ALC COURSE REGISTRATION GUIDE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Art                                                         2

Business/Marketing/Computers                 2

English                                                 2-5

General Electives                                         5-6 

Health                                                 6

Mathematics                                         6-9

Music                                                 9 

Physical Education                                 9

Science                                                 10-11 

Social Studies                                         11-13

World Languages                                         13


ART

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

100000 NTS Art Across Mediums Grade(s): 9 ­ 12

Design and create artworks with a variety of mediums, such as jewelry, cartooning, printmaking, stained glass, book arts, fibers, digital design, set design, and airbrush. Each unit will focus on a unique creative process through historic/cultural contexts and design principles. Course meets the Minnesota Academic Standards in the Arts – Visual Arts.

BUSINESS/MARKETING/COMPUTERS

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 or S2

110000 NTS Business & Personal Finance Grade(s) 10­12

Students will gain the ability to manage their personal finances and make wise economic decisions. Areas explored include budget planning, banking, tax returns, investing, consumer credit, insurance, and career exploration. This course will help students become intelligent decision­makers in a global economy. Business and Personal Finance, Advanced Computers and Computer Applications will meet together.

***Juniors and seniors have the opportunity to receive articulation credit from LSC. See your

counselor or the class instructor for more details.

ENGLISH

All English courses offered by OLL are aligned with the Minnesota English Language Arts Standards which can be found on the Minnesota Department of Education web page. The standards call for an integrated model of literacy driven by four strands: Reading of Informational and Literacy Text; Writing; Speaking, Listening, Viewing, and Media Literacy, and Language.

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

130001/130002 NTS English 9 Grade(s): 9

This survey course is designed to fulfill the expectations of the 9th grade standards for English Language Arts. Students in this course will:

● Read and comprehend 9th grade literature and informational texts for personal enjoyment, interest, and academic tasks, and read widely to understand multiple perspectives and pluralistic viewpoints. Required 9th grade texts including novels and plays, short stories, essay and poetry. Required common texts include Romeo and Juliet, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Odyssey.

● Using information from multiple print and digital sources, use a writing process to write for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences,

● Use MLA formatting; understand how to avoid plagiarism.

● Demonstrate command of the conventions of language while speaking and writing.

● Acquire and accurately use grade-­level vocabulary

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

131101/131102 NTS English 10 Grade(s): 10

This survey course is designed to fulfill the expectations of the 10th grade standards for English Language Arts. Students in this course will:

● Read and comprehend 10th grade literature and informational texts for personal enjoyment, interest, and academic tasks, and read widely to understand multiple perspectives and pluralistic viewpoints. Required 10th grade texts include novels and plays, short stories, essay and poetry. Required common texts include Julius Caesar and/or Much Ado About Nothing, Antigone, Arthurian Legends, and Lord of the Flies.

● Using information from multiple print and digital sources, use a writing process to write for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences,

● Use MLA formatting; understand how to avoid plagiarism.

● Demonstrate command of the conventions of language while speaking and writing.

● Acquire and accurately use grade-­level vocabulary

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

131301/301302 NTS English 11­I & 11­II Grade(s): 11

This course is designed to fulfill the expectations of the 11th grade standards for English Language Arts with an emphasis on American Literature. English 11 explores foundational works of American Literature that are inclusive of multiple cultural perspectives. English 11­1 explores American literature from the pre­colonial period to the late nineteenth century. English 11­2 explores American literature from the nineteenth century to the present. Students in this course will:

● Read and comprehend literature and informational texts for personal enjoyment, interest, and academic tasks.

● Read widely to understand multiple perspectives and pluralistic viewpoints.

● Read at least three of the following texts: The Crucible, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Of Mice and Men, The Great Gatsby, The Autobiography of Frederick Douglass, and The Scarlet Letter.

● Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

● Evaluate authors’ differing points of view, including differing points of view about Minnesota American Indian history on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

● Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in the U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalists, presidential addresses).

