Notre Dame Academy

 

 

 

 

 

ACADEMIC HANDBOOK

2019-2020

 

 

 

 

 

The Notre Dame Academy Faculty Handbook is designed to establish consistent systems and procedures to ensure a productive and predictable learning and teaching environment for students, teachers, administrators and parents. This document works in conjunction with the Personnel Handbook, Curriculum Catalog, Educating with Excellence document, and the Faculty Employment Agreement.

 

The Academic Handbook is a living document that will be reviewed and revised as programs and systems evolve.

Table of Contents

 

NOTRE DAME ACADEMY

Mission Statement of Notre Dame Academy

Philosophy of Notre Dame Academy

Qualities of a Sisters of Notre Dame Educator

Integral Student Outcomes (ISOs) and Benchmarks

Non-Discrimination Policy

STRATEGIC PLANNING & INSTRUCTION

Understanding by Design

Atlas Rubicon Curriculum Mapping

Core Instructional Practice (CIP)

Course Pacing

Assessments

Formative Assessments

Summative Assessments

NDA Test Calendar

Make-up Policy

Retakes

Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO)

Homework

Grading

Incomplete Grades

Semester Exams  and Grade Verifications

Textbooks

Course Policy Sheets (Sample format in Appendix I)

Levels of Collaboration and Aid

Student Presentations

SCHOOLWIDE TESTING and RESPONSIVE EDUCATION

STAR Assessment and Analysis

PSAT and PreACT Testing and Analysis

STUDENT SUPPORT

Communicating Academic Performance

Mandated Reporting

Support System

Students Missing Class Time

International Students

First Generation College Bound Student Program


PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

Communication

Letters of Recommendation

Classroom Stewardship

Prayer, Pledge, and Announcements

Section

Classrooms

EDUCATING WITH EXCELLENCE

CONTRACT OBLIGATIONS AND DUTIES

Work Hours

Missing Class/School

Substitute Teaching

Required Attendance at School Events

Teacher Supervision Duties

Facilities Requests

Tech Support

Daily Schedule

All Classes Meet

Block Day Schedules (Rotation Varies)

DEPARTMENT SPECIFIC GUIDELINES

RELIGION

ENGLISH

MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

SOCIAL SCIENCE

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

WORLD LANGUAGES

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A:  Organizational Chart

APPENDIX B:  Acceptable Use Policy And  Personal Technology Policy

APPENDIX C:  Course Feedback Form, revised August 2016 via Google Forms

APPENDIX D: AP Student/Parent/School Agreement

APPENDIX E: Controversial Topics

APPENDIX F: Movies in the Classroom

APPENDIX G: Guest Speakers

APPENDIX H: Sample Course Policy Sheet

APPENDIX I: Academic and College Counseling Department and Counseling Center

Counseling Appointments

Academic Counseling

College Counseling

Personal Counseling

Counseling Center Student Support and Points of Contact

APPENDIX J: Christian Service Hours

APPENDIX K: Student Detentions

APPENDIX L: Student Uniform

APPENDIX M: Parking

APPENDIX N:  Reimbursement Procedure

Appendix O: Habits of Mind Chart

Appendix P: Growth Mindset

Appendix Q:  Student Engagement Strategies

Appendix R:  Professional Attire

 


NOTRE DAME ACADEMY

Mission Statement of Notre Dame Academy

Notre Dame Academy is a Catholic, college-preparatory high school dedicated to educating young women to make a difference.

Philosophy of Notre Dame Academy

Devoted to educating young women to make a difference, Notre Dame Academy nurtures the development of the whole person by recognizing the dignity, uniqueness and potential of each student. As a Catholic school, Notre Dame Academy encourages students to integrate learning and living in light of the Gospel message. In the spirit of St. Julie Billiart and in the educational tradition and charism of the Sisters of Notre Dame, the academy provides a warm and welcoming atmosphere that reflects God’s goodness and provident care. Named for Mary, the Mother of God, Notre Dame Academy honors Mary’s spirit of prayer and generosity and sets it as a model for students to emulate.

 

In light of Church teaching, Notre Dame Academy acknowledges that parents/guardians are the primary educators of their children and therefore partners with them to promote the growth of each student. Committed to forming women of faith, Notre Dame Academy cultivates an environment in which students are empowered to live Catholic values, witness to God’s goodness and provident care, and put their faith into action. Providing myriad opportunities for prayer, reflection, and service, Notre Dame Academy encourages lifelong participation in the Church, as well as in the local and global community.

 

Dedicated to excellence, the educational program includes a value-centered, rigorous, college preparatory curriculum, enhanced by technology and extra-curricular activities. Notre Dame Academy strives to develop the academic and leadership potential of each student and provides the tools to develop self-confidence, set meaningful goals and take the initiative to achieve them. Celebrating its rich heritage and diversity, Notre Dame Academy cherishes each student as a reflection of God’s goodness and prepares her to lead a life characterized by spiritual and moral growth, academic excellence, social responsibility and a love of learning.

Qualities of a Sisters of Notre Dame Educator

Impelled by Jesus Christ and His mission and our rich heritage of education, we provide a Catholic-Christian environment of educational excellence for the transformation of individuals and society. We form persons who are skilled and committed to journey together in hope as witnesses and catalysts for the responsible care of all God’s creation and for justice and peace, especially for those on the margins of society.

Educational Vision and Principles of the Sisters of Notre Dame

PRINCIPLE ONE: The Centrality of a Good and Provident God

  1. We are grounded in the Word of God and share this source of light and strength.
  2. We cultivate a sense of the sacred and search for transcendence that leads to a deeper meaning in life.
  3. We integrate the teachings and values of Jesus in all aspects of our educational ministry.
  4. We provide religious and moral education to develop an integrated spirituality for global citizenship.
  5. We initiate and deepen faith formation of Christians through a variety of specific programs and experiences.
  6. We promote a spirit of dialogue with diverse cultures and religions and are open to mutual enrichment.
  7. We live a simple Gospel lifestyle and educate for solidarity so that all may enjoy the blessings of the earth.
  8. We commit ourselves through selfless serving to be bearers of hope to a world in need.

 

PRINCIPLE TWO: The Human Dignity of Each Person as an Image of God

  1. We appreciate, respect and reverence the uniqueness of each individual and the diversity among all persons.
  2. We actively support a holistic education that encourages a positive sense of self-worth and the full development of the person.
  3. We reverence the image of God in each person we encounter through respectful listening and availability.
  4. We create a welcoming atmosphere that builds relationships leading to unity and community.
  5. We provide opportunities and environments to help persons to claim and regain their human dignity, identity and self-worth.

 

PRINCIPLE THREE: The Notre Dame Educator as Gospel Witness

  1.  We follow Jesus, our Master Teacher, and give witness to His spirit of compassion, hope and joy, especially to those who experience poverty in its various forms.
  2. We nurture the Notre Dame charism, spirit and mission among ourselves as educators and among all with whom we work.
  3. We reverence Mary, the Woman of Hope, who made visible the glad tidings of the Gospel.
  4. We share the rich spiritual and educational heritage of the Sisters of Notre Dame by using opportunities for ongoing formation and professional growth.
  5. We promote collaborative programs and processes that assure the continuity of the excellence of a Notre Dame education through our commitment, competence and dedication.
  6. We affirm that goodness supported by firmness is a characteristic mark of our educational heritage
  7. We create clean, orderly and attractive surroundings in order to provide a safe environment conducive to learning and respectful of all.

 

PRINCIPLE FOUR: An Integrated Education for Transformation

  1.  We ensure a thoroughness of instruction that is rooted in Gospel values, the Social Teachings of the Church and an understanding of complex world realities.
  2. We provide an integrated education, one that leads people to a fully human life in relation to themselves, God, others and all of creation.
  3. We create the environment to develop value-based leadership skills and the ethical use of communications media and technology.
  4. We form students to be reflective critical thinkers and lifelong learners who have the determination to influence systemic and structural change.
  5. We nurture in ourselves and others an ongoing commitment to act with preferential care and love on behalf of those who are poor and marginalized, especially women and children.
  6. We transform our institutions to be centers of non-violence, compassion and justice, and give personal and corporate witness to peace-building and the responsible care of creation.

 

Integral Student Outcomes (ISOs) and Benchmarks         

Notre Dame Academy graduates are:

 

Women of Faith who live Catholic values and witness to God’s goodness and provident care.  They . . .

  1. Respect themselves and others as reflections of God’s image and likeness.
  2. Understand the Catholic faith and traditions and integrate them into their lives.
  3. Demonstrate a commitment to the communal aspect of church, a strong moral code, personal prayer and growth in personal faith.
  4. Honor God's creation and work to preserve its balance and beauty.   

Women of Academic Excellence who think critically and communicate effectively.   They . . .   

  1. Demonstrate intellectual curiosity and integrity.
  2. Explore the human experience through the arts.
  3. Use scientific attitudes and principles to better understand the natural world.
  4. Speak and write with confidence and skill.

Women of Vision and Leadership who collaborate, problem solve, and use technology ethically. They . . .

  1. Assume responsibilities of leadership.
  2. Conduct themselves with honor.
  3. Dedicate themselves to lifelong learning.
  4. Exercise their social and personal responsibilities in global, national, civic and church communities.

Women of Service and Compassion who make a positive difference in the world.      They . . .

  1. Live a life of service.
  2. Advocate for peace and justice.
  3. Respect the sanctity and diversity of all human life.
  4. Bring the hope and healing of Christ to all they serve


Non-Discrimination Policy

Impelled by Jesus Christ and His mission and our rich educational heritage, we, the Board, Administration, Faculty, and Staff of Notre Dame Academy are committed to maintaining a healthy and inclusive Catholic environment of educational excellence for the transformation of individuals and society.  We strive to form women who are skilled and committed to journey together in hope as witnesses and catalysts for the responsible care of all God’s creation and for justice and peace, especially for those on the margins of society (From The Educational Vision of the Sisters of Notre Dame).


We affirm our commitment as a Catholic school to inclusivity.  We welcome all into this Gospel community including, but not limited to people of all colors, religions, ethnicities, nationalities, immigration statuses, abilities, socio-economic classes, and sexual orientations.  We receive and love all here as God’s children and do not tolerate discrimination.  We remain vigilant to create an environment of mutual respect, of welcoming hospitality, and of genuine warmth in which none is a stranger, and in which all may flourish according to God’s plan.  

As a Catholic school, every attempt is made to serve students whose parents desire a Catholic education for them.  While the school does not discriminate against students with special needs, a full range of services may not always be available to them.  Decisions concerning the admission and continued enrollment of a student in the school are based on the student’s emotional, academic, and physical abilities and the resources available to the school in meeting the student’s needs.


STRATEGIC PLANNING & INSTRUCTION

Understanding by Design

Understanding that the quality of classroom instruction has the biggest impact on student learning, Notre Dame Academy strives to assist educators to transition from a culture of teaching to a culture of learning.  The Understanding by Design (UbD) framework offers a planning process and structure to guide curriculum, assessment, and instruction. Its two key ideas are contained in the title: 1) focus on teaching and assessing for understanding and learning transfer, and 2) design curriculum “backward” from those ends.

