Exploration in Technical Occupations & Careers

Technology Education - Grd 9-12                                                                                                                 Page  of

Units:

Unit 1 - Safety and OSHA Standards

Unit 2 - Basic Mechanical Drawing and Measuring

Unit 3 - Construction Math

Unit 4 - Project Planning

Unit 5 - Rough Framing

Unit 6 - Exterior Finishings and Roofing Applications

Unit 7 - Residential Electrical Systems

Unit 8 - Interior Finishing



Unit Title

Unit 1 - Safety and OSHA Standards 

Timeframe 

3 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit is imperative as a building block to safe learning and participation in the lab setting.  Issues to be discussed will include general safety rules, specific machine safety rules, personal safety issues, and working together in a safe class environment.  The student will be acquainted with OSHA guidelines and how they affect the classroom and workplace.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Can you identify workplace/jobsite safety issues?
  • Are there safety issues in the school?
  • What and why is the inspection process by OSHA important to safety?
  • Why is it necessary to be properly trained on workplace/jobsite tools and machinery?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

1. Various skills are in demand by employers who require an understanding of both workplace/jobsite tooling and equipment operation.

2. Government regulations are in place to ensure a safe and healthy working environment.

3. Using the appropriate PPE for specific jobs, tooling and machinery.

4. Proper tooling, machine, and equipment operation according to OSHA standards

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Identify situations that require PPE (Personal Protection Equipment)
  • Identify and describe the warning signs posted in the shop.
  • Explain who and what OSHA stands for and is used for.
  • The expectations of the student to maintain a safe working/learning environment.
  • Proper room clean-up procedures.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Describe safety precautions for working with various tools and machines.
  • Safely use the tools and machines
  • Understand their role in the safe operation of the class.
  • Explain the plan for room clean-up.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Safety Test Chunking on each individual machine and power tool

Summative/ Benchmark

Students will create a 3-D puzzle game that will use all of the tools and machinery in the shop safely and  effectively

Alternative Assessments

Tool and Machine Safety Packets

Workplace Safety Action Plan Scenarios Worksheets

Technology Lab Safety Action Plan

OSHA Hazardous Workplace Quiz

Learning Activities

Students will use OSHA’s E-Tools web portal to review health and safety standards (https://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/oshasoft/index.html)

Complete OSHA Safety Checklists for Construction and Woodworking Hazards

"Don't Be a Zombie at Work," an interactive, online computer game designed to help teens stay safe in the workplace.

Design a standard OSHA safety poster for the lab on a specific health/safety topic. http://youngworkers.org/posters/

Technology Lab Safety Action Plan Development

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules, OSHA.gov E-Tools & OSHA Young Workers Websites

Equipment

Power tools, machines, hand tools, PPE

Supplemental Resources

Acellus Online Modules, NCEER Performance Tasks

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 2 - Basic Mechanical Drawing and Measuring

Timeframe 

3 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit is imperative for the students to be able to create and read a building plan.  Students will go through various measurement skills that include fractional inches.  Students will learn how to use grid lines to identify plan locations, the difference between scale and ratio, read dimensions on construction drawings, and demonstrate of various types of design and drawing practices will take place, such as basic sketching, orthographic projections, and basic architectural drawing.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Why is it important to have a plan in place before beginning a project?

  • Why is it important to have accurate measurements?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. Identify and read divisions of a ruler and measure accurately to within 1/8 inch
  2. Represent (draw) a 3D object with orthographic and isometric views following proper techniques
  3. Blueprints are a set of plans used in the building trades.
  4. The purpose of engineering drawing is to convey graphically the ideas and information necessary for analysis and construction.
  5. The common lines used in blueprints.
  6. The abbreviations used on blueprints.
  7. Keynotes with symbols.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The elements used in architectural drawings
  • Why scale and ratio are important when making an architectural drawing
  • The different symbols used in an architectural drawing
  • The difference between an elevation plan, floor plan, plot plan

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Design three types of pictorial drawing.
  • Design three types of perspectives.
  • Define scale and ratio
  • Explain how scale and ratio are used in architectural drawings
  • Make an architectural drawing of the classroom
  • Read and understand an architectural ruler  

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Reading a ruler for ruler test

Using a ruler to measure a given object

Drawing exercises

Math worksheets

Calculating board, square, and linear feet.

