Instructor:

Lisa Bloom

Contact Information

lrivers@pps.net or 503-916-6120 x71737

School:

Learning and Credit Options: Virtual Scholars

School Year:

2018-19

Course number: 2721OR2

Course title: US History 2 (Semester 2)

Subject: Social Studies

Grade Level(s): 10

Course Description:

This United States History course consists of the following content area strands: United States History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of United States history from World War II to the 2000s.. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events which occurred before the end of Reconstruction.

Prerequisites: n/a

Priority Standards and Final Proficiencies:

This course is a standards-based course. All students will be exposed to CCSS or Oregon state 10 standards--below are the standards that mastery must be shown in order to earn credit.

SS.9-10.HK.6 Analyze ideas critical to the understanding of history, including, but not limited to: populism, progressivism, isolationism, imperialism, communism, environmentalism, liberalism, fundamentalism, racism, ageism, classism, conservatism, cultural diversity, feminism, and sustainability.

SS.9-10.CS.G.8 Evaluate how human cooperation and competition for resources shape the earth's political, economic, physical, and social environments.

SS.9-10.CS.H.2 Construct, support and refute interpretations of history using political, social, economic, and cultural perspectives by drawing from a variety of primary and secondary sources.

SS.9-10.RH.3 Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceeded them.

SS.9-10.HK.35        

SS.9-10.CS.SSA.28 Analyze characteristics, causes, and consequences of an event, issue, problem, or phenomenon.

SS.9-10.HK.5        Examine and evaluate the origins of fundamental political debates and how conflict, compromise, and cooperation have shaped national unity and diversity in world, U.S., and Oregon history.

SS.9-10.HK.9 Identify historical and current events, issues, and problems when national interests and global
interest have been in conflict, and analyze the values and arguments on both sides of the conflict.

Schedule of Units Covered:

Unit Five:

  • understanding the causes of World War II
  • describing the U.S. response during the early years of World War II
  • identifying the catalysts that brought the United States into formal involvement in the war
  • describing the causes and consequences of the attack on Pearl Harbor
  • analyzing the causes and consequences of the D-Day invasion
  • analyzing the strategies of the Japanese and U.S. militaries in the Pacific Theater
  • describing the ways new military technology enabled the United States to fight successfully on multiple fronts
  • explaining what happened to the Jews and other peoples victimized by the Holocaust
  • describing the response of the United States to the Holocaust before, during, and after World War II
  • describing the social, political, and economic changes experienced by Americans on the homefront during World War II
  • analyzing the use of atomic weapons during World War II and the aftermath of the bombings
  • describing the consequences of World War II on the United States and the world
  • comparing the end of the war in Europe and the Pacific

Unit Six:

  • identifying causes for post-World War II prosperity and its effects on American society
  • explaining how post-World War II prosperity differed by ethnic group and social class
  • analyzing the reasons for and the goals of the United Nations
  • explaining how the Nuremburg Trials promoted justice post World War II
  • analyzing the reasons for and the effectiveness of Truman's foreign policy during the early years of the Cold War
  • analyzing the political, social, and economic consequences of the Red Scare
  • examining the effects of improved nuclear technology on the citizens and government of the United States
  • identifying concerns related to nuclear proliferation
  • explaining the events that led to the intensification of the Cold War
  • analyzing how the Cold War affected American foreign policy in the years 1961–1963
  • analyzing the relationship between the U.S. and Cuba during the 1960s
  • understanding the causes, course, and consequences of the Vietnam War
  • identifying and analyzing the significant foreign policy events surrounding the Vietnam War
  • explaining how the presidents of the 1960s influenced policy on Vietnam
  • analyzing the effects of war on personal freedoms
  • explaining how Vietnam and Watergate affected U.S. public opinion of the government

Unit Seven

  • evaluating President Johnson's domestic policy
  • analyzing the impact of Great Society legislation and its relationship to the New Deal
  • explaining the advancements made in the Women's Rights Movement
  • examining similarities between social movements
  • examining artistic responses to social issues and new ideas
  • Identifying the issues surrounding significant Supreme Court cases related to civil rights and liberties

Unit Eight

  • analyzing the relationship between the U.S. and the Middle East in the 1970s
  • analyzing the political, economic, and social concerns of the 1970s
  • reviewing the concept of globalization and explain how OPEC impacted the U.S. economy and politics
  • analyzing the foreign policy relationship between the United States and Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Middle East
  • explaining how globalization impacted the 1980s
  • analyzing the political, economic and social concerns of the 1980s
  • analyzing immigration policy from 1950-1990
  • analyzing the effects of foreign and domestic terrorism on the U.S
  • examining the controversy surrounding nuclear weapons in Asia and the Middle East
  • examining changes in immigration policy and attitudes toward immigration from 1990-2012
  • examining the role the U.S. in global human rights policy