UbD framework is based on seven key tenets:

  1. Learning is enhanced when teachers think purposefully about curricular planning.
  2. The UbD framework helps focus curriculum and teaching on the development and deepening of student understanding and transfer of learning.
  3. Understanding is revealed when students autonomously make sense of and transfer their learning through authentic performance.
  4. Effective curriculum is planned backward from long-term, desired results through a three-stage design process (Desired Results, Evidence, and Learning Plan).
  5. Teachers are coaches of understanding, not mere purveyors of content knowledge, skill, or activity. They focus on ensuring that learning happens, not just teaching (and assuming that what was taught was learned); they always aim and check for successful meaning making and transfer by the learner.
  6. Regularly reviewing units and curriculum against design standards enhances curricular quality and effectiveness, and provides engaging and professional discussions.
  7. The UbD framework reflects a continual improvement approach to student achievement and teacher craft. The results of our designs—student performance—inform needed adjustments in curriculum as well as instruction so that student learning is maximized.

Atlas Rubicon Curriculum Mapping

Curriculum mapping is the process of indexing or diagraming a curriculum to identify and address academic gaps, redundancies, and misalignments for purposes of improving the overall coherence of a course of study and, by extension, its effectiveness.  At NDA, teachers utilize Atlas Rubicon for curriculum mapping, aligning courses and units with California Common Core Standards. The Common Core State Standards are a clear set of shared goals and expectations for the knowledge and skills students need in English language arts and mathematics at each grade level so they can be prepared to succeed in college, career, and life.  Standards provide a high level benchmark for what students should be able to achieve at various levels of their educational journey. Curriculum maps help to create a bridge between standards and lesson plans, by bringing curriculum into the classroom.

 

Teachers are encouraged to assess, adjust, amend, and update their curriculum maps as they navigate through the year and throughout their experience with the course. Curriculum mapping is not a stagnant process but one that requires consistent reconstruction and renewal.

 


Teachers are expected to complete levels of curriculum mapping and design based on their experience at NDA, these are listed below:

 

New Hires:                                 Scope and Sequence

New Course:                             Scope and Sequence

One year of experience:            Scope & Sequence; One Unit               

2-3 years of experience:           One course mapped

5+ years of experience:            All courses mapped

Core Instructional Practice (CIP)

Complementing the Understanding by Design (UbD) component of curriculum planning is Core Instructional Practice (CIP).  Where UbD is focused on design from big ideas to individual lessons, CIP focuses on daily teaching strategies.  Posting clear, standard-based objectives, providing formative assessments, and basing teaching practices on sound methodology are three expectations teachers are asked to meet.

Course Pacing

Teachers should design a curriculum that takes into account all school-sponsored activities. For example, during sophomore class retreat, a teacher with a mixed class of freshmen and sophomores, or sophomores and juniors will need to carefully consider what work to assign. Ideally, the teacher can do enrichment activities for which the missing students would not be responsible. If just a few students are missing class, then the teacher could work with those students to arrange completion of missed work, keeping in mind that they may have make-up work in other classes as well.

The following are examples of events for which students may miss class time:

 

In addition, the school schedule is comprised of 50-minute periods and 85-minute block periods. Please be attentive to the amount of time available when pacing your course.

Assessments

As NDA continues to utilize UbD and CIP, we aim to fully embrace formative assessment and summative assessment methodologies to achieve effective instruction. 

Formative Assessments

Formative assessment refers to a wide variety of methods used to conduct in-process evaluations of student comprehension, learning needs, and academic progress during a lesson, unit, or course. Formative assessments help to identify concepts that students are struggling to understand, skills they are having difficulty acquiring, or learning standards they have not yet achieved so that adjustments can be made to lessons, instructional techniques, and academic support. Teachers at NDA are encouraged to utilize formative assessments frequently.

Summative Assessments

The goal of summative assessment is to evaluate student learning at the end of an instructional unit by comparing it against some standard or benchmark. Summative assessments are often high stakes, which means that they have a high point value. Examples of summative assessments include:

 

Student work should be returned in a reasonable amount of time, preferably no later than three weeks after the assessment is given, so that students receive feedback that is relevant and useful. For example, an essay should be returned with feedback prior to the next essay being assigned. In this way, the student has the opportunity to ask questions, and receive support and remediation, if necessary.

 

Formative assessments

Summative assessments

inform and guide instruction for the teacher;  inform the student of her level of mastery and area of growth to guide future practice and learning; provide diagnostic feedback.

focus on mastery of explicit standards;

reflect the final levels of understanding as a result of teaching and learning during the formative phases of a designated teaching period.

Examples

Examples

Homework/Homework checks

Unit test/exam

Classwork/activities (e.g. Plickers, Kahoot)

Other assessments

Drafts of essays, projects, paintings, etc.

Final performance task

Practice Questions

Final essay, project, painting, etc.

Exit Tickets and other strategies that check for understanding

Final Exam

Other assignments that check for understanding        

(e.g. self assessment)

 


NDA Test Calendar

The NDA Test Calendar allows teachers to post the dates of their summative (not formative) assessments. It is accessed via the faculty/staff portal on the NDA website.

 

The format for entering an assessment is as follows:

 

●      Single Grade Level Class – grade level, teacher last name, course title, class size

o      (11, Jones, Religion, 48).

●      Split Grade Level Class – grade levels, teacher last name, course title, class size

o      (11/12, Lopez, Pre-Cal, 24/16).

 

If two summative assessments/test are calendared for your grade level on any given day, please refrain from scheduling a third exam. Teachers who do not use the NDA Test Calendar may be required to move their assessment to another day if it conflicts with other assessments previously posted to the calendar. If the assessment affects only a small portion of a grade level, then exceptions to the policy can be made.

Make-up Policy

The school-wide make-up policy is as follows:

 

A student may have the same number of days as she is absent – due to illness or family obligation – to turn in work and she has one week to make up assessments. It is the student’s responsibility to find out from the teacher, or the Google Classroom page, what she has missed so that she may schedule a time to submit missed work or make-up assessments. Teachers must assist in this collaboration and may make exceptions to this policy when circumstances dictate.  If a student is absent long term due to extenuating circumstances, the academic and college counselor will aid in developing an academic recovery plan.

Retakes

A student may “retake” a new or comparable summative assessment (entirely or partially). A retake of a single problem/question, section of an assessment, or entire test/assessment is allowed under the following guidelines:


Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) 

There may be occasions where, despite all the best practices of formative assessment and sincere engagement with the material on the part of the student, she is not yet ready to demonstrate mastery of the material on a summative assessment. In such cases, to acknowledge and promote a growth mindset, the teacher may opt to offer the student an ELO.  Students must never be given the impression that they are entitled to ELO’s.  An ELO must never be used to simply or only raise a grade.

 

ELO’s are allowed under the following guidelines:

 

Course Policy ELO wording example:

 

"If a student does poorly on a test or other summative assessment, the teacher has the discretion to assign an Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) to that student.  Successful completion of an ELO will result in the student earning as high as a 75% on the original assignment.  Criteria and instructions for completing an ELO will be posted at a later date."

 

ELO Procedure:

  1.  The student must show evidence of self-reflection and subsequent practice to achieve mastery. Examples of student actions that incorporate self-reflection, practice, and readiness for the ELO include, but are not limited to (will vary by course and department):
  1. watching a related video and taking notes
  2. taking notes on a reading from the text
  3. working practice problems with a teacher
  4. showing that corrective measures were taken after receiving feedback from formative assessments
  1. The student must submit a written artifact from step one above that is signed by a parent/guardian by a deadline set by the teacher. A reasonable time limit is approximately one week from the time the student received the grade on the summative assessment to the time the signed ELO is submitted.
  2.  Set the value of an ELO to allow the student to achieve a maximum grade of 75% when in combination with the original test score.  Also, a record of the ELO must be recorded in PowerSchool.  Details of how to document in PowerSchool will be shared later.

Homework

Homework should be a purposeful, formative tool used to reinforce learning through practice, develop strong habits of mind, and to check for understanding.  Homework and independent study projects should be developed with sound principles of learning, defined educational purposes, and an emphasis on quality rather than quantity. Students should be able to articulate the purpose of an assignment and understand how it relates to the lesson, as well as how it will help them gather feedback and learn. Take into consideration that students may have homework in five other classes.

 

The objectives of homework are to:

 

Ordinarily, a teacher of a College Prep course may assign up to 20 minutes of homework per regular class meeting and up to 40 minutes of homework per block class. Honors and AP teachers may assign up to 60 minutes of homework. AP teachers may assign homework over holidays and breaks; however, any assignment to be completed over a holiday/break must be given and fully explained to the students in class and should be reasonable and respectful of student and family vacation time (see AP Student/Parent/School Agreement in Appendix D).

 

All homework must be explained to students in class and then posted the same day on Google Classroom by 3:00 PM (7th Period by 5:30 PM). If there is an error, simply post a notice letting students know that there was an error and that they will not be penalized. Do not post to Google Classroom in the evening or on the weekend unless students are expecting new information. Assignments posted on Google Classroom should be succinct and sufficiently clear to allow a student who is absent to understand what she must do for the following next class period. Students provided with at least one week notification of all assigned tests/papers.

Homework must not depend on outside group gatherings. One possibility is for students to generate parts of the project outside of school and then put the parts together in class. A given student’s grade should always be based on her own work only and not dependent on the work of other students.

Grading

It is the teacher's responsibility to familiarize the students with his/her individual grading system—weighting, scaling, higher standards than enumerated above, and ungraded assignments. This should be done at the beginning of each course and stated in the course policy sheets.  All grades should be posted to PowerSchool every two weeks.  Grade posting dates will be placed on the NDA Faculty/Staff Calendar.  In addition, each teacher should ensure that each student has a minimum of two grades recorded for each two week grading period.  

Each semester grade is to be set at:  80% Term and 20% Final Exam

Notre Dame Academy issues report cards after each semester. Grades for Advanced Placement and certain honors courses may be weighted, according to UC standards, as indicated in the Curriculum Catalog. In those cases, the student receives an additional GPA point for any grade above D+.  Please notify a parent/guardian when a student’s grade is beginning to drop, if the grade is a 72% or below a parent/guardian must be notified.  No grades should exceed 100%.

 

The following is used in determining a student’s semester Grade Point Average (GPA). Percentages are included here to clarify for college purposes, since schools vary in the designation of letter grades/percentage equivalents:

 

Grade

Percentage Scale

GPA Points

AP and Honors GPA Points

A

93 - 100%

4

5

A-

90 - 92%

3.7

4.7

B+

87 - 89%

3.3

4.3

B

83 - 86%

3

4

B-

80 - 82%

2.7

3.7

C+

77 - 79%

2.3

3.3

C

73 - 76%

2

3

C-

70 - 72%

1.7

2.7

D+

67 - 69%

1.3

1.3

D

63 - 66%

1

1

D-

60 - 62%

0.7

0.7

F

Below 60%

0

0

Incomplete

 

 

Incomplete Grades

Students who have not completed assignments or tests by the end of the semester due to illness or absence will be given an I (Incomplete) for the semester grade. If the work and/or class time is not completed within the following semester, the Incomplete could become an F. It is the responsibility of the student to take care of this matter with her teacher and her academic/college counselor, who will inform the Assistant Head of School for Academics when the Incomplete may be removed from the transcript and a final grade given. Any exceptions to these policies will be handled by the Assistant Head of School for Academics.

