Academic Course Catalog

2019-2020 | 5779-5780


TABLE OF CONTENTS

ENGLISH        3

ENGLISH ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES        5

ENGLISH ELECTIVES        6

ENGLISH SENIOR COURSES        6

MATHEMATICS        8

MATHEMATICS ELECTIVES        10

MATHEMATICS ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES        11

SOCIAL STUDIES        13

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS        14

SOCIAL STUDIES GOVERNMENT        16

SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES        17

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES        20

SCIENCE        24

SCIENCE ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES        26

SCIENCE ELECTIVES        28

HEBREW        29

HEBREW ELECTIVES        34

SPANISH        36

SPANISH ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES        38

SPANISH ELECTIVES        39

JEWISH STUDIES        40

JEWISH STUDIES ELECTIVES        42

VISUAL ARTS        44

PERFORMING ARTS        48

SPORTS SCIENCES        48

MUSIC        50

THE DANIEL ZALIK ACADEMY OF TECHNOLOGY        51


ENGLISH

Grammar, Composition and Literature         Yearlong/1 credit

Required of ninth grade students.

The major emphases are on the study of grammar, vocabulary enrichment, composition, and literature as a means of strengthening skills in critical thinking, expository writing, and literary analysis. The traditional grammar focus is within the context of enhancing effective writing and speaking skills. Writing assignments include impromptu writing as well as well-developed literary and expository compositions. The literature units will provide a rich and varied interpretive and analytical study of various genres. This course is offered at the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

Offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels.

Reading the World: World Literature & Composition        Yearlong/1 credit

Required of tenth grade students.

This course is designed to expand the cultural awareness of our students living in the 21st century. By expanding their literary horizons beyond the English and American cannons to include the study of masterworks of world literature, both traditional and modern. Students will come to a greater appreciation of and reverence for various religious and cultural traditions, values, and attitudes, while at the same time identifying those elements which bind all humans together. Students will engage in critical reading and thinking skills, texts of both fiction and nonfiction, vocabulary development, creative and expository writing, an annotated bibliography, oral presentations, and independent and team learning projects. This course is offered at the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

Offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels.

American Literature and Composition        Yearlong/1 credit

Required of eleventh grade students. (11th Grade AP Language may be substituted).

This course is part of the American Humanities Experience, which is an interdisciplinary initiative between American Literature, American History, and Modern Jewish History. The course stresses composition as a means of logically organizing and developing ideas in paragraphs and essays. In conjunction with the art of writing, the course stresses mastery of formal grammar and its relevance to skill in composition as a means not only of avoiding errors, but also of developing style. The main thrust of this course centers on composition improvement with the emphasis on vocabulary building, critical thinking, and understanding, interpreting, and analyzing literature. Students will write expository and literary analytical essays and a researched literary analysis. Creative writing assignments and projects are also a foundation for student-generated interpretations and analysis. This course is offered at the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

Offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels.


Senior English        semester-long/0.5 credit

(students must take two for the full senior English credit)

In preparation for the college English format and to give our students more choice, rising seniors select one-semester English courses offered by the department designed to explore literature, topics, and themes at a deeper level than the traditional high school classroom. Each course will have three major writing assignments, an anchor text, regular grammar and vocabulary practice, and an independent reading assignment. For the 2019-2020 academic year, the offerings include Philosophy, “How to Break the Rules” a Creative Writing seminar, , Regional Literature and Cuisine,, and “Spokes and Bandaids,”  a course on the immigrant experience in America. These electives are proposed courses and offered as Honors by choice.


ENGLISH
ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition        Yearlong/1 credit

Eleventh and twelfth grade students (placement recommendation required).

The AP English Language and Composition course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Students are required to take the AP exam at the end of the year.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition        Yearlong/1 credit

Twelfth grade students (placement recommendation required).

Pre-req: AP English Language

The AP English course in Literature and Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the writer's use of language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The course includes intensive study of representative works of recognized literary merit. Students are required to take the AP exam at the end of the year.


English Electives

Journalism        Yearlong/1 Credit

This course focuses on the fundamentals of journalism and producing news. Students will analyze news media outlets, and then progress to a study of the ethics, standards, and legal obligations of being a journalist, as well as develop the ability to use the  A.P. style guide. Students will write and produce news stories in a variety of formats, including news articles, features, and columns. Throughout the year, students will run and publish the school’s news website, The RamPage, which addresses events and issues within the school, the Jewish community, as well as the world at large.

Open to 9-12th grade students.

Offered at the Honors level.

Cannot count toward a core course requirement.

SENIOR ENGLISH COURSES

Regional Literature and Cuisine        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Literature and Cuisine: An Appetite for Reading

“A recipe is a story that ends with a good meal."—Pat Conroy

Food serves as a powerful hook into conversations about class, ethnicity, gender, politics, and aesthetics.  This course takes students through a critical examination of the cultural, historical, and sociological aspects of food as represented in poetry, prose, essay, and film. Class texts will include classic to contemporary fiction and look beyond food as a metaphor for communion, and rather, how it reveals the inner workings of community, character, and our values.  Students will write analysis as well as creative non-fiction in a project-based format, ideally culminating in a collaborative cookbook.

Open to 12th grade students, or 11th grade students enrolled in AP English for the 2019-20 school year.

Offered at Honors level by choice.

Can count toward a core course credit for seniors.

 

Philosophy        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Warning: This class will likely change your beliefs about God, politics, right/wrong, and may very well trigger an existential crisis. Socrates tells us that “the unexamined life is not worth living.” This class is designed to begin cultivating an “examined life” through the continued application of critical thinking skills. Students will be introduced to the major branches of philosophy beyond the point of clarity, and to the point of complexity and paradox. This course will provide some history of philosophy, but the central focus will be the students using works of literature to forge these ideas, generating a measure of their own character and beliefs, and applying them to current-day controversies. The class is designed to leave the student with more questions than answers.

 

Open to 12th grade students, or 11th grade students enrolled in AP English for the 2019-20 school year.

Offered at Honors level by choice.

Can count toward a core course credit for seniors.

Immigration Literature        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Spokes and Bandaids

“We are not to simply bandage the wounds of victims beneath the wheels of injustice; we are to drive a spoke into the wheel itself.” --Dietrich Bonhoeffer

This course puts politics aside to study Hispanic immigration in the United States through a human lens. Through fiction, comedy, film, art, poetry, and religious texts, we will learn about our Jewish responsibility to walk in the shoes of "the other." This course will also include opportunities to travel and meet migrants and to engage in community service.

Juniors will receive Jewish Studies elective credit. Seniors will receive either Jewish studies elective credit or Senior English elective credit.

Open to 12th grade students, or 11th grade students enrolled in AP English for the 2019-20 school year.

Offered at Honors level by choice.

Can count toward a core course credit for seniors.

Can count as Jewish Studies credit if the student is simultaneously enrolled in another English course.

Contemporary Literature             1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Creative Writing: How to Break the Rules

“Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”

                                                --Pablo Picasso

Do what you’re told. Stay in line. Be a good worker bee. Follow the rules. After all, rules create order and without order there is chaos. Right? Not always. What about writers who break the “writing rules” and do so to great acclaim? Are they even out there? Yes. And that’s who we’ll be spending our time with in this class--writers who broke the rules, whose work defied what came before them and defined much of what followed. Why did they do it? How did they do it? And what can we learn from them?

This course will be a structured creative writing seminar that will study novelists, short story writers, poets, screen writers, and even a few musicians in service of generating a creative writing portfolio. What rules will you be bold enough to break?

Open to 12th grade students, or 11th grade students enrolled in AP English for the 2019-20 school year.

Offered at Honors level by choice.

Can count toward a core course credit for seniors.


MATHEMATICS

Algebra I        Yearlong/1 credit

Available to ninth grade students.

The first semester of Algebra I focuses on linear equations, functions and inequalities. The second semester includes systems of equations, quadratic functions, exponential functions and rational expressions. The students are taught to complete problems in an organized, step-by-step format. In addition to the material covered in the textbook, the students also complete various activities designed to bring the “real world” into the math classroom.

Offered on the College Preparatory level.

Geometry        Yearlong/1 credit

Available to ninth and tenth grade students.

Throughout this course, students use an inductive approach to discover geometric properties and conjectures. Topics covered in class include undefined terms (point, line, plane), segments, rays, midpoints, proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, congruence and similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, three-dimensional figures, conditional statements, polygons, and circles.

Offered on the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

Accelerated Algebra I/Geometry         Yearlong/1 credit

Available to ninth grade students.

This course covers all material taught in Algebra I as well as the first semester material of Geometry. The Geometry material covers undefined terms (point, line, plane), segments, rays, midpoints, proofs, and parallel and perpendicular lines. The students are taught to complete problems in an organized, step-by-step format. In addition to the material covered in the textbook, the students also complete various activities designed to bring the “real world” into the math classroom.

Offered on the Honors level.

Prerequisite is demonstrated knowledge and application of algebraic concepts as determined by a placement test.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Algebra II        Yearlong/1 credit

Available to ninth, tenth, and eleventh grade students.

