Program of Studies

2018-2019

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Brattleboro Union High School

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131 Fairground Road

Brattleboro, VT 05301

(802) 451-3400

www.buhs.k12.vt.us


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome        4

Directory of Departments and Programs        5

Counseling & Health Services        6

College Application Procedures        7-8

NAVIANCE Family Connection        9

Graduation Requirements        10

Community Service        11

Preparation for Post-Secondary Education Opportunities        12

Enrollment        12

Co-curricular Eligibility        12

Course Changes        12

Grading and Awarding of Credit        13

Defining Course Levels        13

Educational Options        14

Windham Regional Collegiate High School Dual Enrollment        15-17

Special Programs        18-19

Educational Alternatives and Support        20

STEM Academy        21

Visual & Performing Arts Academy        22-23

International Studies Academy        23

Four-Year Planner        24

Graduation Checklist        26

English        27-35

English for Speakers of Other Languages        36-37

Mathematics        38-43

Science        43-49

Social Studies        49-57

Modern and Classical Languages        58-61

Fine, Digital and Practical Arts        62-71

Music        72-76

Physical Education        77

Driver Education        78

Health Education        79

Special Education        80-83

Cover Photo by: David Mazor

CORE VALUES

The students, staff and parents of BUHS share the following core values which define our mission and shape our vision and our community.  We seek to create a community whose members demonstrate a commitment to the academic, civic and social expectations of our school.

Responsibility

Individual: All members of this community must be responsible for being a part of a safe, supportive and productive environment.

Academic: We seek to foster academic skills and habits that lead to academic and career success. Social: We seek to foster, develop, and model responsible behavior.

Respect

We value and expect respect among all members of the BUHS community.

Relevance

We value connections among a student’s present abilities, experiences, interests, post-graduate plans and that student’s education here.

Community

We value an educational experience that goes beyond academics and an environment that fosters positive and productive interpersonal relationships in both BUHS and the wider community.

TRANSFERABLE SKILLS

Clear and Effective Communication

Students will communicate effectively using a wide range of media.  Students will develop skills that will allow them to adjust their communications to a varied audience for a variety of purposes.

Self-Direction

Students will use their Personal Learning Plans to create long and short term goals relevant to their post-secondary career or college goals. Students will demonstrate self-direction and initiative while planning their own educational pathway.

Creative and Practical Problem Solving

Students will document their ability to solve problems in a wide variety of settings.

Responsible and Involved Citizenship

Students will demonstrate their ability to productively and significantly participate in their communities to enhance the quality of life for those around them.

Informed and Integrative Thinking

Students will apply content from all areas of study to solve real life problems by using modeling, evaluating data and using technology to support their work.


WELCOME

Brattleboro Union High School is a grade 9 through 12 high school serving the towns of Brattleboro, Dummerston, Guilford, Putney and Vernon. The Windham Regional Career Center is attached to BUHS and serves a region which includes BUHS as well as Bellows Falls Union High School, Leland and Gray High School, Hinsdale High School and Twin Valley High School. Together our two schools offer a wide variety of educational opportunities that offer quality education to all students.

The teachers and staff at Brattleboro Union High School are proud of our academic and the  career-technical programs at the Windham Regional Career Center .  We provide a wide variety of relevant  and challenging opportunities for a student body with diverse backgrounds, abilities, and interests.  Our outstanding faculty stretches our students in a multitude of ways through curricula that emphasizes writing and critical thinking; through programs that focus on hands-on projects; through small, personalized or alternative programs; and through courses that promote interaction among the students and the community.

Good education is a shared responsibility.  We work with teachers from all grade levels in the district in establishing common standards and a coordinated curriculum, K-12.  We recognize that one of the most influential learning environments is in the home, and we invite parents and guardians to work with us in identifying and addressing student needs.  We are fortunate to live in a community that supports our schools and students in many different ways. Countless business and professional people serve as mentors (both academic  and personal), advisors to programs, employers, and committee members.

We hope you will take advantage of these amazing resources to meet the challenge of high academic standards and reach for your dreams! We are here to assist you.

Steven R. Perrin, BUHS Principal

Mary Kaufmann, Assistant Principal

Kate F. Margaitis, Assistant Principal


DIRECTORY

Brattleboro Union High School

Telephone: 451-3400

FAX: 451-3935

BUHS Department Heads

Athletic Director,Chris Sawyer        451-3436

Counseling and Health Services, Gina Onorato        451-3421

Driver Education, Chris Sawyer        451-3436

English, Peter Cannizzaro        451-3750

English for Speakers of other Languages, Ana Rawson        451-3756

Fine and Practical Arts, Richard Heller        451-3485

Mathematics, Brian Wuoti        451-3793

Modern and Classical Language, Karen Sebastian        451-3717

Music, Steve Rice        451-3511

Physical Education, Chris Sawyer        451-3436

Science, Michele Hood        451-3737

Social Studies, Kevin Martell        451-3489

Special Education Coordinators

Coordinator of Special Education, BUHS #6, Peg Brown        451-3968

Special Education Team Leader, Diane Leary        451-3505

Special Education Team Leader, Barbara McLoughlin        451-3567


COUNSELING AND HEALTH SERVICES

Counseling and Health Services for students at BUHS are planned to promote wellness and healthy life choices. Counselors focus on young adult's personal/social development and post-secondary planning.

The department is comprised of five school counselors, a clinician, an SAP counselor, an office manager and a registrar. A VSAC outreach coordinator and an Upward Bound counselor also utilize space within the Counseling Department suite.  College admissions personnel make regular visits and students utilize the departments career and college resource room (a computer lab) for working on career research, college searches and applications, and college admission test registration.

Personal development issues that are prevalent for high school students include life management issues, stress management, choosing and forming relationships, resolving feelings of conflict and anger, crisis management, problem identification and problem solving, and peer support.

Academic and post-secondary planning relies on students’ self-assessments to identify values, interests, skills, and abilities. Counselors use that information to help students set goals, choose courses, explore careers, and recommend colleges. In addition to individual and small group counseling with students, counselors regularly communicate and consult with parents, teachers, and administrators.

Improved technological availability and access enables counselors to forward grade level related messages and information to students’ parents. By creating e-mail groups, we are able to send students updated and timely announcements. We also have software to expand and individualize the processes of career exploration and college searches. The creation of online career portfolios enables students, parents, and teachers to access and update information for each student. Parents and students can now update portfolios from home, using current information to make informed choices.

Nurses in the Health Office care for students from Brattleboro Union High School, Brattleboro Area Middle School and Windham Regional Career Center who seek consultation and treatment. They provide information and counseling to promote healthy life choices, assist families with health insurance needs, participate in health education activities, screen students for blood pressure, height, weight, hearing, vision, track immunizations, and maintain student health records.

Counselors and nurses provide a continuum of services and assess student needs in collaboration with our student assistance counselor and our school-based mental health clinician.


College & Career Application Procedures

It is the view of the BUHS Counseling Department that developing plans after high school is a collaborative effort between students, their families and counselors. This works best when the process is initiated and maintained by the student with families and counselors actively supporting the student.

The college application process can be somewhat stressful for students and their families, and the Counseling Department seeks to act as a source of information and support. This represents one of the busiest periods of the year for the Counseling Department, as we process hundreds of requests for supporting materials (transcripts, etc.) to colleges. In order to make the process go as smoothly as possible, students and their families should understand the procedures involved.

Overview:

Senior Year:

Deadlines:

Students must inform their counselors of their application plans at least 10 school days before any deadlines. Students must select the colleges they are applying to on Naviance. Telephone calls or hand-written notes will not be considered adequate notice of application plans. If students give the office less than 10 school days’ notice of deadlines, we will be unable to guarantee that we can meet their deadline.

Please Note: Mid-year report and final grades are required by colleges and are sent to all colleges students have applied to automatically upon completion of semester 1.  

School Report Forms:

Many colleges have a form for the school counselor to complete, and to which we will attach the counselor's letter of recommendation. If the college accepts the Common Application, there is a School Report Form that is part of the Common App package. These forms can be downloaded from the schools' websites. There are also Mid-Year and Final Grade Report forms that are a part of the Common App.  All Common App forms are sent electronically to colleges through Naviance. (Some schools require that students submit Supplemental Forms and students should check carefully for this.)

Test Scores:

Students are responsible for having their SAT or ACT test score reports sent to colleges from the College Board or from ACT. Students are advised to check the web page for each college to determine which college admissions tests are required.


NAVIANCE© Family Connection

Your online tool for college planning with the BUHS Counseling Department!

https://connection.naviance.com/buhs

Naviance is a web-based resource that supports college planning by allowing you to organize and log your college searches, comparisons and admissions information to aid you and your parents in the application process. It is specific to our school and shows how past BUHS graduates have fared in the admission process, by comparing GPA & SAT or ACT scores. It is linked with the Counseling Department, and is a service that is used to track data relating to the college admissions process.

Students and parents/guardians, be sure to talk to your counselor about how to sign-up and use Naviance to your advantage!

IMPORTANT NAVIANCE HIGHLIGHTS:

HOME PAGE is the site for regularly updated messages and news of importance. Check it frequently in your senior year.

ABOUT ME: Answer questions about yourself, your interests and your goals. This personal data will appear in later reports and matches as you compile information from your college searches.

  Links to Other Websites will give you additional assistance and guidance. ENJOY NAVIANCE!

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Colleges and employers today demand thorough academic training and strong skills. We urge you to go beyond the minimum requirements for graduation.  A full, rich, and demanding schedule will lead to greater opportunities and increased chances for success after high school.  While some students may qualify for early graduation after 3 1/2 years, we recommend a full four-year program for most students.  A four-year planning form can be found  in the back of this book.

A total of 97 credits and 40 hours of community service are required to graduate, students are also required to document appropriate progress towards meeting the BUHS transferable skills. Students are required to demonstrate that they have met each transferable skills twice in in grades 9 and 10 and twice in grades 11 and 12.

The distribution requirements are given below:

Required Credits

English

16

Social Studies*

12

Mathematics*

12

Science*

12

Physical Education*

4

Health Education

2

Fine Arts*

4

Keyboarding**

1

Electives

32

Diversity Education

2

Total credits

97

* Career Center courses may serve as equivalents to fulfill some of these required high school courses.

**  Students are offered the opportunity to “test out” of keyboarding.

Virtual High School (VHS), Independent Study (IS) (approved well in advance), and certain athletic participation may serve as alternatives to some courses. VHS may only be used to fulfill elective credit.

KEYBOARDING REQUIREMENT

Successful completion of a keyboarding proficiency exam earns students one BUHS credit and is a requirement for graduation. Grade 8 students are offered the opportunity to test out prior to entering BUHS, enabling them to earn their first BUHS credit prior to the start of ninth grade.  High school students may schedule the proficiency exam by contacting the BUHS keyboarding proctor, Paul Rounds 451-3416 or prounds@wsesu.org. Students may utilize the computer lab to prepare for this exam during their study hall periods or on certain days after school. The keyboarding proficiency exam requires that students demonstrate their ability to type a minimum of 30 words per minute without looking at the keyboard.

COMMUNITY SERVICE

BUHS believes that community service is a worthwhile and rewarding experience for all high school students. It strengthens our community and contributes to personal growth. A BUHS student can demonstrate proficiency in the transferable skill “Responsible and Involved citizenship”. We have, therefore, a graduation requirement of 40 HOURS of community service.  A commitment that may be spread over four years.  You can volunteer for a non-profit organization or a worthy individual.  A non-profit organization is not a business but is an agency which serves the needs of a group of people or the community.  A student may begin accumulating hours to meet this requirement during the summer immediately preceding 9th grade.  For students who transfer to BUHS after 9th grade, the requirement is prorated to five hours per semester.

Service hours must be documented on the BUHS Community Service Form, found in all house offices and the Counseling Office. If a student is absent from school, they cannot accrue community service hours. Work done during the summer must be filed by September 30th of the same year.   Work done during the school year must be filed by June 1st.  Community Service forms must be returned to Mr. Kiehle, Community Service Advisor. He may be contacted at 451-3488 or by email at jkiehle@wsesu.org.

Information detailing more specific guidelines and volunteer opportunities are found on the BUHS web site at www.buhs.k12.vt.us as well as on the Community Service Bulletin Board across from the Social Studies Office.

PREPARATION FOR POST SECONDARY EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES

The best preparation for post high school education is to begin exploring career pathways early.

RECOMMENDED FOR FOUR                                     YEAR COLLEGES                                                                    

RECOMMENDED FOR BUSINESS, TECHNICAL, OR JUNIOR COLLEGES

4 Classes of English

3-4 Classes of Math, including courses beyond Algebra II

4 Classes of Social Studies

3-4 Classes of Lab Science

2-4 Classes of Modern or Classical Language

4 Classes of English

3 Classes of Math

4 Classes of Social Studies

3 Classes of Science (at least 1 lab science)

2 Classes of Modern Language

The Windham Regional Career Center (WRCC) offers business, technical, and career-focused courses in primary areas of interest which are also recommended as preparation for post-secondary education.

The Windham Regional Collegiate High School (WRCHS) offers a wide variety of courses that carry both BUHS and college credit (see pages 16 & 17).

EARLY GRADUATION:  A student may request high school administration approval  for early graduation.  Forms for graduating early are available in the Counseling Office, and students who choose this option must apply as follows:

  1. Make a formal request at the end of the first marking period of their senior year to graduate in 3½ years and at the end of the first the semester of their junior year to graduate in 3 years, which will include:
  1. Submit the request to the administration for approval.

A final decision will be issued in writing. Students or parents may appeal a denial for early graduation to the School Board.

ENROLLMENT

The last day a student may enroll for the fall semester is October 1st and the last day for the spring semester is March 1st. To be fully enrolled, students in grades 9-11 must have classes in all four blocks and take at least 14 credits per semester. Grade 12 students must have classes in 3 blocks and be enrolled in ten (10) credits per semester. Credit is not earned for study hall.  Students in grades 9 – 11 must be fully enrolled. Seniors must be enrolled in sufficient classes to meet graduation requirements.

CO-CURRICULAR ELIGIBILITY

Academic Eligibility
Brattleboro Union High School recognizes and promotes the priority of academics within our athletic programs.  Coaches support this position, and will make every effort to accommodate students’ needs as they balance academics with athletic activities.

It is essential that students and parents understand the following academic eligibility regulations:

•        Any BUHS student who wishes to participate in interscholastic athletics must be enrolled as a full-time student. Students in grades 9-11 must be scheduled in four blocks of classes earning a minimum of 12 credits.  Seniors must be scheduled in three blocks of classes earning a minimum of 10 credits.

•        At the beginning of each school year, incoming 9th grade students will be academically eligible to fully participate in athletics.  Students in grades 10-12 who had one or more failing grades in their previous semester will be considered academically eligible to fully participate in athletics until the third Friday of the new school year.  If they are passing ALL of their courses AND have HOW scores of 2.0 or higher in ALL of their classes, they will remain eligible until the first school-wide check.  If they are failing one or more courses, or do not have HOW scores of 2.0, they will be ineligible until the next school-wide check (five weeks into the school year).

