AP Physics 1 Curriculum

Curriculum #

The AP Physics 1 Course has been designed by the College Board as a course equivalent to the algebra-based college-level physics class. At the end of the course, students will take the AP Physics 1 Exam, which will test their knowledge of both the concepts taught in the classroom and their use of the correct formulas.

The content for the course is based on six big ideas:

Big Idea 1 – Objects and systems have properties such as mass and charge. Systems may have internal structure.

Big Idea 2 – Fields existing in space can be used to explain interactions.

Big Idea 3 – The interactions of an object with other objects can be described by forces.

Big Idea 4 – Interactions between systems can result in changes in those systems.

Big Idea 5 – Changes that occur as a result of interactions are constrained by conservation laws.

Big Idea 6 – Waves can transfer energy and momentum from one location to another without the permanent transfer of mass and serve as a mathematical model for the description of other phenomena.

The course focuses on the interconnections between the various strands and units contained in the course Curriculum and how each contributes to the “Big Ideas” that provide a core foundation for this science course. Problem solving techniques and strategies are fine tuned throughout the year, and students are continually tasked with connecting physics applications learned in different units in order to synthesize solutions to complex problems.

Students have the opportunity to meet the learning objectives in a variety of ways and to apply their knowledge to real world experiences and societal issues. Instructional time involves a variety of student-centered activities. Students have the opportunity to work cooperatively to solve challenging problems and to present their solutions to the class. Throughout the year connections to the world are explored in discussions, group projects, and class demonstrations. Laboratory work, described below, offers frequent opportunities to work cooperatively, explore ideas, and present information. Outside of class, students read the assigned text and complete homework assignments that support and reinforce each lesson as well as what has been learned in the laboratory setting. Unit exams take place at the end of each block of instruction. Students also attend tutorial sessions where they can receive individual assistance from the instructor and work with their peers.

Evaluation: 

Students will get grades on quizzes, laboratory work, projects, and exams. Exams are typically worth 100 points and will consist of questions similar to ones students will see on the AP Exam.  Assignments and quizzes will consist of problems from the textbook, supplements, and old AP Exams. Projects are long-term, and typically will involve groups of students developing a plan, collecting data and/or research, and presenting conclusions in a meaningful way.  Laboratory work is student centered and inquiry based.

Differentiation/Adaptation Modifications:

The curriculum has a strong foundation of differentiated instruction. Differentiate instruction of modifications for all students, special education, ELL, and gifted and talented students include but not limited to learning environment, scheduling of learning tasks, materials and procedures. These modifications are often made by the classroom teacher as appropriated to each child’s developmental and academic needs and/or directed by a child’s IEP or 504 plans. Gifted and talented students as well as all students are given choice of learning activities, assessments and projects as appropriate to the unit of study or lesson to meet their intellectual and academic differences.

21st Century Themes:

Global Awareness, Civic Literacy, Scientific and Numerical Literacy, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Communication and Collaboration, Information Literacy, Technology Literacy, Life and Career Skills, Initiative and Self Direction, Leadership and Responsibility.


Curricular Requirements

Page(s)

CR1

Students and teachers have access to college-level resources including college-level textbooks and reference materials in print or electronic format.

1

CR2a

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of kinematics in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2b

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of dynamics in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2c

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of gravitation and circular motion in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2d

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of simple harmonic motion in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2e

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of linear momentum in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2f

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principle of energy in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2g

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of rotational motion in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2h

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of electrostatics in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2i

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of electric circuits in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR2j

The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of mechanical waves in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

3

CR3

Students have opportunities to apply AP Physics 1 learning objectives connecting across enduring understandings as described in the curriculum framework. These opportunities must occur in addition to those within laboratory investigations.

10

CR4

The course provides students with opportunities to apply their knowledge of physics principles to real world questions or scenarios (including societal issues or technological innovations) to help them become scientifically literate citizens.

11

CR5

Students are provided with the opportunity to spend a minimum of 25 percent of instructional time engaging in hands-on laboratory work with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations.

4

CR6a

The laboratory work used throughout the course includes investigations that support the foundational AP Physics 1 principles.