Ratio and scale

Identifying blueprint symbols

Summative/ Benchmark

Students will be able to lay out the work place at the school and identify various construction aspects with the correct symbols.  They will also make a sketch of their bedroom.

Alternative Assessments

Create a 3D floor plan model using Google Sketch-Up

Architectural 3D Modeling Tutorial - http://www.popupology.co.uk/galleries/2/items/93

Skyline 2D Drawing Collaboration Activity- Discovery Education Link

Learning Activities

Architectural Floor Plan of Students First floor of their Home

Create a Plot Plan of the School’s Courtyard

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Arch/Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules, Creo (Pro Engineer)

Equipment

Projector, computer, handouts, examples of various types of blueprints, drawing materials

Supplemental Resources

NCEER Performance Tasks

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 3 - Construction Math

Timeframe 

2 Weeks

Unit Summary

Construction workers communicate and make decisions using math. Math is used as both a precision and artistry in construction. This unit is an introduction to the types of math used throughout the construction industry.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What is the importance of good math skills when it comes to estimating?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. There are basic shapes used in geometry that relate directly to the construction industry.
  2. Carpenters use measuring and math for calculating such things as rafters, girders and floors.
  3. How to find the perimeter of a fenced in yard
  4. How to find the square footage of a circular room
  5. How many inches are in a foot
  6. How many total degrees are in a triangle
  7. The size of sheet goods

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • How fractions divide whole units into parts.
  • How to add, subtract, divide and multiply fractions.
  • The various types of angles.
  • How to calculate the volume of a cube.
  • How to determine square footage.
  • How to use the Pythagorean formula on a right triangle.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • How to estimating construction costs
  • Use a standard ruler and metric ruler to measure3.
  • Use an architect’s scale on a blueprint
  • Determine how much material is needed for a particular job (siding, drywall, shingles, etc.)
  • Identify circumference, diameter, and radius of a circle
  • Find the perimeter of a given shape.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

1.        Reading a ruler

2.        Using a ruler to measure a given object

3.        Math formative assessment

4.        Calculating board, square, and linear feet.

Summative/ Benchmark

Students will be able to determine amount and cost of building materials needed to redesign their bedroom.

Alternative Assessments

Speed Square Board Tutorial (Following Video) - https://www.thisoldhouse.com/how-to/how-to-use-speed-square

Learning Activities

Speed Square Tool Belt Holder Design -  https://www.thisoldhouse.com/how-to/how-to-use-speed-square

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules,Internet Videos/Tutorials

Equipment

Projector, computer, handouts, examples of various types of measuring devices, drawing materials, Scrap Materials

Speed Squares

Supplemental Resources

NCEER Performance Tasks

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Math

1.    Demonstrations on how to properly read a architectural ruler

2.    Students determine the volume of a given shape

3.    Selecting appropriate measure device

4.    Students will calculate how much tile and paint is needed for the classroom

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 9.3

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION CAREER CLUSTER®

Career Cluster Number

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION (AC)

9.3.12.AC.1

Use vocabulary, symbols and formulas common to architecture and construction.

9.3.12.AC.2

Use architecture and construction skills to create and manage a project.

9.3.12.AC.6

Read, interpret and use technical drawings, documents and specifications to plan a project.

 9.3.12.AC‐DES.6

 Apply the techniques and skills of modern drafting, design, engineering and construction to projects.  

 9.3.ST‐SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real  world problems.

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.A.2 -Analyze a current technology and the resources used, to identify the trade-offs in terms of availability, cost, desirability and waste.