The first semester of Algebra II focuses on equations, systems of equations, matrices and polynomials. The second semester includes quadratic functions, conics, and rational expressions. The students are taught to complete problems in an organized, step-by-step format. In addition, the students will use technology to deepen their understanding of mathematics, using online graphing software in addition to their graphing calculators.  In order to move beyond material covered in the textbook, students will complete various activities designed to bring the “real world” into the math classroom.

Offered on the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Accelerated Algebra II/Geometry          Yearlong/1 credit

Available to ninth and tenth grade students.

This course covers all material taught in Geometry and Algebra II. The Geometry material covered in class include congruence and similarity, Pythagorean Theorem, three-dimensional figures, conditional statements, polygons, and circles. The Algebra II material covered includes equations, systems of equations, matrices and polynomials, as well as quadratic functions, conics, rational expressions, logarithms and series. The students are taught to complete problems in an organized, step-by-step format. In addition to the material covered in the textbook, the students will also complete various activities designed to bring the “real world” into the math classroom.

Offered on the Honors level.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Pre-Calculus         Yearlong/1 credit

Available to tenth, eleventh and twelfth grade students.

The major areas of study for this course are functions, polynomial equations, trigonometric functions and applications, sequences and series, analytical geometry, and limits. Students will master these concepts and leave prepared for the study of Calculus and other branches of mathematics.

Offered on the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Calculus        Yearlong/1 credit

Available to eleventh and twelfth grade students.

This course is designed to provide students with a solid introduction to single variable calculus. The course begins with an introduction to limits and continuity. The concept of the derivative is developed along with techniques for finding derivatives and their application. The methods and uses of integration follow. Other topics which may be examined include, but are not limited to, transcendental and trigonometric functions, polar coordinates, and infinite sequences and series.

Offered on the Honors level.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Statistics        Yearlong/1 credit

Available to twelfth grade students.

The primary focus of the class will be to teach the basic principles of statistical reasoning. Major statistical topics include: using graphs and summary statistics, using simulations to estimate probability distributions; using confidence intervals to estimate parameters; making decisions using hypothesis testing and proper methods of data collection. Use of technology, including online applets and the graphing calculator will be prominent in the course.

Offered on the College Preparatory level.


MATHEMATICS
ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

Advanced Placement Calculus AB        Yearlong/1 credit

Placement recommendation required.

The first-semester topics include limits, rules of differentiation, implicit differentiation, related rates, relative extrema, First and Second derivative tests, logarithmic and exponential differentiation and differentials. In addition, second-semester topics include integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, the area between two curves, volume and surfaces of revolution. Emphasis is placed on the integration of technology with the daily use of a graphing calculator. The course follows the curriculum guidelines set forth by The College Board.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Advanced Placement Calculus BC        Yearlong/1 credit

Placement recommendation required.

All of the Calculus AB topics are covered and extended, followed by several additional topics. Specific BC topics include analysis, derivatives, and integrals of parametric, polar, and vector functions; numerical solutions of differential equations; advanced methods of finding antiderivatives; evaluation of improper integrals; and extensive work with sequences and series. The goal is to provide students with a thorough understanding of Calculus methods and applications. This course follows the curriculum guidelines set forth by The College Board. This course will require extra meeting/class time than the standard math class.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Advanced Placement Statistics        Yearlong/1 credit

Placement recommendation required.

The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data, which involves describing patterns and departures from patterns; Sampling and Experimentation, which involves planning and conducting a study; Anticipating Patterns, which involves exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation; and Statistical Inference, which involves estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. The course follows the curriculum guidelines set forth by The College Board.

Prerequisite is Algebra II. Pre-Calculus preferred.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Multivariable Calculus        Yearlong/1 credit

Placement recommendation required.

Multivariable calculus is a higher-level mathematics course covering advanced topics beyond the scope of traditional high school level calculus curriculum. The first semester will consist of an introduction of Linear Algebra, matrices, and vector spaces and their applications. The second semester will cover more traditional calculus topics expanded to include equations and systems of multiple variables, surfaces and topology, parameterization, and their uses. A strong basis in single-variable calculus is required for this course.

A graphing calculator is required for this course.


SOCIAL STUDIES

World History: from the Ancient Period to Columbian Contact        Yearlong/1 CREDIT

Required of 9th grade students

This course introduces students to the major periods, themes, and events of World History. Students will improve their historical literacy and analytical skill set through document analysis and argumentation. Primary sources will supplement the course textbook.

Offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels.

World History: from Columbian Contact to the Present        Yearlong/1 credit

Required for 10th Graders (AP World History may be substituted).

This course dives deep into selected areas of Modern World History. Students will carefully consider heterogeneous interpretations of complex subjects and events, and will develop the critical-thinking skills necessary for upper-class history courses. Primary sources will supplement scholarly articles and other secondary readings. The course builds upon skills learned in 9th-grade World History.

Offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels.

Modern Jewish History        YEARLONG/1 credit

Required for 11th grade students

This course is a survey of the Jewish experience in the modern world. The “modern Jew” has experienced tremendous transformations since the late 18th century. We will locate the individual Jew in the political, social, religious and cultural changes that occurred throughout the modern period, beginning with the European Enlightenment and ending in the contemporary period. We will explore the ever-evolving question of what does it mean to be a “modern Jew” through the use of primary documents and selections from literary works.  The themes and readings in this class are gleaned from a variety of sources and allow us to encounter men and women from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds and Jewish localities.

Offered at the College Preparatory level.

United States History        Yearlong/1 credit

Required for 11th grade students (AP US History may be substituted).

The eleventh grade humanities course is the third course in the history sequence.  In this class, we will survey American historical and cultural developments from Columbian contact to the present.  This course builds upon the skills established in 9th and 10th grades and lays the foundation for the future study of history as a complex network of political, economic, social, cultural, religious and aesthetic forces, emphasizing the interlocking flow of time and space. The course integrates the history of American Jews into the broader narrative of United States History.  

Offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels.

Social Studies
ECONOMICS

Economics Principles and Practices        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Economics Principles and Practices is a semester-long course designed to foster the development of critical thinking skills through the understanding, application, and analysis of economic concepts. This particular course will emphasize personal finance and use that as the lens through which to view greater global economic concepts and systems. The course includes concepts such as foundational economic theories, micro/macro economics, and money management. 

Open to 11-12th grade students.

Offered at a College Preparatory and Honors levels.

Can count toward a core course credit: Economics

Advanced Placement Microeconomics        1 Semester/.5 Credit

AP Microeconomics is a college-level course exploring how the individual sectors of the economy (households, industries, and governments) make economic decisions with regard to the basic problem of resource scarcity in relation to allocative and productive efficiency within the national economy. In addition, we will look at the relationship of the study of contemporary economics to other academic and vocational disciplines, including but not limited to finance, business, history, psychology, health, public policy, and environmental studies.There is also a strong skills focus on generating and analyzing graphs, interpreting charts, understanding data analysis, and developing economic ways of thinking and reasoning. Given the global focus of the school, practical examples and applications are drawn not only from the U.S. economy, but also from Israel, the E.U., and economies around the world.  Students are prepared for the College Board exam and assessed through unit tests that mirror the AP Exam format.  

Open to 11-12th grade students.

This course will run 1st semester and is strongly encouraged if a student plans to take AP Macroeconomics

Can count toward a core course credit: Economics

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics        1 Semester/.5 Credit

AP Macroeconomics is a college-level course which examines the national and global economy, including in-depth analysis of monetary, fiscal, and trade policies that foster high GDP growth, low inflation, and low unemployment. In addition, we will look at the relationship of the study of contemporary economics to other academic disciplines. There is also a strong skills focus on generating and analyzing graphs, interpreting charts, understanding data analysis, and developing economic ways of thinking and reasoning. Given the global focus of the school, practical examples and applications are drawn not only from the U.S. economy, but also from Israel, the E.U. and economies around the world.  Students are assessed regularly and prepared for taking the May AP Exam through quizzes and tests that mirror the multiple choice and FRQ format of the AP Exam.

Open to 11-12th grade students.

AP Microeconomics is strongly encouraged as a precursor to this course.

Can count towards a core course credit: Economics

Social Studies
GOVERNMENT

United States Government        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

United States Government is a semester-long course that provides students with a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government. Students will examine the foundations of the United States government and will trace its development through the present. Students will also examine the relationship of the United States government to states and citizens.

Open to 10-12th grade students.

Offered at College Preparatory and Honors levels.

Can count toward a core course credit: Government

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics        Yearlong/1 Credit

Open to twelfth grade students, juniors may be admitted if space is available

This course is based on standards established by The College Board that administers the national AP exam.  The purpose of this course is to prepare the students for success on the national examination and, depending on the individual institution, receiving college credit for the course.  For this reason, the class is taught at a level equivalent to a college survey course, with all of the burdens and responsibilities that entails. The specific aims of the course are as follows: to develop the student’s ability to view the functions of US government and politics with a perceptive and open intelligence; to understand the main topics of the AP Government course and to use these topics to interpret and explain the functions of the US government and politics; to refine the ability to analyze and interpret data, charts, and other information relevant to US government and politics; to read both narrative and data with analytical discrimination; and to write with precision and clarity.  