•        During the school year, grades will be checked midway through each quarter (progress reports) and at the end of each quarter.  Students who are passing ALL of their classes AND have Habit of Work (HOW) scores of 2.0 or higher in ALL of their classes may fully participate in athletics without restrictions.

•        Students who do not meet this standard will be notified that they are ineligible for interscholastic athletic competition and will enter a probationary period.  During this probationary period, students will be allowed to practice with their team, but may not dress for or participate in competition and will not be eligible for early dismissal from school for team travel purposes.

•        Students will remain on probation for a minimum period of one week.  At the end of one full week, if the student is passing all classes with HOW scores of 2.0 in all classes, the student will regain full eligibility.  If the student has not yet met the academic standards, he or she will remain on probation for another week, and if necessary, subsequent weeks, until meeting the academic standards.

•        Once a student regains their academic eligibility, they will still continue to have their grades checked on a weekly basis for the remainder of the grading term.  If the student does not maintain the academic standard, the student will be placed back on probation.

Academic Obligations
•        Students who participate in athletics at BUHS have the same academic obligations as other students. They should never use their participation as an athlete to shirk academic responsibilities.

•        To participate in an athletic event, students must attend a full day of classes or have a documented excuse approved by the administration prior to the event.

If a student is absent due to sickness or has an undocumented or unapproved absence the day of a practice or game, they will not be allowed to participate that day.

COURSE CHANGES

Course change requests must be made prior to the start of the each semester. Contact the Counseling Department mid-August.  Students in grades 9 - 11 must be fully enrolled. There will be no schedule changes after the start of each semester.  Classes will not be dropped from a student’s schedule without notifying parents.  A parent conference and approval by an administrator is required if a student is to be less than fully enrolled. If a student has a passing grade at the time of the drop, the withdrawal mark will be a “WP” on the transcript. If the student is failing the course, the withdrawal mark on the transcript will be a “WF.”

GRADING AND AWARDING OF CREDIT

COURSE SCORING POLICY: Beginning with the 2018-2019 school year, BUHS uses a Proficiency Based Assessment system. Rather than assigning traditional grades, we assign scores based on the student’s ability to document progress towards demonstrating specific skills and content. Our course scores are also reported separately from a student’s Habit of Work which includes collaboration, participation, behavior and work completion.  Course credit is awarded for a final score of 2.5 or higher.

WEIGHTED GRADES AT BUHS: Advanced Placement courses at BUHS are weighted when class rank is determined. This means that seven percentage points are added onto the course grade for the purpose of calculating class rank. The course grade on the transcript and the grade point average are not weighted.

PASS/FAIL –BUHS courses are graded on a proficiency based grading scale except in a few circumstances. Grades for all credit earned through Independent Study are on a Pass/Fail basis.  For Independent Study “High Pass” may be used to reflect outstanding achievement. For elective courses beyond those needed to satisfy  specific departmental graduation requirements the student may select to be graded on a pass/fail basis during the first five weeks of the semester. A student may elect the pass/fail option only once in a semester. Pass/fail grades appear on the transcript but are not reflected in the cumulative grade point average. If a student’s grade is “Pass or High Pass” it will appear on the student’s transcript and credit will be given for the course, but it will not have an impact on the student’s grade point average or rank. If the grade is a “Failure” it will appear on the transcript, but will not have an impact on the student’s grade point average or rank.

HONOR ROLL: Students are eligible for the honor roll only if they are fully enrolled, have no incomplete grades at the end of the marking period and are passing any courses being graded on a pass/fail basis.  For High Honors, a student must attain a 3.25 or above in all courses and HP in any FSP or Independent Study course. For Honors, a student must attain 2.8 or above in all courses and a P in any FSP or Independent Study course.

REPETITION OF COURSES: Credit can be granted in a course only once.  A course may be repeated for grade improvement.  The new grade will replace the first on the transcript and be computed in the GPA.  The previous course and grade will continue to show on the transcript, but will not be computed for credit and GPA.  A course grade may ONLY be replaced by a grade earned for the same BUHS course or a similar BUHS course approved by the Department Head and Administration.  Grades for courses completed by other means or at other  institutions will be noted separately.

DEFINING COURSE LEVELS

The content and performance expectations of all required BUHS courses are aligned with BUHS content standards. Most courses are designed for multi-ability or heterogeneous groups.  Some  courses have different levels of difficulty.   If this is the case, the level will be noted in the course title and/or an overview of departmental offerings.

Placement is based on teacher recommendation but students and their parents may elect a different level with the understanding that content and performance expectations will not be modified.

EDUCATIONAL OPTIONS

Not all students learn in the same way or in the same environment. Therefore, we try to provide a variety of options for earning credit towards graduation.

INDEPENDENT STUDY: An option for students with special interests and skills to learn something not offered in the regular curriculum. Students are graded on a pass/fail basis.  Proposals for the first semester must be submitted by June 1st and for the second semester by the last Friday before the December holiday vacation.

Complete guidelines may be obtained in the Counseling Office. Administration will review proposals and approve, deny or suggest modifications based on the education merit of the proposal.  Independent studies can be completed for elective credit.

VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL: VHS offers a large selection of over 250 courses which may be taken for elective credit. These courses are comparable to traditional classroom courses. As a student you must be very self- disciplined, highly motivated, and make time to log into your class on a daily basis.  For a complete listing of available courses check out the VHS website at www.govhs.org – on the left hand menu click VHS catalog.

COLLEGE COURSES:   We encourage students to pursue their interests and seek enrichment and academic challenges.  An outside course may not be used to fulfill a core graduation requirement.  Students must apply to have a course accepted for elective credit.  Prior approval is strongly recommended and required if the student wishes a course to count towards full enrollment. Forms are available in the counseling office.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT: BUHS offers AP courses in English, science, social studies, math and Virtual High School (VHS) offers a wide array of AP options as well. See those sections for the complete listing and description of the courses available.  Students in an AP course must take the AP exam in May.  Preparation for AP examinations may also be done through Independent Study. Advanced Placement examinations are given in May.  Students may register for and take any examination regardless of whether they have taken or are enrolled in an AP course.

JOB CORPS:  A student who enters Job Corps, successfully completes a training program, and passes the GED can earn a BUHS diploma. For more information, students should consult their counselors.

COURSE EXTENSION: In some cases, students may make up a failed course by successfully completing a correspondence course, summer school course, or an online course. This is an option ONLY if the student completed the failed course with a grade no lower than 45.  Counselors will assist students in applying for a course extension, and any extension must have administrative approval.

COENROLLMENT FOR HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION: Vermont High Schools are required to provide alternative pathways to high school graduation, and in May 2009, provisions were put in place for students to be co-enrolled at BUHS and Vermont Adult Learning. Vermont Adult Learning is not a BUHS institution and has separate criteria and policies. Students accepted in this program prepare an individual graduation plan with Vermont Adult Learning representatives and then negotiate their plan with the BUHS Principal.

This program is intended for motivated, independent students.  Students interested in co-enrollment options should speak with their school counselor.


WINDHAM REGIONAL COLLEGIATE HIGH SCHOOL

GET AN EARLY START TO COLLEGE!

Earn both high school & college credit attending classes scheduled during the regular school day.

The mission of the Windham Regional Collegiate High School (WRCHS) is to engage high school students in southeastern Vermont, and neighboring New Hampshire, in a rigorous, supportive learning environment that blends high school and the first two years of college through affordable dual credit courses. WRCHS strives to remove the financial, academic, and psychological barriers that too often prevent students from preparing for, entering and succeeding in college and careers. To accomplish this it is essential to develop partnerships with local institutions of higher education, businesses, government organizations, and parents. This program is designed to help all students with college and career readiness and to reach out to students who may not otherwise see college as an option.

The Dual Enrollment program allows BUHS and Career Center students the elective opportunity to take college courses while still enrolled in high school. Dual enrollment is a great opportunity for students to complete high school graduation requirements and at the same time earn transcripted college credit.

WRCHS courses are typically taught by Career Center and BUHS instructors who have been approved as adjunct faculty by one of the partnering colleges. Dual enrollment classes are traditionally scheduled during the regular school day at BUHS and WRCC to avoid conflicts with after school activities such as sports, other extracurricular activities and jobs. Dual enrollment courses are offered to all high school and Career Center juniors and seniors who have met the college’s admission requirements. Sophomores and freshmen are eligible for a limited number of classes, depending on the college offering credit.

 DUAL ENROLLMENT

COLLEGE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: In order to enroll in a dual enrollment course with one of our participating colleges, students must meet all of the admission requirements of the college that is offering the credit for that course. In some cases this means that students must have a certain level of attainment as measured by the Accuplacer Assessment, which will be provided to students in advance of enrollment.

COLLEGE TUITION: The fee for a typical 3 credit dual enrollment course is usually $100. Tuition payment or payment plans are required at the time of registration. Limited full or partial scholarships are available for students with financial situations that warrant consideration. A scholarship request form is available at registration.

COLLEGE REGISTRATION: Students enroll in their Career Center or BUHS courses through the usual enrollment process. An additional registration process is required to enroll in a dual enrollment course. Registration for dual enrollment courses will take place during the first three weeks of the course. The course instructor or a representative from WRCHS or the college will assist students in completing registration forms. Each college has its own registration form and requirements. Students cannot retroactively enroll in a course. All college prerequisites must be met at the time of registration.

COLLEGE TRANSCRIPTS: Students will need to contact the college providing the credits to order a copy of their transcripts or authorize the school to release the information. Towards the end of most of the dual enrollment courses, transcript request forms will be distributed to students, for them to complete and submit to the college granting credit.


WRCHS List of Dual Enrollment Transcripted College Credit Courses

            PATHWAY and BUHS or WRCC Course Name

COLLEGE

LOCATION

LIBERAL STUDIES & SOCIAL JUSTICE PATHWAY

 

 

ADVANCED CHINESE Level 1

Marlboro

BUHS

ADVANCED CHINESE Level 2

SIT

BUHS

ADVANCED FRENCH Level 1

SIT

BUHS

ADVANCED FRENCH Level 2

SIT

BUHS

ADVANCED GERMAN Level 1

SIT

BUHS

ADVANCED GERMAN Level 2

SIT

BUHS

ADVANCED SPANISH Level 1

River Valley CC

BUHS

ADVANCED SPANISH Level 2

SIT

BUHS

DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL CHANGE

SIT

BUHS

ECONOMICS

SIT

BUHS

ELECTIONS AND GOVERNMENT

Marlboro College

BUHS

ENGLISH 3 & 4:  GOOD, EVIL AND POWER    

SNHU  

BUHS

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & POLICY

Marlboro College

BUHS

INTRO TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (classes at CCV)

CCV

CCV

LAW AND AMERICAN SOCIETY

SIT

BUHS

MENTORING, COACHING & LEADERSHIP

SIT

BUHS

OTHER VOICES: LITERATURE OF DUAL CULTURES    

Marlboro College

BUHS

PERSPECTIVES IN LEARNING       (classes online)

Landmark College

Landmark

SOCIAL STUDIES SEMINAR

SIT

BUHS

SOCIOLOGY  (CHS)    

Marlboro College

BUHS

THE WRITING EXPERIENCE

River Valley CC

BUHS

BUSINESS PATHWAY

 

 

ACCOUNTING

River Valley CC

WRCC

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS AND PROCEDURES

River Valley CC

WRCC

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Castleton

WRCC

SPEECH AND PRESENTATION

Manchester CC

WRCC

START YOUR OWN BUSINESS

River Valley CC

WRCC

WORD AND EXCEL APPLICATIONS

CCV

WRCC

SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS PATHWAY

 

 

ACCELERATED ALGEBRA II

CCV

BUHS

ARCHITECTURE AND CIVIL ENGINEERING

VTC

WRCC

COMPUTER INT. MANUFACTURING I & II (complete both)

NHTI

WRCC

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

NHTI

WRCC

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN

NHTI

WRCC

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

NHTI

WRCC

STATISTICS

VTC

BUHS

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS PATHWAY

 

ADVANCED ART STUDIES IN THE COMMUNITY

Marlboro College

BUHS

CERAMICS II

Marlboro College

BUHS

COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN II

Marlboro College

BUHS

FILM MAKING/DIGITAL EDITING

Lakes Region CC

WRCC

PHOTOGRAPHY II

Marlboro College

BUHS

PHOTOGRAPHY III

Marlboro College

BUHS

SCULPTURE II

Marlboro College

BUHS

HEALTH & BIO-MEDICAL SCIENCES PATHWAY

 

 

BIO-MEDICAL INNOVATION

Missouri

WRCC

HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS

Marlboro College

WRCC

MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS

SVT

BUHS

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

CCV

BUHS

NUTRITION

VTC

WRCC

The list of courses is often changing and some courses are not offered every year. Please check with your Counselor.
For more information, call Heather Harrison, Dual Enrollment Registrar at (802) 451-3421 or talk to your High School Counselor to enroll.   


SPECIAL PROGRAMS

A0002500        DIVERSITY EDUCATION        
2 Credits/Semester/Block every other day

Open to: Grade 9

This course is intended to help freshmen recognize bias in society wherever it exists. The curriculum for this course was written to meet local needs and was encouraged by the Vermont Department of Education. Its prime focus is the elimination of prejudice. Topics included are diverse perspectives, communication, cultural identity and values, diverse communities, history, vocabulary, definitions, contemporary discrimination and racism, and the impact of bias on the community.

Note: The Diversity Education course is required for every freshman It is not a requirement for students who enter BUHS as sophomores, juniors, or seniors. Transfer students are still required to earn 97 total credits.

S4CR2002                YOUTH AND ADULTS TRANSFORMING SCHOOLS TOGETHER (YATST)

4 Credits

All year/alternating days

Open to: Grades 9

 Youth and Adults Transforming Schools Together (YATST) is a course designed as a laboratory for school transformation. Using school and state wide data, students will identify, research, and implement significant change in their school community. Through YATST, students develop the ability to examine institutional change from multiple perspectives. Students may complete YATST as an alternative method to fulfilling the school’s diversity requirement.

T0009000        VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL        

4 Credits Semester

Prerequisites:  Open to all students’ completion of application, interview and online assessment

VHS offers a large selection of over 250 courses which may be taken for elective credit. These courses are comparable to traditional classroom courses.  As a student you must be very self-disciplined, highly motivated, and make time to log into your class on a daily basis. For a complete listing of available courses check out the VHS website at www.govhs.org – on the left hand menu click VHS catalog.  Students will not be scheduled for VHS courses until the application process is complete.

Application process:

  1. Obtain an application in the counseling office and fill it out.
  2. Turn the completed application into the VHS Coordinator:  Lisa Johnson
  3. Interview with VHS Coordinator.