Excessive absences (one-fifth the number classes) may affect the grade given for a course which could result in a failure to fulfill graduation requirements, thereby disqualifying the student from graduating, so any such situation must be addressed immediately following the student’s return. Any exceptions will be handled by the Assistant Head of School for Academics.


Semester Exams  and Grade Verifications

In most classes, the letter grades published on report cards are calculated by giving 80% weight to the semester work and 20% weight to the semester final exam or culminating project.

Semester exams are required in all UC approved Honors courses and may be waived by some teachers in college preparatory and/or Advanced Placement courses.  If a teacher elects to waive a final exam, with approval from the Assistant Head of School for Academics, the teacher must notify students of this within the first month of the semester .  In lieu of a culminating exam at the end of the semester, teachers may have a culminating project or portfolio, approved by the Assistant Head of School for Academics.  Seniors receiving 93% or above in the second semester of a class may be exempt from the final exam at the discretion of the teacher and if they are financially clear. However, AP students who chose not to take the AP exam will not be exempt from their final exam.  In addition, an AP class overrides the senior privilege and UC approved Honors courses are required to take a culminating exam or complete a culminating project.

If a teacher elects to forgo a traditional final exam, the class (all grade levels during first semester exams and grades 9-11 during second semester exams) is required to be present in the classroom on the day of the scheduled exam.  Students may use that time for quiet study.

Students are expected to take final exams at the scheduled times. No exams may be taken before exam week without prior permission from the Assistant Head of School for Academics. Students who are late for a semester exam may forfeit the time missed.  Students take semester examinations in each subject area in December and May/June. The examinations last 90 minutes each and cover the material of the previous term. Since the examination grade is one-fifth of the semester average, these examinations must be carefully and wisely constructed so that the teacher can accurately gauge the students’ long-term achievement. Exams must be reasonable in length and of a difficulty that can be completed within the 90 minute testing period.

Teachers are required to provide students a study guide (created by the teacher or in collaboration with the students) in preparation for final examinations and use those study guides to focus their review with the students during the calendared Study and Review Days the week prior to final exams. Teachers may decide upon the format of the study guide, but the goals are to reduce anxiety, focus student learning, and improve student mastery of the course’s learning objectives as assessed on the final exam. No testing, make-up exams, extended learning opportunities are to take place during Study and Review Days.

 

All teachers must submit drafts of their semester exams to their Academic Deans for approval before duplicating at least one week prior to the beginning of final exam week. Teachers should then submit a file copy (including an answer key) to the Assistant Head of School for Academics as well as a complete copy of materials needed for the exam for any student who is absent at the time of the scheduled exam. Students must make arrangements with the Assistant Head of School for Academics to arrange for making up any missed final exams.

 


All exams are to include a heading that mirrors the following information:

 

Notre Dame Academy

Course name and level

Teacher’s name

Date

 All exams are to include the following NDA Honor Code Statement that is to be signed by the student:

                                                                                                      

NOTRE DAME ACADEMY HONOR PLEDGE

I strive to be an honorable person. I pledge to always:

Act with integrity, including academic integrity,

Respect other people and their belongings,

Treat everyone with love and concern, and

Inspire and encourage those around me to act with honor.

 

Signature: _______________________________

 

Teachers should securely store students’ semester exams and save them for one semester before properly shredding them for disposal.

 

Prior to giving a student a term or semester grade of D, F, or I (Incomplete), the teacher must contact the student’s parents to notify them of their daughter’s grade risk either by phone or email (verified by a reply from the parents). Incomplete grades require the permission of the Assistant Head of School for Academics.

 

Teachers should complete all grades in PowerSchool by the date and time indicated by the Assistant Head of School for Academics, and immediately verify the grade verification sheets he/she will be provided by the Registrar. First semester grades are usually due within a few days of returning to school in January. Second semester grades are usually due within a few days of the last final exam.  After approving the grade verification sheets, any further grade changes must be submitted via the Grade Change Form to the Assistant Head of School for Academics, as the final grades will be stored and archived. Please note, teachers’ PowerSchool gradebooks are the property of NDA.

Textbooks

Departments are to carefully evaluate required texts in terms of the merits of the proposed text and the total financial burden to the student. If teachers ask students to purchase a textbook, then it must be actively integrated into the curriculum. After having discussed the option with the Academic Dean of the department,  a teacher may create his/her own teaching resources in lieu of a textbook that may be shared digitally or printed for purchase by the students but please be cognizant of copyright laws.  Discussions regarding textbooks must occur no later than May 1, 2020.

 

Textbooks for the following year and requests for instructional material purchases for their classes must be finalized by May 15, 2020. Please be thoughtful about the cost of texts. It is up to the discretion of the teachers to determine to select to use a traditional hard copy or iBooks/ebooks. Students purchase their textbooks online through the NDA bookstore before the beginning of each school year. Academic Deans are responsible for assessing the number of teacher’s editions available and for submitting the order to the Registrar. No teacher may independently order from a publisher.

Teachers must have a book check in class within the first two weeks of school to confirm that all students have required materials for class. Students without materials will be referred to the Registrar for assistance with acquiring textbooks.

Course Policy Sheets (Sample format in Appendix I)

 Teachers are expected to present their Course Policy Sheet on the second day of class. All Course Policy Sheets must be submitted to the Academic Deans a week prior to the beginning of the school year for approval and submitted to designated Cloud Storage within the first week of school.

                                                                                                                                                                

College Prep and Honors Courses must contain the components listed below:

Advanced Placement Course Policy Sheets will include the above components plus additional wording regarding specific NDA Advanced Placement (AP) policies related to taking the AP exam or a second semester final, for example:

 

All students will take the second semester final exam unless exempted by the instructor. Exemptions may be granted if a student has displayed exemplary habits of mind, growth mindset, and academic achievement throughout the school year, put forth the required effort to prepare for a score of 3 or higher on the AP Exam, and demonstrated effective test taking strategies and professionalism while taking the AP Examination.

A teacher must first consult with the Assistant Head of School, if he/she is concerned about a student being prepared for the AP exam.

Levels of Collaboration and Aid

If there is a clear rationale for group projects, allow time for students to work together in class. When assigning a group project, please indicate to the students the Level of Collaboration which you expect them to use. The Honor Committee, in collaboration with students, teachers, the guidance department, and administration, formulated levels of collaboration by which to work.  Those levels are listed below.

 

Collaboration With Classmates

Level 1: Totally open.  Collaboration allowed.

Level 2: Discussion permitted within assigned groups. You will either turn in one assignment as a group, or individual assignments, depending on the teacher’s instructions, but collaboration is limited to your assigned group.

Level 3: Only your own work. No collaboration allowed.

 


Resources

Level A: Anything allowed

 

Level B: Specified resources

Level C: Nothing allowed, for example, a test

 

Whenever assigning work, please keep in mind the students have been informed that:

 

Student Presentations

Teachers should make students are aware of the following guidelines before allowing them to make presentations to the class. Students may not:

 

 


SCHOOLWIDE TESTING and RESPONSIVE EDUCATION

STAR Assessment and Analysis

STAR Assessment provides an individualized, computer-adaptive online assessment in reading and math. It is given three times during the year in all 9th-1th grade English and math classes. STAR provides immediate feedback on student performance and provides online tools to chart growth over time. Each teacher is expected to analyze his/her classes using STAR data so as to intervene in the case of a struggling student and to extend the learning for those who need enrichment. In this way, STAR becomes a critical tool in the responsive education for all learners. STAR testing scores are also utilized to determine placement in honors and AP courses.

PSAT and PreACT Testing and Analysis

While the PSAT and PreACT are not an exact replicas of the standardized exams, they serve as an excellent introduction to the tests because the questions and test formats are similar. The PSAT includes three tests, Reading, Writing and Language, and Mathematics, while the PreACT includes English, Math, Reading, and Science and no Writing section. The test results give students an idea of how they will perform on the standardized exam and provide feedback in the areas where they may need improvement. Juniors scoring as one of the highest 50,000 test takers on the PSAT will be considered for the College Board $2,500 National Merit Scholarship. The counselors provide data to teachers so areas in need of improvement can be addressed in classroom instruction. The goal is for an increase in student scores on the standardized tests.

 

PSAT 8/9:           Freshmen

PreACT:             Sophomores

PSAT:                 Juniors

 


STUDENT SUPPORT

Communicating Academic Performance

PowerSchool allows parents/guardians and students to view the student’s grades and attendance record online using school-generated personal usernames and passwords. As a result, it is the responsibility of parents/guardians and students to check student progress regularly. Teachers will communicate essential information to parents/guardians and students via PowerSchool.

 

Teachers must contact the parents/guardians of any struggling student via email or phone call at PowerSchool checkpoints or at any point during the semester, if the student is:

 

Mandated Reporting

If a teacher (or academic advisor) assigns a written assignment of a personal nature, the assignment must be read within 24 hours. As teachers are mandated reporters for the State of California, this allows the teacher time to comply with the 36 hour Mandatory Reporting Regulations of the State of California. If a teacher needs to contact Child Protective Services as a result of a written or verbal confidence, he/she may file a report, then alert the Assistant Head of School or he/she may ask for guidance from the Assistant Head of School if need be.  If a teacher recognizes behavior unusual to a student, the teacher should contact that student’s academic advisor immediately.

Support System

Teachers should make every effort to work with those students who are underperforming by inviting them to receive help during E Periods or office hours.  The teacher may also consider additional support for the student by referring her to the Student Learning Commons, the Guidance Department, Outreach Concern, or the Dean of Students.

When determining ways in which to support students, consider the following steps for student support:

  1. Encourage student to meet during E period or office hours.
  2. Communicate with parent/guardians and counselors regarding a student’s academics; refer student to peer tutoring or NHS tutoring.
  3. Invite, communicate and collaborate with Academic Deans; schedule a parent/student conference.
  4. Invite, communicate, and collaborate with the Assistant Head of School for Academics regarding student.


E Period (for “Engagement” Period) is a weekly scheduled opportunity for students to meet with teachers, collaborate with classmates, or study independently.  The Student Learning Commons and classrooms should be utilized for academic collaboration or quiet study time, while the cafe and outside spaces are available for less structured activities. This is also an opportunity for teachers to have students make up quizzes and exams.

Freshmen and sophomores will remain in the class that precedes E Period.  If a freshman or sophomore needs to meet with a teacher, staff member, counselor, or other students (for collaborative projects), she must sign out before leaving the room and must sign in upon her return.  Juniors and seniors, as upperclasswomen, will have the privilege to choose where and how to best use their E Period.

The Student Learning Commons, which has replaced the traditional library, is a center to support student learning. The Student Learning Commons Coordinator supports and supervises Independent Study students, Study Hall students, students on campus before and after school, and at lunch and break. He provides research assistance, book checkout, database support, online course monitoring, and more. Teachers may request to bring their class in for research and database training. In addition, teachers may send students approved for extended time or distraction-free testing to the Student Learning Commons to complete their tests when completing those exams within the classroom is impractical. Finally, teachers may also make arrangements with the Student Learning Commons Coordinator for students to make up assessments during E Periods, at lunch, or before or after school.