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 4 - Project Planning

Timeframe 

2 Weeks

Unit Summary

Planning of a project is crucial.  Poor planning can result in lost of time, money and possibly the job.  Planning will also give the builder and owner an estimate of materials, costs, and labor.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How do we know how much material to buy?
  • What is the cost of labor?
  • Why are plans(drawing) important?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. Planning a project is the first step to success
  2. One must have plans on any project
  3. Board foot is how wood it priced
  4. Organization is key to efficiency
  5. Efficient and calculated material usage is very important

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • How to determine appropriate materials for project.
  • Estimated costs of labor for the project.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Create a set of plans for the project
  • Use an architect’s scale on a blueprint
  • Determine how much material is needed for a particular job (siding, drywall, shingles, etc.)

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  1. Students will keep a construction work log to include daily journal entries, notes, research, problems encountered, and dimensions and notes applicable to projects and shop processes.
  2. Students will create a Bill of Materials.
  3. Students will create an Order of Operations List.

Summative/ Benchmark

Students will be able to apply the planning steps and process to make their own set of plans for a section of a wall.

Alternative Assessments

3D model wall design in google sketch-up or Creo

Learning Activities

Researching and listing specific job descriptions and duties of Construction Materials Coordinators/ Modeling Specialists.

Design and Develop Construction Company Name/Logo for all media

Design and Create Invoice/Bill of Materials Template in Google Sheets for students design/construction teams

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules,Internet Videos/Tutorials

Equipment

Projector, computer, handouts, examples of various types of measuring devices, drawing materials

Supplemental Resources

Wall framing calculators (Online Resourses) NCEER Performance Tasks

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections 

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Math-

Students determine appropriate estimate include material list

ELA-

 Construction work Log to track daily progress and project completion modeling industry requirements

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 9.3

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION CAREER CLUSTER®

Career Cluster Number

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION (AC)

9.3.12.AC.1

Use vocabulary, symbols and formulas common to architecture and construction.

9.3.12.AC.2

Use architecture and construction skills to create and manage a project.

9.3.12.AC.6

Read, interpret and use technical drawings, documents and specifications to plan a project.

 9.3.12.AC‐DES.6

 Apply the techniques and skills of modern drafting, design, engineering and construction to projects.  

 9.3.ST‐SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real  world problems.

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.A.2 -Analyze a current technology and the resources used, to identify the trade-offs in terms of availability, cost, desirability and waste.

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.5 - Create scaled engineering drawings of products both manually and digitally with materials and measurements labeled.

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems.

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.

Unit Title

Unit 5 - Rough Framing

Timeframe 

9 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit will introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of framing.  The areas of floor, wall, and roof framing will be discussed.  Different methods used in the construction industry will be explained and demonstrated during instruction.  The relationship between the drawing of a structure and the building of the same structure will be outlined.  The meaning of various construction terms such as scale, on-center, rafter, joist, header, and stud will be defined and explained.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What is the importance of correctly framing a wall in regards to load transfer?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. Planning a project is the first step to success
  2. One must have plans on any project
  3. Board foot is how wood it priced
  4. Organization is key to efficiency
  5. Efficient and calculated material usage is very important

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The fundamentals of floor framing.
  • The use of plywood to cover floor joists.
  • Laying out and framing wall sections.
  • The use of exterior sheathing to enclose walls.
  • How to use math skills to configure roof angles such as pitch and rake.
  • The use of sheathing to enclose the roof section.
  • The use of mathematics to estimate square footage for enclosures

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Name the three basic types of construction used in residential construction.
  • Describe the difference between a joist and a stud?
  • Explain that wall framing is assembling the vertical and horizontal members that support the outside and inside walls of a structure.
  • Identify how far studs and joists are placed according to building code
  • Name all of the parts of a wall
  • Explain what a load bearing wall is
  • Explain the benefits of building with trusses

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  1. Students will keep a construction work log to include daily journal entries, notes, research, problems encountered, and dimensions and notes applicable to projects and shop processes.
  1. Students will create a Bill of Materials.
  2. Students will create an Order of Operations List.