ZTR21001          INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE STUDIES (DEV-0280)

Please Note: This course is a CCV course.

To register for this free course, please call CCV at 254-6370

2 Credits 13-week session

This course provides an orientation to the college experience for high school and new students. This course helps students make the transition to college by exploring the skills and expectations necessary for success at the  college level; conducting college searches and applying for financial aid. Students will develop time management, test-taking, communication and study skills. Stress management and goal setting will also be emphasized, as well as learning to seek and use available information resources. The course is generally offered in a 13-week session with classes meeting once a week for 2 hours at the Community College of Vermont campus. The course is graded on a P/F (pass /fail) basis.


EDUCATIONAL ALTERNATIVES AND SUPPORT

The following programs are designed to provide educational support as well as the opportunity to earn credit towards graduation.

Z0000051 (S1)                ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Z0000052 (S2)                

Open to: grade 9-10

Block alternate days

Academic Support is a one semester, credit bearing program for ninth and tenth grade students. Students may be referred to the program from their sending schools, parents, counselors and/or teachers. Students must meet basic eligibility criteria to be considered for Academic Support; these include, but are not limited to AIMS Web data, NECAP scores, departmental screening, and overall school performance. The primary focus of the program is on individual student academic achievement and skill development.  Goals are based on students improving academically in a predetermined area of need(s) based on a variety of assessment data and to explore a variety of valid study skills that will enhance student awareness of their personal learning style.  Academic support is offered primarily in the areas of Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science. Students will be required to participate in all lessons, as well as independent skill work based on student plan. Parent involvement and student effort are required. Initially, parent, teacher, and student will meet to discuss the outcomes of classroom testing and other data sources in order to create an individual learning plan.  Follow-up meetings will review student progress towards goals and benchmarks.

Z0005000 (S1)                COMMUNITY BASED LEARNING PROGRAM

ZS205000 (S2)

The Community Based Learning Program at Brattleboro Union High School is an educational pathway for those students who are at risk of not successfully completing high school. It is designed to provide real world learning experiences for students in grades 10 through 12. The Community Based Learning Program places students in internships with local businesses and organizations. Through this internship experience, students will pursue their personal interests and develop their academic skills.  Upon successful completion of their internship, students will earn credit toward graduation.


Academies: STEM, International Studies, and Visual Performing Arts

Brattleboro Union High School and the Windham Regional Career Center offer three content-based academies. The Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Academy is designed to allow students to explore extended studies in either Engineering or Biomedicine. The Visual Performing Arts (VPA) Academy is designed to provide students extended academic and studio experiences in digital communication, performing arts, fine arts, dance/circus or musical arts. The International Studies Academy will equip students with the knowledge to communicate and participate in an increasingly complex and interconnected world. Participation in the academies requires a combination of required and elective coursework, a student portfolio, professional interaction within the chosen field and a capstone course.  Successful completion of an academy will result in a notation on a student’s transcript and a notation on one’s high school diploma as well. An application and interview are required for acceptance to any of the academies.

STEM ACADEMY

SCIENCE  •  TECHNOLOGY  •  ENGINEERING  •  MATHEMATICS

Dan Braden,  Coordinator dbraden@wsesu.org

https://sites.google.com/a/wsesu.org/stem/

BIOMEDICAL STRAND:                                ELECTIVE COURSES: (Choose one)

REQUIRED COURSES:        Protective Services (EMR)

Human Body Systems (PLTW)               Medical Terminology

Medical Interventions (PLTW)        Nutrition

Biomedical Innovation (Capstone Course)        

Principles of Biomedical Sciences (PLTW)

        

Additional BIOMEDICAL REQUIREMENTS:
*16 credits in Math and 16 credits in Science (including Chemistry and Physics).

*Attendance and documentation of participation in monthly STEM seminars and field trips.

*Portfolio presentation (senior year).

*A minimum of 75% in all courses and consistent attendance (all four years).

ENGINEERING STRAND:

NOTE: THE WRCC IS RESTRUCTURING PROGRAMS, AND SOME COURSE REQUIREMENTS MAY CHANGE.  SEE MR. BRADEN OR YOUR COUNSELOR WITH QUESTIONS.


REQUIRED COURSES:

CHOOSE ONE of the following areas of emphasis:        

Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing (2 blocks; full year; open to grades 11 and 12)

Electricity/Speaker Building (2 blocks; full year; open to grades 11 and 12)

        

Additional ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS:
*16 credits in Math (including Pre-Calculus) and 16 credits in Science (including Chemistry and Physics).

*Attendance and documentation of participation in monthly STEM seminars and field trips.

*Portfolio presentation (senior year).

*A minimum of 75% in all courses and consistent attendance (all four years).

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS ACADEMY

Fine Arts • Music • Digital Arts • Theater • Movement

Karen Trenosky, Coordinator, VPA Academy Coordinator  ktrenosky@wsesu.org.

The Visual and Performing Arts Academy (VPA) is designed to provide students extended academic and studio experiences in digital arts, theater arts, fine arts, movement arts or musical arts. Participants in the VPA Academy require a combination of required and elective coursework, a student portfolio, professional interaction within the chosen field and a capstone course. Successful completion of a VPA program will result in a notation on a student’s transcript and a notation on one’s high school diploma as well. An application and interview are required for acceptance. Application deadline for the 2018-2019 Academy class is May 1st, 2018.



STRAND: FINE ARTS        
REQUIRED COURSES:        ELECTIVE COURSES: (Choose two)
Foundations in Art        Journalism                        
Studio Art I (Drawing and Design)        Graphic Design I
Advanced Art Studies in the Community (Capstone Course)        Intro to Poetry
One of the following areas of emphasis:        Art and Humanities
Studio Art II (Painting) and Advanced Studio Art        Sewing
Ceramics I and II        Mythology
Sculpture I and II        Interior Design        
        Photography I        
Fine Arts Strand Requirements: In order to receive VPA Academy accreditation, along with the required courses, students must complete: Attendance requirements, documentation of participation in seminars, workshops and trips (total of 30 points), the capstone course, and the completion of a Fine Arts portfolio and presentation.


STRAND: MUSIC- Vocal & Instrumental    

VOCAL REQUIRED COURSES                VOCAL ELECTIVE COURSES: (Choose two)

Honors Chorus I (8 credits-4 semesters)                Selection of 1 instrumental music course

Honors Chorus I (8 credits-4 semesters)                Performing Arts - Acting or Directing

Music Theory        Introduction to Poetry

Madrigals        Visual Arts Course*

Music Capstone        Art & Humanities

          Performing Arts - Dance

        Modern & Classical Language (Intermediate or Advanced Level)

INSTRUMENTAL REQUIRED COURSES        INSTRUMENTAL ELECTIVE COURSES: (Choose two)

Honors Band (8 credits-4 semesters)        Selection of 1 vocal music course        

Honors Band (8 credits-4 semesters)        Performing Arts - Acting or Directing

Music Theory        Intro to Poetry

Jazz Band or Jazz Workshop        Visual Arts Course*

Music Capstone        Art & Humanities

        Performing Arts – Dance

Music Strand Requirements: In order to receive your VPA Academy accreditation, along with the required courses, students must complete: Attendance requirements, documentation of participation in seminars, workshops and trips (total of 30 points), the capstone course, and presentation.

*Visual Art Courses include Foundations in Art, Graphic Design I, TV Production I or Interior Design.


STRAND: DIGITAL ARTS    

REQUIRED COURSES                        ELECTIVE COURSES (Choose two)

Foundations in Art                        Performing Arts - Dance

Studio Art I (Drawing and Design)        Speech and Argumentation

Digital Arts Capstone                        Performing Arts - Acting or Directing

One of the following areas of emphasis:        Journalism

    Computer GDI and Computer GDII        English - Other Voices

    Photography I, II and III        Intro to Poetry

    TV Production I, TV Production II        The Writing Experience

     and Filmmaking and Digital Editing        Visual Arts Course

Digital Arts Strand Requirements: In order to receive your VPA Academy accreditation, along with the required courses, students must complete: Attendance requirements, documentation of participation in seminars, workshops and trips (total of 30 points), the capstone course, and the completion of a portfolio and presentation.


STRAND: THEATER    

REQUIRED COURSES

Performing Arts - Acting (8 credits - 2 semesters)                

Performing Arts - Directing (8 credits - 2 semesters)        

Theater Capstone        

ELECTIVE COURSES (Choose three)        

One or more Visual Arts course        One or more Music courses        Sewing

Shakespeare        Performing Arts - Dance        Performing Arts-Circus

Filmmaking & Digital Editing        Television Production I                Human Body Systems

Mythology        Intro to Poetry                        Speech and Argumentation        

Theater Strand Requirements: In order to receive your VPA Academy accreditation, along with the required courses, students must complete: Attendance requirements, documentation of participation in seminars, workshops and trips (total of 30 points), the capstone course, and the completion of an actor portfolio.


STRAND: MOVEMENT - Dance & Circus

DANCE: REQUIRED COURSES:                CIRCUS: REQUIRED COURSES:        

Dance I - Intro to Dance                Dance I - Intro to Dance or Performing Arts-Dance        

Performing Arts- Dance (8 credits-2 semesters)        Performing Arts- Acting or Directing

Performing Arts- Dance (8 credits-2 semesters)        Performing Arts- Circus (8 credits-2 semesters)

Movement Capstone                      Performing Arts- Circus (8 credits-2 semesters)

                  Movement Capstone

ELECTIVE COURSES (DANCE: Choose two electives; CIRCUS: Choose one elective)                

One or more Visual Arts course                Filmmaking and Digital Editing         Sewing

One or more Instrumental or Vocal courses        Mythology                                Intro to Poetry
British Literature                Television Production I                Shakespeare

Performing Arts - Acting or Directing or Circus (Students in Dance strand can take Circus for elective credit)        

Movement Strand Requirements: In order to receive your VPA Academy accreditation, along with the required courses, students must complete: Attendance requirements, documentation of participation in seminars, workshops and trips (total of 30 points), the capstone course, the completion of a portfolio and presentation..

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES ACADEMY

Karen Sebastian, Coordinator ksebastian@wsesu.org

The Brattleboro Union High School/Windham Regional Career Center International Studies Academy will equip students with the knowledge to communicate and participate in an increasingly complex and interconnected world. Students will gain and demonstrate transferable skills that are essential for career readiness and global citizenship in the 21st century. These competencies include proficiency in a second language, social and intercultural awareness and skills, and an understanding of the connections among political, geographical, historical, cultural, religious, and economic systems. Students who successfully complete the ISA requirements will receive a designation on their transcripts and a notation on their high school diploma.

The MCL, International Business, English and Social Studies courses which would meet the International Studies Academy requirements are below:

        

MODERN AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGES(Required)

ENGLISH (2 courses)

SOCIAL STUDIES (2 Courses)

WRCC (2 Courses)

ADDITIONAL ISA REQUIREMENTS:

FOUR-YEAR PLANNER

There is room in each semester for four, four-credit classes or a total of eight per year. However, due to variations in credit and scheduling of classes, you may not succeed in neatly fitting the classes you want and need into a given year.

YEAR 1

  1. __________________________________________        5. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        6. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        7. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        8. ______________________________________________

        

YEAR 2

  1. __________________________________________        5. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        6. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        7. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        8. ______________________________________________

        

YEAR 3

  1. __________________________________________        5. ______________________________________________

  1. .__________________________________________        6. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        7. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        8. ______________________________________________

YEAR 4

  1. __________________________________________        5. ______________________________________________

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  1. __________________________________________        7. ______________________________________________

  1. __________________________________________        8. ______________________________________________

GRADUATION CHECKLIST

NAME: __________________________________        YOG:_______________________

REQUIRED COURSES* (check off number

CREDITS

CREDITS

CREDITS

of courses completed)

REQUIRED

EARNED

NEEDED

English        1        2        3        4         16                ________        ________

Math        1        2        3         12                ________        ________

Science        1        2        3         12                ________        ________

Social Studies      1        2        3         12                ________        ________

Phys. Ed.        1        2         4                ________        ________

Health        1         2                ________        ________

Fine Arts        1         4                ________        ________

Keyboarding        1        ________ test out                                 ________        ________

Diversity Education (required of all 9th graders) or YATST        2                ________        ________

ELECTIVES (list)        32*                ________        ________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

TOTAL 97        ________                ________

COMMUNITY SERVICE (40 HOURS)          ________                ________

Notes:        Dates Updated:        ________

ENGLISH

BUHS English courses have high standards of literacy for students.  Courses are designed to develop critical skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing.  In all English courses, students are expected to read both informational and literary texts, and to write in various modes of discourse, utilizing the conventions of the English language. Sixteen credits in English are required for graduation.

English 1* and 2*, which serve as a foundation for further study, constitute eight of the sixteen credits in English needed for graduation. These first two courses are sequential; a student must demonstrate proficiency in and complete English 1 before receiving credit for English 2, a student must demonstrate proficiency in and complete English 2 before receiving English credit for any English electives.

Credits for English 3 and 4 can be earned through a choice of semester-long English electives which focus on areas of particular interest while offering continued development of all five essential language skills. A course must have sufficient enrollment to run.

English 1 and 2 are offered at two levels: (Honors) and (College and Career).

English 3 and 4 required electives are offered every year (with noted exceptions). Students may choose to earn more than the required number of credits in English. Some electives have limited numbers of sections and limited enrollment due to the writing requirements of those courses. Seniors shall have priority in scheduling electives.

**Journalism (0640) and Advanced Journalism (0643) are open to all students, grades 9-12, but students will receive English credit only if they have completed and demonstrated proficiency in English 1 and 2..

Course

Honors/ Collegiate High School

College and Career

1st Course

(ninth grade)

English 1 Honors (Block class/semester)

English 1 College and Career (Block class/semester)

2nd Course

(tenth grade)

English 2 Honors (Block class/semester)

English 2 College and Career (Block class/semester)

3rd & 4th Course

(for Juniors and
Seniors)





AP English: Literature and Composition

 

Good, Evil, & Power

 

 

English Composition 1:The Writing Experience

Directing (WRCC);  Adventure Reading;  Journalism, Introduction and Advanced*; Modern Culture; Mythology; Research: Writing the Research Paper; Revisiting Children’s Literature; Speech and Argumentation; Morality and Power; TV Production 1 English and TV 2 English; Poetry, Studies in American Literature

Career Center Note: A student can receive English credit towards graduation by demonstrating proficiency in the following Career Center courses.

 

See the WRCC Program of Studies for WRCC course descriptions

 

ENGLISH 1

ECC00010        ENGLISH 1: College and Career        

4 Credits

Semester

English 1 is a semester long course focusing primarily on reading and writing skills. This course provides a study of literary forms: short story, novel, drama, poetry. Additional emphases include study skills, research skills, speech, literature, grammar, vocabulary, and spelling.  This course assumes grade-level reading, writing, speaking, and problem-solving skills. Successful completion of and demonstrate of proficiency in this course is a prerequisite for English 2. This course runs for one block, one semester.