● Using information from multiple print and digital sources, use a writing process to write for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences,

● Use MLA formatting; understand how to avoid plagiarism.

● Demonstrate command of the conventions of language while speaking and writing.

● Acquire and accurately use grade­level vocabulary.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1 or S2

131700 NTS Values in Literature Grade(s): 11­12

This unique course offers a discussion of basic philosophical questions through a study of literature and informational texts from ancient times to modern. Students in this course will:

● Analyze the development of central ideas of literary and philosophical texts.

● Use textual evidence to support analysis of ideas and inferences drawn from the text.

● Write several essays including one on personal values.

● Use MLA formatting; understand how to avoid plagiarism.

● Demonstrate command of the conventions of language while speaking and writing.

● Acquire and accurately use grade­level vocabulary.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1 or S2

131900 NTS Grammar and Composition Grade(s): 11­12

This course is designed to increase proficiency in both writing and the understanding of grammar. Students in this course will:

● Write routinely over extended time frames for a range of tasks.

● Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.

● Develop and strengthen writing by planning, drafting, revising, editing, and rewriting.

● Use technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

● Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

● Use MLA formatting to cite and credit sources.

● Write original compositions using grammar, language mechanics, and other conventions of standard written English.

● Demonstrate command of grammar, usage, and punctuation when writing.

GENERAL ELECTIVES

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 or S2

252200 NTS Work­Based Learning Internship Grade(s): 9­12

This course uses community job sites to teach students employment skills. Students will work with the Job Placement/Work-­Based Learning Coordinator to develop an individual employment plan. Students will have the opportunity to learn specific employment skills, to effectively interact with co-­workers and employers, and to self-­advocate at community work sites. They will also develop good work habits and identify personal employment preferences.

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 or S2

252100 NTS Work­Based Learning Seminar Grade(s): 9­12

In this course, students will have the opportunity to identify career interests and aptitudes, research careers, learn about local employment opportunities and how to access local employment resources, use online resources to find a job, learn application, resume, and interview skills, and learn how disability impacts work performances.

HEALTH

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

140000 NTS Health Grade(s): 9­12

This course is based on the National Health Standards and is designed to assist students in obtaining accurate information, developing lifelong positive attitudes and behaviors, and making wise decisions related to their personal health. It uses a wellness approach stressing prevention and self-­responsibility through informed choices. The inter­relationship of the physical, mental, and social dimensions of health and their effects on the total person is emphasized. Students use problem-­solving, research, goal­-setting, and communication skills to protect their health and that of the community. Students will receive their CPR Certification through this course.

MATHEMATICS

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1

181001 NTS Intermediate Algebra IA Prerequisites: Algebra I Grade(s): 9­12

This course is designed for students who have successfully passed 8th grade Algebra I. Students will understand the concept of function and identify its important features. Students will recognize and solve math problems involving linear, quadratic, and exponential functions in mathematical situations and represent functions with tables, graphs and symbols.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S2

181002 NTS Intermediate Algebra IB Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra IA Grade(s): 9­12

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Algebra 1A. Students will represent real­world and mathematical situations using equations and inequalities involving linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Students will solve equations and inequalities symbolically and graphically.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1

181601 NTS ALGEBRA II Prerequisites: Geometry or concurrently with Geometry Grade(s): 10­12

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Geometry. Students will solve problems involving linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Students will generate equivalent algebraic expressions involving polynomials, and radicals.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S2

181602 NTS ALGEBRA II Prerequisites: Geometry or currently with Geometry Grade(s): 10­12

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Geometry. Students will solve problems involving linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Students will generate equivalent algebraic expressions involving polynomials, and radicals.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1