Academic Vocabulary

Affirmative action
Agent Orange
Alliances
Allies
American Federation of Labor (AFL)
Amnesty
Amphibious
Anarchist
Anarchy
Annihilation
Annotate
Anti-Semitic
Anti-Semitism
Apartheid
Appeasement
Armistice
Arms race
Article X (Article 10)
Assassination
Assembly line
Assimilate
Astronaut
Atlantic Charter
Atrocities
Audio sources
Autocracy
Baby Boom
Baby Boomers
Balance of power
Balance of trade
Bank holiday
Bataan Death March
Battle of Guadalcanal
Battle of Iwo Jima
Battle of Leyte Gulf
Battle of MIdway
Battle of Okinawa
Battle of the Bulge
Bear market
Beats
Berlin Airlift
Bessemer process
Big Four
Big stick diplomacy
Big Three
Bimetallism
Black Codes
Black Tuesday
Blockade
Boycott
Bracero program
Bribes
Bull market
Buying on margin
Cabinet
California Gold Rush
Camp David Accords
Capitalism
Caricatured
Cash crop
Cash-and-carry
cease-fire
Central Powers
Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882
Civil disobedience
Civil rights
Civil rights legislation
Civil Rights Movement
Code talkers
Cold War
Collective bargaining
Committee on Public Information
Communism
Competition
Complacency
Confederacy
Confederate
Conformity
Congress
Conscientious objectors
Conscription
Conservative
Consumerism
Containment
Context clues
Contraband
Convoy
Corporation
Corruption
Coup
Court-packing plan
Credibility gap
Crematoria
D-Day
Dawes Plan
Deferment
Deficit
Demagogue
Demilitarized zone (DMZ)
Demobilization
Demographic
Denotations
Deregulation
Desegregation
Détente
Dictator
Disarmament
Discrimination
Disenfranchise
Disillusionment
Displaced persons
Disproportionate
Dissidents
Dissuade
Distractor
Dollar diplomacy
Domestic policy
Domino theory
Double V Campaign
doves
Dumbarton Oaks
Dumping
Dust Bowl
Economic
Ecosystem
Eighteenth Amendment
Electoral
Emancipation
Emancipation Proclamation
Embargo
Emission
Entangling alliances
Espionage Act
Evidence
Executive Order 8802
Executive Order 9066
Executive privilege
Expansionism
fallout
Farmers' Alliance
Fascism
Federal debt
Feminism
First Hundred Days
First Industrial Revolution
First New Deal
Five-Power Naval Treaty of 1922
Flappers
Four-Power Treaty of 1921
Fourteen Points
Free market
Free Silver Movement
Freedmen
Freedmen's Bureau
Front
Fundamentalism
Gas chambers
Geneva Accords
Genocide
Gentleman's Agreement
GI Bill of Rights
Glasnost
Global warming
Globalization
Grandfather clause
Grange
Great Depression
Great Migration
Greenhouse gas
Gross domestic product
Gross national product (GNP)
Guerilla
Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
Harlem Renaissance
Hawks
Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty
Haymarket Riot
Historian
Holding company
Holocaust
Homefront
Homestead Act
Hoovervilles
Horizontal integration
Human systems
Immigration
Immigration Act of 1924
Impeachment
Imperialism
Incumbent
Inferences
Inflation
Innovation
Installment plan
Insurgent
Integration
Intellectual property
Intelligentsia
Intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM)
Internment camps
Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC)
Interstate Highway System
Intervention
Iron Curtain
Island hopping
Isolationism
Jazz
Jazz Age
Jim Crow laws
Johnson-Reed Act
Juvenile Delinquents
Kamikaze
Kellogg-Briand Pact
Knights of Labor (KOL)
Korean War
Ku Klux Klan
Labor union
Laissez-faire
League of Nations
Legislatures
Lend-Lease
Liberal
Literacy laws
Manhattan Project
Market economy
Markets
Marshall Plan
Mass production
Materialism
Migrant laborer
Militarism
Mixed economy
Mobilize
Monopoly
Monroe Doctrine
Moratorium
Morrill Land Grant Act
Muckrakers
Munich Pact
Nadir
napalm
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
National Grange
National War Labor Board
Nationalism
Nationalizing
Nativism
Nativists
Natural resource
New Deal
Niagara Movement
Nineteenth Amendment
No man's land
Normandy
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
Nuclear proliferation
Nuremberg trials
Objective Summary
Open Door policy
Outsourcing
Override
Pacific Theater
Panic of 1893
Patent
Pearl Harbor
Pentagon Papers
Perestroika
Philanthropy
Planned economy
Platt Amendment
Plessy v. Ferguson
Pocket veto
Political
Political machine
Poll tax
Pool
Popular sovereignty
Populist Party
Potsdam Conference
Potsdam Declaration
Poverty rate
Precedent
Primary source
Progressive
Prohibition
Propaganda
Pullman Strike
Push-pull factors
Radical Republican
Rationing
Reaganomics
Reagan Doctrine
Recession
Reconnaissance
Red Scare
Relative locations
Religious revival
Rendition
Reparations
Repudiate
Reservation
Roaring Twenties
Roma, Sinti
Roosevelt Corollary
Rosewood Incident
Rust Belt
Salerno (Italian invasion)
Sanctions
Sand Creek Massacre
Schenck decision
Scientific management
Seceded
Secession
Second Industrial Revolution
Second New Deal
Secondary source
Sedition Act
Segregation
Selective Service Act
Self-determination
Settlement house
Sherman Silver Purchase Act
Sit-down strike
Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act
Social
Social Activism
Social Darwinism
Social Gospel movement
Social Security
Social welfare program
Socialism
Space Race
Speculation
Sphere of influence
States' rights
Steerage
Stock market
Sun Belt
Sussex Pledge
Tariff(s)
Teapot Dome Scandal
Tehran Conference
Teller Amendment
Tenement
Tenure of Office Act
Tet Offensive
Totalitarianism
Treaty of Paris
Treaty of Portsmouth
Treaty of Versailles
Trench warfare
Triple Alliance
Triple Entente
Truman Doctrine
Trust
Turner's Thesis
U-2
U-boat
U.S. Constitution
Unconstitutional
United Nations
United States Food Administration
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA)
Unrestricted submarine warfare
Urbanization
V-J Day
Vertical integration
Veto
Vietcong
Vietnamization
Visual sources
Volstead Act
War bonds
War Industries Board
War Powers Act
Ward
Warsaw Pact
Watergate Scandal
Welfare state
Yalta Conference
Yellow press
Zimmerman Note
Zionism
100 Percent Americanism
13th Amendment
38th parallel