EH000040        ENGLISH 1: Honors        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisites: Completed course contract(must be submitted before registering for the course), completed required pre- course reading, completed required pre-course writing assignments.

This Honors English One course, which requires completion of pre-course reading and writing assignments, is offered for students who are prepared to work hard at an accelerated pace. While teacher conferences for further discussion of class work are always available, remedial assistance is not a component of this course. Students must complete assigned readings prior to the first meeting of the class and submit a completed course contract. We advise students to think carefully before committing themselves to this rigorous level of English. Successful completion of and demonstration of proficiency in this course is required before moving on to English 2 options.

ENGLISH 2

ECC00110                        ENGLISH 2: College and Career        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of English 1

English Two is a semester long course which continues the emphasis on writing and reading skills.  Additional emphases include research skills, speech, grammar, vocabulary, and spelling. This course assumes grade-level reading, writing, speaking, and problem-solving skills. Successful completion of and demonstration of proficiency in this course is a prerequisite for English 3 and 4 electives.

EH000140                        ENGLISH 2: Honors        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisites:  Successful completion of English 1, completed course contract (must be submitted at the time of course registration)completed required pre-course reading, completed required pre-course writing assignments.

This course is the honors level of English Two.  Although this section is open to all, students who want to take it must be prepared to work hard at an accelerated pace. Students must also submit a completed course contract. This course requires that students complete substantial reading and writing assignments prior to the first meeting of the class. We advise students to think carefully before committing themselves to this rigorous academic level of English. Successful completion of and demonstration of proficiency in this course is a prerequisite for English 3 and 4 electives.

ENGLISH 3 & 4

Prerequisite for English credit for any English 3 and 4 electives is successful demonstration of proficiency in and completion of English 1 and English 2.

In all English 3 and 4 courses, students will continue to read both informational and literary texts for comprehension, analysis, and discussion; to write in various forms, including essays; to research pertinent topics for oral and/or written presentation; and to discuss issues/topics/themes related to works studied.  Students should expect daily homework assignments in all English 3 and 4 electives.

EW000600        ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH:

4 Credits        LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

Semester

Prerequisite: English 1 and 2, completed contract, pre-course reading and writing assignments

ADVANCED PLACEMENT - (available for English 3 and 4 only) This course requires students to submit a completed course contract and to complete substantial pre-course assignments. Students who complete these courses are also required to take the corresponding Advanced Placement exam in May.

This course was designed according to guidelines set by the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board.  It emphasizes critical reading of literature and advanced composition. The class is challenging and will take greater time and effort than other electives. Students who choose it should have strong English skills and thorough preparation for literary studies. Readings may include works by William Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Dickens, Emily Bronte, Kurt Vonnegut, Chinua Achebe, Margaret Atwood, among  others, and major poets of England and America, among others. Although AP English Literature and Composition is open to all students who have completed English 2 successfully, those who wish to enroll must submit a completed course contract and complete substantial pre-course reading and writing assignments.

                                  English 3 & 4 with focus on:

ECHS0413        English Composition I:

        THE WRITING EXPERIENCE*                                    

4 Credits

Semester

This course is an opportunity to take English 3 or 4 for both high school and college credit. .In this challenging workshop/tutorial course, students experiment with four modes of writing:  expressive, affirming, persuasive, and informative, and read nonfiction and fiction prose models. These explorations may take the form of journal entries, reflections, autobiographies and memoirs, opinion essays, and poetry.  Students focus on a process approach to writing, producing approximately eight formal, multi-draft, heavily revised papers, in addition to several shorter works. With the help of peer and teacher conferences, and participation in public readings and presentations, students work toward the creation of two portfolios throughout the semester (one per quarter). This course is designed for the self-motivated learner who enjoys writing and/or has a sincere interest in learning to become a better writer. * This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT. This course will require a contract which must be submitted at the time of registration.

E0000499                        English 3 & 4 with a focus on:

MORALITY AND POWER                                

4 Credits

Semester (A student may only take Morality and Power OR Good, Evil and Power for credit)

This course consists of two major areas of study: writing and literature.  The writing area is designed to review and improve writing skills.  The other focus of the course, literature, will enable students to study standard literary works (both traditional and non-traditional selections) which are organized thematically.  Vocabulary study is also stressed.

Readings include titles such as Lord of the Flies, Othello, Animal Farm, Antigone, The Handmaid’s Tale.  Do Androids Dream of electric Sheep?

ECHS0498        English 3 & 4 with a focus on:                          

        GOOD, EVIL & POWER *                                

4 Credits
Semester
(A student may only take Morality and Power OR Good, Evil and Power for credit)

This course is an opportunity to take English 3 or 4 for both high school and college credit. This course consists of two major areas of study:  writing and literature.  The writing area is designed to review and improve writing skills. The other focus of the course, literature, will enable students to study standard literary works (both traditional and non-traditional selections) which are organized thematically. Vocabulary study is also stressed.  Readings include titles such as Lord of the Flies, Othello, Animal Farm, Antigone, The Handmaid’s Tale. *This course may be taken for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT. This course will require a contract which must be submitted at the time of registration.

E0000494        English 3 & 4 with a focus on:

        SPEECH AND ARGUMENTATION                        

4 Credits
Semester

This course introduces students to a variety of advanced speech skills and gives practical exposure to, and experience in, the use of those skills. Students will be required to participate in several different forms of speech presentation, including individual informative and persuasive speeches, discussion groups, debates, interviews, and interpretive readings of literature.  Extensive work will be done in the areas of research, subject analysis, problem-solving, persuasion and argumentation, organization, interpretation, and speech delivery.

E0000496        English 3 & 4 with a focus on:

  MYTHOLOGY                                        

4 Credits
Semester

The language of myth is the language of human experience.  Students will explore both hero myths and creation myths over the course of civilization. Through a study of cultures and their stories, both ancient and contemporary, we will explore who we are as human beings. The following cultures may be studied:

Babylonian, Greek, Roman, Celtic, Norse, Native American, Asian, and African. The primary text used is World Mythology.

E0000450        English 3 & 4 with a focus on:        

 THE RESEARCH PAPER

4 Credits

Semester

The research paper is an organized document prepared by the student after careful research, observation, investigation and discovery. The student goes beyond personal knowledge or experience, through a specific sequence of activities: identifying a thesis, locating source material, judging and assessing the data, and then incorporating the research into a cohesive example of scholarship. The student increases his or her understanding, knowledge of and opinions on the research topic through this process.

While research projects differ, all student researchers must select an appropriate topic, develop a working thesis or hypothesis, use the library and its various sources, prepare a working bibliography, take notes, outline the paper and then do the writing.

This course is designed to help the student master the skills necessary to locate relevant information and to use it to produce scholarly research papers using three different documentation styles (MLA, APA, and CMS). This course is designed for the college-bound student.

E0000480                        English 3 & 4 with a focus on:
                                INTRODUCTION TO POETRY        
        
4 Credits Semester
In this course, students will explore a variety of poetry, look at the various structures and terminology of the genre (such as, but not limited to, foot, meter, rhyme, figurative speech, imagery, literal and figurative meaning, tone, sound, symbol, and rhythm). Students will also write, share, and critique their own poems in class. In addition, students will read a variety of poetry, respond to the poems and share their reactions in a group setting.

E0000475         English 3 & 4 with a focus on:

            MODERN CULTURE                                

4 Credits

Semester

In this course, students will explore issues of modern culture including political and literary history, technological progress, the changing shape of information, and cultural identity. Units will revolve around utopian visions of modernity, the consequences of modernism, media and the shape of society, and modern citizenship. There will be a variety of texts and media, including novels and long-form non-fiction. There will be regular reading homework and regular writing assignments.

Readings may include such titles as Brave New World, Cat’s Cradle, Feed, and Between the World and Me, as well as a variety of short fiction, articles, poetry, and film.

E0000505                            English 3 & 4 with a focus on:

4 Credits                         REVISITING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE               

Semester

The books we read as children meant one thing to us then, but are worth another look years later. As we read some classic children’s books, we’ll also be reading about the books:  the philosophy, psychology, sociology, history and cultural connections of the books, in addition to literary criticism and film adaptations.  Expect to do annotations, light research and bi-weekly essays. This will be a scholarly look at what seems to be a very simple subject.

 E0000359        English 3 & 4 with a focus on:

 4 Credits        ADVENTURE READING                        

Semester

This course in intended for students interested in reading non-fiction and fiction stories of adventure (stories of survival, both physical and psychological).  The goal is to heighten the student’s interest in reading more and varied selections.  Students will also view films with the themes related to the reading, and write reviews, essays, etc.  Longer titles include: The Things They Carried, Unbroken, and Into Thin Air. Expect reading homework most nights.

E0000510                        English 3 & 4 with a focus on:                                                
                                STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE                
4 Credits

 Semester
Author Edith Hamilton wrote, “A people's literature is the great textbook for real knowledge of them.” In other words, if we want to understand a society, its literature is a good place to start.  That’s what we’ll be doing in Studies in American Literature. You had a look at some of the key American works in English 2. This class provides the opportunity for group and individual study of both traditional and contemporary authors, and how they reflect and shape American society. Discussion will be an important part of the course, so you’ll need to do what’s necessary to be able to “bring something to the table” each day.  Expect reading homework most nights and writing short pieces approximately twice a week.  

E0000640        INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to all students, grades 9 - 12

Students who have completed English 1 and 2 successfully will receive English 3 or 4 credit for this course. Other students will receive general elective credit.

The study of journalism is an effective way to develop both reading and writing skills, the foundations of literacy. The two underlying beliefs of this intensive journalistic writing course are as follows: (1) a command of clear, concise language leads to effective written and spoken communication; and (2) students who take an intensive

journalistic writing course learn skills useful in any field of endeavor. Through writing, reading, viewing, and discussing, students in this course will learn the principles of ethical journalism, interviewing techniques, news writing, editing, and newspaper design.  In addition, students will read and discuss the work of professional journalists.  Class members will contribute to the student newspaper, THE BRATTLEBORO BEACON. This course is a prerequisite for Advanced Journalism 0643.

E0000643        ADVANCED JOURNALISM        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Introduction to Journalism

Students who have completed English 1 and 2 successfully will receive English 3 or 4 credit for this course. Other students will receive general elective credit. This course is an advanced offering of 0640. The goal of this class is to apply the journalism skills learned previously to other media. Through hands-on experience, students in this course will continue to develop their knowledge of the principles of ethical journalism, interviewing techniques, news writing, editing, and newspaper design. In addition, students will read and discuss the work of other journalists.  Students must have completed 0640 successfully to enroll in this course.

 OTHER ENGLISH OPTIONS

E0000690        ENGLISH INDEPENDENT STUDY        

1,2,3,4 Credits

Open to: Grades 11-12

Prerequisite:  Special Permission of Department Head

This course is an independent project of the student's choosing.  This offering is not intended to duplicate existing courses.  Content should be determined in consultation with the head of the English Department.

C0004655                        PERFORMING ARTS-DIRECTING
8 Credits
Full Year
Open to : Grades 10-12

This is a rigorous academic course for students who wish to learn more about directing for the stage and other technical aspects of theatre production. Previous acting experience is highly recommended as students will both direct and act with classmates in a number of directing exercises and scenes. Active daily participation
if required. Students must be eager to take creative risks and to receive critical feedback on their work. Because this course may qualify as English 3 or English 4  (requires successful completion of and demonstrated proficiency in English 1 and 2) for some students, rigorous academic work is included in the curriculum. Students
write eight major essays, a research paper, frequent short reviews, and prepare a director’s prompt book. Note: this course is offered every other year on a rotating basis with Performing Arts – Acting.

ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES

English for Speakers of Other Languages, (ESOL), classes are designed for students whose primary language is not English.  Students are tested using ACCESS to determine their English language proficiency and placed in an ESOL level according to their skill.  Student’s progress through levels by mastering standards in the areas of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The goal of this program in accordance with state and federal mandates is to reach native level English in all four competency areas.

Content support in mainstream classes and language accommodations are also provided as needed by students who qualify for ESL language support.

J0004600        NEWCOMER

Students in this class are recent arrivals to the United States. They may have had interrupted schooling or are not literate in their native language.  Using the theme of American culture, students work on survival English skills, introduction to literacy, and phonemic awareness. A strong emphasis is placed on orientation to school systems and community for social-cultural adjustment.

J0004608        ENTERING

Students at this level have scored an entering proficiency on the ACCESS Test, but they are familiar with the Roman alphabet, have had uninterrupted schooling, and may have studied some English in their country.

In a cooperative learning approach students use visuals, manipulatives, and film to construct comprehensible language learning experiences.  Literacy is developed in a whole language approach using vocabulary students understand.  Students learn to write seven basic sentence structures with punctuation, and concentrate on high frequency English vocabulary.

J0004609        BEGINNING

Students at this level have scored a beginning proficiency, or mastered the ESOL state standards for entering level.  Beginning students build vocabulary and literacy skills using a reading series based on progressively difficult text. They begin to work with formal grammar points and idioms.

Students learn to format paragraphs, letters, and short oral presentations after cooperative group projects. There is a strong focus on developing higher order thinking skills within the proficiency level.

J0004610        DEVELOPING

Developing English Language Learners (ELLs) have mastered the Beginner level of standards but still need to develop stronger language skills to pass the Developing level.  Students at this level often have strong verbal English skills, but are still developing English literacy skills.  Developing ELLs concentrate on oral expression, and content vocabulary from mainstream classes.  Students will learn to write narrative, descriptive, and persuasive essays. Students are introduced to poetry, a novel, and short stories.  Developing students work on the theme of United States history and geography.  This serves to build vocabulary, increase thinking skills, and schemata for social studies.  Students engage in debates, learn to use the Internet for research, and work on note taking skills. There is a strong focus on literacy skills, and comprehension.

J0004611        EXPANDING

Students at this level have mastered the standards of the Developing level. They are able to express themselves with few grammatical errors.  Students are working for native English competency especially in reading and writing.  

Students read four Shakespearean plays in modern English. They write comparison essays comparing the plays to the movie versions.  Students learn to research, assemble, write, and edit a research paper. Topics are chosen from their interests, or assigned from content classes.  Students will continue to study vocabulary as well as the meaning of prefixes and suffices to expand comprehension with English.

J0001002        BRIDGING

Students at this level have mastered the standards of the Expanding proficiency level. They work on skills needed in content classes. Students strive to acquire grade appropriate reading levels to meet state standards in writing and strengthen vocabulary.  Students engage both in cooperative group projects and individual work based needs in grammar.  Extensive writing experience is provided using the writing process. Students engage in writers’ workshops where they help to edit each other’s work.  Instruction is provided on grammar errors found in writing. This class prepares ELLs students to meet exit criteria from the ESOL program.