181401 NTS Geometry Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra IA and IB Grade(s): 10­12

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Algebra (1A and 1B). Students will calculate measurements of plane and solid geometric figures, solve geometric problems using algebraic methods, and construct logical arguments, based on axioms, definitions and theorems. Students will also know and apply properties of geometric figures (parallel and perpendicular lines, angles, triangles, and quadrilaterals) to solve real­world problems.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S2

181402 NTS Geometry Prerequisites: First Semester of Geometry Grade(s): 10­12

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the first semester of Geometry. Students will calculate measurements (surface area and volume) of plane and solid geometric figures and solve geometric problems using algebraic methods. Students will know and apply properties of geometric figures (Pythagorean Theorem and trigonometry, and circles) to solve problems.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1

181651 NTS Probability and Statics Prerequisites: Algebra II or Algebra II Concepts Grade(s): 11­12

This course is designed for students that have successfully completed Algebra 2 Concepts, Algebra 2, or Pre­Calculus. An introduction to college statistics, students will work with probability, data collection, descriptive and inferential statistics, and technological tools to draw conclusions, identify trends and describe relationships. The course will focus on exploring data, producing models using probability theory, and making statistical inferences. Students will also study statistical measures of centrality and spread, methods of data collection, methods of determining probability, binomial and normal distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals. Students will use multiple representations to present data including written descriptions, numerical statistics, formulas, and graphs.

181652 Credit: .5 Term(s): S2

NTS Probability and Statics Prerequisites: Algebra II or Algebra II Concepts Grade(s): 11­12

This course is designed for students that have successfully completed Algebra 2 Concepts, Algebra 2, or Pre­Calculus. An introduction to college statistics, students will work with probability, data collection, descriptive and inferential statistics, and technological tools to draw conclusions, identify trends and describe relationships. The course will focus on exploring data, producing models using probability theory, and making statistical inferences. Students will also study statistical measures of centrality and spread, methods of data collection, methods of determining probability, binomial and normal distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals. Students will use multiple representations to present data including written descriptions, numerical statistics, formulas, and graphs.

MUSIC

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

191203/191204 NTS Exploration of Music Grade(s): 9­12

This course is open to all students who want to study the fundamentals of music in a non­performance setting. Students will explore music of various cultures, composers and historic eras along with listening, reading and evaluating music. Students will play a variety of instruments. No previous music experience is required.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

210000 NTS Foundations of Fitness Grade(s): 9­12

This course will enable students to fulfill their High School Physical Education .5 requirement in a traditional physical education class setting. Students will obtain the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a healthy lifestyle through a combination of team games, lifetime activities, fitness center workouts, and cardiovascular training. Participation in these activities is the main focus of the class.


SCIENCE

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

220001/220002 NTS Physical Science 9/Earth Science 9 Integrated Grade(s): 9

Physical Science is a two­semester course that introduces chemistry one semester and physics the other semester. The course is designed to help students understand basic chemistry and physics in a laboratory situation. The goal is to help students become more aware of the importance of science in the world around them. Students will develop an understanding of these disciplines through the process of scientific investigations, hands­on activities, group work, and projects.

This course will also integrate Earth Science concepts into the Physical Science course.

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

221101/221102 NTS Biology Grade(s): 10­12

This course uses a high school level text and emphasizes biochemical functions of organisms as well as genetics, evolution and the diversity of life, classification and ecology. Grading will include an emphasis on written tests, quizzes, lab reports, dissection (fetal pig), and daily assignments. Students are expected to participate in all laboratory activities.

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

222701/222702 NTS Chemistry Grade(s): 11­12

Chemistry is the study of materials, their composition and structure, and the changes that they undergo. Chemistry is a systematic body of knowledge gained from observation, study, and experimentation ­ as opposed to guesswork and opinions. By studying chemistry, students will be able to understand the nature of the materials around them. Students enrolling in Chemistry will gain an understanding of the basic topics of chemistry including atomic structure, element families and the periodic chart, chemical bonding, formula writing, equation writing and balancing, acids and bases, and many others. Substantial emphasis will be placed on laboratory investigations requiring critical thinking, observing, and drawing conclusions. Skill in scientific writing will be developed as well. If your career plans include a college education, Chemistry or Honors Chemistry is recommended.