 

In the Academic and College Counseling Department, NDA provides three counselors to assist students.  The counselors have divided the student population alphabetically. The breakdown is as follows: Ms. Morgan- A-F, Mr. Ho G-M, and Ms. Melvin N-Z. Students will meet with their assigned counselor in the spring and the fall of each year. All students are encouraged to meet with their counselor to discuss any academic issue or concern. Teachers may refer a student to her academic advisor for support or may meet with the advisor to discuss issues about a student. The Guidance Department reviews each student’s grades at the halfway point of the semester and talks to students who are in danger of a D or F grade.

 

Admittance with support is an Academic Support Program offered by NDA during freshman year.  The program aims to ease the transition from middle school to high school as students benefit from a structured E-period as well as small-group mentorship from the Guidance Department.

 

College Counseling is provided to all students; however, formal meetings are arranged with juniors and their parents in the spring of junior year to develop a college list and provide the families with a clear timeline of the college application process. Counselors provide support by assisting students with the college application process, assisting teachers in writing letters of recommendation, and hosting college representatives, college fairs, and parent events throughout the school year.

 

Outreach Concern is a counseling service contracted by NDA.  They offer several Master’s-level interns to provide personal counseling services to our students. Students may meet with an Outreach Concern counselor once before she is required to obtain parental permission for further visits. Outreach Concern provides an essential service and may request teacher support. Teachers may also recommend to a student’s academic advisor that she be referred to an Outreach Concern counselor if the teacher observes that there may be issues impacting the student’s ability to focus on her studies. Teachers are not to engage in the discussion of personal issues with students, but rather refer the student to her academic advisor who will notify an Outreach Concern counselor.

 

The Dean of Students serves as a resource for students and teachers. The Dean of Students makes an effort to get to know the students and their families and is a great resource for information regarding students. Teachers may also seek assistance from the Dean of Students regarding individual or class discipline issues. The Dean of Students can observe students in class or as an added support in the classroom, meet with individual students, mediate student/teacher meetings, or support in a parent meeting. In addition to general school rules, the Dean of Students handles all issues of academic integrity and the Honor Code.

Students Missing Class Time

On occasion, the office staff may call into a classroom to request a student so that she may attend a meeting. Teachers may indicate that the student cannot leave if a test or something essential is taking place.

International Students

Because international students enhance the education of our community both in and out of the classroom, NDA welcomes students from around the world. Some students join NDA for all four years of high school, while others take advantage of a single enrichment semester or academic year.  Whatever the length of the International Student’s stay, she is to be held to the same standards as all NDA students.  NDA currently has students from China, India, Australia, and Germany in attendance. For any concerns regarding international students, please contact international student coordinator.

First Generation College Bound Student Program

The First Generation Student program provides students and their parents with information they need to better navigate the college application process.  The Academic and College Counseling Department offers opportunities including meet and greet events, guest speakers (college representatives, alumnae, specialized consultants), mentorship, and workshops covering the college application and financial aid processes. Students and their families are encouraged to participate in these events in order to meet the challenges of the college process.

 


PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

Communication

When speaking to students and parents, a professional level of conversation is to be maintained at all times. Teachers are to be friendly but formal. Students and parents are always to be treated with respect. If an issue arises in a communication with a student or parent, the teacher should contact the Dean of Students.

 

Emails from parents or students must be acknowledged within 24 hours. If there is not an immediate answer to the question or issue, please respond with “I received your email regarding . . . I do not have that information at this time, but I will find out and get back to you by . . . ”

 

Communicate positively and professionally with colleagues and show respect by listening, engaging in respectful dialogue, agreeing to disagree, giving credit to experts, not dismissing ideas or thoughts, considering other perspectives, and being empathetic. Collaborate to make the teachers’ lounge a positive environment for all who go there to work, relax, or mingle.  Teachers should communicate consistently and proactively with the administration through email or an appointment to discuss concerns.

Letters of Recommendation

Teachers of juniors and seniors, particularly in core subject areas, should be prepared to write college recommendation letters for students. Students are to personally request that a teacher write a letter, preferably with four weeks advance notice. The teacher has the prerogative to agree or decline to write a letter; however, please keep in mind that every student will need one or two letters to apply to the colleges of her choice. If the teacher agrees, then an official request through Naviance will be received by the teacher. Completed letters are to be uploaded through Naviance.

 

Teachers writing a large number of recommendations may request a personal day from the Assistant Head of School of Academics. NDA will provide a substitute teacher and the day will not count against personal or sick days for the year.

Classroom Stewardship

Prayer, Pledge, and Announcements

Student leaders lead an all-school prayer and pledge each morning.  Everyone is expected to stand respectfully and face the flag while the pledge is being recited.  Public announcements over the intercom take place before break, lunch, and at the end of the day.  Teachers are expected to model appropriate behavior while listening to announcements. Please pause or stop your lesson, and ask students to remain silent and attentive to the announcements.   All classes begin with a prayer in the Catholic tradition -- teacher or student led.

 

 Section

“Section” comes immediately after Period 2 and each section teacher is responsible for his/her students during section announcements. The section representative, a member of student government, reads the daily announcements to the class.

 

During the long standing tradition of “Section Snack” each Thursday, a different student may sign up to bring a snack for the entire section.

 

Classrooms

Classrooms are expected to be kept organized and neat at all times. Bulletin Boards in the classroom should showcase learning and support learning goals. Teachers are expected to decorate classrooms and bulletin boards appropriately in a neat and engaging manner.

 

Classrooms must be kept locked at all times and teachers must utilize the Lock Bløk when in the classroom. Projectors are to be turned off at the end of the day or during extended periods of non-use throughout the day. When adhering items to the wall, please utilize either blue painter’s tape or sticky tack.  Be careful when moving furniture and enlist the aid of Facilities and Operations when doing so.  Teaching resources shall be kept in the classroom or department storage area from year to year.

 

Students are never to be left in a room unattended.  Students should be out of the hallways and the Cafe by 3:00 PM, students are welcome to stay in the Student Learning Commons after 3:00 PM or remain outside.  When working independently with a student, doors should remain open. One-on-one tutoring with a student should be completed by 4:00 PM.

 

EDUCATING WITH EXCELLENCE

Grounded in our Catholic faith, the principles of the SND, and the teachings of Father Overberg, a member of the 21st century NDA community strives to be a(n): Learner, Expert, and Community Builder. The Educating with Excellence document will be used to foster a community focused on professional growth.

Please access the document through THIS link.


CONTRACT OBLIGATIONS AND DUTIES

Work Hours

Every teacher is accorded “prep” time. It is expected that teachers use this prep time to prepare daily lessons and assessments that align with their UbD and Curriculum Maps. Because teaching hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (1:30 p.m. on Block 2, Non-meeting Days), teachers are expected to arrive by 7:30 a.m. even if the first class of the day is listed as a “prep” period. Teachers should also be in their classrooms by 7:45 a.m. so that students may get settled. This early arrival also facilitates the smooth running of the school in the event that another teacher calls in sick. If a teacher’s prep falls at the end of the school day and is not asked to sub, the teacher may choose to use the prep time at school or elsewhere. If a teacher chooses to leave campus during school hours, including the use of prep time elsewhere at the end of the day, he/she must sign-out at the office.

 

Missing Class/School

Teachers who are ill and unable to report to school are to notify the school by emailing absent@ndala.com as early as possible, but no later than 7:30 a.m. Please provide a lesson plan that a substitute can easily carry out and include any information related to lunch or pick-up duty in your message. Assignments can also be posted on Google Classroom to simplify the procedure for the substitute. In general, the students should be working independently and silently.

 

The instructions should include:

  1. Teacher’s name
  2. Date
  3. Period
  4. Classroom
  5. Lesson plan
  6. Homework

When requesting a personal day, please speak directly with the Assistant Head of School for Academics prior to submitting an electronic request through Paycom.

Substitute Teaching

All teachers are expected to substitute 10 regular classes or 5 block periods per year.  Any substitution teaching beyond that will be compensated. If you are subbing during a period in which you are normally teaching, i.e. Senior Life Experience Week, Kairos, Freshman Retreat, etc., it will not be counted toward your expected 10 substitutions.

Required Attendance at School Events

Teachers are required to attend the following events each year. If a teacher is unable to attend, permission from the Assistant Head of School for Academics must be secured a week prior to the event.  Dates are on the NDA calendar.

 

Teacher Supervision Duties

All supervision duties will be assigned at the beginning of the year, with teacher preference being met where possible. Teachers are asked to arrive at each post on time, put all other work aside for the duration of the shift, and find a substitute if a shift must be missed.  Teachers are required to do the following duties:

 

Facilities Requests

The Director of Facilities handles all facilities requests, i.e. facilities, custodial, security, and technology.

Tech Support

Technical support for computers, iPads, and audio/visual needs can be accessed through help@ndala.com.


Daily Schedule

All Classes Meet

Class

Start

End

Zero Period

7:00

7:50

0

1st Class

8:00

8:50

1

2nd Class

8:55

9:45

2

Section

9:45

9:50

BREAK

9:50

10:05

3rd Class

10:10

11:00

3

4th Class

11:05

11:55

4

LUNCH

11:55

12:40

5th Class

12:45

1:35

5

6th Class

1:40

2:30

6

DISMISSAL

2:30

Period 7

2:45

Varies

7

 


Block Day Schedules (Rotation Varies)

Block 1a:

E Period/Assembly After the First Class

Rotation varies

Class

Start

End

Zero Period

7:00

7:50

1st Class

8:00

9:25

Section/

Announcements

9:25

9:30

E Period/Assembly

9:30

10:30

Break

10:30

10:45

2nd  Class

10:50

12:15

Lunch

12:15

1:00

3rd  Class

1:05

2:30

Dismissal

2:30

 

Period 7

2:45

varies

Block 1b:

E Period/Assembly After the Second Class

Rotation varies

Class

Start

End

Zero Period

7:00

7:50

1st Class

8:00

9:25

Section/

Announcements

9:25

9:30

Break

9:30

9:45

2nd Class

9:50

11:15

E Period/Assembly

11:15

12:15

Lunch

12:15

1:00

3rd Class

1:05

2:30

Dismissal

2:30

 

Period 7

2:45

varies

Block 1c:

Liturgy

Rotation varies

Class

Start

End

Zero Period

7:00

7:50

1st Class

8:00

9:20

Section/

Announcements

9:20

9:25

Liturgy

9:25

10:40

Break

10:40

10:55

2nd Class

11:00

12:20

Lunch

12:20

1:05

3rd Class

1:10

2:30

Dismissal

2:30

 

Period 7

2:45

varies

Block 2:

Dismissal at 1:00/PLC for Faculty

Rotation varies

Class

Start

End

Zero Period

7:00

7:50

1st Class

8:00

9:25

Section/

Announcements

9:25

9:30

1st Break

9:30

9:45

2nd Class

9:50

11:15

2nd Break

11:15

11:30

3rd Class

11:35

1:00

Dismissal

1:00

 

Period 7

1:15

varies

Period 7 on PLC Days

2:45

varies

DEPARTMENT SPECIFIC GUIDELINES

RELIGION

Curriculum

 

Prayer and Liturgical Life

 

Campus Ministry

 

Cross-curricular

 

All religion teachers will support the Christian Service program by ensuring that students have met the deadlines posted for pre-approval, supervisor verification of hours on x2VOL and are aware of their responsibilities as described by the signed document entitled Los Angeles Boundary Guidelines for Junior High and High School Youth Working or Volunteering with Children or Youth.