MATHEMATICS

The Mathematics Department offers a variety of courses, some of which are similar in content but different in approach, depth of study, and pacing.  Students in each course are given the opportunity to learn not just course content, but to develop the 8 Mathematical Practices. Problem solving requires students to solve multi-step problems which involve skills and knowledge with which the student is familiar but may require the student to apply mathematics to new situations.  Mathematical communication requires that students explain clearly, systematically, and accurately, in written prose, math procedures, and results. Very often this procedure involves the use of charts, diagrams or graphs. Math Department objectives are closely aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

Freshman entering BUHS as Level 1, Level 2 or Level 3 mathematics students will take Accelerated Algebra 1, Algebra 1 or Fundamentals of Algebra respectively.

MATHEMATICS COURSE OFFERINGS

COURSE

SPECIAL COURSES AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

1ST Course

NA

Accelerated

Algebra 1
(M0001220)

Algebra 1 (M0001225)

Algebra 1 (yr long)

(MAY81225)

2nd Course

NA

Accelerated Geometry

(M0001230)

Geometry (M0001130)

Essentials of Geometry

(M0001135)

3rd Course

NA

Accelerated Algebra 2 (MCHS1250)

Algebra 2 (M0001150)

Techniques in Problem Solving (MUC01031)

4th Course

Statistics (MCHS1180)

Accelerated Pre-Calculus (M0001273)

Pre-Calculus (M0001274)

5th Course

AP Calculus –
Part 1

(M0001292)

6th Course

AP Calculus –

Part 2

(M0001293)

See the Career Center Note on the next page for a list of courses which satisfy one math equivalent.


Repeating a Mathematics Course to Improve a Grade

A student may repeat a mathematics course, which s/he passed, for the purpose of obtaining a greater understanding of the course content and earning an improved grade.  However, the repeat must be completed before taking the next sequential mathematics course as described in the Chart of Course Offerings (first page of this section) and both grades will appear on your transcript. It is permissible to use a Level 2 course to replace the grade of a Level 1 Accelerated course of the same name.  The level 2 course replaces the complete record of the Level 1 Accelerated course; that is, the student earns only four credits towards graduation.

Career Center Note: A student can receive mathematics credit towards graduation through successful completion of one of the following Career Center programs. Please refer to the Career Center program of studies for specific course descriptions:

LEVEL 1

The accelerated sequence is intended for students who desire the challenge that a fast-paced environment provides. As students’ progress through the accelerated sequence of courses there will be minimal time spent reviewing previously learned material. Accelerated Algebra 1, Accelerated Geometry and Accelerated Algebra 2 must be completed within a two year period in order to be eligible to take AP-Calculus.

M0001220        ACCELERATED ALGEBRA 1        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  Recommendation of Current Teacher

This course emphasizes the conceptual skills of Algebra.  Special attention is given to the abstract developmental structure of mathematics and to the student acquiring problem solving skills to be both applied and used as a learning strategy.

M0001230        ACCELERATED GEOMETRY        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: 80 or better in Algebra 1 or recommendation of Algebra 1 teacher

This course consists of a Euclidean approach to plane and solid geometry. Emphasis is placed on deductive reasoning and formal proof using postulates, definitions, and theorems. Methods of inductive reasoning are explored through the use of dynamic geometry software.

MCHS1250                                ACCELERATED ALGEBRA 2 *                                                      

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  80 or better in Accelerated Algebra 1

This course is a continuation of Accelerated Algebra One. Topics include graphing systems of linear equations and a graphical analysis of higher order polynomials. The student studies manipulation of algebraic expressions, particularly those containing rational exponents and radicals. * This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

M0001273        ACCELERATED PRE-CALCULUS        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: 80 or better in Accelerated Algebra 2 and Accelerated Geometry is highly recommended

This course prepares students for, and is the principal prerequisite for, AP calculus. The student studies elementary functions including: transformations, combinations of functions, inverse functions, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions with an emphasis on their unifying properties. Sinusoidal functions and oblique triangle trigonometry are studied in depth. Literal derivation of basic formulas, individual and group projects, and problem solving are key components of this course. It is assumed that a student taking this course is self- motivated and genuinely interested in an exploratory approach to learning mathematics. The level of success students will experience in this course is directly related to how well they have internalized the skills and concepts studied in their previous mathematics courses.

MCHS1180        STATISTICS * (including Probability)        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite: 75 or better in Algebra 2

Statistics is an introduction to the basic ideas and techniques of probability and statistics. Topics included are: numerical and graphical descriptive measures, probability, random variables, probability distributions (binomial, geometric and the normal), sampling theory, estimation and confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, use of the correlation coefficient in making predictions from regression equations (both linear and non-linear). Numerical calculations of the above will be done using the list processing capabilities of the TI-84 calculator. * This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

M0001292        AP CALCULUS – Part 1        

4 Credits

Fall

Open to: Grades 11-12

Prerequisite:  80 or better in Accelerated Pre-Calculus

A college level course in differential and integral calculus which, if both parts are completed successfully, prepares the student for the Calculus AB Advanced Placement Examination. It is strongly recommended that students register for both AP Calculus Part 1 and AP Calculus Part 2 in order to ensure adequate preparation for the rigorous advanced placement exam.  See next course description.

M0001293        AP CALCULUS – Part 2        

4 Credits

Spring

Open to: Grades 11-12 Prerequisite:  Completion of Part 1

The second part of the two-semester AP Calculus sequence. A college level course in differential and integral calculus which was designed according to guidelines set by the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board.

LEVEL 2

The level 2 course sequence is a college preparatory sequence and is suggested for students planning to attend a technical school, college or university. If necessary, Algebra 2 may be taken before Geometry.

M0001225        ALGEBRA 1        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to:  Grade 9

Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation using state mandated testing scores as a guide.

A standard beginning Algebra course consisting of properties of real numbers; solving linear equations and inequalities; graphing linear functions; writing linear equations to solve word problems; solving systems of linear equations, exponential functions and data and statistics.

M0001130        GEOMETRY        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  Algebra 1

This course offers a Euclidean approach to plane geometry which includes a study of the properties of polygons, (especially triangles and quadrilaterals), parallelism, perpendicularity, and circles. The student also studies the concepts and applications of congruence, similarity, and coordinate geometry.

M0001150        ALGEBRA 2        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: 75 or better in Algebra 1

This course is a continuation of Algebra One. The student studies the applications of the real number system to solving second degree equations, factoring polynomials and simplifying rational expressions. Topics include graphing with an emphasis on solving systems of equations and quadratics.  Students interested in taking this course who do not meet the prerequisite criteria above should consult with their previous math teacher and counselor.

M0001274        PRE-CALCULUS        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  75 or better in Geometry and Algebra 2

In this course the student will be exposed to functions including, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric. Students will study the parent function and shifts that can be applied to the parent function as well as the inverses of these functions and their applications in real world situations.  Personal ownership of a scientific calculator is highly recommended for students taking this course. Students interested in taking this course who do not meet the prerequisite criteria above should consult with their previous math teacher and counselor.   (Note: this course does not satisfy the prerequisite for AP calculus.)

LEVEL 3

The Level 3 course sequence is designed for students who need to strengthen their working knowledge of basic mathematical skills.

Fundamentals of Algebra and Essentials of Geometry are designed to address the educational needs of students who did not achieve the standard as measured by state mandated testing.

MAY81225                                  ALGEBRA 1                                                  

8 Credits (4 Math/4 Elective)

Year Long/Block

Prerequisite – Teacher Recommendation

Covers the same content as the Algebra 1 course with additional time to become proficient. Content consists of properties of real numbers; solving linear equations and inequalities; graphing linear functions; writing linear equations to solve word problems; solving systems of linear equations, exponential functions, and data and statistics. The pace of the course is adjusted accordingly so that careful attention can be given to reinforcing skills necessary for success in the study of Algebra.
A preview of Geometry concepts that integrate Algebra will also be included.

M0001135        ESSENTIALS OF GEOMETRY        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite – Algebra I (yearlong)

This is an introductory Geometry course. Emphasis is placed on covering the most fundamental standards in the Geometric strand of the Common Core State Standards in mathematics.  The pace of the course is adjusted so that careful attention can be given to reinforcing skills necessary for success in the study of Geometry.  Open to Grade 10 or by teacher recommendation.

MUC01031        TECHNIQUES IN PROBLEM SOLVING        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

The student will acquire the basic skills of mathematics through the discovery and application of problem solving strategies. The student will also acquire the ability to communicate mathematically, both orally and in writing and should expect to work collaboratively with fellow students in small groups, and to make class presentations. Topics included are:  probability, tessellation and other geometric concepts, logical reasoning, drawings and diagrams, coordinate geometry, and algebra. There will be high expectations for in-class participation and productivity.  

M0001990        MATHEMATICS INDEPENDENT STUDY                        

1,2,3,4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 11-12

Prerequisite:  With approval of the head of mathematics department

An independent project of the student’s choosing. This offering is not intended to duplicate existing courses and is not eligible for core credit. Content should be determined in consultation with the Mathematics Department as early as possible. The student must find a faculty mentor to monitor this study.


SCIENCE

The Science Department requires that all students take our two-course, standards-based sequence, which includes Earth and Space Science (ESS) and Biology. The third science requirement is for students to complete one of two physical science pathways. It is recommended that students who establish a strong interest in and desire to pursue science at the college level take one semester of Chemistry and a semester of Physics. Students planning to pursue other interests are recommended to take Introduction to Chemistry and Physics, a lab-based course that will prepare them for many pathways, including college studies in fields other than science. Students may also take Introduction to Chemistry and Physics in order to strengthen their preparation for Chemistry and/or Physics. (Students who complete Introduction to Chemistry and Physics may take all 4th and beyond courses; however, students wanting to take AP Physics after Introduction to Chemistry and Physics should take either Chemistry or Physics.)

Both ESS and Biology are heterogeneous courses. Introduction to Chemistry and Physics is also heterogeneous with the exception that students with a strong interest in the sciences will likely select the alternate pathway. All courses include students who have varied interests and learning experiences. We encourage students to be active participants in the learning process, employing the science and engineering practices as defined by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). It is our intent that students will attain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to make informed decisions and succeed in their future endeavors.

SEQUENCE

SCIENCE CLASSES

1ST Required

Earth and Space Science (ESS) (S0002008)

2nd Required

Biology (S0002006)

3rd and beyond

Introduction to Chemistry and Physics (S0002030)

Chemistry (S0002115)

Physics (S0002120)

4th and beyond

Global Science (S0002116)

Wildlife Ecology & Management (S0002027)

Environmental Science and Policy * (SCHS2125)

Advanced Biology (S0002021)

Advanced Placement Physics (S0002200)

Project Lead the Way Biomedical Strand

Students who are or may be interested in pursuing careers in health science following high school are encouraged to take the Project Lead the Way WRCC sequence in biomedical science. The courses present students with learning opportunities that blend laboratory science, online learning, and case history scenarios. These courses are NOT currently available for BUHS science credit unless all four are completed. They ARE an excellent pathway to support student success in the study of biomedical science. Each course includes opportunities for career investigation, and students begin to shape plans based on interest. Currently, all PLTW Biomedical courses are available for dual enrollment.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY BIOMEDICAL SEQUENCE

SEQUENCE

WRCC PLTW BIOMEDICAL COURSE

1st

Principles of Biomedical Science (CLPB7304)

2nd

Human Body Systems* (CCHS7306)

3rd

Medical Interventions* (CCHS7307)

4th

Biomedical Innovations* (CCHS7308)

S0002008                        EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE (ESS)                                        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite:  None

The required first course in the BUHS Science sequence provides students with a study of earth and its place in the universe with an emphasis on science and engineering practices.  This course is designed to meet the Next Generation Science Standards in Earth and Space Science.  Topics include: the history of Earth, plate tectonics, weathering, erosion, and deposition, climate, and space systems. Human sustainability is a theme that runs throughout the course.

S0002006                        BIOLOGY        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESS

Students are introduced to fundamental concepts of biology including biochemistry, the living cell, characteristics of life, evolution and genetics. A variety of lab exercises and problem solving activities will be used to demonstrate these principles.  A term project, the Capstone, presented by the student to the class, is a culmination of student research and understanding.

S0002030                          INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESS and Biology

This course is designed to provide students with access to the physical science standards in a lab-based setting. Students will gain proficiency in understanding the fundamental concepts of matter and its interactions; motion and stability; energy; and waves and their applications in technologies for information transfer. Students who complete Introduction to Chemistry and Physics may continue on to take all 4th and beyond science courses. Students wanting to take AP Physics after taking the Fundamentals of Chemistry and Physics, should first take either a full semester of Chemistry or Physics.

CLPB7304

4 Credits

PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE: A PROJECT LEAD

THE WAY COURSE       (PBS)                                                                                          

Semester

Open to grades 9 – 12

Does not meet BUHS Science graduation requirement unless you take all of these: PBS, HBS, MI, and BI.

Students will explore biology concepts through the study of human diseases. Students will determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine and research processes. Note that this is a course within the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) sequence of Biomedical Science courses and that a significant amount of work will be conducted online.

CCHS7306

HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS: A PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

COURSE* (HBS)

4 Credits

Semester

Open to grades 9 – 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology or Principles of Biomedical Science

Does not meet BUHS Science graduation requirement unless you take all of these: PBS, HBS, MI, and BI.

Students undertake a detailed study of human body systems through organ dissection, guided Internet research, and 3-D modeling of all major organs.  Labs feature data acquisition software used to monitor body functions such as blood flow, muscle reflexes, and respiratory capacity.  Case studies explore the roles of biomedical professionals as they diagnose fictional patients and devise treatment plans.  Research projects explore the interactions between body systems and the careers available to those who work in health-related professions.  A unit on bone-based and DNA-based forensics is also included.  Note that this is a course within the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) sequence of Biomedical Science courses and that a significant amount of work will be conducted online. *This course may also be offered for optional college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

CCHS7307

4 Credits

MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS: A PROJECT LEAD THE WAY COURSE* (MI)

Semester

Open to grades 10 – 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Human Body Systems

Does not meet BUHS Science graduation requirement unless you take all of these: PBS, HBS, MI, and BI.

Students follow the life of a fictitious family as they investigate how to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. Students explore how to detect and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; evaluate cancer treatment options; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through real-world cases, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Note that this is a course within the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) sequence of Biomedical Science courses and that a significant amount of work will be conducted online. This course may also be offered for optional college credit; see pages 10 & 11.

CCHS7308

4 Credits

BIOMEDICAL INNOVATION: A PROJECT LEAD THE WAY COURSE*   (BI)                                                                                                                 

Semester

Open to grades 11 – 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Medical Interventions

Does not meet BUHS Science graduation requirement unless you take all of these: PBS, HBS, MI, and BI.

