Foundations of Socially Responsible Engineering Curriculum 9-12 grade                                                                Page  of

Units:

Unit 1 - Safety and OSHA Standards

Unit 2 - Got Design?

Unit 3 - How does this work?

Unit 4 - Recycled Light Source

Unit 5 - Got Efficiency? (Alternate Energy)

Unit 6 - Simple Machines and Core Technologies (Rube Goldberg)




Unit Title

Unit 1 - Safety and OSHA Standards 

Timeframe 

3 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit is imperative as a building block to safe learning and participation in the lab setting.  Issues to be discussed will include general safety rules, specific machine safety rules, personal safety issues, and working together in a safe class environment.  The student will be acquainted with OSHA guidelines and how they affect the classroom and workplace.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

Can you identify workplace/jobsite safety issues?

Are there safety issues in the school?

What and why is the inspection process by OSHA important to safety?

Why is it necessary to be properly trained on workplace/jobsite tools and machinery

What is PPE and why OSHA requires job specific equipment

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

1. Various skills are in demand by employers who require an understanding of both workplace/jobsite tooling and equipment operation.

2. Government regulations are in place to ensure a safe and healthy working environment.

3. Using the appropriate PPE for specific jobs, tooling and machinery.

4. Proper tooling, machine, and equipment operation according to OSHA standards

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Identify situations that require PPE (Personal Protection Equipment)
  • Identify and describe the warning signs posted in the shop.
  • Explain who and what OSHA stands for and is used for.
  • The expectations of the student to maintain a safe working/learning environment.
  • Proper room clean-up procedures.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Describe safety precautions for working with various tools and machines.
  • Safely use the tools and machines
  • Understand their role in the safe operation of the class.
  • Explain the plan for room clean-up.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Safety Test Chunking on each individual machine and power tool

Clean up/Organization

Summative/ Benchmark

Students will create a 3-D puzzle game that will use all of the tools and machinery in the shop safely and  effectively

Alternative Assessments

Tool and Machine Safety Packets

Workplace Safety Action Plan Scenarios Worksheets

Technology Lab Safety Action Plan

OSHA Hazardous Workplace Quiz

Learning Activities

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules, OSHA.gov E-Tools & OSHA Young Workers Websites

Equipment

Power tools, machines, hand tools, PPE

Supplemental Resources

Acellus Online Modules, NCEER Performance Tasks

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

English Language Arts (NJSLS) in the Workplace Safety Action Plan Scenarios

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.7 Examine the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities for both employers and employees in the global workplace.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION (AC)

9.3.12.AC.1

Use vocabulary, symbols and formulas common to architecture and construction.

9.3.12.AC.2

Use architecture and construction skills to create and manage a project.

9.3.12.AC.6

Read, interpret and use technical drawings, documents and specifications to plan a project.

CONSTRUCTION (AC‐CST)

9.3.12.AC-CST.5

Apply practices and procedures required to maintain jobsite safety.

9.3.12.AC-CST.9

Safely use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery, equipment and resources to accomplish construction project goals.

MAINTENANCE/OPERATIONS (AC‐MO)

9.3.12.AC-MO.1

Recognize and employ universal construction signs and symbols to function safely in the workplace.  

MANUFACTURING (MN)

9.3.MN.3

Comply with federal, state and local regulations to ensure worker safety and health and environmental work practices.  

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards.  

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.  

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.  

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.  

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.3 - Analyze a product or system for factors such as safety, reliability, economic considerations, quality control, environmental concerns, manufacturability, maintenance and repair, and human factors engineering (ergonomics).

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 2 - Got Design?

Timeframe 

9 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit will begin by raising student interest in the Engineering Design Process and the designed world. Our society

has been greatly transformed by technological innovations since the dawn of time, most noticeably in the past

century. We now take for granted many great advances that did not exist even a generation ago and the rate of

innovation is not expected to slow in the future. We as a society are just at the beginning stages of many new

innovations in areas such as autonomous robots, nanotechnology, and biotechnology, among others.  

Using the Sweet Project Design Brief and the Engineering Design Process, teams of 2-3 students will design, name

and create a prototype candy bar. A theme will be development to market the candy bar that will relate to the shape

and texture of the bar as well as the packaging.