Summative/ Benchmark

Students will be able to layout and create a framed model of a shed with a truss roof

http://casteelarchitectureshedkit.weebly.com/

Alternative Assessments

Design shed model(kit) in any 3D design software (Creo,Sketch-Up, On-Shape, TinkerCad)

Learning Activities

Design and Construct a ¾  scale model of a 8’ framed wall with one window and door opening.

The Construction model is an ongoing, culminating learning activity that takes groups through the entire construction process,as each unit covers specific topics and construction techniques that are required in the steps to complete a residential build.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules,Internet Videos/Tutorials

Framing Basics Reference (http://classes.sdc.wsu.edu/classes/cstm370/lectures/pdfs/Framing.pdf)

Equipment

Projector, computer, handouts, examples of various types of measuring devices, drawing materials, balsa stock

Supplemental Resources

NCEER Performance Tasks a

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Science-

 Practical labs

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.
  • 9.2.8.B.6 Demonstrate understanding of the necessary preparation and legal requirements to enter the workforce.
  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

CONSTRUCTION (AC‐CST)

9.3.12.AC-CST.8

Demonstrate the construction crafts required for each phase of a construction project.

9.3.12.AC-CST.9

Safely use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery, equipment and resources to accomplish construction project goals.  

DESIGN/PRE‐CONSTRUCTION (AC‐DES)

9.3.12.AC‐DES.6

Apply the techniques and skills of modern drafting, design, engineering and construction to projects.  

MANUFACTURING (MN)

9.3.MN.3

Comply with federal, state and local regulations to ensure worker safety and health and environmental work practices.  

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

MAINTENANCE, INSTALLATION, & REPAIR (MN‐MIR)

9.3.MN-MIR.2

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment to ensure a safe and healthy environment.  

9.3.MN-MIR.5

Implement a preventative maintenance schedule to maintain manufacturing equipment, tools and workstations.  

PRODUCTION (MN‐PRO)

9.3.MN-PRO.4

Coordinate work teams when producing products to enhance production process and performance.

9.3.MN-PRO.5

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.  

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.  

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST‐SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.A.2 -Analyze a current technology and the resources used, to identify the trade-offs in terms of availability, cost, desirability and waste.

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The attributes of design.

8.2.12.C.2  - Analyze a product and how it has changed or might change over time to meet human needs and wants

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.3 - Analyze a product or system for factors such as safety, reliability, economic considerations, quality control, environmental concerns, manufacturability, maintenance and repair, and human factors engineering (ergonomics).

8.2.12.C.5 - Create scaled engineering drawings of products both manually and digitally with materials and measurements labeled.

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 6 - Exterior Finishings and Roofing Applications

Timeframe 

9 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit will cover the various types of exterior finish materials and roofing applications,their installation procedures, from sheathing and house wrapping,window and door sealing to wood, metal, vinyl, and fiber-cement siding finishes.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Why is it important to select the correct finishing and roofing materials to complete a project?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. Planning a project is the first step to success
  2. One must have plans on any project
  3. Exterior finishings and roofing come in a variety of sizes and styles
  4. Industry material standards are important in calculating the required amount of materials needed.
  5. Organization is key to efficiency
  6. Efficient and calculated material usage is very important

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The use of exterior sheathing to enclose walls.
  • Techniques for sheathing a gable roof with an opening.
  • The various types of exterior finishes and how to install.
  • The various types of window & door applications
  • Air Sealing and Energy Efficient exterior applications
  • The use of mathematics to estimate square footage for exterior finishes and roofing
  • How exterior finishings and roofing materials are packaged and sold in specific standardized amounts

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Sheath exterior walls, roof, and cut openings for windows and doors
  • Paper, flash, install and cut standard architectural fiberglass roofing
  • Install windows & doors with waterproofing materials
  • Identify and install exterior finishings properly using the correct tooling and materials according to industry standards.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  1. Students will keep a construction work log to include daily journal entries, notes, research, problems encountered, and dimensions and notes applicable to projects and shop processes.
  2. Students will create a Bill of Materials.
  3. Students will create an Order of Operations List.
  4. Students will calculate square footage of roofing and exterior finishings needed to complete the job.

