyce Apsel

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401-006 | TR 4:45-6:10 | Mona El-Ghobashy

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401-007 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Matt Longabucco

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401-008 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Ifeona Fulani

IDENTITIES AND REPRESENTATIONS

SCOI-UF 401-009 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Phil Washburn

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401-010 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Amy Wilkinson

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401-011 | TR 3:30pm-4:45pm | Peter Diamond

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401-010 | MW 4:45-6:10 | James Polchin

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401-010 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Nancy Reale

ARTS AND LITERATURES

SCOI-UF 401-010 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Regina Gramer

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION


Social Foundations II

SFII-UF 102-101 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Heidi White

Course Description TBA

SFII-UF 102-102 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Michael Shenefelt

Course Description TBA

SFII-UF 102-103 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Laura Samponaro

Course Description TBA

SFII-UF 102-104 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Joseph Portanova

Course Description TBA


Social Foundations III

In addition to the Advanced Writing Studio and Global Topics courses listed on this document, students have the option to take Cultural Foundations III or Social Foundations III to satisfy the GLS Upper Division Elective requirement. Please note that these courses include both GLS and Liberal Studies Core Program students.

Social Foundations III course descriptions can be found
here.