District-Adopted Materials

vs.pps.net

Supplemental Resources

As needed

Differentiation/Accessibility Strategies and Support (TAG, ELL,SpEd, other):

Accommodations based on IEP and 504 will be adhered to with guidance from case manager. Case manager approval is required for a student to take a VS course.

 

Instruction and assessments are created and delivered with a mind to multiple learning styles; it is with active cognition that teachers build material for students who learn in many different ways.

Career-Related Learning Experiences

N/A

Essential Skills and Required Work Samples:

Being a standards-based course, work will need to be scored at “Successful” or higher in order to earn credit.

Assessment/Evaluation/Grading Policy

Students are expected to submit work in each course weekly. Students can learn at their own pace; however, students must follow their course calendar and make progress in the course every week. Students are required to complete self-checks, practice lessons, multiple choice questions, projects, discussion-based assessments, and discussions. Students are expected to:

  • Make regular progress (follow course calendar)
  • Maintain regular contact with teachers

When teachers, students, and families work together, students are successful.

 

This course is a standards-based course.

Course lessons and assessments are targeted to a specific set of CCSS/Oregon state standards. Students will be expected to score at the “Successful” level or higher in order to be marked proficient in each assessment. Students are expected to complete all assessments in the course.

 

If a student scores “Work In Progress” on an assessment, they will be able to revise and resubmit it for re-scoring.

Final grades in Virtual Scholars are determined using the VS Proficiency Matrix.

Behavioral Expectations:

PLAGIARISM is strictly monitored.

 

From the PPS Student Acceptable Use Guide:

Students will not plagiarize works that they find on the Internet. Plagiarism is taking the ideas or writings of others and presenting them as if they were original to the student.

Students will respect the rights of copyright owners. Copyright infringement occurs when an individual inappropriately reproduces a work that is protected by a copyright. If a work contains language that specifies appropriate use of that work, the student should follow the expressed requirements. If the student is unsure whether or not they can use a work, they should request permission from the copyright owner.

 

Students will adhere to the regulations outlined in the PPS Student Acceptable Usage guide

Safety Issues and Requirements

N/A