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Course Number: SOC 253
Course Title: Introduction to Political Science
Term: Fall 2017

Time: Mondays/Wednesdays 2:40 PM-3:55 PM

Fr. Peter Samuel Kucer MSA STD

pkucer@holyapostles.edu

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

The course surveys ideas in the study of government and politics, examines the perennial questions in political life (Who should rule? and Is it good to have power? and Do truth and right change in the course of history?), and explores the various fields of political science.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: The Study of Politics

        Monday, August 28th 

  1. Syllabi Review
  2. Assignment of Presentations
  3. Choose a Term Paper Topic (see number 11 on this syllabus) The final date that your research paper is due on November 20th, right after class begins. The highest grade a paper may receive after this date is 80%. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.
  4. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter One

        Wednesday, August 30th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter One

Week 2: Ideologies/isms, and Utopias

        Monday, September 4th 

  1. Labor Day – No Class

        Wednesday, September 6th 

                1. Quiz 1

  1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Two and Chapter Three

Week 3: Various Systems of Governance

        Monday, September 11th 

  1. Quiz 2 and Quiz 3
  2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Four

        Wednesday, September 13th 

                1. Lecture on Pecknold’s “Introduction”

Week 4: Monarchies and Tyrannies

        Monday, September 18th 

  1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Introduction – See Summary Writing Rubric
  2. Quiz 4
  3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Five Part I and Part II

        Wednesday, September 20th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Five Part I and Part II

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter One “The Western Political Imagination”

Week 5: Representational Democracies

        Monday, September 25th 

                1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Chapter One – see Summary Writing Rubric

                2. Quiz 5 Part I and Part II

                3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Six

        Wednesday, September 27th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Six

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter “Two God’s New City”

Week 6: Stages of Transition

        Monday, October 2nd 

                1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Chapter Two – see Summary Writing Rubric

                2. Quiz 6

                3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Seven

        Wednesday, October 4th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Seven

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter Three “Saint Augustine’s Two Cities”

Week 7: Development

        Monday, October 9th 

                1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Chapter Three – see Summary Writing Rubric

                2. Quiz 7

                3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Eight

        Wednesday, October 11th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Eight

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter Four “Pope and King”

Week 8: Citizenship and Democratic Participation

        Monday, October 16th 

  1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Chapter Four – see Summary Writing Rubric
  2. Quiz 8
  3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Nine Part One and Part Two

        Wednesday, October 18th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Nine Part One and Part Two

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter Five “Towards Hobbesian Bodies”

Week 9: Political Leaders

        Monday, October 23rd 

  1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Chapter Five – see Summary Writing Rubric
  2. Quiz 9 Part One and Part Two
  3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Ten

        Wednesday, October 25th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Ten

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter Six “Luther and Machiavelli”

Week 10: Public Policy and Security

        Monday, October 30th 

                1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Chapter Six – see Summary Writing Rubric

                2. Quiz 10

                3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Eleven Part One and Part Two

        Wednesday, November 1st 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Eleven Part One and Part Two

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter Seven “Between Calvin and Hobbes”

Week 11: War

        Monday, November 6th 

                1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Chapter Seven – see Summary Writing Rubric

                2. Quiz 11 Part One and Part Two

                3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Twelve Part One

        Wednesday, November 8th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Twelve Part One

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter Eight “Restless Democracy’s True Desire”

Week 12: Terrorism

        Monday, November 13th 

                1. The final date that your research paper is due on November 20th, right after class begins. The highest grade a paper may receive after this date is 80%. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

                2. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Chapter Eight – see Summary Writing Rubric

                3. Quiz 12 Part One

                4. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Twelve Part Two

        Wednesday, November 15th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Twelve Part Two

                2. Lecture on Pecknold’s Chapter Nine “The Freedom of the Church”

Week 13: International Politics and Organizations

The final date that your research paper is due on November 20th, right after class begins. The highest grade a paper may receive after this date is 80%. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

  1. Hand in Summary of Pecknold’s Nine – see Summary Writing Rubric

        Monday, November 20th 

                1. Quiz 12 Part Two

                2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Chapter Thirteen Part One and Part Two

        Wednesday, November 22nd 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter Fourteen Politicians and Sanctity

Week 14: ---------------------------------

        Monday, November 27th 

                1. Quiz 13 Part One and Part Two and Quiz 14

                2. Student Evaluations

        Wednesday, November 29th 

                1. End of Term Presentations of Some Students

Week 15: December 5th to December 9th Final Exam Week

                1. End of Term Presentations of Remaining Students

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

1. Quizzes: 15%

2. Chapter Summaries: 15%

        2. Presentation: 30%

3. Paper: 40% *

* The final date that your research paper is due on November 20th, right after class begins. The highest grade a paper may receive after this date is 80%. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

5. REQUIRED READINGS

6. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

Research Paper Rubric

Writing and Expression

Outcome: An ability to use important conventions of research writing, including the use of a clear thesis, effective paragraphing, & an organizational pattern, effective transitions that develops an idea over the course of the research paper rather than simply listing supporting ideas.