Can count towards a core course credit: Government


SOCIAL STUDIES
Advanced Placement Courses

Advanced Placement World History        Yearlong/1 CREDIT

Open to students in tenth grade.

This course is based on standards established by The College Board that administers the national AP exam.  The purpose of this course is to prepare the students for success on the national examination and, depending on the individual institution, receiving college credit for the course.  For this reason, the class is taught at a level equivalent to a college survey course, with all of the burdens and responsibilities that entails. This yearlong AP World History course will develop in students a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. AP World History highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. While there is no prerequisite for AP World History, students should make sure that they are prepared for the course load associated with an Advanced Placement History course.  Students should already be familiar with general world history and geography so as not to fall behind when discussing deeper subject matter and current political problems around the world.

Can count toward a core course credit.

Advanced Placement United States History         Yearlong/1 credit

This course is based on standards established by The College Board that administers the national AP exam. The purpose of this course is to prepare the students for success on the national examination and, depending on the individual institution, to help students receive college credit for the course. For this reason, the class is taught at a level equivalent to a college survey course, with all of the burdens and responsibilities that entails. This course will survey the history of the United States of America from the "discovery" of the New World to the very recent past. The primary focus of the course will be to provide students with an opportunity to develop an understanding of some of the major themes in American history, to train students to analyze historical evidence, and to develop in students the ability to analyze and express historical understanding in writing. The bulk of instructional time in the classroom will consist of intensive instructor lectures, in addition to independent assignments, including analyzing primary documents and delving into scholarly articles. This course is very dependent on the student’s ability to read outside of class and bring that information into the classroom. Students will have summer reading to complete prior to taking the course.

Can count towards a core course credit.


Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics                       Yearlong/1 Credit

Open to twelfth grade students, juniors may be admitted if space is available

This course is based on standards established by The College Board that administers the national AP exam.  The purpose of this course is to prepare the students for success on the national examination and, depending on the individual institution, receiving college credit for the course.  For this reason, the class is taught at a level equivalent to a college survey course, with all of the burdens and responsibilities that entails. The specific aims of the course are as follows: to develop the student’s ability to view the functions of US government and politics with a perceptive and open intelligence; to understand the main topics of the AP Government course and to use these topics to interpret and explain the functions of the US government and politics; to refine the ability to analyze and interpret data, charts, and other information relevant to US government and politics; to read both narrative and data with analytical discrimination; and to write with precision and clarity.  

Can count towards a core course credit: Government

Advanced Placement Psychology        Yearlong/1 CREDIT

The purpose of AP Psychology is to introduce students to the studies of behavior and mental processes of humans. Students will be provided with a critical overview of the study of psychology, focusing on the theories and research methods used in psychological science and practice. Because psychology is a multivalent subject, it is possible to explore the field using a variety of methods. The course information will be presented through lectures, class participation activities, demonstrations, and audio-visual aids. Students will use the textbook and other resources such as the internet, popular media, newspapers, and professional Psychological publications in order to conduct research throughout the year. Students will learn about the methods and ethical approaches of professional psychology.

Open to eleventh and twelfth grade students.

Can count towards a core course credit.

Advanced Placement Microeconomics        1 Semester/.5 Credit

AP Microeconomics is a college-level course exploring how the individual sectors of the economy (households, industries, and governments) make economic decisions with regard to the basic problem of resource scarcity in relation to allocative and productive efficiency within the national economy. In addition, we will look at the relationship of the study of contemporary economics to other academic and vocational disciplines, including but not limited to finance, business, history, psychology, health, public policy, and environmental studies.There is also a strong skills focus on generating and analyzing graphs, interpreting charts, understanding data analysis, and developing economic ways of thinking and reasoning. Given the global focus of the school, practical examples and applications are drawn not only from the U.S. economy, but also from Israel, the E.U., and economies around the world.  Students are prepared for the College Board exam and assessed through unit tests that mirror the AP Exam format.  

Open to 10-12th grade students.

This course will run 1st semester and is strongly encouraged if a student plans to take AP Macroeconomics

Can count toward a core course credit: Economics

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics        1 Semester/.5 Credit

AP Macroeconomics is a college-level course which examines the national and global economy, including in-depth analysis of monetary, fiscal, and trade policies that foster high GDP growth, low inflation, and low unemployment. In addition, we will look at the relationship of the study of contemporary economics to other academic disciplines. There is also a strong skills focus on generating and analyzing graphs, interpreting charts, understanding data analysis, and developing economic ways of thinking and reasoning. Given the global focus of the school, practical examples and applications are drawn not only from the U.S. economy, but also from Israel, the E.U. and economies around the world.  Students are assessed regularly and prepared for taking the May AP Exam through quizzes and tests that mirror the multiple choice and FRQ format of the AP Exam.

Open to 10-12th grade students.

AP Microeconomics is strongly encouraged as a precursor to this course.

Can count towards a core course credit: Economics

Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

AP Comparative Government and Politics is a college-level course that introduces students to the current global political landscape through a comparative lens, highlighting the variations among countries in political culture, institutions, ideologies, and policy processes/outcomes.  Despite a wave of democratization in the last hundred years, many contemporary democratic states are fragile and under threat. A comparative study of countries offers us an opportunity to analyze the broad historical and contemporary trends and the future challenges for democracy in our increasingly interdependent world.  In accordance with the College Board Advanced Placement syllabus, the course focuses on six pre-selected countries - China, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and the United Kingdom.  All are studied according to five themes: Authority and Power Structures; Political Institutions; Citizens, Society and the State; Political and Economic Change; and Foreign and Domestic Policy Issues. In addition to the six countries, case studies and examples are also drawn from the U.S. and Israel.  The policies and programs of the E.U., U.N., and WTO are introduced.  

 

Open to 11-12th grade students.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.


Social Studies Electives

AP Comparative Government and Politics        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

AP Comparative Government and Politics is a college-level course that introduces students to the current global political landscape through a comparative lens, highlighting the variations among countries in political culture, institutions, ideologies, and policy processes/outcomes.  Despite a wave of democratization in the last hundred years, many contemporary democratic states are fragile and under threat. A comparative study of countries offered us an opportunity to analyze the broad historical and contemporary trends and the future challenges for democracy in our increasingly interdependent world.  In accordance with the College Board Advanced Placement syllabus, the course focuses on six pre-selected countries - China, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and the United Kingdom.  All are studied according to five themes: Authority and Power Structures; Political Institutions; Citizens, Society and the State; Political and Economic Change; and Foreign and Domestic Policy Issues. In addition to the six countries, case studies and examples are also drawn from the U.S. and Israel.  The policies and programs of the E.U., U.N., and WTO are introduced.

Open to 11-12th grade students.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Criminal Psychology        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

This course will model itself on the criminal process, from the formation of ‘criminals’ and ‘criminal minds’, through issues of who and what takes responsibility for a crime, while also examining aspects such as eyewitnessing, police investigation, jury decision-making, and punishment. It will also address the important issue of how criminologists undertake creating their models of criminality, and how and why these models have changed over time. Psychopathy will form a significant part of the course.

Open to 11-12th grade students.

Offered at a College Preparatory and Honors level.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Economics Principles and Practices        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Economics Principles and Practices is a semester-long course designed to foster the development of critical thinking skills through the understanding, application, and analysis of economic concepts. This particular course will emphasize personal finance and use that as the lens through which to view greater global economic concepts and systems. The course includes concepts such as foundational economic theories, micro/macro economics, and money management.  

Open to 11-12th grade students.

Offered at a College Preparatory and Honors levels.

Can count toward a core course credit: Economics

Advanced Placement Microeconomics        1 Semester/.5 Credit

AP Microeconomics is a college-level course exploring how the individual sectors of the economy (households, industries, and governments) make economic decisions with regard to the basic problem of resource scarcity in relation to allocative and productive efficiency within the national economy. In addition, we will look at the relationship of the study of contemporary economics to other academic and vocational disciplines, including but not limited to finance, business, history, psychology, health, public policy, and environmental studies.There is also a strong skills focus on generating and analyzing graphs, interpreting charts, understanding data analysis, and developing economic ways of thinking and reasoning. Given the global focus of the school, practical examples and applications are drawn not only from the U.S. economy, but also from Israel, the E.U., and economies around the world.  Students are prepared for the College Board exam and assessed through unit tests that mirror the AP Exam format.  

Open to 11-12th grade students.

This course will run 1st semester and is strongly encouraged if a student plans to take AP Macroeconomics

Can count toward a core course credit: Economics

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics        1 Semester/.5 Credit

AP Macroeconomics is a college-level course which examines the national and global economy, including in-depth analysis of monetary, fiscal, and trade policies that foster high GDP growth, low inflation, and low unemployment. In addition, we will look at the relationship of the study of contemporary economics to other academic disciplines. There is also a strong skills focus on generating and analyzing graphs, interpreting charts, understanding data analysis, and developing economic ways of thinking and reasoning. Given the global focus of the school, practical examples and applications are drawn not only from the U.S. economy, but also from Israel, the E.U. and economies around the world.  Students are assessed regularly and prepared for taking the May AP Exam through quizzes and tests that mirror the multiple choice and FRQ format of the AP Exam.