Summative/ Benchmark

Student teams will complete previously framed models with necessary sheathing, roofing, exterior applications, windows/doors with additional air sealing energy efficiency industry practices/materials

Alternative Assessments

NCEER Construction Tech Performance Tasks

Learning Activities

The Construction model is an ongoing, culminating learning activity that takes groups through the entire construction process,as each unit covers specific topics and construction techniques that are required in the steps to complete a residential build.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules,Internet Videos/Tutorials

Equipment

Projector, computer, handouts, examples of various types of measuring devices, drawing materials, exterior finishings, roofing and window/door applications, tooling and equipment for installing finishings

Supplemental Resources

Exterior finishings manufacturer brochures and spec sheets

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Science-  Practical labs

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.
  • 9.2.8.B.6 Demonstrate understanding of the necessary preparation and legal requirements to enter the workforce.
  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

CONSTRUCTION (AC‐CST)

9.3.12.AC-CST.8

Demonstrate the construction crafts required for each phase of a construction project.

9.3.12.AC-CST.9

Safely use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery, equipment and resources to accomplish construction project goals.  

DESIGN/PRE‐CONSTRUCTION (AC‐DES)

9.3.12.AC‐DES.6

Apply the techniques and skills of modern drafting, design, engineering and construction to projects.  

MANUFACTURING (MN)

9.3.MN.3

Comply with federal, state and local regulations to ensure worker safety and health and environmental work practices.  

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

MAINTENANCE, INSTALLATION, & REPAIR (MN‐MIR)

9.3.MN-MIR.2

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment to ensure a safe and healthy environment.  

9.3.MN-MIR.5

Implement a preventative maintenance schedule to maintain manufacturing equipment, tools and workstations.  

PRODUCTION (MN‐PRO)

9.3.MN-PRO.4

Coordinate work teams when producing products to enhance production process and performance.

9.3.MN-PRO.5

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.  

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.  

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST‐SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.A.2 -Analyze a current technology and the resources used, to identify the trade-offs in terms of availability, cost, desirability and waste.

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The attributes of design.

8.2.12.C.2  - Analyze a product and how it has changed or might change over time to meet human needs and wants

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.3 - Analyze a product or system for factors such as safety, reliability, economic considerations, quality control, environmental concerns, manufacturability, maintenance and repair, and human factors engineering (ergonomics).

8.2.12.C.5 - Create scaled engineering drawings of products both manually and digitally with materials and measurements labeled.

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.

Unit Title

Unit 7 - Residential Electrical Systems

Timeframe 

3 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit is to provide the student with the entry level skills needed to secure employment within the electrical

Industry, knowledge of both electrical safety skills and general industrial safety skills, and to acquaint the student with the use and application of the National Electrical Code and other applicable reference materials.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Why is it important to obtain a permit for a project?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. Why electricity is dangerous
  2. What grounding is
  3. How to install an electric box in a finished and unfinished wall
  4. Proper way to install a fixture
  5. The importance of permits

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The different types of wire used in different applications
  • How to remove the insulation on the wire
  • How to create a pigtail
  • What grounding is
  • How to calculate circuit load
  • The various types of wires to use in different applications

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • demonstrate knowledge of safety procedures
  • identify the basic tools of the electrician and demonstrate proper use
  • discuss electrical career opportunities
  • understand basic wiring diagram reading
  • Wire a switch to a light
  • Use a volt meter
  • Use all of the electrical tools required
  • Identify electrical symbols on a blueprint

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  1. Students will keep a construction work log to include daily journal entries, notes, research, problems encountered, and dimensions and notes applicable to projects and shop processes.
  2. Identifying different types of wire and their application
  3. Identify various electrical components
  4. Wiring an electrical component (switch, receptacle)

Summative/ Benchmark

Wiring circuit run in wall section to connect a fixture to a switch.