The first design challenge is meant for the teacher/instructor to walk the students through each step of the

Engineering Design Process while giving instruction on the skills necessary to complete each step. The second

design challenge is meant for the students to practice the Engineering Design Process. Throughout the second

design challenge, further instruction will be provided to further refine their skills needed for each step.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

What is technology?

How has technology shaped the world that we live in?

What is an efficient way to develop a viable solution to a problem?

What is the benefit of teamwork?

What is the engineering process?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

1. Technology is how people modify the natural world to satisfy human needs and

wants.

2. Technology affects both society and the environment and conversely, the environment and society impact technology.

3. The Engineering Design Process is an iterative process, and not always followed in a linear path.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Everyone has the ability to be creative and innovative.
  • There are multiple possible solutions to a problem that often have risks and require trade-offs.
  • The abilities of CAD software

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Create a prototype of a new hanger
  • Create a prototype of a new candy bar

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Engineering Notebook

Clean up/Organization

Summative/ Benchmark

  • “Hang it up” project
  • “Sweet candy Wars”
  • Presentations

Alternative Assessments

Design files

Learning Activities

  • Adobe Illustrator
  • Pumpkin
  • Clock
  • Ruler
  • Package design

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

TSA Handbook

Harms, H. R., & Janosz, D. A. (2012). Pre-engineering. Bothell, WA: McGraw Hill Education.

Equipment

Power tools, machines, hand tools, computer

Supplemental Resources

Acellus Online Modules

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

The use of Mathematics (NJSLS 4.2), Next Generation Science Standards,

And English Language Arts (NJSLS) in the Sweet Candy Wars project

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.7 Examine the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities for both employers and employees in the global workplace.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐ET)

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST.5

Demonstrate an understanding of the breadth of career opportunities and means to those opportunities in each of the Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Career Pathways.

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST-SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

9.3.ST-SM.3

Analyze the impact that science and mathematics has on society.

9.3.ST-SM.4

Apply critical thinking skills to review information, explain statistical analysis, and to translate, interpret and summarize research and statistical data.

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards.  

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.  

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.  

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.  

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.3 - Analyze a product or system for factors such as safety, reliability, economic considerations, quality control, environmental concerns, manufacturability, maintenance and repair, and human factors engineering (ergonomics).

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Apply the design process.

8.2.12.D.1 - Design and create a prototype to solve a real world problem using a design process, identify constraints addressed during the creation of the prototype, identify trade-offs made, and present the solution for peer review.

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 3 - How does this work? 

Timeframe 

3 Weeks

Unit Summary

You are a Systems Engineer for a local engineering firm. You have been approached by your supervisor with a serious concern….the competing firm downtown appears to be taking the lead on an emerging product design. In order for you to better understand what is happening in their product, reverse engineering is required. Products in the designed world are comprised of a series of subsystems working together. Reverse engineering allows the user to analyze the different sub systems in operation within a product, classify the component parts, associate the functions, and analyze the environmental responsibility in its design. These skills are essential to troubleshooting, and the ability to communicate findings to others is essential to making sure that your company once again takes control of the consumer market for this product. You will be provided with a real world product, and as design teams work collaboratively to reverse engineer it.

Each design team will capture in a technical report with text and images the specific steps of the process and provide concise directions that will allow other design teams to reassemble the product back to its original form.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

How do products function?

What is the role of dependability and reliability in product design?

What is the role of reverse engineering in research and development?

What is the connection between reverse engineering and reassembly?

What is the connection between reverse engineering and budgeting?

Who should reverse engineer products?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. Products function because of a series of subsystems working together.
  2. Troubleshooting can require reverse engineering.
  3. A decision as to whether a product must be re- assembled must be made prior to beginning the reverse engineering process.
  4. The failure of one subsystem may result in malfunction.
  5. All stakeholders have a vested interest in the long term durability and reliability of products.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Recognize that products in the designed world function as a result of multiple subsystems working together.
  • Recognize the challenges of design under constraint.
  • Identify how different products work.
  • Differentiate between the various sub systems; their functions and their components.
  • Demonstrate the mechanical aptitude to complete the reverse engineering process without damaging the product and its subsystems.
  • Document the proper sequence of the reverse engineering process through text and
  • images.
  • Demonstrate the ability to reconstruct a different product using only text and images without any verbal interaction.
  • Demonstrate effective use of hand tools.
  • Present evidence of working product to class and instructor upon completion.
  • Discuss multiple ways to assess product design in order to facilitate disassembly and reassembly.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Be able to utilize a product with multiple subsystems.
  • Disassemble the product, archiving the images of the sequential process, and documenting findings.
  • Utilize the written directions from another design team to reassemble another product.
  • Compare and contrast the differences between reverse engineering and reassembly.
  • Demonstrate the proper function of a product.
  • Present findings and insights to peers.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Engineering Notebook