4-10

CR6b

The laboratory work used throughout the course includes guided-inquiry laboratory investigations allowing students to apply all seven science practices.

4-10

CR7

The course provides opportunities for students to develop their communication skills by recording evidence of their research of literature or scientific investigations through verbal, written, and graphic presentations.

4

CR8

The course provides opportunities for students to develop written and oral scientific argumentation skills.

4, 10, 11


Textbook: 

Giancoli, Douglas C.  Physics: Principles with Applications. 6th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2005.  [CR1]

Instructional Material:

NJ Center for Teaching and Learning (NJCTL) - AP Physics Instructional Notes

Integration of Technology/Standards:

8.1.12.A.3  Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

8.1.12.A.5  Create a report from a relational database consisting of at least two tables and describe the process, and explain the report results.

8.1.12.C.1  Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

8.1.12.E.2  Research and evaluate the impact on society of the unethical use of digital tools and present your research to peers.

8.1.12.F.1  Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Topics Covered:

1. Kinematics (Big Idea 3) [CR2a]

a. Vectors/Scalars

b. One Dimensional Motion (including graphing position, velocity, and

acceleration)

c. Two Dimensional Motion

2. Dynamics (Big Ideas 1, 2, 3, and 4) [CR2b]

a. Newton’s Laws of Motion and Forces

b. Friction

c. Interacting objects: Ropes and Pulleys

3. Universal Law of Gravitation (Big Ideas 1, 2, 3, and 4) [CR2c]

a. Circular Motion

4. Simple Harmonic Motion (Big Ideas 3 and 5) [CR2d]

a. Simple Pendulums

b. Mass-Spring Oscillators

5. Momentum (Big Ideas 3, 4, and 5) [CR2e]

a. Impulse and Momentum

b. The Law of Conservation of Momentum

6. Energy (Big Ideas 3, 4, and 5) [CR2f]

a. Work

b. Energy

c. Conservation of Energy

d. Power

7. Rotation (Big Ideas 3, 4, and 5) [CR2g]

a. Rotational Kinematics

b. Rotational Energy

c. Torque and Rotational Dynamics

d. Angular Momentum

e. Conservation of Angular Momentum

8. Electrostatics (Big Ideas 1, 3, and 5) [CR2h]

a. Electric Charge

b. The Law of Conservation of Electric Charge

c. Electrostatic Forces

9. Circuits (Big Ideas 1 and 5) [CR2i]

a. Ohm’s Law

b. Kirchhoff’s Laws

c. Simple DC Circuits

10. Mechanical Waves and Sound (Big Idea 6) [CR2j]


Laboratory Activities:

Students spend 25% of the instructional time engaged in laboratory work. [CR5] Experiments designed by the instructor are used to demonstrate procedural guidelines and to learn how to use specific laboratory equipment. The majority of labs are inquiry-based where students are given an objective and a set of materials. They are tasked with designing a procedure and collecting data to determine specific quantities, determine the relationship between variables, and/or to derive fundamental physics equations. Laboratory design, experimentation, data gathering, data presentation, analysis, drawing conclusions, and experimental error analysis are elements in these lab activities.

Laboratory work is recorded in a laboratory notebook, and students will have opportunities to present their laboratory work to their peers. All aspects of the laboratory work including any pre-lab work, question/hypothesis, experimental procedure, data, analysis, graphs, conclusion, and error analysis will be recorded. [CR7] Additional information as indicated in the following pages will also be included in the lab notebook. At the end of completing the lab work for the investigations that are labeled “Guided- Inquiry,” the students will present their method, data and conclusions on whiteboards. The class will then engage in peer critique of each group’s results, and discuss strategies.

Lab reports will consist of the following components: [CR7]


Every major unit will have an inquiry-based lab, and inquiry-based labs will make up no less than half of the laboratory work. Collectively, laboratory work will engage students in all seven science practices.  Laboratory activities and simulations in this class are included the following table.

Name

Open-Inquiry or Guided-Inquiry? [CR6b]

Short Description

Science Practices

Constant Velocity Lab

Y

Students will design an

experiment to determine the

velocity of two uniform motion cars.  They will graph the motion of each car and develop an equation to model the motion of each car.