 

All religion teachers will ensure that his/her students have written a Christian Service Reflection Essay by the posted due date. This essay counts as test grade for the second semester. Each religion teacher provides the prompt and the grading rubric. In addition, if a student does not complete her Christian Service requirement, the teacher will assign an incomplete for the second semester. When the student has completed those hours and the hours have been both verified and approved on x2VOL, the teacher of record will be notified by the Christian Service Coordinator. The teacher is then responsible for updating the student's grade in PowerSchool and submitting a grade change to the Registrar.

 

 

 ENGLISH

Curriculum

Placement Exams

Students interested in honors or Advanced Placement courses may be required to take a placement examination in order to qualify.  Placement exams will be given on a case-by-case basis.

Consistency

 

Students will

 

 

MATHEMATICS

 

Curriculum

Placement Exams

 

SAT Subject Test Preparation

Honors Pre-calculus prepares students for the SAT Level 2 Mathematics Subject Test.

 

Calculators

A TI 83/84 calculator is required. Students may also use Desmos on the iPad/MacBook, but all students must be proficient with use of the graphing calculator.

 

Consistency

Teachers will:

SCIENCE

 

Curriculum

 

Safety

 

Placements

 

SAT Subject Test Preparation

 

 

 


SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

 Curriculum

 

Placements

 

Consistency

Teachers will:

 

Students will:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

Curriculum

Placements

Consistency

Teachers will:

Students will:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

Curriculum

 

Placement

 

Consistency

Teachers will:

 

Students will:

 

 

  

 

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A: Organizational Chart

Leadership Roles 2019-2020

Assistant Head of School for Mission and Ministry

Assistant Head of School for Educational Operations

Assistant Head of School for Student Life

Assistant Head of School for Academics

Shared Responsibilities

  • Catholic Identity of the School along with Lilliam and Kristin
  • E3 Educational Improvement Plan items
  • Freshman orientation
  • Advisory
  • New academic course proposal
  • Student/Parent Handbook updates (Dean of Students)
  • Updating curriculum catalog
  • Admissions events
  • Faculty morale
  • Honors/awards assemblies
  • CPS and DCFS
  • Disciplinary Committee
  • Calendar
  • Parent newsletter
  • Formal and Prom
  • Approval of guest speakers


Assistant Head of School for Mission and Ministry

Assistant Head of School for Educational Operations

Assistant Head of School for Student Life

Assistant Head of School for Academics

Oversees the Campus Ministry and Student/Adult Ministry Teams, programs, calendar and drives along with Christian Service program and x2vol

ADLA Christian Service Award winner

Family Mass

DTASC, Fine Arts Night, and Spring Musical approval

Faculty Faith Formation/Retreat

Member of the SubCommittee of the Board for Mission Effectiveness

  • Attends evening meetings 5x/year
  • Participates in the meetings
  • Writes the National Catholic Benchmarks Report  (10 hours)
  • Shares the ADLA Catholic Identity Report along with the National Catholic Benchmarks Report

ADLA Catholic Identity Report (10 hours to write and edit report) and 10 hours of Catholic Identity development for the Faculty/Staff each year

Manage the IT department

  • Classroom tech
  • Sound and lights
  • Event management
  • Student devices
  • Internet issues
  • Website updates

WAAG

Manage registrar

  • Scheduling
  • Report cards
  • Transcripts
  • Fulfilling graduation requirements
  • Final grades
  • Powerschool

Manage the Athletic Director

Manage the front office

  • Attendance
  • Improve intercom etiquette
  • Lost and Found

Manage SLC

  • Coverage
  • Coordinate online courses
  • Policies

Student scheduling process

  • Transfer student

Summer school

Data analysis

  • STAR
  • PSAT/PreACT
  • SAT
  • ACT
  • AP
  • HSPT
  • National Clearinghouse

Daily schedule decisions

Moderators

  • Clubs
  • Student council
  • Student organizations

Parent Guild

Non-academic activities and events

  • Dances
  • Socials
  • Senior activities
  • Student leadership retreat
  • Family Mass BBQ
  • Holidays with students

Community time and non-academic assemblies

Clubs and activity proposals

Field trip coordination

  • Buses

On Paper and front board

Supervision

  • Afterschool, evening, lunch, car-line

Parking lot

Non-academic calendar decisions

Friday Morning Live

Parent Communication

  • Invitations to events via Gmail

Teachers

  • Curriculum development and support
  • Professional development
  • PLC
  • Grading
  • Parent/teacher conferences
  • Back to School Night
  • New teacher on-boarding, support, coaching
  • Evaluation process
  • Observations
  • Intersession
  • Time off requests
  • Paycom
  • Tech Training
  • Academic field trip approval
  • E Period

Students

  • Curriculum concerns
  • Teacher concerns
  • Grades
  • Final exams/financial issues
  • Make up final exams
  • Student scheduling process
  • Attendance (impacting course credit)
  • D/F/Inc List
  • Remediation of courses
  • E Period

Parents

  • Curriculum concerns
  • Teacher concerns
  • Grades

Academic Deans

  • Scheduling
  • Curriculum
  • CST
  • Teacher mentoring and coaching

Academic and college counselors

  • STEP/MAP
  • STAR
  • Parent meetings
  • Time off requests and Paycom
  • Long term student absences

SLC

  • Extended time testing
  • Teacher support

Outreach Concern

  • Liaise with academic and college counselors

Academic assemblies

  • Scheduling
  • AP Info nights
  • Counselor parent meetings

Academic calendar decisions


APPENDIX B:  Acceptable Use Policy And  Personal Technology Policy

 

Statement of Intent

Notre Dame Academy is committed to providing a Catholic education in an academically challenging environment. Technological resources are provided for the purpose of promoting educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, collaboration, interactive learning and communication.

             

The use of both school and student-owned technology while on campus must be in support of academic purposes and relevant to the curriculum being taught. The school will not be responsible for supervising or monitoring usage and communication beyond the scope of supervision defined in this policy. Students will use all technology in a responsible, ethical, and legal manner at all times.

 

The use of these electronic resources is a privilege, not a right. Inappropriate use will result in the termination of the privilege and/or disciplinary action.

 

General Guidelines

  1. All school systems, all information stored on them, and all work performed on them are subject to supervision, inspection and school policies. Only students currently enrolled at NDA and other authorized persons may use the NDA technology resources.
  2. The school reserves the right to monitor, access, retrieve, and read all data created, sent, received or stored on its systems (including connections made and sites visited) and to disclose this information to law enforcement officials or others without prior notice.
  3. NDA bears no responsibility for any loss of or damage to a student’s device.
  4. In order to accommodate students with home printer emergencies, students may upload documents to their school-supplied ndala.com Google Drive and print them in the Student Learning Commons for a small fee.
  5. Parents/guardians have the right at any time to request to see the contents of their daughter’s files.
  6. Any viruses, tampering, or other system breaches must be reported immediately to the teacher.
  7. Materials placed on any course-related web page, such as Google Classroom, must be appropriate and comply with rules and restrictions set forth in this policy.
  8. Students may not repost a message that was sent privately without permission of the person who sent the message.
  9. Students may not photograph any person without that person’s consent. No photography is allowed in the restrooms or locker rooms.
  10. Device cameras and audio recording capabilities may not be used during class without permission.
  11. Students will promptly inform their teacher or other school employee of any message received that is inappropriate or makes them feel uncomfortable.
  12. Internet access from outside the school is the domain of the parent/guardian.  NDA expects parents/ guardians to be equal stakeholders in the implementation of computer system policies by monitoring their daughter’s Internet access and electronic use at home in a manner supportive of the school’s policies. While the school may provide consequences for inappropriate electronic communications among students outside of school, note that in some cases, law enforcement may be called to intervene.

 

Cell Phone and Smartwatch Use

Students may use their cell phones and smartwatches (Apple Watch, Fitbit, etc.) before school, during break and E Period, at lunchtime, and after school. Since E Period is a work time, students who use their phones at that time must do so responsibly. During class time and passing periods, cell phones must remain in a student’s backpack or purse. If a student is found in violation of the cell phone policy, the phone will be confiscated and given to the Dean of Students to be claimed at the end of the school day. Cell phone use during break and lunch is a privilege and can be taken away from an individual student or the entire school.

 

Smart Watches may not be worn during any form of assessment (quiz, test, final, SAT, ACT).

 

Students may never talk on the phone in the Student Learning Commons.  During break and lunch, they may use their phones in the Student Learning Commons only to text. Phones and Smart Watches must be kept on vibrate or silent.

 

iPad and MacBooks

  1. Students are required to have their school approved iPad or MacBook with them throughout the school day.
  2.  Students must use their iPads or MacBooks only as directed or permitted by their teachers during classes.
  3. iPads and MacBooks must have a case at all times.
  4. Students are solely responsible for the care and safekeeping of their iPads or MacBooks – any loss or damage to the device, regardless of the cause, will be strictly the financial responsibility of the students and her parents.
  5. Students must have “Find my iPad/Mac” function enabled.
  6. Students are responsible for ensuring their iPad’s battery is completely charged and ready for a full day’s use.
  7. Students are responsible for securing their device (i.e., not leaving it unattended or unlocked in any unsupervised area or in unattended vehicles) and passwords must be used.
  8. Students are allowed to install personal apps on the iPads with parental permission, but these personal apps must be kept at the end of the menu screens. Academic content takes precedence over personal files/apps.
  9. Students are responsible for updating their apps and backing up their files on a regular basis through services such as iCloud, Google Drive, or personal hard drives.  
  10. iPads and MacBooks are subject to random checks by any teacher, staff person, or administrator.
  11. Students and families are responsible for repairs (i.e. cracked screen) and will need to contact Apple directly for repairs covered under their AppleCare+ warranty.

Electronic Communications/Email

  1. Communications from parents/guardians via fax and email may be subject to verification.
  2.  All students have NDA email accounts hosted on Gmail.
  1. All student email correspondence with teachers must come from her Gmail account, and students must check their NDA email daily. Teachers and staff who send emails to students’ Gmail addresses will expect students to read and act upon such emails as appropriate.
  2. Students may not access email or messaging apps during class unless instructed to do so.
  3. Students may not engage in “spamming” (sending an unnecessary message to a large number of people).
  4. All NDA communications are monitored and archived by Notre Dame Academy.

Internet/Wireless Usage

  1. Students will be given internet access on their school devices by the technology department.
  2. Students may not view or download music or any other materials that are not academically related. Students may not download large files without approval. This includes streaming of music or videos during school hours unless so instructed by a teacher.
  3. Students may not post personal contact information about themselves or others except as directed by a teacher/advisor.
  4. Students may not agree to meet with a person they have met online.
  5. Students may not participate in internet gambling.
  6. Students will not attempt to gain access to websites blocked by school policy through use of proxy services, software, or websites.