Clean up/Organization

Summative/ Benchmark

Description of subsystems working together

Fully disassembled product

Reassembled product in working condition

Discuss and present ways to construct or make assembly easier

Alternative Assessments

3D design of parts in an exploded view using 3D prototyping software

Learning Activities

Fully reverse engineered product

Description and exploded drawing of parts

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

TSA Handbook

Harms, H. R., & Janosz, D. A. (2012). Pre-engineering. Bothell, WA: McGraw Hill Education.

Equipment

Power tools, machines, hand tools, computer

Supplemental Resources

Acellus Online Modules

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

The use of Mathematics (NJSLS 4.2), Next Generation Science Standards,

And English Language Arts (NJSLS) in the Reverse Engineering project

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.7 Examine the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities for both employers and employees in the global workplace.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data

9.3.ST.3

Describe and follow safety, health and environmental standards related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workplaces.

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST-SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

9.3.ST-SM.3

Analyze the impact that science and mathematics has on society.

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐ET)

9.3.ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.6 - Research an existing product, reverse engineer and redesign it to improve form and function.

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 4 - Recycled Light Source 

Timeframe 

5 Weeks

Unit Summary

Students are challenged to design a new portable light source for use by people that do not have access

to the power grid or in situations where power will be out for an extended period. This unit begins by

having students work in teams to disassemble two common electronic products, flashlights and solar

yard lights. Prior to disassembly they will be asked to predict what they expect to find inside each

product. During disassembly they will keep notes and prepare sketches including exploded view

drawings to document how the products were assembled. Related lessons will introduce students to the

basics of electronics including components, circuits, circuit diagrams as well as the building and testing

of temporary and permanent circuits.

The knowledge gained through these activities will provide

students with the background that will enable them to design and model a new battery operated light.

Throughout the unit students will continue to increase their knowledge of electronics and acquire

insight into the wide range of career opportunities in electronics.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

What is a circuit?

What kinds of components are commonly used in electronic circuits?

How can the disassembly of electronic products lead to an understanding of how they work?

How can new lighting products satisfy human needs and wants?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Electronics are a key element of many of today’s most popular products.
  • The same basic electronic components are found in many different products.
  • New circuits and products can be developed through use of the engineering design process.
  • Through innovation existing products can evolve into new products.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • How to wire a circuit
  • The components that are used to make a simple light
  • How to troubleshoot an electronic device
  • Communication is not always verbal

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Research, discuss and document the tasks that need to be addressed in the design.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the Engineering Design Process by using it to create a solution to the recycled light problem, and document the process.
  • Summarize brainstorming and research to describe how the product meets specifications and limitations.
  • Describe how different circuits and products work.
  • Demonstrate safe and proper use of tools used for building electronic circuits.
  • Research, discuss and document how existing devices work.
  • Model selected solution.
  • Present project design to peers.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Engineering Notebook

Clean up/Organization

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Reverse engineering project
  • Recycled light project
  • Communication activity
  • Presentations

Alternative Assessments

Design files

Learning Activities

Reverse engineering of existing products (Flash light, solar light)

Design and construction of recycled light

Communication without words

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

TSA Handbook

Harms, H. R., & Janosz, D. A. (2012). Pre-engineering. Bothell, WA: McGraw Hill Education.

Equipment

Power tools, machines, hand tools, computer

Supplemental Resources

Acellus Online Modules

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

The use of Mathematics (NJSLS 4.2), Next Generation Science Standards in the Reverse Design project

And English Language Arts (NJSLS).

  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.7 Examine the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities for both employers and employees in the global workplace.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐ET)

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST.3

Describe and follow safety, health and environmental standards related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workplaces.

