Density Balloons

This activity will demonstrate that there is a relationship between the temperature, density and volume of gases.

Time requirement: 50 minutes as an activity, 30 minutes as a demonstration.

Materials

Procedures

  1. Inflate the balloon and secure the end so that the air does not escape.
  2. Measure and record the circumference of the balloon at room temperature.
  3. Add heat to the balloon by placing the balloon in a container of hot/warm water. Cover the container and allow the balloon to heat up.
  4. Measure and record the circumference of the hot balloon.
  5. Let the balloon sit and return to room temperature.
  6. Now allow the balloon to lose heat energy. Place the balloon in a container of ice water. Cover the container.
  7. Measure and record the circumference of the cold balloon.

Data

Temperature (c)

Balloon Circumference (cm)

Room Temperature

Hot/Warm Water

Cold Water

Observation questions

  1. How much did the circumference of the balloon increase in size when heat energy was added and the temperature increased?

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  1. How much did the circumference of the balloon decrease in size when heat energy was removed?

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  1. Why did the balloon increase in size when heat energy was added?

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  1. Why did the balloon decrease in size when heat energy was removed?

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  1. The density of a gas (or liquid or solid) is equal to its mass divided by its volume. When the balloon was heated, did its volume increase or decrease? Did the density increase or decrease?

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