Open to 11-12th grade students.

AP Microeconomics is strongly encouraged as a precursor to this course.

Can count towards a core course credit: Economics

United States Government        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

United States Government is a semester-long course that provides students with a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government. Students will examine the foundations of the United States government and will trace its development through the present. Students will also examine the relationship of the United States government to states and citizens.

Open to 10-12th grade students.

Offered at College Preparatory and Honors levels.

Can count toward a core course credit: Government

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics        Yearlong/1 Credit

Open to twelfth grade students, juniors may be admitted if space is available

This course is based on standards established by The College Board that administers the national AP exam.  The purpose of this course is to prepare the students for success on the national examination and, depending on the individual institution, receiving college credit for the course.  For this reason, the class is taught at a level equivalent to a college survey course, with all of the burdens and responsibilities that entails. The specific aims of the course are as follows: to develop the student’s ability to view the functions of US government and politics with a perceptive and open intelligence; to understand the main topics of the AP Government course and to use these topics to interpret and explain the functions of the US government and politics; to refine the ability to analyze and interpret data, charts, and other information relevant to US government and politics; to read both narrative and data with analytical discrimination; and to write with precision and clarity.  

Can count towards a core course credit: Government

History of Sports in Modern America        1 Semester/.5 credit

The History of Sports in Modern America will examine sports—especially soccer, boxing, baseball, college and professional football, and basketball—from the mid-19th century to the present with attention given to the interactions between sports, society, and culture. Specific attention will be paid to how sport has influenced American life as well as how American life has influenced the relationships between sport and a wide range of topics, including race, class, gender, imperialism, politics, nationalism, and religion.

 

Open to 10-12th grade students.

This course is offered at an Honors level.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

History of Rock and Roll        1 Semester/.5 credit

This course will cover the history of Rock & Roll in America, from early blues and gospel influences to current trends in popular music.  We will also be examining the social and historical context in which this music was created.

 

Open to 9-12th grade students.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

AP Psychology        Yearlong/1 credit

The purpose of AP Psychology is to introduce students to the studies of behavior and mental processes of humans and animals. Students will be provided with a critical overview of the study of psychology, focusing on the theories and research methods used in psychological science and practice. Because psychology is a fascinating course, it is possible to explore the field using a variety of methods. The course information will be presented through lectures, class participation activities, demonstrations, and audio-visual aids. Students will use the textbook and other resources such as the internet, popular media, newspapers, and professional Psychological publications in order to conduct research throughout the year. Students will learn about the methods and ethical approaches of professional psychology. You are to be commended for taking on the challenge of a college-level course during this year. If the effort is put in, the rewards can be significant.

 

Open to 11-12th grade students.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

 

Sweet, Funny, Mean, Scary? The Psychology of Children’s Books        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Where the Wild Things Are, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day, The Lorax -- Why did you love these books so much growing up? How do children’s book authors know how to tap into a child’s mind? Why are children drawn to scary and sometimes violent books? What are the secret messages imprinted through these books on children’s minds and how does it set the stage for the child’s entire life? How do these books reflect the measure of our humanity?

In this class we will explore children’s books through the lenses of child psychology, children’s literature from different cultures, morality, and the art of bookmaking and book illustration.

For the creative part of the class the students will experiment with various art forms to reflect text; the class will visit relevant museum exhibits; and will have children’s book authors and illustrators as guest speakers.

The students will read material on child psychology, morals and values, and a variety of children’s literature including recently translated Yiddish children’s stories. The class will meet professionals in the fields of psychology, children’s literature, and Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture. The class will visit local elementary schools to read books to children. Using what we learn, each student will create a book based on a children’s story.  

Open to 9-12th grades.

Offered at the CP level.

Can count toward an Art or Jewish Studies credit; students choose one.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Israeli History and Politics        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Israel History and Politics is the preparatory course for students going on the Israel Poland Experience. The course is designed to provide students with a broader understanding of the Jewish experiences in both Israel and Poland, while also serving as an orientation for the actual trip. Upon their return from the trip, students will reflect on their experiences and share these reflections with the Weber school during our annual Yom Hashoah, Yom Hazikaron, and Yom Haatzmaut commemorations and celebrations.

Open to 12th graders who participate in the Israel Poland Experience.

Offered at the CP level.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

SCIENCE

Biology        Yearlong/1 credit

Required of ninth grade students.

This is an introductory course in biology and is a prerequisite for the advanced placement biology class.  This course covers the chemical, physical, and biological properties of cells, biological macromolecules and their transformation, metabolism, enzymes, protein synthesis, and photosynthesis.  It also includes the study of the gene, heredity, evolution, classification and the anatomy of the major systems in the human body and their functions in daily living.  Flowering plants, their structure and function are also studied.

This course is offered at the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

Chemistry        Yearlong/1 credit

Required of tenth grade students.

Students in chemistry will  examine  the  fundamental  properties  of  elements,  compounds,  and mixtures.  Chemical reactions and chemical processes are observed and explained at the atomic and   molecular   level   using   the   scientific   method. Students will integrate conceptual understandings, algebra skills and an ongoing laboratory experience to develop the fundamentals of problem solving,  laboratory work, and the practical application of chemistry.

This course is offered at the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

Physics        Yearlong/1 credit

Required of eleventh grade students. (AP Physics may be substituted).

The first semester of Physics focuses on Mechanics, including motion, forces, gravity, momentum, energy and work.  The students also briefly examine the different states of matter.  The second semester includes Waves (sound and light) and Electricity.  If time permits, students also explore some of the more modern applications of Physics, including quantum theory and nuclear physics.  Throughout the year the students complete laboratory experiments and write lab reports based on their findings.  These write-ups emphasize using data to draw conclusions and make predictions.  In addition to the material covered in the textbook, the students also complete various activities designed to bring the “real world” into the physics classroom.  

This course is offered at the Honors and College Preparatory levels.

Anatomy and Physiology        Yearlong/1 credit

Open to twelfth grade students.

Anatomy is the science of structure and the relationship among structures.  Physiology is the science of body functions, that is, how the body parts work.  Because function can never be completely separated from structure, this course is designed to understand the human body best by studying anatomy and physiology together. By the end of this course students should be able to understand how each structure of the body is designed to carry out a particular function and how the structure of a part often determines the function it performs.  

This course is offered on the Honors and College Preparatory levels.


SCIENCE
Advanced Placement Courses

Advanced Placement Biology        Yearlong/1 credit

Open to tenth - twelfth grade students. Placement recommendation required.

This course aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.  The two main goals are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process.  The three general areas covered are molecules and cells; heredity and evolution; and organisms and populations. These topics are taught based on the following eight major themes: Science as a process; Evolution; Energy transfer; Continuity and Change; Relationship of Structure to Function; Regulation; Interdependence in Nature; Science, Technology, and Society.  By the end of this course the students should have an understanding of biological concepts and be prepared to take the Advanced Placement test. The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course.

Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science        Yearlong/1 credit

Open to twelfth grade students. Placement recommendation required.

This course is designed to be equivalent of first year environmental science course in college.  The goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems-both natural and anthropological, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine the alternative solutions for resolving or preventing these.

Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces wide variety of topics from geology, biology, chemistry, ecology, and geography. Yet there are several unifying themes that cut across different areas of study. Unifying themes include:  science is a process, energy conversions underlie all ecological processes, earth is an interconnected system, humans alter natural systems, environmental problems have a social and cultural context, and human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems. It is open to all juniors and seniors that have completed biology, chemistry, and at least one year of algebra.


Advanced Placement Physics 1        Yearlong/1 credit

Open to eleventh and twelfth grade students. Placement recommendation required.

AP Physics 1 is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. The course enables students to deepen their understanding of the concepts and theories of physics through experimentation and thinking inquiry. In addition to building conceptual understanding, problem solving skills, and laboratory process skills, the curriculum is designed to develop the ability to apply these concepts to new situations and interpret phenomena in the framework of the first principles of physics. Finally, the course aims for the students to learn and practice process skills to pursue and answer self-generated questions and to apply critical thinking in many situations. This course will be instructed according to the College Board AP Physics guidelines for content, labs and examination format.

AP Physics 1 is designed to be taught over the course of one full academic year and may be taken as a first-year physics course without any prior physics coursework necessary. This course is also recommended as second-year physics course for students coming from CP Physics as per their physics teacher recommendation.  Students taking AP Physics 1 should have completed Algebra II and be presently enrolled in CP or H Pre-Calculus.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT Physics C        Yearlong/1 Credit

Open to eleventh and twelfth grade students. Placement recommendation required.

This course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. The sequence is parallel to or preceded by mathematics courses that include calculus. Methods of calculus are used wherever appropriate in formulating physical principles and in applying them to physical problems. Strong emphasis is placed on solving a variety of challenging problems, some requiring calculus. The subject matter of the AP Physics C: Mechanics course is classical mechanics and includes topics in kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion, work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; oscillations; and gravitation. Use of calculus in problem solving and in derivations is expected to increase as the course progresses.