2.1, 2.2, 4.1,

4.2, 4.3, 6.1

Uniformly Accelerated Motion

Y

Determine the acceleration of a cart on an incline using the following graphs:

-Position vs Time

-Velocity vs Time

1.4, 2.2, 4.3, 6.1

Rocket Lab

Y

Students will design an

experiment to determine the

initial velocity of an air-powered

rocket.

1.2, 1.4, 2.1,

2.2, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Marble in Cup

Lab

N

Students will determine where a

paper cup needs to be placed on

the floor so that a marble rolled

off of the edge of a table will

land in it.

1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

2.3, 4.3

Projectile Motion Challenges

Y

Using a projectile launcher,

students will be given a series of

challenges such as placing a ring

stand at the maximum height, or

placing a cup at the point where

the marble will land.

1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Newton’s 2nd

Law Lab

Y

What is the relationship between

the mass of a system and the

acceleration of the system?

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Forces on a Crate

Simulation

N

Using a simulation, analyze

the motion of a crate. Students

can vary the force on the crate,

the direction of that force, the

initial velocity of the crate,

and the coefficient of kinetic

friction.

1.1, 1.4, 2.2,

4.3, 6.1

Jupiter’s Moons

N

Students will do research on

Jupiter and four of its moons.

Based on this research, students

will mathematically come up

with the mass of Jupiter. They

will compare this information to

the accepted value.

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4, 7.1

Pendulum Lab

Y

What factor(s) control the

period of a simple pendulum?

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Mass-Spring

Oscillator Lab

Y

Students must determine both

the spring constant

k

of a spring

and the mass of three unknown

masses. Students must also

investigate the conservation

of mechanical energy of the

system. Materials given: spring

with unknown spring constant,

known masses, unknown

masses.

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

A Two Car Collision

Simulation

N

Students will observe a

simulation of two identical cars

crashing. The elasticity of the

collision can be varied.

1.1, 1.4, 2.2,

4.3, 6.1

Introductory

Circular Motion

Lab

Y

When velocity is kept constant,

what is the relationship between

the radius of circular motion and

the period of circular motion?

The speed? The acceleration?

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Centripetal

Force Lab

Y

Using a spinning rubber stopper

to lift masses, students will

determine the relationship

between the acceleration of

the stopper and the centripetal

force.

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Conservation

of Angular

Momentum Lab

Y

What is the relationship

between the moment of inertia

of a system and the angular

momentum of a system?

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Torque Simulation

N

Students will use a computer

simulation to study rotational

equilibrium.

1.1, 1.4, 2.2,

4.3, 6.1

Coulomb’s

Law Lab

Y

What is the charge stored on a

pair of charged balloons that are

repelling each other?

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Electrostatics

Simulation

N

Using a computer simulation

involving two positive charges,

explore the electrostatic force

of repulsion between the

charges, the accelerations of

the charges, and how the force

and acceleration changes with

distance.

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Series and

Parallel Lab

Y

Using a number of resistors,

explore current and voltage in

resistors hooked up to a power

supply when resistors are wired

in series with one another and

when they are wired in parallel

with one another.

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Standing

Waves on a Wire

Lab

Y

Students will vary wavelength,

frequency, and the tension in a

wire while looking at standing

waves formed on a wire.

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.2,

4.3, 4.4, 5.1,

6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Standing

Sound Waves in a

Tube Lab

N

Students will vary the frequency

of sound coming out of a speaker

to create standing waves in a

tube to determine the speed of

sound in the classroom.

1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2,

3.3, 4.1, 4.4,

5.1, 6.1, 6.2, 6.4

Outside the Classroom Lab Experience: [CR3]

In addition to labs, students will be required to do one exercise outside of the laboratory experience. Students may pick one of the following at the end of our rotation unit (end of mechanics):

Real World Physics Solutions:

In order for students to become scientifically literate citizens, students are required to use their knowledge of physics while looking at a real world problem. [CR4] Students may pick one of the following solutions:

BOE approved 9/10/14