 

Unacceptable Behavior

  1. Students may not damage, alter, disrupt, or gain unauthorized access to technology or other systems; e.g. using others’ passwords or accessing others’ data.
  2. Students may not enable unauthorized persons to access or use the school’s computer systems or jeopardize the security of the school’s electronic communications systems.
  3. Students may not introduce a virus, attempt to breach system security, or tamper with the school’s technology system.
  4. Students may not use obscene, defamatory, and/or disruptive language.
  5. Students may not use school technology or credentials to send or post electronic communications that are abusive, bullying, obscene, sexually oriented, threatening, harassing, damaging to another person’s reputation, illegal or contrary to NDA’s philosophy.
  6. Students may not send comments or images that would reasonably offend a person or an organization on the basis of race, creed, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, political beliefs, disability, etc.
  7. Students will not knowingly or recklessly post false or defamatory information about a person or organization, including Notre Dame Academy.
  8. Students may not upload, download, or otherwise transmit copyrighted, trademarked, patented or indecent material; trade secrets; or other confidential, private, or proprietary information.  In the case of copyrighted materials, certain exceptions are given for educational purposes.  If there is any doubt about the legality of the use of copyrighted material, students must consult their teachers.
  9. Students may not access material that is profane or obscene (pornography) or that advocates illegal acts, violence, or discrimination.
  10. Students may not participate in any activity that violates a school rule or a local, state or federal law.

 

Violation Consequences

Any user who is found to be in violation of these rules may be subject but not limited to the following:

  1. Detention
  2. Confiscation of devices for a period of time and/or temporary loss of certain privileges
  3. Confiscation of device for forensic imaging
  4. Suspension and/or termination of network/technology privileges
  5. Suspension and/or expulsion from Notre Dame Academy
  6. Referral to civil law enforcement authorities for criminal prosecution

 


APPENDIX C:  Course Feedback Form, revised August 2016 via Google Forms

 

Please think through each question and select the best answer choice for this class. Select ‘Always’ even if there are exceptions but if the statement applies most of the time.

 

Response Choices:  always, sometimes, never

  1. I know what the daily learning objective is at the beginning of each class.
  2. I know when tests and projects are due that I can plan and prepare in advance to be successful.
  3. The homework matches what we do in class and helps me practice or deepen my understanding of the daily learning objective.
  4. Homework is used during the next class period to deepen understanding.
  5. The course material is presented in an organized manner that I can follow.
  6. There is a climate of student-to-student respect in this class.
  7. There is a climate of teacher-to-student respect in this class.
  8. I am able to contact my teacher to communicate about my progress in this class.
  9. I invest more than the minimum to study and prepare for this class.
  10. I ask questions to clarify the subject matter during class time.
  11. I prepare for tests and projects by planning ahead and using my time wisely.
  12. I have used E period time to get assistance in this class when needed.
  13. I come to class prepared to learn on a daily basis.
  14. I am respectful in my words and actions to my classmates so as to contribute to a strong learning environment.
  15. I am respectful in my words and actions to my teacher so as to contribute to a strong learning environment.
  16. I see how this class is connected to my future.
  17. I uphold the NDA Honor Code in this class.
  18. This class encourages me in my Habits of Mind and reinforces a Growth Mindset
  19. In class, I use my iPad/laptop only when it is appropriate.
  20. This class begins with a prayer in our Catholic tradition.

 

There is a short space provided to give written feedback provided the student states what she will do to improve academically in class.

 

 

 

 

 APPENDIX D: AP Student/Parent/School Agreement

 

Advanced Placement (AP) courses are designed to offer rigorous college-level classes for students who have demonstrated readiness for a college-level curriculum and course load, have a growth mindset and the habits of mind to fulfill the requirements of these courses without accommodations, and set high yet attainable goals. Students who choose to take an AP class or classes are responsible to themselves, their fellow classmates, and the entire school community to take these courses seriously to the very end, to accept the requirements of the courses without modifications, and to maintain a high standard of quality work at all times, including on the AP exam. Notre Dame Academy’s faculty works very hard to ensure the best curriculum for the students in these classes. It is the expectation that every student reciprocate by fulfilling her promise to meet the requirements outlined below. In order to comply with NDA’s AP expectations and non-negotiables, it is critical that every student and parent read the requirements below and agree to support the AP program as outlined in this agreement.

 

Considerations for Acceptance into an AP Course

 

Requirements During an AP Course

 

If I am approved for, and ultimately take, one or more AP courses, I commit to the following:

 

  1. I will be responsible for completing all of the reading, homework, assignments, and study requirements on time and with a high quality of work.
  1. Student initials _______ Parent initials _______
  1. I understand that AP courses require extensive reading and extra work that can extend beyond the regular school week.
  1. Student initials _______ Parent initials _______
  1. My effort in these classes can affect my classmates, so I must come to class prepared every day to keep up with the pace and rigor required by the College Board.
  1. Student initials _______ Parent initials _______
  1. How seriously I take the AP exams can affect my school and the teachers who supported me throughout the year in my AP classes. As a result, I understand that I must take the AP exam seriously, even if I have already been accepted to college.
  1. Student initials _______ Parent initials _______
  1. I understand that if I do not comply with the requirements of this agreement, I will take the second semester final exam, or I may be dropped from the AP class(es) in question.
  1. Student initials _______ Parent initials _______

 

We have discussed this AP Agreement and have made a family decision to support the program through thoughtful consideration of the requested courses in light of our daughter’s church, family, service, school, sports, and extracurricular commitments scheduled in the coming year.

_________________________________  __________________________________________  _____________

Student Name                                                  Student Signature                                          Date

_________________________________  __________________________________________  _____________

Parent Name                                                     Parent Signature                                           Date

                                                                                                                                                                   

 

Please save this form to submit along with your Course Request Form later in the spring, should you decide to request any AP courses.

 


APPENDIX E: Controversial Topics

The Gospel of John reminds us: “When he comes, the Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth. He will not speak on his own, but he will speak what he hears, and will declare to you the things that are coming” (John 16: 13). (Archdiocesan Ch. 4)

 

Controversial issues are topics of a religious, moral, social, or political nature where there are differing opinions among recognized theologians, moralists, and social scientists. Teachers, coaches, and staff members must share with the Administration any topics that may arise either inside or outside the classroom that may be controversial regarding Church teachings and practice. Teachers and staff members must always be conscientious about learning what the Church teaches before they presume to present or discuss the position of the Church on controversial issues. Presentations and discussions on such matters are to be conducted in harmony with the teachings of the Church in a spirit of ecclesial unity. Teachers whose courses include or touch upon controversial topics, must check the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops website (www.usccb.org) for the most up to date authentic teaching of the Church. Two sections of the website are particularly helpful: What We Believe and Issues/Action. The Catechism of the Catholic Church can be found on the website as well. If further clarity is needed, the Religion teachers can be of assistance.

 

 

 

APPENDIX F: Movies in the Classroom

 

The use of movies in the classroom can be of great pedagogical importance provided the teacher adheres to the following protocol:

  1. Know the rating of the movie and understand why it was rated thusly.
  2. Weigh the full length of the movie against the class time needed to accomplish the objectives. Can important clips be shown instead of the full feature and accomplish the same educational objectives?
  3. Preview the movie to identify any unacceptable scenes which may need to be fast-forwarded or skipped (such as sexually explicit scenes). Please do not assign movies with unacceptable scenes to be watched at home unless a letter has been sent home (as described below).
  4. Include the title and length of the movie in the course’s Atlas Curriculum Map.
  5. Write objectives to the viewing that correspond to the aims of the particular unit, and be sure it is communicated clearly to the students.
  6. Prepare a viewing guide or study guide that requires student engagement as the movie is being viewed. This guide is turned in and students’ receive feedback.

 

In the upper grades, as students mature, there may be rare occasions when a more difficult topic lends itself to the showing of an R-rated movie. To show an R-rated movie in the classroom, teachers must follow the same procedures for showing a movie and conducting lessons on controversial topics as stated above. In addition, two weeks before showing the film, the teacher would:

 

  1. Preview the film and review the proposed methodology with the Academic Dean and/or Assistant Head of School for Academics and alert him/her to potential issues and concerns.
  2. Compose a letter to the parents explaining the reasons for the R-rating and why student viewing of the film helps meet particular learning objectives. The letter should also offer the parents the opportunity to preview material and to decide if their daughter should view the film. Parents have the option of requesting their daughter achieve the same educational goal by participating in a different learning activity.
  3. Receive approval by the Academic Dean and/or Assistant Head of School for Academics before the letter is sent home to the parents and provide a copy of the approved letter to the Academic Dean and Assistant Head of School for Academics for future reference.
  4. Obtain parent signatures. Keep accurate records and the permission slips.
  5. Prepare the alternative assignment for those students who do not have permission and make arrangements ahead of time for those students so they are able to do their work in the Student Learning Commons.

 

There may be certain classes in which film is used heavily. In this case, the teacher may either proceed on a case by case basis as stated above or include all the pertinent films in question along with a brief pedagogical explanation in the Course Policy sheet which is then signed by the parents.  

 

Unrated movies (particularly foreign films)

 

Teachers need to preview movies that are not rated and review their use with the Academic Dean and/or Assistant Head of School for Academics. In general, these films should be used only when objectionable material can be deleted or fast-forwarded. All of the protocols above must be followed.

 

 

APPENDIX G: Guest Speakers

 

"The Catholic community and Catholic institutions should not honor those who act in defiance of our fundamental moral principles. They should not be given awards, honors, or platforms which would suggest support for their actions." (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Catholics in Political Life).

 

Discussion of Catholic teachings and practice that promote a deeper understanding of the faith is important. Speakers or topics, however, should not contradict the mission and principles of the Catholic Church, especially in the area of objective Catholic moral teaching (see the US Catholic Conference of Bishops website for more information at www.usccb.org). The person in charge will ensure that only speakers (whether private individuals, elected civic officials, or appointed civic officials) who do not contradict these standards are invited to address any audience at a school, parish, or archdiocesan event. Consultation with the Office of the Archbishop​ should take place if there is any concern about the suitability of a speaker or topic. Final responsibility and judgment on these matters is reserved to the archbishop.

 

Teachers may invite guest speakers who are qualified to speak on certain areas of interest. As a policy, the individual teacher should discuss and submit this request to the Dean and/or Assistant Head of School for Academics at least one week in advance for approval. Guest speakers are bound by the same policies as faculty members in speaking on controversial issues. These policies must be made known to the speaker in advance of the engagement by the teacher who has issued the invitation. An outline of the talk is usually requested prior to the approval being granted by the Administration. Stipends for these speakers, when required, come from the department budget with the approval of the Academic Dean. A parking space for the speaker may be reserved as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX H: Sample Course Policy Sheet

 

United States Government

Course Policies

                                                                                                                         

 

Teacher Name                                                                                                      School Year

 

Office Hours: M-Th, 7:25-7:55, 2:30-3:00, by appointment

Email:  teacher@ndala.com

Google Classroom Code:                                                                                                                                           

Course Description

Objectives

Scope and Sequence or Syllabus

 

Course Materials

Grading Policies

 

Classroom Procedures And Policies

 

Homework

Make-Up Work  (Schoolwide Policy)

ELO’s (Schoolwide Policy)

Behavior

Technology

Help

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Once you’ve read the US Government Course Policy Sheet, please sign and return the bottom portion of this sheet to the teacher.

 

____________________________________________________________________

Student Signature                                                                                                                            Date

____________________________________________________________________

Parent Signature                                                                                                                        Date                                    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX I: Academic and College Counseling Department

and Counseling Center

 

In our counseling department structure, students will work with counselors based upon the following alphabetical breakdown by student last name (2019-2020 academic year).