Alternative Assessments

http://www.nationalcraftchampionships.org/Portals/43/2017/2017%20Electrical%20Commercial-Residential.pdf

NCEER Performance Tasks

Learning Activities

Continual construction of wall section.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules,Internet Videos/Tutorials

Framing Basics Reference (http://classes.sdc.wsu.edu/classes/cstm370/lectures/pdfs/Framing.pdf)

Equipment

Projector, computer, handouts, hand tools, electrical supplies and components

Supplemental Resources

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

     Sheetrock

1.     Lecture and class discussions.

2.     Demonstrations on how to safely measure, cut and install sheetrock.

3.     Demonstration on how to spackle and sand sheet rock

4.     Demonstration on how to repair sheetrock.

5.     Practical labs

6.     Selecting appropriate tools for installing sheetrock

             Doors

1.  Demonstration on how to install a prehung and slab door.

2.  Installing a hardware set.          

            Windows

1.     How to measure and install a new construction and vinyl replacement window.

2.     How to repair windows

Installing trim

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.
  • 9.2.8.B.6 Demonstrate understanding of the necessary preparation and legal requirements to enter the workforce.
  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

CONSTRUCTION (AC‐CST)

9.3.12.AC-CST.8

Demonstrate the construction crafts required for each phase of a construction project.

9.3.12.AC-CST.9

Safely use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery, equipment and resources to accomplish construction project goals.  

DESIGN/PRE‐CONSTRUCTION (AC‐DES)

9.3.12.AC‐DES.6

Apply the techniques and skills of modern drafting, design, engineering and construction to projects.  

MANUFACTURING (MN)

9.3.MN.3

Comply with federal, state and local regulations to ensure worker safety and health and environmental work practices.  

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

MAINTENANCE, INSTALLATION, & REPAIR (MN‐MIR)

9.3.MN-MIR.2

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment to ensure a safe and healthy environment.  

9.3.MN-MIR.5

Implement a preventative maintenance schedule to maintain manufacturing equipment, tools and workstations.  

PRODUCTION (MN‐PRO)

9.3.MN-PRO.4

Coordinate work teams when producing products to enhance production process and performance.

9.3.MN-PRO.5

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.  

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.  

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST‐SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.A.2 -Analyze a current technology and the resources used, to identify the trade-offs in terms of availability, cost, desirability and waste.

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The attributes of design.

8.2.12.C.2  - Analyze a product and how it has changed or might change over time to meet human needs and wants

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.3 - Analyze a product or system for factors such as safety, reliability, economic considerations, quality control, environmental concerns, manufacturability, maintenance and repair, and human factors engineering (ergonomics).

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.

Unit Title

Unit 8 - Interior Finishing

Timeframe 

7 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit deals with the basic elements of interior enclosure treatments.  It covers the various types of gypsum drywall, their uses, and the fastening devices and methods used to install them.  Tools, materials and methods used to finish and patch drywall will also be discussed.  Students will also learn the different types of windows and doors used in construction as well trim and flooring applications.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Why is the modern day drywall used as an interior finishing?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. Dry wall consists of a gypsum core and is used as an interior finishing.
  2. Windows and exterior doors will protect the finishing materials from weather damage.
  3. How deep drywall screws should be set
  4. And describe two methods of installing drywall patch
  5. What a reveal is for doors and windows
  6. A door that consists of two doors hinged together is called a bifold
  7. What a cope cut is (in reference to trim)
  8. Applications for different floor coverings