5 Points

4 Points

3 Points

2 Points

Thesis

The statement is clear and offers a very specific idea that clearly sets the topic & limits its scope.

The statement is clear and sets out a clear topic, but might not clearly limit its scope.

The statement is clear, but offers only a vague or general point that may be taken in many directions.

The statement does not offer a clear point that can be developed.

Paragraph effectiveness

Each paragraph has a central stated or clearly implied point and develops it with clear details.  Each has an explicit or clearly implied connection to earlier paragraphs & the overall point of the essay.

Each paragraph has a central stated or clearly implied point and develops it with clear details.

Each paragraph has a central stated or implied point and the details in the paragraph are relevant to that point, though they may comprise a list rather than a development of the point.

Paragraphs lack a central stated or implied point.

Organization & Transition  

Transitions are fully developed and the paper fully develops a point.

Transitions move beyond the simple use of transition phrases and the paper demonstrates some attempt to develop and build a point rather than simply list ideas.

Inconsistent use of transition; or, transitions are provided, but tend to be mechanical.  The paper is organized simplistically – for instance, points are simply added to one another.

Little or no sense of transitions; connections between paragraphs and the overall organization of the paper is unclear.

Research

Outcome: An ability to use language that generally conveys meaning to readers & contains few errors; an ability to ethically & accurately use Turabian format when  citing sources.

5 Points

4 Points

3 Points

2 Points

Correctness

Free of errors.

Few errors – fewer than one per page.

Errors may appear (fewer than three per page), but do not impede meaning.

Errors impede meaning or are too numerous – more than three per page.

Style

Meaning is very clear and the writer’s language enhances reader’s understanding.

Meaning is clear and the writer’s language is competent.

Meaning is sometimes clear to readers, but not consistently.

Meaning is unclear. Sentences may be wordy and/or vocabulary is limited or incorrectly used.

Use of Turabian/Chicago Format – See the HACS Style Sheet

All quotes are correctly introduced; quotes and paraphrases are correctly cited and formatted. The works cited page is correctly formatted and includes all resources.

All quotes are correctly introduced.  Only one or two citations for quotes or paraphrases are missing or incorrectly formatted, and/or the works cited page has minor formatting issues but includes all resources in the correct order.

Quotes are often not correctly introduced.  Only quotes (not paraphrases) are cited; or the works cited page completely disregards Turabian format.

Quotes are not correctly introduced.  Many citations are missing and may be incorrectly formatted OR there is no works cited page.

Presentation Rubric

 

Exemplary (4)

Proficient (3)

Developing (2)

Beginning (1)

Organization

Organizational pattern (specific introduction that provides in advance the logical steps the presentation will take, conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is clearly and consistently observable, is skillful, and makes the content of the presentation cohesive.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is clearly and consistently observable within the presentation.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is intermittently observable within the presentation.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is not observable within the presentation.

Language/Delivery

Language choices are imaginative, memorable, and compelling, and enhance the effectiveness of the presentation. Language facilitates retention and attention by being unique to the oral channel. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness, lack of filler words “ums, ah, you know etc.” ) make the presentation compelling, and speaker appears polished and confident. Delivery appears natural and purposeful. There are no signs of speech anxiety.

Language choices are thoughtful and generally support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language includes choices that reflect an orally communicated message as opposed to a written message. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation interesting, and speaker appears comfortable. Delivery generally appears natural and purposeful. Signs of speech anxiety are minimal and, if present, disappear as the speech begins.

Language choices are mundane and commonplace, and partially support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language helps minimally in promoting retention and attention of the audience. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation understandable but delivery sometimes lacks purpose and, at times, appears rehearsed. Speaker appears tentative with signs of speech anxiety present intermittently.

Language choices are unclear and minimally support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language does not reflect the uniqueness of the oral channel. Language in presentation is not appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) detract from the understandability of the presentation. Delivery choices lack purpose and virtually any appearance of being natural. The speaker appears uncomfortable, being controlled by speech anxiety.

Central Message

Central message is compelling (precisely stated, appropriately repeated, memorable, and strongly supported.) Message is appropriate for purpose, context, and audience.