In the final capstone course of the Biomedical Science sequence, students build on the knowledge and skills gained from previous courses to design innovative solutions for the most pressing health challenges of the 21st century. Students address topics ranging from public health and biomedical engineering to clinical medicine and physiology. They have the opportunity to work on an independent design project with a mentor or advisor from a university, medical facility, or research institution. Note that this is a course within the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) sequence of Biomedical Science courses and that a significant amount of work will be conducted online. This course may also be offered for optional college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

S0002116        GLOBAL SCIENCE        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of ESS, Biology, Introduction to Chemistry and Physics or either Chemistry or Physics.    

Global Science is a college preparatory course that will focus on the relationship between science and society. Global Science is a true integrated science course requiring students to understand the interrelatedness of energy, economics, food production, population, the environment and our society’s use of resources. We will examine our present consumption patterns as well as historical resource depletion information as a basis for future land management and resource planning.

SCHS2125        ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLICY *        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite:   Honors level work in ESS, Biology Introduction to Chemistry and Physics, or either Chemistry or Physics and teacher recommendation.

This interdisciplinary course emphasizes ecosystems, resource use, human population, energy use and agriculture.  We incorporate ideas from many scientific disciplines such as Earth Science, Chemistry and Biology, but also other fields such as Social Studies and Economics.  Our work will focus on human impact on the environment and human health, including pollution, toxicology, resource depletion and climate change.  We will intensively study the policies and history that drive how these topics play out in American and worldwide.  Environmental Science and Policy is also a challenging course with college-level material.  It is reading and writing intensive.  A willingness and commitment to working hard will support your success in this rigorous course.  This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

S0002027        WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

4 Credits
Semester

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESS, Biology, Introduction to Chemistry and Physics, or either Chemistry or Physics.    

Wildlife Ecology and Management is a course about the ecology and wildlife of New England.  Areas of Study include population dynamics, forest management, aquatic ecology, fisheries management, wildlife management and the natural history of species found in New England.  Students enrolled in this course will be expected to participate in field work on a regular basis. Students will be expected to work independently and cooperatively on field studies and projects.

S0002120        PHYSICS        

4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESS and Biology; completed Algebra 2 with 75% or higher

Physics is a college preparatory course that will probe the fundamental laws of nature which serve as a foundation of all natural phenomena. This course will offer a traditional, mathematically and conceptually based study of classical mechanics, force, motion, energy, thermodynamics, wave motion and light,electricity and magnetism.   Historical background of natural philosophy as related to physics will also be included. Students are expected to solve problems, do laboratory work, maintain an organized science notebook , and display effective work and study habits.

S0002115        CHEMISTRY        
4 Credits

Semester
Prerequisites:  Successful completion of Algebra 1, ESS and Biology with 75% or higher

Chemistry is a math-based chemistry designed for students planning to attend college with the possibility of majoring in a science. The course requires excellent study skills, time management, and the use of a scientific calculator in solving problems. Chemistry has a strong laboratory component. Students may be required to develop and maintain a science laboratory notebook.  Portions of the lab program support student participation in lab design using logical problem solving skills. Topics include: a review of matter and scientific measurement, quantum mechanics and the periodic table, chemical bonding and chemical reactions, the mole and stoichiometry, the behavior of gases, solutions chemistry, acid-base chemistry, oxidation-reduction reactions, and thermochemistry. A term project will be required of all Chemistry students.

S0002021        ADVANCED BIOLOGY        
4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESS, Biology, Introduction to Chemistry and Physics, or either Chemistry or Physics.  Admitted with approval of Science Department

Advanced Biology is a course for college-bound seniors who have excelled in Biology and previous science course work and are motivated to pursue detailed study in the biological sciences.  Students are asked to do in depth research on topics such as the human nervous system, the diversity of life, evolution, and the environment. The complementarity of structure and function (anatomy and physiology) is a central component of the course which includes the dissection of the rat.  A significant portion of time will be devoted to laboratory activities, problem solving, and group discussion and student presentations.

SW002200        ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS        
8 Credits

Full Year
Prerequisites:  Application process through Science Department; Honors work in Pre-Calculus, and 3 science courses

The full-year AP Physics sequence would be an excellent background for students interested in pursuing science, engineering, medical, or related majors in college.  The purpose of this course is to prepare students for success on the College Boards AP Physics exam. AP Physics topics will include kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, and gravitation, in the first part of the course. It then continues with wave, sound, light and electricity, and current investigations in physics. Demonstrated ability in algebra techniques is required.  Students will be expected to work at a high academic level at a rapid pace in problem solving, laboratory investigations, and independently directed project work. Students are required to take the AP Physics 1 exam in the spring.

S0002900        INDEPENDENT STUDY        
2 or 4 Credits

Prerequisite: Three Science courses and extensive interest and initiative. Arrangements must be made with a science instructor with permission of the head of the science department.

Career Center Note: A student can receive science credit towards graduation through successful completion of one of the following Career Center programs. Please refer to the Career Center program of studies for specific course descriptions.

4 BIOMEDICAL COURSES (PLTW)

FILM MAKING & DIGITAL EDITING

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

FORESTRY AND NATURAL RESOURCES HORTICULTURE AND LANDSCAPING TECHNOLOGY

CULINARY ARTS

PROTECTIVE SERVICES: FIRE FIGHTER PROTECTIVE SERVICES: LAW ENFORCEMENT TECHNICAL ELECTRONICS I

ELECTRONICS II: DIGITAL ELECTRONICS & PHOTOTONICS FIBER OPTICS PHOTONICS


SOCIAL STUDIES

The general purpose of a social studies education is to help students develop the skills and basic knowledge needed to be responsible, contributing members of our society and the increasingly interdependent global society. By studying the past and present, and by learning how to anticipate the future, students can begin to better understand the general workings of all societies, the specific aspects of existing societies, and the role they play as individuals in their community and in the world.

The 12 credit social studies requirement at Brattleboro Union High School gives students an opportunity to hone their understanding of United States' diverse society, world geography, and other societies and to identify major historical eras and trends throughout history, from both western and non-western perspectives. Students, in the first year of the sequence, spend a semester focused on mastering their understanding of world cultures or world political systems as they begin their exploration of how various societies develop different political, economic and cultural structures. These first-year course options in Civics and World Cultures provide students with the foundation they need to move into their studies of United States history.

The next sequence of courses focuses on US history and its impact in the world historical setting, giving students the opportunity to sharpen their critical thinking skills by analyzing periods of transition and by interpreting the political, economic, and social influences of the past on the present. The program has students analyze the relationships among geography, politics, historical events, economic development, and racial and ethnic diversity within the United States.

In addition to the required course offerings, students are encouraged to elect other history and social studies courses that provide focus to specific areas of history and the social sciences. Electives offer students a chance to pursue areas of personal interest while continuing to hone their critical thinking skills.

The Social Studies requirement at BUHS is the successful completion of 12 credits.

Grade

Courses

9th Grade Options (1st Course)

Required - select one of the two options

World Cultures and Geography (4 Credits) A0002010

Comparative Politics and Current Events (4 Credits) A0003002

10th Grade Options 
(2
nd Course)

Required - select either one of the three options.  

US in the World 1 and 2 combine to meet 8 credits of social studies requirements.

US History Survey requires an elective to meet 8 credit requirement

United States in the World 1: 1870 to 1945 (4 credits) A0002015

  • This option requires subsequent enrollment in United States in the World 1945 to Present

United States History Survey Industrial Revolution to Present Day
(4 Credits)  A0003004

Advanced Placement United States History
(8 Credits) AW803050

11th Grade Options 
(3
rd Course)

Required – select either one of the three options.

Note: if you have successfully completed United States History Survey you need one more elective. (4 credit)

United States in the World 2: 1945 to Present Day (4 Credits) A0002020

  • This course is the second half of United States History Survey Industrial Revolution to Present Day (4 Credits)  

Advanced Placement United States History
(8 Credits) AW803050

11th and 12th Grade Electives

Law and Society (4 Credits - Dual Enrollment CHS) ACHS3205

Sociology CHS (4 Credits - Dual Enrollment CHS) ACHS3260

Topical Social Studies Seminars (4 Credits - Dual Enrollment CHS) ACHS3401

Mentoring, Coaching and Leadership  (4 Credits - Dual Enrollment CHS) ACHS6256

Economics (4 Credits- Dual Enrollment CHS) ACHS3221

Elections & Gov’t* (4 credits-Dual Enrollment CHS) ACHS3250

Advanced Placement United Sates History (8 Credits) AW803050

Dimensions of Social Change (4 Credits - Dual Enrollment CHS) ACHS6250

REQUIRED OPTIONS GRADE 9

Either World Cultures and Geography  
or Comparative Politics and Current Events are required of students in grade 9.

 A0002010                 WORLD CULTURES AND GEOGRAPHY
4 Credits

 Semester

Open to: Grade 9

An examination of the culture, geography, and history in world culture regions aligned with the Common Core State Standards. While learning about our changing world, the student will be better informed about the dynamics of the earth/human situation, will strengthen existing Social Studies skills, and will begin to develop a global perspective on the present and the future. Students can expect a variety of learning activities in the course which will include discussions, lectures, written assignments, audio-visual experiences, map work, simulation/games, debates, and personal contact with people of other cultures. World Cultures and Geography meets a social studies school requirement for graduation.

A0003002                         COMPARATIVE POLITICS AND CURRENT EVENTS                          
4 Credits                                                                                                        Semester

Open to: Grade 9

In this political science course students will examine global political structures, institutions and systems. Using the comparative method, students will compare and contrast the political structures of several different states. They will develop the skills to compare and contrast the nature of these states and will use current political events to enhance their understanding. Some of the themes and concepts under study will include: political ideologies, systems of government, international relations, international political organizations, development and underdevelopment, civil society, power, sovereignty, citizenship, economic systems and public policy. Comparative Politics and Current Events meets a social studies school requirement for graduation.

REQUIRED OPTIONS US HISTORY GRADE 10 AND 11

United States in the World 1: 1870 to 1945 (Social Studies 1) combined with US in the World 2: 1945 to the Present (Social Studies 2), or United States History Survey, or Advanced Placement United States History meet social studies requirement for graduation.

A0002015                          UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD 1 1870 TO 1945                  

4 Credits
Semester

Open to: Grades 10 – 12 – This course is required to be combined with US in the World 2:  1945 to the Present upon completion.

A survey of the social, political and economic history of Vermont, the United States, and the World from 1870 through 1945 aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Teachers will strive to relate historical events in perspective to contemporary issues. Emphasis is placed on writing, study skills and critical thinking as well as the development of concepts related to history and social studies. A wide variety of teaching materials and methods are applied throughout the course. Students will be asked to conduct personal research as well as maintain knowledge of contemporary events.  This option requires subsequent enrollment in United States in the World 2: 1945 to Present.  US in the World 1: 1870 to 1945 meets a social studies school requirement for graduation.

A0002020                        UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD 2 1945 TO PRESENT                              

4 Credits
Semester

Open to: Grades 10 - 12

Prerequisite: United States in the World 1870 to 1945 – This course is the second half of the US in the World requirement.

A survey of the social, political and economic history of Vermont, the United States, and the World from 1945 to the present, aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Teachers will strive to relate historical events in perspective to contemporary issues. Emphasis is placed on writing, study skills and critical thinking as well as the development of concepts related to history and social studies. A wide variety of teaching materials and methods are applied throughout the course. Students will be asked to conduct personal research as well as maintain knowledge of contemporary events. US in the World 2: 1945 to the Present meets a social studies school requirement for graduation.

A0003004                         UNITED STATES HISTORY SURVEY INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION                                         TO THE PRESENT DAY         
4 Credits
Semester

Open to: Grades 10 – 12

This course is an accelerated paced survey of the social, political and economic history of Vermont, the United States, and the World from the post-Civil War industrial growth of the United States to the present day with a focus on the emergence of the United States into economic and political involvement in world affairs.  This course moves at a faster pace than the United States in the World 1 and 2 and is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Teachers will strive to relate historical events in perspective to contemporary issues. Emphasis is placed on writing, study skills and critical thinking as well as the development of concepts related to history and social studies. A wide variety of teaching materials and methods are applied throughout the course. Students will be asked to conduct personal research as well as maintain knowledge of contemporary events. US History Survey meets a social studies school requirement for graduation.

 

AW803050                         ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY

8 Credits
Year long/Block

Open to: Grades 10-12

The AP U.S. History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of U.S. history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and  argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides seven themes (American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places. College Course Equivalent

AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. history course. Students electing this course will be required to take the AP U.S. History exam.  AP US History meets a social studies school requirement for graduation.

Advanced Placement United States History will count has meeting 8 credit requirements serving as equal credit in place of United States in the World 1870 to 1945, United States in the World 1945 to the Present, or United States History Survey.


ELECTIVE OFFERINGS

ACHS3260                         SOCIOLOGY CHS*                                         
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 11-12

The course provides an introductory study of sociology using the principles and methods of social sciences and the scientific method. Sociological principles, sociological perspectives, and the relationship of the individual to societal groups will be emphasized. Culture and the elements influencing society today are major themes of the course. Other topics that will be examined include socialization, social structure, stratification, race, class, family, education, population, economics, religion, gender, age, and social change. Sociological research and the role of sociologists in the modern world are discussed. Students learn to think critically about the nature of society and social institutions. Large and small group discussion is emphasized. A number of papers will also be required. A college level text book will be utilized in this course. This course is offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT..

ACHS3205                         LAW AND AMERICAN SOCIETY*                                 
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 11-12

This dual-credit course is an overview of constitutional, criminal, and civil law. The course emphasizes active citizenship and the balance between individual liberties and security. Learning will be facilitated through discussion, group work, simulations, case studies, research, presentations, guest speakers, and independent projects. All students will have the option of engaging in an internship or project out in the community. In addition, the class will take part in field studies at the District Court of Vermont and at the Southern Vermont Correctional Facility. The class makes use a wide variety of materials, including various texts, readings, videos, periodicals, and internet resources.

* This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT..

ACHS3401                         SOCIAL STUDIES SEMINAR *                          
4 Credit                        Genocide and Holocaust

Semester

Open to: Grades 11 – 12

The 20th Century has been called a century of genocide.  Why? This course will explore five genocides that occurred in the last century.  Beginning with a half semester spent on the study of the Holocaust students will use personal testimonies, literature, research, and video to gather a full understanding of the causes and effects of the Holocaust.  The second half of the semester will be spent exploring and comparing the cause and effects of genocides in the Ottoman Empire, Cambodia, Bosnia, and Rwanda.  Much of the class depends on students discussion, participation, reading, writing and research.  There will be opportunities to attend events outside of BUHS. This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

SOCIAL STUDIES INDEPENDENT STUDY                 

1, 2, 3, 4 Credits

Open to: Grades 11 – 12

Prerequisite: An application is required for enrollment in this course.  This is an elective course for able and interested students who desire to pursue independent study under the guidance of a faculty member or a qualified community mentor. The student and the mentor will mutually agree on specific guidelines for the independent project. Though the student will be reporting to his/her faculty advisor, the major responsibilities for developing and pursuing a carefully planned and rigorous learning experience will fall upon the student. Each student will be expected to produce some measurable and purposeful project. Independent study may not substitute for a standard course offering. Students electing to do Independent Study are reminded that they must fulfill the graduation requirement of successful completion of 12 credits of classroom experience in order to graduate.