9th - 12th Grades

A - F

Ms. Kathy Morgan

G - M

Mr. Gary Ho

N - Z

Ms. Brittany Melvin

Counseling Appointments

To assist each student during her four years at NDA, both individual and group academic counseling services are offered.  Counselors will schedule appointments with students via Google Calendar.  It is the responsibility of the student to confirm and/or reschedule appointments with her counselor.  In addition, students must inform a teacher at least two days in advance that she has an appointment. Students should not seek academic or personal counseling sessions during a class period in which they have a quiz or test except in case of emergency.

Academic Counseling

Counselors carefully monitor the academic progress of each student and assist in course selection for the next year.  The Academic counseling program also includes standardized testing; freshmen take the PSAT 8/9, sophomores take the Pre-ACT and juniors take the PSAT/NMSQT.

   

The Guidance Department offers presentations and workshops on topics including, but not limited to the following:

College Counseling

The academic and college counselors work closely with students throughout their academic career at NDA to assist them in making college/university choices.  Each student is taught the skills to handle the college admissions process efficiently and effectively.  Please refer to the Curriculum Catalog for specific information regarding college and university requirements.  The NDA counseling center provides students with resources, tools, and materials needed for selecting the best fit colleges.

Personal Counseling

The school provides personal counseling through Outreach Concern, a private counseling service.  If you feel a student may be in need of personal counseling, please consult with her counselor who may then refer the student to Outreach Concern. Students may meet once with an Outreach Concern counselor; successive visits require parents to complete a permission form.

Contract for College Planning

Guiding students and their families through the college acceptance process is a top priority at Notre Dame Academy. Throughout the years, the Guidance Department has been expanded and systematized to offer valuable information and up to date programs, ongoing communication, more opportunities to work with the counselors and direct education for parents and students. Notre Dame Academy has a variety of established points of contact with the counseling team throughout this process. That being said, each student and family can customize their experience and expand the services they receive throughout the process based on the opportunities they each choose to participate in beyond the established ones. To ensure that every student and her parents are aware of all of these options from the beginning, this document outlines many of the opportunities for contact with the guidance team in order to help families plan their own experience. It is Notre Dame Academy’s mission to make this process as clear and personal as possible. Please take time to review the counseling options available to your family and use this chart to plan your calendars and strategy.

 

The Guidance team is involved in every aspect of the list above as well as many more pieces behind the scenes. This team will be available at all events plus online, by phone and in their offices for meetings. When they are not involved in the attached list, they are calling college reps, setting up visits, traveling to colleges and writing personalized recommendation letters for each student. It is imperative that each student and her family take advantage of the many points of contact and opportunities outlined on the attached chart to make the most of this experience. It is also important that the student reach out to get to know her counselor and to help her counselor get to know her. In the end, each student is responsible for the final application. How much she and her family use the resources available will make a difference in this process.

 

The college application process is a team effort between the guidance team, parents and the student. We look forward to working with you on this journey to college.

 

Kathy Morgan

Director of Academic and College Counseling


Academic and College Counseling Department

College Application Process Notification

Agreement

Class of 2020

 

I have read and understand the many programs and opportunities available through the guidance department to work on my college application and decisions. I also understand that this process involves collaboration between the guidance counselor, the parents and the student. As a result, I understand that my participation in the opportunities available to me is an important piece of the process.

 

Student Name (Please Print)

 

________________________________________________________

 

Student Signature ___________________________________ Date _______________

 

Parent Signature ____________________________________ Date _______________

 

Guidance Signature __________________________________ Date ______________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


APPENDIX J: Christian Service Hours

 

20 hours Freshman Year (5 hours for Freshman Service Project + 15 hours on their own)

 

25 hours Sophomore Year (5 hours for Sophomore Retreat + 20 hours on their own)

 

25 hours Junior Year (10 hours for Junior Service Day at the LA Food Bank + 15 hours on their own)

 

30 hours Senior Year (30 hours for Agape in Action)

 

 

 

 

 

 


APPENDIX K: Student Detentions

Instructions for Giving a Detention

The detention form is accessible via the Faculty/Staff portal on the school website as well. On the detention form, please provide additional information in the free response section about the situation that may be useful for the parent to know. The parent/student now receive an email, so it is easy to customize what is sent home to each student/family.

 

Uniform violations are still paper copies. If you need a uniform violation book, you may get one from the Dean of Students office. Please submit the uniform violations to the Dean of Students mailbox.

 

Grounds for One Detention Include

In general, a student may receive a detention for failure to follow any school rule or policy. Grounds for detention include but are not limited to:

 

Grounds for One to Five Detentions Include

 

Grounds for Suspension Include

●      Truancy

●      Serious misbehavior

●      Forging a signature

●      Inappropriate language

●      Visible tattoos

●      Piercings other than in the ears

●      Receiving five detentions for a single offense


APPENDIX L: Student Uniform

Daily Uniform

From Dennis:                            White, black or burgundy polo with school logo

                                                        Khaki:  skirt (no more than 4” above knee), walking shorts, or pants

From Campus Uniform:           Burgundy or cream V-neck sweater with NDA Logo

                                                    Burgundy zip-up sweatshirt

                                                    Burgundy jacket

 

Ankle socks, knee socks, or non-textured nylons/tights are required. Colors: solid white, beige, brown, burgundy, black or gray.  Sweatpants are never acceptable as “tights.”

 

Shoes: solid or combo of white, beige, brown, burgundy, black or gray. Never: high-tops, athletic shoes, boots, sandals, open-toed, backless, moccasins, slippers, Crocs or UGGS or heel more than 1.5” high.

 

No NDA apparel with a Gryphon on it, including black PE sweatshirts (Monday - Thursday)

Neck scarves are OK

Hoods for outside only

 

Dress Uniform

●      Burgundy and white checkered skirt

●      Uniform blouse (not polo)

●      School blazer or senior sweater

●      White anklet or knee socks or unpatterned white tights

●      Classic, black leather penny loafers with slot for penny – no bows, tassels, buckles

 

Regal Gryphon Spirit Days – Every Friday

Students may wear an NDA sports or club T-shirt or sweatshirt along with uniform skirt or pants.

 

Athletic Game Days

On game days, athletes may change into their team uniforms/warm-ups at lunch.

 

Non-uniform Days/Buck-A-Stuff Days

Attire must be modest and appropriate for school. Shoes must have a full back or heel strap.

No:  shorts or skirts more than 4” above the knee, halter dresses, tube tops, exposed-midriffs, low-cut tops, skirts with slits more than 4” above the knee, pajama tops or bottoms, items printed with offensive or suggestive images or slogans, hats, head scarves, bandanas.

 

Hair and Accessories

 


Senior Privileges

Each year the senior class is granted certain privileges.  These often include:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


APPENDIX  M: Parking

 

The Faculty Lot, in front of Rosa Mystica Hall, is on a first come, first served basis. Please note that most spots are filled by 7:30 a.m.

 

The Student Lot sometimes has available space and faculty may sign up for a parking spot (usually tandem). Please contact the Dean of Students for this option.

 

Street parking is available and a map of parking options is below (areas highlighted in green); however, always read posted signs before parking.   There are several places where parking is limited to only a couple of hours, restricted to permit parking, or days on which street cleaning is done. If you encounter a neighbor regarding parking, remain polite, disengage, and direct him/her to contact the school office. Also, if you choose to park on the east side of Overland Ave (across the street from the school), use the marked crosswalks to cross the street, do not jaywalk.

 

 

 


APPENDIX N:  Reimbursement Procedure

 

All intended purchases – i.e. instructional supplies, buses, field trip admission costs, textbooks, office supply special orders, professional development – must be pre-approved by an Academic Dean (STEM, Humanities, and VPA), a Director (Athletics, Campus Ministry, Student Life),  Assistant Head of School (Academics, Student Life, Educational Operation, Mission and Ministry) according to department or area, prior to the purchase.  An excel spreadsheet/form (file can be provided by the Business Manager), must be typed and signed by the appropriate budget authority prior to its submittal to the Business Manager.  Receipts must be submitted within 30 days of the purchase of the item in order to be reimbursed.

 

 


APPENDIX O: Habits of Mind Chart


APPENDIX P: Growth Mindset


APPENDIX Q:  Student Engagement Strategies

ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY

DESCRIPTION (How to...)

EXAMPLE and WHEN to USE

Objective on the board

Write the day's objective on the board so that students know what the focus is for the lesson.  Then use the objective at the end of the lesson to check understanding of the goal.

Share the objective in the opening of the class by writing it on the board. Check it at the end of the lesson with an exit ticket, target response, quick write or other formative assessment strategy.

VIP        

Highlight or flag # ___ very important points. Ask students to share them and discuss which are the most important points among their group to streamline the VIP's.

Read a section in the social studies book for homework. The next day share out the VIP's or get into groups to discuss the VIP'S and to agree on 3 VIP's for the group. Then share out. Another purpose is to read a chapter in a book, flag the three or four important points and write a summary of what you read.

Daily Warm Ups

Wrong answer, multiple choice, T/F, open ended question, thought provoking prompt, essential question, or other engagement strategy to review (talking chips, VIP group work etc.)  

Write a math problem on the board. Have students analyze it to see if it is correct or incorrect. If it is incorrect, ask them to determine how to fix it and where the error exists. Then have a quick share out before going into the new lesson to determine if there is a need

to review this concept.

Hands Up/Partner Up/Link Elbows

Stand up and put one hand up. Look for a partner and high five. Then you can put your hand down so we know you have a partner. Once everyone is matched up, pose a question, a problem or a to do with that partner. Then share out.

Use to create pairs, study buddies, conversation partners and go from there.

Jigsaw

Divide work into teams, each team is responsible for reading, discussing, or finding the VIP to become an expert on the section assigned to that group. They then share their findings or work with the whole class or the group that they go back to.

Use Jigsaw at any point in the lesson to structure meaningful conversation across a wide range of material. Use it when you are:

  • Building background knowledge on a unit of study
  • Conducting an author study before beginning a new novel
  • Learning about different viewpoints on a historical event or discovery
  • Focusing on complementary – or divergent – concepts in a unit of study
  • Reviewing different aspects of a unit of study to prepare for an assessment

Tea Party

Each person in the team gets quote/problem. They read aloud to the partner, share their response, then the second person does the same with their quote. They switch quotes/problems at the end and find a new partner.

Use Tea Party/Classroom Mingle at any point in the lesson to structure meaningful conversation:

  • Before introducing new material to tap into prior knowledge
  • In the beginning of the school year to allow students to meet each other
  • After watching a film clip to gauge a reaction
  • After reading a short text to begin a discussion
  • In an ESL or foreign language classroom to practice questions and answers
  • After a unit of instruction to serve as a review.

Book in a day

Basically jigsaw the chapters in a book and then add an extender activity: chart VIPs and share out; timeline, storyboard.

To read a book that you do not normally have time to read.

Gallery Walk

Each group prepares a chart of main ideas, information, questions, etc. for a prompt/problem/question. Then they walk around the room reading and interacting with all the other charts.