Central message is clear and consistent with the supporting material. Message is generally appropriate for purpose, context, and audience.

Central message is basically understandable but is not often repeated and is not memorable. Message may fall short of adhering to purpose, and lacks a consistent appropriateness for context and/or audience

Central message can be deduced, but is not explicitly stated in the presentation. Message is not clearly in line with purpose and lacks a consistent appropriateness to audience and context.

Time

Ten Minutes

 One minute below.

Two minutes below.

Three minutes below.

Oral Presentation Requirements and Rubric

        The two oral presentations are to be accompanied by outlines. The format of the outline is as follows.

Introduction

        The introduction needs to be written out with a minimum of ten grammatically correct sentences. In the introduction, you are to present your topic and the steps by which you will talk on your topic.

Body

        You only need to outline the body of your presentation, but grammar still will be corrected.

        Direct quotes need to be fully written out and properly footnoted. Include at least three direct quotes, preferably from primary sources.

Conclusion

        The conclusion needs to be written out in at least ten sentences. In the conclusion, you are to summarize and make a synthesis of your presentation steps.

Bibliography

        In Turabian format and a minimum of 5 sources with at least one primary source.

Outline Rubric

15 Points

12 Points

10 Points

8 Point

Introduction

In at least ten written out sentences, the main idea is introduced, and clearly stated, and the steps you will take are presented.

Although a main idea is clearly stated in the introduction, it is not the main idea present in the presentation.

The main idea is presented in an unclear, confusing manner.

The main idea is missing in the introduction.

Body

The essential supporting ideas are presented in a logical order.

Some essential supporting ideas are missing.

Those presented are explained in a logical order.

The essential supporting ideas are presented but an illogical, random manner.

Only some essential ideas are presented. These are presented in an illogical, random manner.

Conclusion

The main idea is restated in at least 10 sentences in a complementary but different way than it was in the introduction.

The main idea is restated but almost exactly as it was in the introduction.

The main idea is not restated in the conclusion.

A conclusion is missing.

Grammar

Error-free grammar and error-free citations/bibliography.

Very few (1-3) errors and those that appear do not obscure meaning.

Some (4-7) errors or lack of clarity of expression.

Many (over 7) errors.

Writing Summary Rubric - Political Science

4 Points

3 Points

2 Points

1 Point

Introduction

The main idea is clearly stated in the introduction.

Although a main idea is clearly stated in the introduction, it is not the main idea present in the chapter.

The main idea is presented in an unclear, confusing manner.

The main idea is missing in the introduction.

Body

The essential supporting ideas to the main idea are presented in a logical order with transitions.

Some essential supporting ideas are missing.

Those presented are explained in a logical order.

The essential supporting ideas are presented but an illogical, random manner.

Only some essential ideas are presented. These are presented in an illogical, random manner.

Conclusion

The main idea is restated in a complementary but different way than it was in the introduction.

The main idea is restated but almost exactly as it was in the introduction.

The main idea is not restated in the conclusion.

A conclusion is missing.

Grammar

(this category includes citations)

Error-free grammar.

Very few (1-3) grammatical errors and those that appear do not obscure meaning.

Some grammatical errors (4-7) or lack of clarity of expression.

Many grammatical errors (over 7).

7. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Disabilities Office Coordinator, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

8. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

9. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Students are expected to be on time and to attend all classes.  If excused, students will still be required to complete all assignments.

10. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

11. Term Paper Topics

Athenian Democracy

Thomas Hobbes and the Social Contract Theory

John Locke and the Social Contract Theory

Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the Social Contract Theory

The Political Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas

Thomas More’s Political Views

Count Henri de Saint-Simon and Socialism

François Marie Charles Fourier and Socialism

Robert Owen and Socialism

Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Herland

Burrhus Frederic Skinner and Walden Two

Alexander Hamilton and the Federalist Party

Thomas Jefferson and Anti-Federalism

Lord Acton (John-Dalberg-Acton) and Politics

Rene Girard’s Scapegoating Theory and Politics

Political Propaganda

Leadership Models and Theory

Chile and the “Chicago Boys”

Haiti and Somalia from the Perspective of “Failed States”

Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s Political Thought

Leo Tolstoy’s Political Thought

Mahatma Gandhi’s Political Thought

Hans Morgenthau and International Relations

Peter Kroptotkin’s Political Thought

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

Your instructor, Fr. Peter, is most eager to open your minds to politics from a Catholic perspective.  I hope this course will inspire you, if called, to actively engage in politics.Peter Samuel Kucer