ACHS6250                         DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL CHANGE *                                 
4 Credits
                                                                                

Semester (BLOCK 3)

Open to: Grades 11-12

This interactive elective course will offer students an opportunity to explore the role of youth as leaders and mentors in creating a more socially just society, with a particular emphasis on school communities. Students will identify and study the social, economic and cultural forces that impact behaviors and attitudes among young people today, nationally and locally. With a focus on these issues, students will apply their understanding and creativity to develop a series of interactive workshops with elementary and middle school students. These practicum workshops will work to promote a safe and inclusive school environment. School climate assessment data from district schools will be reviewed by students and will help to inform workshop design. This course is for students who are interested in developing leadership and mentoring skills along with an understanding of how social and cultural issues shape their self-awareness and self-understanding. Time will be given for self-reflection and the development of one’s own creativity, as each student shapes his or her own identity as a youth leader.

This course is offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

ACHS6256                         MENTORING, COACHING & LEADERSHIP *                         
4 Credits

Semester (BLOCK 3)

Open to: Grades 11-12                                                                                

The ability to coach and mentor are valued competencies in business, non-profit, academic, civic and team environments. This course is intended to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of concepts, principles and practice of coaching and mentoring through theoretical and practical applications. Students will develop the necessary knowledge and skills needed to foster or create and maintain effective mentoring relationships. Topics include: creating coaching or mentoring relationships, stages of coaching and mentoring, understanding learning styles; working with groups vs. individuals, managing difficult conversations. A major

component of this course will be field work in which students will be expected to select a mentoring or coaching project. Examples include: developing programs for students transitioning into BUHS, middle school leadership teams and Big Brothers/Big Sisters.

This course is offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

ACHS5287                         INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY *                        

4 Credits

Semester/Off Campus

Location: Community College of Vermont                                                

Students will be able to describe the origin and development of anthropology as a social science and as a humanities field, the subject matter it includes, and how anthropology is related to other disciplines and the application of anthropological method to the study of human culture, and provide examples of how facts, concepts, and theories are used to explain cultural phenomena. Students are required to complete Accuplacer testing and to apply to CCV prior to the start of the semester for this course.* This course is offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

ACHS3221                         ECONOMICS*                                                 

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 11-12                                                                                

This course provides a foundation in the basic concepts upon which our economic system operates. Students study current economic issues and problems as they relate to producers, consumers, government, labor, management, and finance. Extensive reading, research, and writing are course expectations. Special emphasis is given to the examination and development of economic case studies resulting in students-designed case studies. In addition, class activities include seminars, group work, lectures, simulations, and presentations by guest speakers and student use of the Internet to obtain current data and research materials. Assessment of progress is based on the analysis of class participation, research, homework, quizzes, and tests.* This course is offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

ACHS3250                 ELECTIONS AND GOVERNMENT *                                

4 Credits                 

Semester

Open to: Grades 11-12                                                                                

This course focuses on the election process and the way in which local, state, and national government is organized. A key element of this course is the requirement that students become active participants in the events and activities of an election campaign or by direct involvement in government services. Special features of this class include presentations by candidates, elected and appointed government officials, and the media. Students are accountable for completion of reading, research, and writing activities both in and out of class. When feasible, field studies are conducted to provide exposure to the activities of government. Assessment of progress is based on the analysis of completed assignments, class participation, research, quizzes, and test. * This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.


MODERN AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

In modern language classes, students learn to communicate in real-world situations as they build their proficiency in speaking, writing, listening and reading.  Students must meet proficiency (80%) on an assessment of those four skills as they progress from Novice to Intermediate, and from Intermediate to Advanced.  A passing grade at the completion of Novice 2 does not, by itself, ensure that a student will qualify for Intermediate; a passing grade at the completion of Intermediate 2 does not, by itself, ensure that a student will qualify for Advanced.

Credit: Novice, Intermediate and Advanced courses are subdivided into levels 1 and 2. When students take Novice, Intermediate or Advanced courses a second time, Novice Level 2, Intermediate Level 2, or Advanced Level 2 will appear on both the report card and the transcript. Students entering the Novice or Intermediate levels may, with the recommendation at the teacher also choose to work at an accelerated pace and fulfill the requirements for either Novice Level 2 or Intermediate Level 2 in one semester.

Successful completion of        is equivalent to

Novice 2        two years of study

Intermediate 1        three years of study

Intermediate 2        four years of study

Advanced 1        five or more years of study

Advanced 2        six or more years of study

Independent Study

Students may apply for independent study when they are not able to schedule an appropriate class.  Independent study in languages requires a considerable amount of contact time between the teacher and the student.  Scheduling an independent study with a BUHS language teacher is subject to teacher availability; students may have to pay for private tutor.  Potential candidates are encouraged to consult with the MCL Department Head and discuss their plans with a potential mentor and their counselor early in the registration process.

SAT II Subject Test and Advanced Placement Exams: Students interested in taking either or both of these exams in a modern or classical language should begin planning their sequence of language study as early as possible.  It is best to have completed at least one semester of advanced study prior to the senior year.

Specific preparation for the exam may be accomplished through an Independent Study.


Sequence of Courses

SPANISH

FRENCH

GERMAN

CHINESE

LATIN

1st course

Novice
L0004410

Novice
L0004210

Novice
L0004310

Novice
L0004230

2nd course

Novice L0004410

or Intermediate L0004420

Novice L0004210

or Intermediate L0004220

Novice L0004310

or Intermediate L0004320

Novice L0004230

or Intermediate L0004235

Latin II L0004120

3rd course

Intermediate L0004420

Intermediate L0004220

Intermediate L0004320

Intermediate L0004235

Latin, III L0004122

4th course

Intermediate L0004420

or

*Advanced LCHS4493

Intermediate L0004220

or

*Advanced LCHS4293

Intermediate L0004320

or

*Advanced LCHS4391

Intermediate L0004235

or

*Advanced LCHS4591

5th course

*Advanced LCHS449

*Advanced LCHS4293

*Advanced LCHS4391

*Advanced LCHS4591

6th course

*Advanced LCHS4493

*Advanced LCHS4293

*Advanced LCHS4391

*Advanced

 LCHS4591

*Designates honors courses.  See eligibility requirements below and course descriptions.

NOVICE CLASSES

L0004230        CHINESE

L0004210        FRENCH

L0004310        GERMAN

L0004410        SPANISH

4 Credits
Semester

NOVICE CURRICULUM

The Novice curriculum is centered on the student’s daily life and immediate surroundings. The Novice curriculum is based on the ACTFL National Proficiency Guidelines for speaking, writing, reading, listening, and intercultural communication.

Classes from Novice through Advanced are conducted as much as possible in the target language.  Students should be prepared for an interactive classroom with the expectation of active listening and daily pair or group work.  Students will communicate in the target language.  Stories, novellas, short films and readings are an important component of Novice study.  

Novice topics:

Myself, My Friends and Family, School and Daily Routine, Where I Live

Novice Level 1 and Level 2 are grouped together in the same classroom.

At the completion of Novice 1:    

Students can understand written and spoken texts about the Novice topics.  They can engage in conversation using the vocabulary and structures of the Novice topics. Students’ speaking skills in unrehearsed situations can be limited to words and phrases. Students’ spoken language  is comprehensible even though  influenced by the first language. They can write and present texts based upon familiar topics.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

At the completion of Novice 2:  

Students can understand written and spoken texts about the Novice themes.  They can engage in conversation and provide information using the vocabulary and structures of the Novice themes. They can write and present texts based upon familiar topics.  Their written and spoken work is longer and contains more complex structures than in Level 1. Students’ speaking skills in unrehearsed situations expand from Novice 1 skill level to include complete sentences and increased accuracy and complexity of structures. Students’ spoken language  is comprehensible and more fluid, even though influenced by the first language.

INTERMEDIATE CLASSES

L0004235        CHINESE

L0004220        FRENCH

L0004320        GERMAN

L0004420        SPANISH

4 Credits
Semester

Prerequisite: To qualify for the Intermediate level, students must demonstrate proficiency (80%) on all four sections of the Novice 2 final exam: the oral proficiency interview (OPI), writing, listening, and reading.  Incoming students from the Brattleboro Area Middle School and all other incoming students who wish to qualify for Intermediate will also need to demonstrate proficiency on all four sections of the Novice 2 final exam.

INTERMEDIATE CURRICULUM

The Intermediate Curriculum is based on the following topics:

My Life: My Childhood/My Autobiography; Travel: City Stay, Giving and Getting Directions, Money and Shopping, Restaurant, Health and Health Issues, Social Life, Accepting and Extending Invitations


The Intermediate Curriculum is centered on students’ experiences, their future plans, and on situations that relate to travel abroad. It is based on the ACTFL National Proficiency Guidelines for speaking, writing, reading, listening, and cultural perspectives and practices.
Resources include stories, novellas, short and feature-length films, news stories and other articles. Native-speaker visits and daily conversations provide students with much of the language and practice needed to work within the thematic units.
Intermediate classes are conducted as much as possible in the language. Students should be prepared for an interactive classroom, with the expectation of active listening, daily pair or group work, and role-playing, narrating audio, video or readings and retelling stories. Students communicate in the target language to build their proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening.

BUHS Intermediate Level 1 and Level 2 are grouped together in the same classroom. Level 1 and Level 2 students in the class work on the same topics, but assignments are differentiated and and proficiency expectations for each level are different.

At the completion of Intermediate 1:
Students can understand written and spoken texts about the Intermediate topics in all major time frames.  They can respond to questions using the vocabulary and structures of the Intermediate topics. They can write and present texts based upon the Intermediate themes in all major time frames.

At the completion of Intermediate 2:   
Students can understand written and spoken texts about the Intermediate topics.   They can initiate, maintain, and end conversations. They can write and present texts in all major time frames.  Presentational writing and speaking for Intermediate 2 students are both longer and more complex than their Level 1 counterparts.  Intermediate 2 students also begin to show evidence of the ability to communicate beyond the limits of the studied topics.

To qualify for Advanced courses, students must meet proficiency (80%) on all sections of the Intermediate Level 2 final exam.  Oral final exam includes an oral proficiency interview and role-playing a “survival situation” scenario.

ADVANCED: Language and Culture

LCHS4591                        CHINESE*

LCHS4293                        FRENCH*

LCHS4391                        GERMAN*

LCHS4493                        SPANISH*

4 Credits
Semester

Prerequisite:To qualify for the Advanced level, students must demonstrate proficiency (80%) on all four sections of the Intermediate 2 final exam.  These four sections are: the oral proficiency interview (OPI), writing, listening comprehension, and reading comprehension. .

This is an honors level course in which you will continue to build your proficiency and confidence while working at an accelerated pace with challenging materials. Discussions and writings are based on authentic readings and feature films in their historical and cultural contexts. Activities may include exploring current events and cultural trends, preparing skits or presentations, and short field trips.  In class, students and teachers speak French/German/Spanish/Chinese almost exclusively. Students will be expected to complete all assignments and participate actively in class to prepare for the written and oral competencies at the advanced level.  As the topics vary each semester, a student may take this class more than once.

Advanced level Chinese, French, German and Spanish may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.
ADVANCED CURRICULUM


Student graduation proficiencies are: speaking, writing, reading, listening, and cultural perspectives and practices. They are based on the ACTFL National Proficiency Guidelines.         

The BUHS Advanced Curriculum is based on the following topics:
Current events/politics
History/Geography
Ecology:  global challenges
Social justice
Aesthetics: Literature/Art/Music
Life events
Cultural perspectives in rural and urban settings
Careers and world of work

These topics are approached through the following text sources:
Authentic films        
Authentic reading (fiction, nonfiction, blog posts, web sites)
Authentic listening (radio broadcast, documentaries, podcasts, television interviews/news)

Resource texts include stories, novellas, poems, short and feature-length films, podcasts, blog posts, websites, newspaper and magazine articles, primary source documents such as speeches.

Native-speaker visits, communication via Skype, and daily conversations in the target language are essential components of advanced study. These activities provide students with the language and practice needed to work within the thematic units.  

The Advanced curriculum has a flexible design to build a foundation for post- secondary language study, as well as the skills to interact with native speakers when traveling or pursuing a career.

Advanced classes are conducted almost exclusively in the target language. Students will:
Do daily group/pair work
Role-play
Narrate audio, video or written readings
Retell stories
Present personal or researched information to the class
Speak primarily in the target language
Work more independently than at the intermediate level

Advanced Level 1 and Level 2
Level 1 students are in their first semester of Advanced and Level 2 students are in their second semester of Advanced. At BUHS, Advanced Level 1 and Level 2 are grouped together in the same classroom. Level 1 and Level 2 students in the class work on the same topics, but assignments and proficiency expectations for each level are differentiated.
Eligibility: To be eligible for Advanced courses, students must meet proficiency (80% or above) on all sections of the Intermediate Level 2 final exam. The Intermediate 2 oral final exam includes an oral proficiency interview and role-playing a “survival situation” scenario. This will involve problem-solving a real-world situation or issue.

At the completion of Advanced Level 1:
Students can understand written and spoken texts about the Advanced topics in all major time frames.  They can respond to questions and accomplish tasks and projects using some of the vocabulary and structures from the Advanced topics. Students can converse, write texts and make presentations  in all major time frames.

At the completion of Advanced Level 2:   
Students can understand texts about the Advanced topics in all time frames, the indicative and subjunctive moods and the passive and active voices.   They can initiate, maintain, and end conversations and write and present texts based upon the Advanced topics in all major time frames.  Presentational writing and speaking tasks for Advanced 2 students are longer and more complex than those of Level 1.  Advanced 2 students also begin to show evidence of the ability to communicate beyond the limits of the studied topics.

LATIN


Stories and readings are the vehicles by which students are exposed to the rudiments of the  Latin language as well as the connections it makes to grammar,vocabulary , as well as western culture. This curriculum is based on the ACTFL National Proficiency Guidelines for reading, writing, listening and speaking.  

L0004120                        LATIN II        
4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite:  A final grade of 70 or better in Latin I

Students in Latin II continue to learn Latin grammar and vocabulary through direct readings in Latin.  These readings focus on the daily life of the members of a typical Roman household in the 1st century C.E.  Students demonstrate their understanding of Latin texts via direct translations into literal and idiomatic English and responding to comprehension questions.  Students are learning to read Latin aloud with correct pronunciation, as well as to respond in Latin to questions in the target language.  While learning the Latin language, students make linguistic connections with Latin roots and their English derivatives, and begin an understanding of formal etymology.