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST-SM.4

Apply critical thinking skills to review information, explain statistical analysis, and to translate, interpret and summarize research and statistical data.

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards.  

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.  

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.  

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.  

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.2 - Analyze a product and how it has changed or might change over time to meet human needs and wants

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 5 - Got Efficiency? (Alternate Energy)

Timeframe 

9 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit will begin by raising student interest and awareness about how energy is used and the impacts on the world around us. The world population is continuing to increase at the same time a larger percentage of the population is becoming more technologically advanced. These advancements take an increasing amount of energy to create, operate and maintain.  At the beginning of the unit students will complete an energy audit for their home and then compare this to the energy used by families living in other parts of the world. The knowledge gained from this activity will be reflected on and be the basis for selecting the specific problem to solve. Throughout the unit the use of the engineering design process will be used as a method to develop a solution to a problem. They will also acquire insight into the growing field of alternate energy.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

In what ways is energy used in modern society?

How does the energy that we use affect the environment?

What are different forms of alternative energies?

What social and ethical responsibilities to individuals and organizations have to limit their utilization of energy?

What are the scientific principles that govern the use and transformation of energy?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  1. It is possible for energy usage to surpass energy production.
  2. Energy usage has an impact on the world that we live in
  3. Energy is used in the production, transport, use, maintenance, and disposal of products.
  4. There are natural limitations to how energy can be created and transformed.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • How much energy is needed to light up a single LED
  • Why it is important to explore alternative energies
  • How to wire a simple circuit
  • How to calculate efficiency

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Differentiate between renewable and nonrenewable energy sources
  • Research and document the rate at which they are using energy in their current lifestyle.
  • Research and document the carbon footprint that is created based on their energy consumption.
  • Compare and contrast their energy consumption/carbon footprint to those of individuals in other parts of the world in order to create more energy efficient systems.
  • Create a Public Service Announcement related to alternative energy.
  • Identify the interfacing of systems in the production and use of energy, and ways in which these systems could be improved.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the Engineering Design Process by using it to create a solution to a proposed problem, and document the process.
  • Safely and accurately use tools to process materials in generating a solution to a
  • problem.
  • Develop and produce a product that will monitor and/or limit the amount of energy used for a defined task.
  • Document the use of the engineering design process to develop a solution to a problem.
  • Present evidence of a solution to a problem using the data gathered in the testing process.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Engineering Notebook

Clean up/Organization

Summative/ Benchmark

Wind turbine

Solar Tower Power Station

Alternative Energy Display

Alternative Assessments

Hydropower

Design Files

Learning Activities

Wiring Inspection

Wind turbine - LED

Laser Engraver Wind Turbine

Solar Tower Power Station

Alternative Energy Display

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

TSA Handbook

Harms, H. R., & Janosz, D. A. (2012). Pre-engineering. Bothell, WA: McGraw Hill Education.

Equipment

Power tools, machines, hand tools, computer

Supplemental Resources

Acellus Online Modules

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

The use of Mathematics (NJSLS 4.2), Next Generation Science Standards,

And English Language Arts (NJSLS) in the Alternative Energy Project

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.7 Examine the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities for both employers and employees in the global workplace.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐ET)

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process.

9.3.ST-ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data.

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

9.3.ST-SM.4

Apply critical thinking skills to review information, explain statistical analysis, and to translate, interpret and summarize research and statistical data.

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards.  

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.  

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.  

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.  

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.3 - Analyze a product or system for factors such as safety, reliability, economic considerations, quality control, environmental concerns, manufacturability, maintenance and repair, and human factors engineering (ergonomics).

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Apply the design process.

8.2.12.D.1 - Design and create a prototype to solve a real world problem using a design process, identify constraints addressed during the creation of the prototype, identify trade-offs made, and present the solution for peer review.

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.