*Prerequisite is AP Physics I and Calculus.

Advanced Placement elective open to 11-12th grades.


Science Electives

Microbiology        YEARLONG/1 credit

Microbiology is the study of organisms too small to be seen without the aid of visual equipment, which includes bacteria, viruses, prions, virions, protists, and fungi. This course focuses on the medical and human impacts of microbiology, including the investigation of infectious diseases, outbreaks, and the quest to eradicate pathogens like smallpox (the only success story thus far!). The class will be tailored to the interests of the students. Microbiology touches many aspects of human life- genetic engineering, agriculture, the food industry, and the environment, to name a few.

Offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels.

Available to grades 10-12.

Can count for a core course requirement for seniors.

Forensics        YEARLONG/1 Credit

Forensic Science is the application of science (chemistry, physics, and biology) to the criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in a criminal justice system. It includes the investigation of fingerprinting, fiber analysis, ballistics, arson, trace evidence analysis, poisons, drugs, blood spatters, and blood samples. Students are taught the proper collection, preservation, and laboratory analysis of various samples.

CP elective open to 12th grades.

Can count for a core course requirement for seniors.


HEBREW

Introduction to Hebrew        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

This is an introductory proficiency based course, designed for students with no prior study/knowledge of the language. The course teaches the fundamentals of Modern Hebrew language starting with the Hebrew alphabet and vowels system, basic vocabulary and pronunciation, followed by basic grammar concepts. Students will be introduced to listening comprehension, oral and written basic communication, grammar and reading. The emphasis will be on the development of basic oral and written communication skills in standard Modern Hebrew. Students will be provided with numerous participation opportunities during class. Classes are conducted mostly in the target language - Hebrew. This allows students to gain a solid level of confidence by practicing speaking, listening, reading and writing in Hebrew, from the very beginning.

Prerequisites: None.

Hebrew 100        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

This course is intended for students with a mid-novice proficiency level in Hebrew. Students will continue to develop the basic skills mastered in Introduction to Hebrew. The course includes a general review and expansion of grammar, along with vocabulary development, conversation, readings and writing exercises. Students benefit from specially designed exercises to gradually expand their vocabulary and improve pronunciation through conversational drills in order to develop oral skill.

The course integrates the four major language-acquisition skills—speaking, listening, reading, and writing. In speaking, students will work towards successfully handling uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations. In listening, students will work towards understanding sentence-length expressions that consist of recombinations in limited content areas. In writing, students will work towards meeting practical writing needs, such as: letters and paragraphs about topics grounded in personal experiences. In reading, students will work towards understanding simple connected text dealing with basic and social needs. During the course, students encounter materials and exercises of increasing complexity as they progress towards proficiency in Hebrew.

Prerequisites: Intro to Hebrew or equivalent level (based on Placement Test).


Hebrew 110        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

This course is intended for students who have successfully finished Hebrew 001 language learning and have reached the mid/ high novice proficiency level in Hebrew. Class will be conducted mostly in Hebrew, and the use of English by students will be discouraged.

The course integrates the four major language-acquisition skills—speaking, listening, reading, and writing. In speaking, students will work towards successfully handling most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations. In listening, students will work towards understanding longer discourse on a number of topics related to different times and places. In writing, students will work towards meeting most practical writing needs and limited social demands, such as taking detailed notes on familiar topics, using more complex sentences. In reading, students will work towards fully understanding texts dealing with basic and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge. The course teaches students to understand semi-authentic articles and produce passages in Modern Hebrew through exposure to the Hebrew language currently used in Israeli media, cinema, music, literature and everyday conversation.  During the course, students encounter materials and exercises of increasing complexity as they progress towards proficiency in Hebrew.

Prerequisites: Hebrew 001 or equivalent level (based on Placement Test).

Hebrew 200        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

This course is intended as a continuation of skill development in Hebrew 100 for students who have reached the mid novice proficiency level and are developing their proficiency level in Hebrew. The course integrates the four major language-acquisition skills—speaking, listening, reading, and writing. It engages students in increasing their proficiency in conversation, reading and writing skills and further exposing them to Israeli culture. In speaking, students will work towards successfully handling uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations. In listening, students will work towards understanding sentence-length expressions that consist of recombinations in limited content areas. In writing, students will work towards meeting practical writing needs, such as:  letters and paragraphs about topics grounded in personal experiences. In reading, students will work towards understanding simple connected text dealing with basic and social needs. During the course, students encounter materials and exercises of increasing complexity as they progress towards proficiency in Hebrew. Class will be conducted solely in Hebrew, and the use of English by students will be discouraged.

Prerequisites: Hebrew 001, 110 or equivalent level (based on Placement Test).


Hebrew 210        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

The course is intended as a continuation of the growth fostered in Hebrew 110. The course integrates the four major language-acquisition skills—speaking, listening, reading, and writing at the high novice- low intermediate proficiency level. The course will further develop listening comprehension and speaking skills, with an increased emphasis on reading, writing and cultural knowledge. In speaking, students will work towards successfully handling most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations. In listening, students will work towards understanding longer discourse on a number of topics related to different times and places. In writing, students will work towards meeting most practical writing needs and limited social demands, such as taking detailed notes on familiar topic, using more complex sentences. In reading, students will work towards fully understanding detailed texts dealing with basic and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge. The course teaches students to understand short authentic articles and produce passages in Modern Hebrew through exposure to the Hebrew language currently used in Israeli media, cinema, music, literature and everyday conversation. During the course, students encounter materials and exercises of increasing complexity as they progress towards proficiency in Hebrew.  

Prerequisites: Hebrew 110, or equivalent level (based on Placement Test).

Hebrew 300        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

This course is intended as a continuation of the growth fostered in Hebrew 200. The course integrates the four major language-acquisition skills—speaking, listening, reading and writing at the low intermediate proficiency level. In speaking, students will work towards successfully handling most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations. In listening, students will work towards understanding longer discourse on a number of topics related to different times and places. In writing, students will work towards meeting most practical writing needs and limited social demands, such as taking detailed notes on familiar topic, using more complex sentences. In reading, students will work towards fully understanding texts dealing with basic and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge.  During the course, students encounter materials and exercises of increasing complexity as they progress towards proficiency in Hebrew.

Prerequisites: Hebrew 200, Hebrew 210, or equivalent level (based on Placement Test).


Hebrew 310        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

This course is intended as a continuation of the growth fostered in Hebrew 210 for students who have reached the intermediate level and desire to expand their knowledge and proficiency in the Hebrew language (low/mid intermediate). Students’ language skills will be strengthened by developing their ability to express thoughts, ideas and opinions, in both oral and written forms.

The course integrates the four major language-acquisition skills—speaking, listening, reading and writing.  In speaking, students will work towards conversing casually about topics of current public and personal interests. In listening, students will work towards understanding main ideas in detailed discourse about topics beyond immediate situations. In writing, students will work towards writing several lengthy paragraphs about familiar topics. In reading, students will work towards reading longer prose such as short stories. The students will watch two movies and read a book during this course and will encounter materials and exercises of increasing complexity as they progress towards proficiency in Hebrew.  

Prerequisites: Hebrew 210, or equivalent level (based on Placement Test).

Hebrew 400        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

This course is intended as a continuation of the growth fostered in Hebrew 300. The course integrates the four major language-acquisition skills—speaking, listening, reading, and writing at the low/mid intermediate proficiency level. Students learn to understand and produce texts in Modern Hebrew through exposure to the Hebrew currently used in Israeli media (TV, radio, Internet), as well as through movies, music, literature and everyday conversation.  In speaking, students will work towards conversing casually about topics of current public and personal interests. In listening, students will work towards understanding main ideas in detailed discourse about topics beyond immediate situations. In writing, students will work towards writing lengthy paragraphs about familiar topics. In reading, students will work towards reading longer prose, such as short stories. During the course, students encounter materials and exercises of increasing complexity as they progress towards proficiency in Hebrew.

Prerequisites: Hebrew 300, Hebrew 310, or equivalent level (based on Placement Test).

Hebrew 410        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

This course is intended as a continuation of the growth fostered in Hebrew 310. The course integrates the four major language-acquisition skills—speaking, listening, reading and writing at the mid/high intermediate proficiency level. Special emphasis will be on expanding previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. The course incorporates reading, discussing and analyzing texts as a basis for expression and interpretation, with special attention to verb conjugation, noun and pronoun declension, as well as syntactic structure of Modern Hebrew. In speaking, students will work towards an increase in quality and quantity discourse functions. In listening, students will work towards developing emerging awareness of culturally implied meanings beyond the surface meanings of the text. In writing, students will work towards fluency in writing about a variety of topics in detail. In reading, students will work towards understanding parts of conceptually abstract and linguistically complex texts on unfamiliar topics.  During the course, students encounter materials and exercises of increasing complexity as they progress towards proficiency in Hebrew.

Prerequisites: Hebrew 310, Hebrew 220, or equivalent level (based on Placement Test).