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 & S2

223001/223002 NTS Physics Grade(s): 10­12

The conceptual approach engages students with analogies and imagery for real­world situations to

build a strong understanding of physical principles ranging from classical mechanics to current physics

theories. With this strong foundation, students will be better equipped to understand the equations

and formulas of physics, and to make connections between the concepts of physics and their

everyday world. This course is for students who want to learn about physics, but may have difficulties

with the higher level mathematics.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Credit: .5 per semester Term(s): S1 or S2

233706 NTS Civics and Geography Grade(s): 9

The goal of Social Studies 9 is to provide students with a foundational skill set for understanding social

studies concepts and content. Students will investigate how American government and society

operates. The examination of American government and civics will focus on founding documents,

organization of federal, state, tribal and local government. Another major focus will involve

citizenship, rights guaranteed by the Constitution and Bill of Rights, and the responsibilities of citizens

of the United States. This course will also integrate geospatial skills and an understanding of human

systems in their impact on society.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1

231001 NTS American History Grade(s): 10

This course is an examination of the history of the United States from 1896­1932. This class gives a historical, cultural, social, economic, and political overview of American from the early twentieth century to the middle of the twentieth century. Topics covered will include the Progressive Era, the Industrial Age, the Age of Imperialism, World War I, Isolationism, the Suffragettes, Prohibition, the Jazz Age, the Roaring Twenties, and the beginnings of the Great Depression.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S2

231002 NTS American History Grade(s): 10

This course is an examination of the history of the United States from 1932 to present. This class gives a historical, cultural, social, economic, and political overview of American from the middle of the twentieth century to the beginning of the twenty­first century. Topics covered will include the Great Depression, the Labor Movement, the rise of European Fascism, World War II and the Holocaust, the Atomic Age, the Cold War, the Red Scare and McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Great Society, Vietnam, the Women’s Movement, Watergate, the Reagan Revolution, and the Contemporary American History.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1

231301/231302 NTS World History Grade(s): 11­12

World History gives a historical, cultural, social and political overview of the rise of complex human

societies. The course provides an overview of history beginning with the development of early river

civilizations. In the first semester, the era of complex societies from approximately 1,000 BCE through

1450 CE will be examined with an emphasis on developments in religion, philosophy, arts, sciences,

technology, and governments. Second semester topics include the transformations of nation states

starting in approximately 1450. The interactions among the Americas, Asian, African, and European

realms through the twentieth century will be examined and compared to the Contemporary World.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1 or S2

231700 NTS Economics Grade(s): 11­12

This course examines decision­making through the lens of microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Fundamental principles of scarcity and choice guide students in understanding how economic

decisions affect personal finance and business decisions as well as national and global well­being.

Students will use and analyze economic data in order to understand such concepts as supply and

demand, pricing, and opportunity cost, and comparative advantage.

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1 or S2

231500 NTS American Government Grade(s): 12

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the functions and

organizations of the federal, state, tribal, and local systems of government within the United States.

Included in this course will be a look at the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government.

Topics covered will include the United States Constitution, amendment process, electoral process,

state government, local government, policy making, and current political issues.

WORLD LANGUAGES

Credit: .5

Term(s): S1 & S2

241301/241302 NTS Spanish Grade(s): 9­12

During the first level of language study, students acquire fundamental listening, speaking, reading and

writing skills. The course presents elements of the cultures of the Spanish speaking world, prepares

students for Spanish II, and begins to prepare students for college world language requirements.

Students are encouraged to continue the study of Spanish through at least level III. Topics are

introduced which enable students to talk and write about themselves and their world. Reading,

writing, and conversation will center on everyday life situations and will be enriched by the study of

diverse Spanish speaking world cultures.