Use a Gallery Walk at any point in the lesson to engage students in conversation:

  • After reading a story to discuss ideas, themes, and characters
  • After completing a lab to discuss findings and implications
  • To examine historical documents or images
  • Before introducing a new topic to determine students’ prior knowledge
  • After students have created a poster or any other type of display project, or even before they submit it for a grade, use  I Like, I Wonder, Next Steps (see below)
  • To solve a math problem
  • To generate ideas or pre-writes                                                              

Card Sort

Teacher prepares 'cards' with important information, vocabulary, quotes, problems, etc. Students are divided into teams of 2 or 4 and given a set of cards which they need to sort and

explain to each other.

Use Card sort at any point in the lesson to structure meaningful conversation:

  • Before beginning a new assignment to test prior knowledge
  • After introducing new vocabulary
  • After learning about categories and classification
  • When a unit is completed to review concepts and terms

Tech Responses: Padlet, Today's Meet, Socrative, Kahoot, Plickers, etc.

Teacher sets up account and invite students to the digital 'classroom' where they respond digitally to a prompt or

question or quiz.

These can be used as: pre-assessment or baseline understandings; quick checks; conversation starters and extenders; exit tickets to show understanding. Padlet can be used for timelines, portfolios, inspiration boards, conversation starters etc.

Baseline Assessments

Teacher organizes a pre-unit assessment on the main concepts, ideas, and vocabulary for the upcoming unit to establish where the gaps and strengths are. Then, uses the data to tailor the

teaching of the unit.

Give a quiz on basic math facts or math skills. Assess their understanding of how to use the bible with a scavenger hunt activity of the parts of the bible. Have them write a paragraph or summary to assess the skills for writing.

Exit Ticket

A single problem, question, prompt that allows the students to demonstrate their learning and understanding at the end of the lesson. It allows the teacher to re-teach if necessary information/concepts that were unclear the next day (or later on in the lesson).

Use Exit Tickets at the end of class to:

  • Check students' understanding by having them summarize key points from the lesson
  • Verify that students can solve a problem or answer a significant question based on the lesson
  • Emphasize the essential question for the day's lesson
  • Have students ask questions they still have about the lesson
  • See if students can apply the content in a new way
  • Formulate guided groups for students who did not demonstrate understanding after the lesson
  • Create extensions for students who demonstrate mastery after the lesson

Think Pair Share

Students reflect on a question independently sometimes thinking, writing on a post it and then are paired up with a partner. They then share aloud their thoughts and thinking with each other.

They work out any differences in their solutions and share

out their answers.

Use Think-Pair-Share at any point in the lesson to structure meaningful conversation:

  • Before introducing new material to tap into prior knowledge
  • After watching a film clip to gauge a reaction
  • After reading a short text to begin a discussion
  • Before students begin an assignment, such as an essay or a set of word problems, to gather ideas or formalize procedures

Target or 1-2-3-4

Students are asked to assess their understanding of a concept or skills by holding up a 1,2,3 or 4 to share their level of understanding.                (Bullseye of target: I know it and can teach someone else. Middle ring: I know it but I need some practice . Outer ring: I get it but I could use more practice and explanation.

Farthest one out: I don't get it at all. )

Use to check understanding:

Allows students to assess their own learning and gives the teacher a quick sense of what is happening in the classroom.

Stand when you have the answer

Pose a question to the students. Students are asked to take a minute to think about the questions or to work it out. Then they stand when they have the answer.  (No hand raising while you are standing.) If someone does not know the answer, they are asked to talk to somebody so that they can stand up. Teacher waits until all are standing. Once you are standing the teacher gets to call on anyone to answer or explain so it is important to get the information before standing.

 

Quick Write/Round Table

Pose a quick question (review from yesterday or today's lesson) and ask students to write a few sentences summarizing their understanding of information. Variation: combined with Round Table - Students complete the quick write in a group by having one person write one sentence and then each person adding on to the information by passing the paper around the group.

Use to review information and check for understanding for class lecture, something that was read for homework or to review. Write a summary of what happened in the novel last night. Write a quick write to show what you know about the Boston tea party based

on our discussion today.

Total Group Response (TGR) includes: Student Response Cards, stand up when you have the answer, etc.

Pose a question. Each student has a set of cards (either T/F, A/B/C/D, yes/no, more/less, agree/disagree) and must raise their card in response to a question.

Use Student Response Cards at any time during a lesson to check for understanding:

  • Periodically throughout the input section of the lesson to keep students engaged
  • During Independent Practice to gauge understanding
  • When playing a review game where students answer questions
  • At the beginning of a lesson to activate prior knowledge
  • At the end of a lesson to check for overall understanding of important concepts
  • Periodically throughout the input section of the lesson to keep students engaged
  • During Independent Practice to gauge understanding
  • When playing a review game where students answer questions
  • At the beginning of a lesson to activate prior knowledge
  • At the end of a lesson to check for overall understanding of important concepts.

Talking Chips

Everyone receives a controlled number of chips, beans, paperclips, markers which are now the 'talking chips'. The teacher poses a question. Each student has to put in a chip to talk during the discussion. Once they are out of chips, the discussion is over.  A student can pass but in the end all chips must be in the center of the table. So, the person who passed has to participate before the game is done. If that person is shy or not prepared, the group can ask the person questions to help the student gain understanding and participate in some way.

Ask students to use talking chips to discuss the reading the night before. They can use the chips to summarize the topic of discussion or of the lecture midway through a lesson. They can also use chips to have a debate on a lesson in Government class.

White Board Wipe Out

Pose a question and the students work out the answer on the whiteboard and then hold them up. Can be done digitally.

Use White Board Wipe Out at any point in the lesson to check for understanding:

  • Multiple times during the Input portion of a lesson to ensure students are following along
  • As a closing activity so that students can review what was learned in the lesson
  • As a review game for an upcoming test or assessment
  • At the beginning of a lesson to activate prior knowledge or to review material
  • from a previous lesson

Stop and Jot

Students have a page for notes or a graphic organizer. At a certain point students are asked to respond to new information/lecture/video/reading with a vip or summary of

what they just heard.

Use Stop and Jot at any point in the lesson to provide processing time and note-taking assistance for students:

  • Before introducing new material to activate prior knowledge
  • Before a new lesson to help assess what students already know
  • Before a lesson to assist with planning instruction
  • During the middle of a lesson to provide opportunity for students to
  • make sense of the material
  • During a lesson as a check for understanding
  • During a lesson to provide time for students to create a written summary
  • statement of auditory material
  • After the lesson to provide closure, check understanding, and clarify any misunderstandings
  • After a lesson to clarify key ideas or critical pieces of information
  • After the lesson to allow students to make connections to previously learned material
  • After a lesson to allow students to find personal relevance

Whip Around

Pose a prompt that has multiple answers. Each student thinks/jots down responses. Then each student in the class has a chance to say one sentence/response to the prompt as you 'whip around' the room. Variations include: no repeats or build on something someone already said.

Use Whip Around to encourage responses from all students in the class:

  • During Guided Practice to get students talking about the material just covered
  • As a warm up activity to discuss highlights from yesterday’s lesson
  • As a closing activity to summarize information covered in the lesson
  • To have students provide evidence from a text
  • As a brainstorming activity
  • To help students uncover common themes
  • As an icebreaker to help establish a positive classroom environment

"3-2-1"

Each student writes: 3 things they learned, 2 things they found interesting and would like to learn more about,

1 question they still have.

Use "3-2-1" at any time during a lesson to encourage students to think about their learning:

  • As a Check for Understanding during any portion of the lesson
  • During class discussions as a way for students to record their thoughts
  • As a closing activity so that students can review what was learned in the lesson
  • As an exit ticket at the end of the class period

Cafe Conversations

Questions or topics are placed on chart paper on different tables around the room. Students are divided into groups. One per chart paper. The students can write on the chart with words, pictures or symbols to respond to the prompt. Students are then asked to switch to another chart. One student stays behind to share the responses with the next group and that group adds to the chart or responds to what was written.

Great for discussions, review, brainstorming etc.

Graphic Organizers

There are several different types of graphic organizers (Think Maps) and digital ones as well (Inspiration Maps). They help students organize information into categories, organize information, review and clarify thinking. Use them to warm up, focus a lesson, assess understanding, organize a project, take notes.

Use Graphic Organizers at any point in the lesson to structure information into understandable chunks:

  • When taking notes about new information in a lesson to organize ideas
  • After reading a book to organize the plot
  • When comparing and contrasting two concepts
  • As a way to help students classify new information into meaningful categories
  • To help students find similarities and differences by creating analogies
  • As a brainstorming tool to generate ideas before students begin an assignment, such as a writing task, a set of word problems, or a lab, to gather ideas or formalize procedures

Pick a Side

The teacher poses a question that has two sides (T/F, this or that, opinion, correct/incorrect, agree/disagree) and asks students to choose a side by walking to one side of the room.

EX: Do you agree or disagree that freedom of speech should include...If you think

this is the correct answer

Popsicle Sticks

Write the name of each student on a popsicle stick. Use them to form groups; call on students randomly (instead of the same ones who raise their hands all the time).

Use Popsicle Sticks when you would like to make sure that all voices are heard, not just your quick and/or external processors!

Find a partner

One person has the question, while the other person has the answer. So the students have to match themselves up.

Use for any type of review.

Stand in support

If you agree with the statement or have the same answer stand in support.

Use for checking for understanding and to get students talking and moving.

Quote Talk

Teacher prepares quotes from the book (etc) and then the student must talk from the quote for a discussion. The teacher can use the Tea Party Cooperative Learning Structure.

 

Gradual Release

I do... we do.... you do... The teacher demonstrates or models how to perform the task. Then, the students and the teacher do a second one together. Finally, the students do one alone and the teacher checks for accuracy.

This allows for modeling and helping the students gain confidence to work independently.

Think Time

Teacher poses a question and then allows time for each student to think independently or try the task or confer with another student before soliciting a response.

 

The Important Thing is...

Use the template from the book "The Important Thing is" to have students review content or material.

 


APPENDIX R:  Professional Attire

At Notre Dame Academy, there are four different categories of professional dress, all of which are marked on the calendar for students and teachers alike – Daily, Spirit Wear Fridays, Dress Uniform/Liturgy days, and Buck-a-Stuff Days (a fundraiser collected for the missions in which one donates a dollar and may wear modified non-uniform dress).

Please remember that any clothes that are too tight, too short, or too revealing are not appropriate for the workplace. Jewelry should remain simple and tasteful, and hair color should be of a natural hue. Guidelines for teacher attire are as follows:

Daily  (Business Casual Attire)

 

Men  

                

Women

 

Spirit Wear Fridays (Supporting NDA)

 

Guidelines for Daily Business Casual still apply EXCEPT that you may wear an NDA polo in lieu of a business casual shirt/top.

 

Dress Uniform/Liturgy Days (Business Professional Attire)

 

Men

 

Women

 


Buck-A-Stuff Days (Relaxed Business Casual Attire)

 

In addition to Daily Business Casual Attire, teachers may choose to wear:

 

 

Exceptions to Teacher Dress Guidelines

 

  1. Teachers may wear Halloween costumes if they, too, conform to the student guidelines.
  2. Teachers may change into more casual dress after Mass on Notre Dame Day and Mary’s Day.
  3. Teachers of specialty programs (e.g. PE, dance) have different guidelines for everyday wear.