Hebrew 520: Poems, Short Stories, and Media        YEARLONG/1 credit

The course is designed to introduce students to a few of the greatest Israeli poets, whose work became famous and timeless songs throughout the history of Israel. Students will explore the ways poetry and music are influenced by socio-cultural developments from 1900’s to present, with reference to the historical changes throughout time. Students are introduced to cultural and linguistic differences when they listen to, learn and analyze songs and poems. They have the opportunity to recognize and appreciate a different language and culture than their own and to develop a solid knowledge of Hebrew poetry and music, while developing a lifelong interest in learning the Hebrew language and its culture. Analysis of poems with particular attention to music is an integral part of this course.

Prerequisites: Heb 300, 400, or Heb 200 with teacher recommendation.

Open to 11th-12th grade students.

Offered at an College Preparatory level.

Can count toward a Jewish Studies credit.

Can count toward a core course credit.

Hebrew Electives

Hebrew: CE480        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Current Events

This course will focus on socio-cultural issues and current events in Israeli life as reflected in Israeli media in various fields: social, political, economy, culture and more. Students in this course will be required to watch and listen (inside and outside of class) to Israeli news and/or news related to Israel.

The main goals of this elective course are for student to develop a deeper awareness and understanding of the presented issues, issues that reflect on Israeli culture, politics and social life. Language will be developed through class activities such as listening to news, reading, discussion and oral presentations in Hebrew.

Prerequisites: Heb 220, 310, 410, or 420.

Open to 11th-12th grade students.

Offered at an Honors level.

Can count toward a Jewish Studies credit.

Can count toward a core course credit.


Israeli Film              1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Israeli Film & Culture - (50s - Present) Society and Politics

Film is an excellent tool to introduce students to the culture of a nation with its conflicts, hopes and dynamics, while developing a lifelong interest in learning the Hebrew language and its culture. This course offers the use of film as a tool to follow the changes that have taken place in Israeli society through the study of a variety of topics. The curriculum is based on an Israeli education program with the goal of examining the societal changes through the portrayal of the Israeli citizens in films. This course will focus on an introduction to Israeli cinema, genres in Israeli cinema and Israeli society. The course will have reading and writing components that will require reflection and response to the films and readings.

Prerequisites: any of: Heb 220, 310, 410, 420

Open to 11th-12th grade students.

Offered at an Honors level.

Can count toward a Jewish Studies credit.

Can count toward a core course credit.


SPANISH

Spanish 100        Yearlong/1 credit

This course is intended for students with little or no prior study of the Spanish language. This course will introduce students to the study of Spanish language and to begin to develop in them an appreciation for Hispanic culture. Emphasis will be given to the development of basic proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening comprehension, writing, and reading. Students will begin with the alphabet and basic greetings and leave-takings. By the end of the year, the students will be able to express themselves in the present tense on the following topics: self, school, family, pastimes, sports, travel, and weather. Students will begin to explore and gain a basic understanding of the cultural, geographical, and political diversity present in the Spanish speaking world. This course is offered at the College Preparatory level. All students will prepare for and take the National Spanish Exam.

Spanish 200/210        Yearlong/1 CREDIT

This course is intended to build on skills learned in Spanish 100. The students will continue to develop their skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. The students will gain confidence in using the present tense, the present progressive, and the immediate future and will learn to express themselves in the past tense. By the end of the year, students will be able to communicate about the following topics:  shopping, clothing, daily routines, food, and celebrations. They will gain confidence in communicating with the teacher and their classmates in the target language. The students will widen their understanding of the Hispanic world by continuing to explore its diversity. This course is offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels. Students at the Honors level will prepare for and take the National Spanish Exam.

Spanish 300/310        Yearlong/1 credit

This course is an intermediate level Spanish course that will build on the skills learned in Spanish 200/210 and will continue to foster growth in the four areas of language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This course aims to prepare students to make the transition from basic to advanced level Spanish. Students will learn to use a variety of verb moods and tenses. By the end of the year students will be able to talk in the present, past and future about relationships, friendship and family, health and well being, nature, the environment, and literature. Students will be challenged to develop sound critical thinking skills as well as creative expression in the target language. Culture will become integrated with language and literature studies. This course is offered at the College Preparatory and Honors levels. Students at the Honors level will prepare for and take the National Spanish Exam.


Spanish 400/410        Yearlong/1 CREDIT

This course is a continuation of the intermediate level of Spanish. The course will continue to build on skills learned in Spanish 100- Spanish 300/310 and will challenge the students to communicate both orally and in writing on a variety of issues and topics. The students will gain confidence and proficiency in using more complex structures of the Spanish language; they will also be able to communicate about issues regarding science, technology, the workplace, art, literature, politics, and religion. All activities proposed for this level of study will stress two criteria: the critical thinking process as well as language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students at the Honors level will prepare for and take the National Spanish Exam.


SPANISH
ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH        Yearlong/1 CREDIT

The course is designed for students who have a sincere desire to develop proficiency and who already have more than a basic knowledge of the language. Students will be asked to comprehend Spanish intended for native speakers and will be required to produce Spanish comprehensible to native speakers in a variety of settings. Students should be able to apply his or her language skills to unfamiliar situations and be able to improvise. Successful completion of this course requires a student to utilize significant reading comprehension skills and writing skills as well as outstanding listening and speaking skills. The following areas are emphasized: comprehensive review of grammar, oral activities to improve fluency, essay writing, and listening and written comprehension skills. Other objectives of this course include understanding of and appreciation for literary works centered on Hispanic history and culture; preparing students to become better citizens of the 21st century by discussing world, national, local and Hispanic current events in the target language; and further developing students’ critical thinking skills.


SPANISH ELECTIVES

Spain: Unplugged        SEMESTER/.5 CREDIT

¡Vamos a España! In this elective course, we will delve into the rich history and culture of Spain, focusing on Jewish history, contemporary politics, and Northern Spanish culture. We will study what makes Spain Spanish different from Latin American Spanish, and most importantly, students will get to experience this language themselves through continuous interactions with native speakers. This course is an Honors by Choice, Jewish Studies credit course open to 10th-12th grade students who are in Spanish 200 or higher. The course will meet for 20 hours during the first semester outside of a regular block and will include a 2 week trip in Spain in January 2020, followed by 5 hours of post-trip class time. Students must interview to be considered for the program.

Prerequisite: Interview + enrollment in Spanish 210 or higher

Open to 10th-12th grade students.

Offered at the College Preparatory level or Honors by choice.

Can count toward a Jewish Studies credit.

Cannot count toward a core course credit. 


JEWISH STUDIES

Jewish Law and Literature        Yearlong/1 credit

*9th Grade Required Course (Comparative Jewish Law & Literature H may be substituted).

In this course you will master the skills needed for understanding and interpreting biblical texts. Through a close reading of the text, you will begin to appreciate the interpretative methodology of the classical rabbis and medieval commentators, as well as the literary criticism of modern commentators. You will also explore artists’ interpretations of the text, respond to the text using a range of annotation techniques and journaling, and develop your own interpretations. Finally, you will create message-driven art in each unit of study. The focus of our study will be the book of Bereshit (Genesis), which will serve as a backdrop for our learning how to learn; we will consult related texts in the TaNaKh (Hebrew bible) and parallel texts in the Christian bible and Quran.

Offered at CP and Honors levels.

Comparative Jewish Law and Literature Honors         Yearlong/1 credit

*9th Grade Course

This interdisciplinary course, combining traditional yeshiva learning with a Socratic seminar, will center on a variety of issues through the multiple lenses of Jewish literature, law and philosophy along with corresponding sources from other literary traditions. By studying a series of sugyot (thematic sections) from the Talmud along with comparative readings in general philosophy and literature, we will embrace the Rabbinic tendency towards machloket (informed, erudite, vigorous and respectful debate) and work to master this unique form of Jewish learning and argumentation. Class topics will range from the foundations of Jewish tradition (e.g. “Why be Jewish?”,) the ethics of personal relationships and communication (e.g. “Is there a Jewish way to communicate by text, Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram), business ethics, relations between parents and children, conflicting values in tzedakah (philanthropy) and the roots of Zionism and our relationship with the land of Israel.

Offered at the Honors level.

Jewish Literature and Thought II         Yearlong/1 credit

*10th Grade Required Course

Students will delve into themes including individual responsibility, rebellion, justice, leadership, and wisdom with Jewish Literature. Texts will include Tanakh—Torah, Prophets and Writings—as well as Rabbinic sources. Students will improve their text analysis skills and study the texts to understand both the simple meaning and modern applications. The class will explore concepts and ideas using classic commentators, modern Jewish thinkers, philosophy, and art. Students will also have opportunities to prepare and present projects that involve individual research and reflection.

Offered at CP and Honors levels.

Death, Dying, and Jewish Bioethics        YEARLONG/1 credit

Possible topics we will explore: out of body experiences, euthanasia, heaven and hell, resurrection of the dead, reincarnation, sexuality, test tube babies, genetic engineering, and cloning. We will take field trips to visit  a cemetery and a funeral home. Speakers may include members of the Jewish Burial Society, an organ transplant recipient and an organ transplant coordinator, and Planned Parenthood about contraception. All the comics that your funny bone can handle.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Offered at the CP level

Can count toward a core course credit for sophomores.