Unit Title

Unit 6 - Simple Machines and Core Technologies (Rube Goldberg) 

Timeframe 

7 Weeks

Unit Summary

This project can be used to integrate social studies and science. Rube Goldberg was a political cartoonist who also drew cartoons that showed simple tasks performed in convoluted, indirect ways. While the students are learning about World War II in social studies, they can learn about this cartoonist. His political views sometimes caused so much opposition that he changed his children’s last name in order to protect them. Today, engineering students around the country have turned his cartoons into a competition. The idea is to create a chain reaction that accomplishes a simple task. Such as; turning a page, popping a balloon, ringing a bell etc. To introduce the lesson students view quick clips of Rube Goldberg devices and competitions. The students in our district design a contraption and bring items in from home to create it. Simple items such as paper towel tubes, ping-pong balls, dominoes, Matchbox cars and marbles are commonly used. The students’ goal is to have at least 4 causes and effects for the contraptions. Students plan in groups and problem solve the contraptions. On the final day, the students share their contraption with the class and they are graded based on the number of causes and effects the devices complete.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

How are simple machines the building blocks of every technological system.

What core technologies do we use on a daily basis?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

1. The core concepts of technology.

2. Recognize a problem and apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills to solve the problem

3. The abilities to use and maintain technological products and systems.

4. Proper tooling, machine, and equipment operation according to OSHA standards

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • How pulleys help reduce effort to do work to move a load.
  • How lever and wedges help reduce the effort needed to perform work.
  • How changing the angle of an inclined plane changes the amount of effort needed to move a load.
  • How to use Mechanical advantage
  • Understanding how things work and designing solutions to problems of almost any kind can be facilitated by systems analysis. In defining a system, it is important to specify its boundaries and subsystems, indicate its relation to other systems, and identify what its input and output are expected to be.
  • Scientific laws, engineering principles, properties of materials, and construction techniques must be taken into account in designing engineering solutions to problems.
  • Explain who and what OSHA stands for and is used for.
  • The expectations of the student to maintain a safe working/learning environment.
  • Proper room clean-up procedures.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Identify 6 simple machines in daily use
  • Identify a minimum of 5 core technologies within a system.
  • List the 9 types of core technologies, and classify them from an existing technological device.
  • Create a rube goldberg consisting of simple machines that completes a simple task
  • Document processes and procedures and communicate them to different audiences using appropriate oral and written techniques.
  • Troubleshoot, analyze, and maintain systems to ensure safe and proper function and precision.
  • Operate systems so that they function in the way they were designed.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Engineering Notebook

Clean up/Organization

Summative/ Benchmark

Rube Goldberg

Alternative Assessments

Amazing Marble MAchine

Learning Activities

Core Technologies Worksheet

Tug of war activity: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/k-12/Summer_Training/KaeAvenueES/TUG_OF_WAR.html

Lifting weight activity: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/k-12/Summer_Training/KaeAvenueES/pulleys.html

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

TSA Handbook

Harms, H. R., & Janosz, D. A. (2012). Pre-engineering. Bothell, WA: McGraw Hill Education.

Equipment

Power tools, machines, hand tools, computer

Supplemental Resources

Acellus Online Modules

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

The use of Mathematics (NJSLS 4.2), Next Generation Science Standards,

And English Language Arts (NJSLS) in the Rube Goldberg project.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.7 Examine the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities for both employers and employees in the global workplace.

Technology Standards - 9.3

Career Cluster Number

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐ET)

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process.

9.3.ST-ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data.

9.3.ST.3

Describe and follow safety, health and environmental standards related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workplaces.

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐SM)

9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

9.3.ST-SM.4

Apply critical thinking skills to review information, explain statistical analysis, and to translate, interpret and summarize research and statistical data.

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards.  

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.  

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.  

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.  

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

9-12th Grade

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.12.B.1 - Research and analyze the impact of the design constraints (specifications and limits) for a product or technology driven by a cultural, social, economic or political need and publish for review.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.12.C.3 - Analyze a product or system for factors such as safety, reliability, economic considerations, quality control, environmental concerns, manufacturability, maintenance and repair, and human factors engineering (ergonomics).

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Apply the design process

8.2.12.D.1 - Design and create a prototype to solve a real world problem using a design process, identify constraints addressed during the creation of the prototype, identify trade-offs made, and present the solution for peer review.

  • Use and maintain technological products and systems.

8.2.12.D.3 - Determine and use the appropriate resources (e.g., CNC (Computer Numerical Control) equipment, 3D printers, CAD software) in the design, development and creation of a technological product or system.

  • Assess the impact of products and systems.

8.2.12.D.5 - Explain how material processing impacts the quality of engineered and fabricated products.

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.