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The different types and thickness of drywall required for specific installations
  • How soundproofing is achieved in drywall installations
  • The hand tools used in drywall finishing and installation
  • The automatic tools used in drywall finishing
  • The different types of interior doors
  • The different types of exterior doors
  • The different types of standard molding and their uses.
  • How to choose the correct fastener.
  • How to estimate the amount of trim and cost of a job.
  • How to mortise hinges and cut holes for doorknob

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Select the correct fasteners for a drywall installation
  • Install drywall on wood studs
  • Install drywall on steel studs
  • Measure and cut drywall
  • Cut around outlets and light switches
  • Tape and spackle flat seams
  • Tape and spackle inside and outside corners
  • Patch damaged drywall
  • Demonstrate the procedure for placing and hanging a selected door
  • Install a door hardware set
  • Make a square and miter cut using a miter box or miter saw
  • Attach trim around a window or door
  • Install baseboard trim, casing, and crown molding

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  1. Identifying different types of doors and windows
  2. Identify uses for different types of wall coverings
  3. Drywall hung and finished
  4. Drywall hole repaired
  5. Trim installed

Summative/ Benchmark

Construction of wall section.

  • Applying sheetrock
  • Finishing Sheetrock seems
  • Installing baseboard, casing, and crown moldings

Alternative Assessments

Design shed model(kit) in any 3D design software (Creo,Sketch-Up, On-Shape, TinkerCad)

Learning Activities

Continual construction of wall section.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules,Internet Videos/Tutorials

Framing Basics Reference (http://classes.sdc.wsu.edu/classes/cstm370/lectures/pdfs/Framing.pdf)

Equipment

Projector, computer, handouts, hand tools

Supplemental Resources

Examples of the following:

-Framed wall with sheetrock attached

-Prehung door

-Windows; vinyl and new construction

-Hardware set

Various types of molding

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

     Sheetrock

1.     Lecture and class discussions.

2.     Demonstrations on how to safely measure, cut and install sheetrock.

3.     Demonstration on how to spackle and sand sheet rock

4.     Demonstration on how to repair sheetrock.

5.     Practical labs

6.     Selecting appropriate tools for installing sheetrock

             Doors

1.  Demonstration on how to install a prehung and slab door.

2.  Installing a hardware set.          

            Windows

1.     How to measure and install a new construction and vinyl replacement window.

2.     How to repair windows

Installing trim

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.
  • 9.2.8.B.6 Demonstrate understanding of the necessary preparation and legal requirements to enter the workforce.
  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

CONSTRUCTION (AC‐CST)

9.3.12.AC-CST.8

Demonstrate the construction crafts required for each phase of a construction project.

9.3.12.AC-CST.9

Safely use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery, equipment and resources to accomplish construction project goals.  

DESIGN/PRE‐CONSTRUCTION (AC‐DES)

9.3.12.AC‐DES.6

Apply the techniques and skills of modern drafting, design, engineering and construction to projects.  

MANUFACTURING (MN)

9.3.MN.3

Comply with federal, state and local regulations to ensure worker safety and health and environmental work practices.  

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

MAINTENANCE, INSTALLATION, & REPAIR (MN‐MIR)

9.3.MN-MIR.2

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment to ensure a safe and healthy environment.  

9.3.MN-MIR.5

Implement a preventative maintenance schedule to maintain manufacturing equipment, tools and workstations.  

PRODUCTION (MN‐PRO)

9.3.MN-PRO.4

Coordinate work teams when producing products to enhance production process and performance.

9.3.MN-PRO.5

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.  

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.  

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST‐SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.A.2 -Analyze a current technology and the resources used, to identify the trade-offs in terms of availability, cost, desirability and waste.

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The attributes of design.

8.2.12.C.2  - Analyze a product and how it has changed or might change over time to meet human needs and wants

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.3 - Analyze a product or system for factors such as safety, reliability, economic considerations, quality control, environmental concerns, manufacturability, maintenance and repair, and human factors engineering (ergonomics).

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.