How to Talk Like Moses and Martin: Public Speaking in the 21st Century        
YEARLONG/1 credit

This course will explore effective public speaking, the relationship between speaker and audience, selecting a meaningful topic, crafting a  speech, and finally delivering.   Using different speeches from celebrated Jewish figures, we will explore the tools used by these orators to captivate their audience.  Students will also learn how to utilize their speaking platform to promote ethics and ideals from Jewish texts.  Students will write speeches on a variety of issues to a variety of different audiences in order to learn the subtle art of tone, message, and performance.

Open to 10-12th grades.

Offered at the CP level.

Can count toward a core course credit for sophomores.


Jewish Studies Electives

Death, Dying, and Jewish Bioethics        YEARLONG/1 credit

Possible topics we will explore: out of body experiences, euthanasia, heaven and hell, resurrection of the dead, reincarnation, sexuality, test tube babies, genetic engineering, and cloning. We will take field trips to visit  a cemetery and a funeral home. Speakers may include members of the Jewish Burial Society, an organ transplant recipient and an organ transplant coordinator, and Planned Parenthood about contraception. All the comics that your funny bone can handle.

Open to 10-12th grades.

Offered at the CP level

Can count toward a core course credit for sophomores.

How to Talk Like Moses and Martin: Public Speaking in the 21st Century        
YEARLONG/1 credit

This course will explore effective public speaking, the relationship between speaker and audience, selecting a meaningful topic, crafting a  speech, and finally delivering.   Using different speeches from celebrated Jewish figures, we will explore the tools used by these orators to captivate their audience.  Students will also learn how to utilize their speaking platform to promote ethics and ideals from Jewish texts.  Students will write speeches on a variety of issues to a variety of different audiences in order to learn the subtle art of tone, message, and performance.

Open to 10-12th grades.

Offered at the CP level.

Can count toward a core course credit for sophomores.

Things That Go Bump in the Night        Fall SEMESTER/.5 credit

More Things That Go Bump in the Night        Spring SEMESTER/.5 credit

In this course, we will explore a wide range of topics associated with Jewish folk tradition (superstition) and mystical (magical) practices that are often considered taboo, including: sorcery and witchcraft, demons and vampires, hamsas and magic bowls, astrology and golems. In addition to studying the textual sources and history of these folk traditions, we will learn about the objects of art associated with them and create our own clay objects in the ceramics studio, as well as other two-dimensional artwork. No previous ceramics experience is required.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Offered at the CP level

Can count toward an Art credit.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Process of Hate and the Holocaust        YEARLONG/1 CREDIT

The most important part of this course is the many survivors of the Holocaust and other genocides (Rwanda, South Sudan), and liberators--all heroic “Witnesses to History”--who will come and share their experiences and insights. A small sampling of topics include: Nazi propaganda, art and music of the Holocaust, acts of spiritual resistance, and the roles of perpetrators, bystanders, victims and rescuers.

Open to 10-12th grades.

Offered at the CP level

Cannot count toward a core course credit.


VISUAL ARTS

Art Foundations        1 YEAR/1 credit

This is a course designed to acquaint students with all areas of art.  In this yearlong course, students will learn the basics of drawing, painting, 2-D design, collage and mixed media (combining many materials in one artwork), ceramics, and 3-D design.  This course prepares students for all other areas of art and design, including ceramics, drawing, and 3-D printing courses.   This introductory studio course is a one semester elective that will prepare the student for further high school art experiences. The student will be introduced to skills and media that are utilized in the other art electives also including: drawing, painting, ceramics, the elements and principles of design, color theory, the critical process, and keeping a sketchbook journal. This is a yearlong course that is a prerequisite to Painting I and Ceramics I.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

DRAWING & PAINTING I        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

This course is designed to instruct students on classical and contemporary drawing and painting, techniques and concepts, with emphasis on the understanding of its formal language and the fundamentals of artistic expression.  Drawing and painting from still-life, landscape, and life models from observation will be geared towards realism; at the same time, various other drawing and painting styles could be explored. Color theory, linear perspective, pictorial composition, figure/ground relationships, visual perception, spatial concepts, and critical thinking skills will all be emphasized extensively. We will study and research major painting styles and movements in historical context.  Demonstrations, slide lectures, group and individual critiques will be given throughout the course.  

Open to 10-12th grades.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

DRAWING & PAINTING II        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

This course is a continuation of Drawing and Painting I with a focus on the figure, developing form and depth, working in various mediums and techniques, textural techniques, and individual style development. Color theory, linear perspective, pictorial composition, figure/ground relationships, visual perception, spatial concepts, and critical thinking skills will all be emphasized extensively. We will continue more in depth study and research of major painting styles and movements in historical context.  Demonstrations, slide lectures, group and individual critiques will be given throughout the course.

Open to 10-12th grades.

Prerequisite: Drawing & Painting I

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

2D Art        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

In this creative, 2-Dimensional art class, students will explore painting, creating murals for the walls of the school.  They will work in collage, jewelry making, drawing, watercolors, graffiti styles, altering books with stamping, stencils, image transfers, and various other fun and experiential art activities.  Students will also be allowed explore mediums and styles of art that interest them. 

Open to 9-12th grades.

Prerequisite: none

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

3D Art        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

A fun art class in which students will create body sculptures with packing tape, large scale cardboard cities, and large scale multi media three dimensional paintings. Students will also work in paper mache, clay, batik, metal and mixed media.  Student will explore carving from stones and wood, and building sculptures from all kinds of materials, using all kinds of tools.  

Open to 9-12th grades.

Prerequisite: none

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Ceramics I: Handbuilding        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

An introductory clay studio consisting of hand-building construction to familiarize artists with the quality and temperament of clay. The course will include an examination of texturizing, carving, glazing and firing processes.  Introduction to traditional and historical ceramic arts will be incorporated into the lab experiences. Artists begin the semester creating a simple pinch pot, a second pinch pot with sgraffito carving, and an advanced pinch pot, the unit one skull project.  Subsequent units include various methods of clay constructions -- coil, molds and slab -- requiring advancing levels of manual dexterity.

Open to 10-12th grades.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Ceramics II: Introduction to the Wheel        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Introductory wheel course.  Students begin with basic centering, cylinder form (adding handles), bowl form (carving foot), pitcher form (adding spout and handles), and more complex combinations for final projects.  Design research and problem-solving are key to success in this class. A team approach to participating in loading the kiln and firing is enacted.  An alternative approach is allowed for students who want to follow handbuilding, or a combination of throwing and handbuilding, throughout the semester course.  Raku firing is introduced at the end of the semester.

Open to 10-12th grades.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Prerequisite: Ceramics I

Ceramics III Honors        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Enhances level-two skills and provides opportunities to apply design techniques in clay through hand building and/or wheel-throwing techniques while developing a personal artistic voice.  Design research and problem-solving are key to success in this class.  Presents ceramic/pottery forms as art and craft in a historical context.  Explores ideas and questions about form and function of ceramic works, past and present.  Outside project of a gallery visit and subsequent in-class presentation is mandatory. Raku glazing and firing at the end of the semester.  Assessment using rubrics and critiques throughout the semester.

Open to 11-12th grades.

Offered at the Honors level.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Prerequisite: Ceramics I, II

Ceramics IV Honors        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Enhances level-three skills and provides opportunities to apply design techniques in clay through hand building and/or wheel-throwing techniques while continuing to develop a personal artistic voice. Design research and problem-solving are key to success in this class; students write their own syllabus, reviewed and approved by the teacher, in the first week.   Emphasizes more complex form and surface treatments using tools, glazes (teams with instructor to mix glazes), resists, and multiple clay bodies.  Potters at this level are required to take part in studio maintenance and firing in addition to strengthening their own artistic voice.  Outside project of a gallery visit and subsequent in-class presentation is mandatory.  A raku firing will take place after school once during semester.  Assessment rubrics and critiques throughout the semester.

Open to 11-12th grades.

Offered at the Honors level.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Prerequisite: Ceramics I, II, III

Ceramics Raku Honors        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Enhances level-two skills and provides opportunities to apply raku-oriented designs in clay through hand building and/or wheel-throwing techniques. Design research and problem-solving are key to success in this class. Emphasizes more complex form and surface treatments using tools, resists, and multiple clay bodies.  Potters at this level are required to take part in studio maintenance and firing in addition to strengthening their own artistic voice.  Outside project of a gallery visit and subsequent in-class presentation is mandatory.  A raku firing will take place after school once a month during semester.  Assessment critiques throughout the semester.

Open to 11-12th grades.

Offered at the Honors level.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Prerequisite: Ceramics I, II

AP STUDIO ART        YEARLONG/1 credit

The Advanced Studio Art (AP) program is intended for highly motivated students committed to the serious study of art. In this course, the student will produce a portfolio of artwork. This portfolio will consist of 24 pieces of artwork, which demonstrate the student’s ability to deal with the fundamental concerns of the visual arts so that he/she may be given credit, advanced placement, or both, at the college level. Students are required to go through an application process with the instructor in order to be approved for the course.  This includes an art portfolio assessment of work they have completed and compiled through previous years art courses.  Students should have had at least two to three years of art prior.  Artwork made outside of school may be included in the portfolio assessment.

Open to 12th grade students.

Students are required to go through an application process with the instructor.


SPORTS SCIENCES

101 Strength and Conditioning        1 Semester/.5 Credit

This course is designed to familiarize the student with athletic conditioning and strength training. This class will encourage students to develop knowledge in tracking and learning about resistance training as it relates to athletics. Each student will be provided a personalized weight-training program based on personal fitness goals and both individual and sports specific needs. Students will be provided quality workout opportunities based on the strength training principles taught. Topics which may be explored include systematic strength training, plyometric (explosion) training, speed & agility training, physiology of exercise, and other training methods.  Tests and measurements of fitness, strength, & conditioning, as a means of evaluating progress, will be part of this course.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Can be taken multiple times.

103 Sports Nutrition        1 SEMESTER/.5 Credit

This course explores nutrition in the enhancement of health and fitness. Discussion includes the nutrient requirements for attainment and maintenance of health, disease prevention and sports performance. The appropriate use of dietary supplements, popular diets, and causes and treatment of eating disorders and obesity will be studied. Claims targeted to the exercising population will be evaluated.

Open to 9-12th grades.

104 Athletic Training and Sports Medicine        1 SEMESTER/.5 Credit

This course will examine methods of recognizing and caring for sport injuries, including basic physical evaluation and taping skills, purposes and procedures for adequate care of injured athletes. Athletic Training and Sports Medicine is designed for students interested in fields such as athletic training, physical therapy, medicine, fitness, physiology of exercise, kinesiology, nutrition, and other sports medicine related fields. This class work includes practical hands-on application in the following areas: prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries, taping and wrapping of injuries, first aid/CPR certification, emergency procedures, and sports medicine careers. 

Open to 9-12th grades.

105 Sports Clinical or Internship        1 SEMESTER/.5 Credit

Students develop practical and leadership skills in a pre-approved professional setting including (but not limited to) Weber Athletics, college recreation or athletic programs, community recreation agencies, sport businesses, sport facilities, athletic amateur organizations and/or professional sports teams. Students are required to complete a minimum of 60 hours of work at a pre-approved site and in the classroom.

Open to 9-12th grades.


MUSIC

Band         Yearlong/1 Credit

Band is an instrumental performance ensemble, with a focus on jazz, rock and reading and improvisation skills.

Open to 9-12th grades. Can be taken multiple times.

Can count toward your Art credit.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Must already play an instrument proficiently.

Chorus        Yearlong/1 Credit

Weber Chorus is an opportunity for students to develop their vocal skill, both as soloists and in an ensemble.  We will be performing music from a variety of time periods and genres, both popular and sacred.

*Admission by audition only. Can be taken multiple times.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Can count toward your Art credit.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Beginning Guitar          1 SEMESTER EACH/.5 CREDIT Each

Intermediate Guitar        

Learn to play guitar - for those with no (or very little) experience.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Students may enroll in first or both semesters.

Can count toward your Art credit.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Music Theory        Yearlong/1 Credit

In this course, students will learn how music works. This course is intended for beginners.  Learn to read, understand and ultimately write your own music.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Can count toward your Art credit.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.


THE DANIEL ZALIK ACADEMY

Creative Design        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Innovate, Design, Create

Who came up with the idea for the computer mouse?

Who thought up the spork?

What about velcro?

What made Steve Jobs and Apple so successful?

How about Stephanie Louise Kwolek? (inventor of Kevlar) Sarah Blakley?

Who else has created change through innovative design and thinking?

How did they become creative problem solvers? How do they stay creative?

Can you become a creative thinker? What ideas do you have? Can you transform the idea into a product?

In this class you will  learn about creative thinkers and how they work. You will practice creativity and explore different creative outlets. We will use paper arts and engineering, various visual arts, and make use if the new FabLab, 3D printers, and any other form of product creation we can support.

Some of the most memorable and impactful learning experiences come through experiential and creative learning. To implement what we learn about creativity, we will research, design and create projects that ‘disrupt’ traditional learning. You will choose the subject of your product from a variety of moral, value based, environmental or Israel based topics. The possibilities are endless and you will be able to choose a topic or subject that interests you within those areas. This will be a hands on class where we create with purpose.

Open to 9-12th grades.

No prerequisites.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Can count toward a Jewish Studies credit OR toward an Art requirement.

Design Studio AKA TOM Studio        YEARLING/1 credit

TOM (Tikkun Olam Makers) Studio is a year-long introductory design studio. In this class, we will learn the fundamentals human centered design while working on humanitarian and service based projects. Along the way, we will explore topics including: sustainability, social entrepreneurship, ethics, user research, design thinking, and social activism. Students will also make use of the FabLab to take their ideas from inspiration to final products, creating prototypes to hone their concepts into fully realized solutions that serve others at Weber and in the local community.

Open to 9-12th grades.

No prerequisites.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

COMPUTER SCIENCE THREAD

Computer Science Principles        YEARLONG/1 Credit

Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. Computer Science Principles also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science. This course makes use of Python as well as MIT's AI2 App Inventor.

Open to 9-12th grades.

No prerequisites.

Offered at the Honors level.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

AP Computer Science        YEARLONG/1 Credit

Advanced Placement® Computer Science A is a fast-paced course equivalent to a college introductory programming class. Students will learn about the exciting kinds of problems tackled by computer science while exploring the field’s most important tool—programming. The focus will be on developing systematic problem-solving strategies that can be applied to real-world problems. The course will be anchored around projects that will explore a broad range of fields that use programming to solve problems. The course will cover fundamentals of programming syntax and methodology using the Java programming language. In addition to gaining fluency in Java, students will develop general skills and understandings in computer science.

Open to 10-12th grades.

Prerequisites: Upperclassmen: Algebra II; Underclassmen: Algebra II; Computer Science Principles or significant, demonstrable coding experience

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Android App Development        YEARLONG/1 Credit

Students will learn to use Android Studio and develop apps for Android OS. Java is at the heart of development for Android, thus a background in the language is required. Students will create fully functional applications while learning to integrate functionality with third-party services such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Google services. Students will also learn about User Experience and User Interfaces in order to create usable and aesthetically pleasing apps.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Prerequisites: AP Computer Science or demonstrated knowledge of Java.

Offered at the Honors level.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

PROTOTYPING/MODELING THREAD

Prototyping and Modelmaking        1 Semester/.5 Credit

Introduction to physical prototyping and fabrication. Students will learn techniques for spatial representation and visualization and use them to express different ideas in the physical world. Students will be immersed in an iterative design process as they use different materials and processes (cardboard, foamcore, foam sculpting, textiles, electronics) to solve real-world problems.

Open to 9-12th grades.

No prerequisites.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Introduction to 3D Modeling        1 Semester/.5 Credit

Introduction 3D modeling including sketching, line drawing, and 3D solid modeling (CAD). Students explore the need for spatial representation and visualization and practice drawing projections in formats. They then develop three-dimensional representations and engage in the model construction process, specifically using CAD software. Students also make use of different presentation media (renders, 3D printing, etc) to highlight other uses for digital models.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Digital Fabrication        1 Semester/.5 Credit

An introduction to prototyping and fabrication using digital processes. Students will learn the history of CNC manufacturing and 3D printing and the difference between each process. Students will immerse themselves in the additive and subtractive processes processes, learning to operate machines such as CNC routers, laser cutters, mills, and 3D printers and design for the processes. Other topics include assembly and tolerances, model finishing, and strengths and weakness of the processes.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Prerequisites: Prototyping and Modelmaking OR Intro to 3D Modeling

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

DESIGN THREAD

Graphic Design        1 SEMESTER/.5 credit

Students will learn the fundamentals of graphic design including layout, typography, and color schemes as well as presentation of information through icons, infographics, and advertisements using the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign).

Open to 9-12th grades.

No prerequisites.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.

Yearbook        Yearlong/1 Credit

Students will work to complete the Weber School yearbook, the Infinity. Students will gain experience working with a professional publication program and practice skills essential to yearbook publication including: writing techniques, photography, page layout, and graphic design. Students will complete one or more of the following tasks toward the completion of the yearbook: design page layouts, take photographs, conduct interviews, write articles and/or captions.

Open to 9-12th grades.

Can count toward an Art credit.

Cannot count toward a core course credit.


Our Mission

The Weber School prepares its students for success in college and in life, inspiring them to be knowledgeable, thinking, responsible Jewish adults, by weaving together:

        •        The pursuit of academic excellence;

        •        A commitment to Jewish values, the Jewish people and Israel; and

        •        A responsibility to serve our community and improve our world.

6751 Roswell Road • Atlanta, Georgia 30328 • 404-917-2500

www.weberschool.org • facebook.com/weberschool • twitter.com/theweberschool

instagram.com/theweberschool • youtube.com/reshetweber

The Felicia Penzell Weber Jewish Community High School admits students
of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

(REVISED 3/6/19)