Themes:
Ecce Romani IA - IB.
Rome ca. 1st century AD: family roles & social stratification in regards to masters, overseers and slaves, Romulus & Remus: the Founding of Rome, The Roman Monarchy, Roman mythology, Baiae and the Bay of Naples, archaeology.

L0004123                        LATIN III        
4 Credits

Semester

Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 or better in Latin II

Students in the third course of Latin will be exposed to a variety of Latin authors and types of literature.  Students solidify their understanding of Latin grammar; increase their vocabulary while making more connections to English word roots. A major part of the course is devoted to the medieval opera the Carmina Burana. Augustan poetry from Catullus and Ovid is included as well. Through these readings students gain a deeper understanding of classical culture and history, as well as an introduction to medieval European society.

MODERN LANGUAGE EXCHANGE PROGRAM

Modern Language teachers organize exchange programs to Costa Rica, Geneva Switzerland and Leipzig,Germany for students enrolled in the Intermediate or Advanced levels French, German or Spanish. These exchange programs also count toward required points for the BUHS International Studies Academy.

BUHS students welcome exchange partners as guests in their homes and participate in a variety of activities with their student in and around Brattleboro, Boston and New York City.
BUHS students then travel to the destination country to stay in their exchange partner’s family.
Students spend about 10 days in their exchange partner’s country; this usually takes place during part or all of a vacation week from school.

Exchange Program provides a unique opportunity for students to experience full immersion in language and culture while still in high school. Any BUHS student enrolled and in good standing in Intermediate or Advanced French, German or Spanish is eligible to participate.  Students interested in participating in the MCL Exchange to Costa Rica, Geneva or Leipzig should contact their teacher for more information.


FINE, DIGITAL AND PRACTICAL ARTS

The Fine and Practical Arts Department offers over twenty courses with a project based approach to learning. Introductory through advanced studies are available in a variety of content areas, Computer Graphic Design, Television Production, Photography, Foods, Interior Design, Drawing and Painting, Sewing, Fiber Arts, Ceramics,

Sculpture, and Advanced Art Studies in the Community. The department has three divisions: Visual Arts, Digital Arts & Family Consumer Sciences. Students develop life-long skills and prepare for post-secondary studies through creative projects and portfolio development. It is the goal of the department to actively involve students in the aesthetic environment of the school and community creating objects by hand and with thoughtful minds. The new Visual and Performing Arts Academy supports artistic growth in a variety of arts and interdisciplinary course offerings. Along with portfolio reviews, students who earn a VPA notation on their diploma will have participated in numerous school and community art related activities (For more information on V.P.A. academy see pg. 21).  Presently 3 more courses may be taken for college credit in Fine, Digital and Practical Arts.

A graduation credit in the arts can be obtained by successful completion of the following classes: Foundations in Art, Interior design, Television Production 1, Computer Graphic Design 1, and Sewing.  These classes will also serve as a prerequisite to upper level electives in all areas of the arts. The shared objective of these classes is to provide a background in the basic language of the visual arts, hands on skills in problem solving, historical backgrounds in the respective areas and self reflection through critical analyses. Any of the above classes may still be taken as an elective credit.

Career Center Note: A student can receive Fine, Digital and Practical Arts credit towards graduation through successful completion of one of the following Career Center programs. Please refer to the Career Center program of studies for specific course descriptions.

PERFORMING ARTS-CIRCUS                

PERFORMING ARTS – DANCE

PERFORMING ARTS – DRAMA

FILM MAKING AND DIGITAL EDITING

SEQUENCE                                CLASSES

Fine and Practical Arts Requirement

Foundations in Art, Graphic Design I, Interior Design, Television Production I, Sewing

All of these classes can

serve as prerequisites for upper level classes and electives in the Visual Arts.  All may still be taken as electives.

Intermediate Level

Photography I, Ceramics, Digital design II and 3D design, Sculpture, Drawing, Painting, Sewing II, Television Production II

Advanced Level

Advanced Studio Art, Arts in the Community, Sculpture II, Ceramics II, Photo II and III Independent studies.

FAMILY CONSUMER SCIENCES

(Credits in this area satisfy elective requirements)

Family & Consumer Science courses focus on real life learning.  As today’s students prepare for the future, skills taught within the FCS curriculum will assist them.  Students will immediately recognize the usefulness and relevance of course curriculum.  The FCS department teaches knowledge and skills needed to live successfully and independently in the future. All courses require students to read relevant consumer news and/or design articles which provide rich material for written responses and classroom discussion.  The department’s courses include, Food Fundamentals, Advanced Foods, Independent Living, Interior Design, Sewing and Advanced Sewing.

F0007642                        FOOD FUNDAMENTALS        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12
Prerequisite: None

Food Fundamentals will teach you how to be comfortable in the kitchen through hands on cooperative learning. You will learn about food preparation techniques, proper equipment usage, meal planning, purchasing techniques, nutrition, consumer issues, regional food and foreign food.  You will explore the nutrient value in food, how appetite appeal affects what you eat, the social significance of how food plays into our choices, and cultural aspects of food. This course is for those who have an interest in learning about food.

F0007645                        FOODS ADVANCED        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 11 -12

Prerequisite: Food Fundamentals

Using the skills learned in Foods Fundamentals students will further develop their skills with more advanced learning, community connections and hands on food labs. This advanced study is based on nutrition, new food investigation, advanced cooking techniques, and the understanding of where food comes from along with recipe development.  Each student will design a goal that connects to the community that will become part of the curriculum for the class. Students who take this class should have the desire to explore various aspects related to food.

F0007742                        INDEPENDENT LIVING        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: None

Within the next few years you will be living on your own in some way, whether your path takes you to college, military, or the workforce. This course will expose you to the many challenges you will face as you pursue your future goals.  By participating in a “real life” simulation, topics encountered will be personal finance (checking and savings accounts), budgeting, finding a job, finding an apartment, buying a car, consumer purchasing, and credit cards to name a few. This course will give you the knowledge and skills to approach your future independently and successfully.

F0007751                        INTERIOR DESIGN        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 9-12

(Please note this course satisfies the Art graduation requirement)

Prerequisite: None

Students will learn about creating living environments that meet specific design concepts and needs. We will look at how housing today relates to human needs and wants and how we create balance between the two.

Through design projects students will learn about drafting, furniture arrangement, and how to design a storyboard for a visual presentation. Concepts covered are the elements of design, principles of design, and the role of color. Students will learn in class how to create hands on projects that relate to interior design. This class is for the student who likes to take a vision and develop it into a workable living space.

FA000777                           SEWING        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 9-12

(Please note this course satisfies the Art graduation requirement)

Prerequisite: None

Fibers and Fabrics.  A course for students to create a solid foundation creating with soft materials.  Examine the characteristics of textiles: fibers, fabrics, and finishes, learn the basics of design and sewing construction using patterns, machines and equipment, basic fabric construction, knitting and weaving.  Class time is largely hands on project time supported by an understanding of material.  While some projects require student fabric purchases, a wide variety of fabric is available in the classroom.  Color, line, shape, form, design, texture, pattern, rhythm, emphasis and how pieces work to make a whole using fibers as the emphasis of this class.

F0007772                        ADVANCED SEWING         
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Sewing 

Independence and freedom in project choice will build on your previous learning. This course is for the student who is interested in learning more sewing and fiber art techniques with more freedom in project choice. As in Sewing, class time is largely hands on time. Learn how to use the computerized embroidery machine to customize your projects, how to quilt, applique, knit, weave and so much more. Some projects require student fabric purchase.  Students will learn how to apply their knowledge gained in Sewing I.


FINE AND DIGITAL ARTS

Which also includes Interior Design, Computer Graphic Design I and T.V. Production I

(Credits in this area satisfy Arts Graduation Requirement and/or elective credits)

The Art Department celebrates the creation and study of the visual arts.  We do this through the production of art (Studio), the study of beauty (Aesthetics), the study of diverse cultures’ art, past and present (Art Appreciation), and the study of the qualities that make a successful work of art (Criticism).  Art courses are designed to develop ability in making art, creative problem solving, perception, and verbal and written skills. All courses require students to read relevant literature and articles which provide rich material for written responses and classroom discussion.

Upon successful completion of the Foundations in Art course, students have the option to continue their studies of art through the following intermediate art courses: Studio Art Drawing & Painting, Photography I, Ceramics, Sculpture, Computer Graphic Design II and 3D Digital Design & Art.  Students are advised to look closely at the prerequisites, course descriptions, and requirements for each of these classes.  Expectations are that students bring to these courses a fundamental understanding of design and its vocabulary, the motivation to produce art, a genuine interest in the subject, willingness to take creative risks, and to keep an open mind about the subject.

With the successful completion of a variety of intermediate courses students may elect to pursue a more personal approach to art through advanced studies in one of the following courses: Advanced Studio Art, Photography 2 & 3, Sculpture 2, Ceramics 2, Graphic Design II or 3D Digital Design & Art, Independent Study Project, and Advanced Art Studies in the Community.  It is our expectation that advanced and independent study students embrace the subject fully, challenge themselves technically and intellectually, and demonstrate quality use of time and materials. Course expectations are high. The advanced and independent courses may be repeated for credit.

F0006002                        FOUNDATIONS IN ART        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Students in Grades 9-12 Prerequisite: None

(Please note this course satisfies the Art graduation requirement)

Design, draw, paint and study Art in 2 and 3 dimensions. Pencil, pen, ink, charcoal, watercolor, cray pas, acrylic paint, clay are the materials used to explore and solve visual design problems. While predominantly a “hands on” course, students will also be asked to respond to art through reading and writing.

F0006103                        STUDIO ART I (Drawing and Design)        
4 Credits
, Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Completion of a Fine and Practical Art course or permission of the department head.

Studio Art Drawing is an intermediate course focusing on drawing and design skills. Students will be exposed to a range of media and techniques to enhance their skills. A strong emphasis is also placed on composition. Students who have completed Foundations in Art or who have a waiver based in a submitted portfolio of drawing may qualify for the class. All abilities are welcome and evaluation is based on student improvement over the course of the semester vs. innate talent. This is predominantly a “hands on” class and also explores art history through presentations and web journeys. Portfolio development is supported.

F0006105                        STUDIO ART II (Painting and Color Exploration)

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Completion of Studio Art 1 (Drawing) or permission of the department head.

An intermediate course focused on developing an understanding of paint and color. Students will explore color through a variety of materials and techniques. While predominantly a “hands on” course, students will increase their understanding of color theory, art history, and composition, and be asked to respond to art through reading and writing. A partial list of materials may include pastel, watercolor, acrylic paint, and mixed media.

F0006132                        CERAMICS I        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12 Prerequisite:  Fine and Practical Art course or with department head approval.

Get your fingers, hands and minds involved with clay. Pinch, coil, and slab clay for creative solutions to class projects. Learn who the earliest potters were and how culture contributions affect how we use clay today. With a focus on native tribes, Greek pottery, and modern clay sculpture, hand building projects are balanced with wheel instruction. Wheel thrown cups, bowls, and a final teapot round out the semester. Glazing techniques and alternative firing methods are studied along with weekly COW’s (Ceramicists of the Week). Weekly journals, in class readings and writing, as well as an investigative, self-directed, exciting research project (not written) are part of this exciting class. Students are expected to pay a lab fee of $10 which partially covers clay and glazes.

FCHS6134                        CERAMICS II*        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  Ceramics I with a grade of 75 or above or with department head approval.

Advanced ceramics offers motivated students the opportunity to further their wheel throwing and hand building skills. Students are largely independent and contract for their grade. With attention to proportion and sculptural form, students use historical and cultural examples to deepen their understanding of the medium. In addition, students study and practice glazing using historical and contemporary references. Alternate firing methods such as smoke and sagger fires are also explored. An applied research project, weekly readings from ceramics and sculpture journals, and site visits to local studios are an important part of the class. A lab fee of $10 is required. *This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

 

F0006137                        SCULPTURE I        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  Fine and Practical Art course with a grade of 75 or above or with department head approval.

Sculpture an intermediate level art class, allows students who have completed Foundations in Art to continue to work on 3 dimensional design problems. The assignments and materials provide a greater challenge than Foundations in Art, and students are given more creative freedom within the assignment framework. In keeping with the departmental philosophy, Sculpture is a discipline based art program in which students learn design theory, art history relevant to their work, and are required to think critically about their work. Various sculptural processes such as casting, relief sculpture, subtractive and additive processes are undertaken and some materials include wood, plaster, clay, and wire. While predominantly a "hands on" course, students will be asked to respond to art through reading and writing. Students will be expected to pay a $10 lab fee at the beginning of the course.

FCHS6138                        SCULPTURE II *        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  Fine and Practical Art course and Sculpture I with a grade of 75 or above or with department head approval.

This course is designed to build on the 3-dimensional design skills learned in Sculpture I and to create at an advanced level. Students will utilize their prior knowledge of color and surface quality, the work of great sculptors past and present, and technical skills to work “in the round” and relief. Casting, multi- piece molds, additive and subtractive methods will be part of the Sculpture II curriculum.  Students will have the opportunity to work in teams to create public art that enhances the community.  In addition to the creation of sculpture,

students are expected to articulate their knowledge and experience through writing and class discussions. *This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

F0006142                        ADVANCED STUDIO ART        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  Studio Art I and II or permission of the department head.

A studio course designed to build on the artistic skills acquired in the intermediate classes. Advanced techniques, materials, and concepts are explored through teacher presented studies and student developed projects. Student expression and independence is encouraged with teacher guidance. Portfolio development, both digitally and through collected work, can be used to facilitate entrance to art schools and related university studies. Techniques include drawing, printmaking, painting, 2D and 3D design, and non-traditional materials. Selected readings in art history and contemporary art will facilitate discussions and written responses. This course may be repeated for credit.

F0006151                        ART AND HUMANITIES        
4 Credits

Semester

Note: This course is offered alternating years.

Open to:  Grades 9-12 (recommended for Grades 11-12) Prerequisite:  None (recommended prior historical knowledge)

How do we learn about our creative self and culture through Art?

Art and Humanities examines art, aesthetics and the creative process through time and place, from the dawn of ancient civilizations to the Post Moderns. In addition to a basic text, there will be a variety of supplemental materials, guest speakers, and individual projects. Visual “literacy”, an understanding of the critical role art plays in our cultures, opens an understanding of how art impacts our everyday lives.

FCHS7773                        ADVANCED ART STUDIES IN THE COMMUNITY *
                                (V.P.A. Capstone course)

4 Credits
Semester

Open to:  Grades 12
Prerequisite:  See below

This course will focus on student involvement in the art community outside of the BUHS campus. Students will continue to develop what they have learned in the Fine & Practical Arts department to further their studies in art. Students will work with one, or many, local artists or craftsmen in a community based learning environment.

Students will participate in a variety of online activities, in tandem with their outside learning environment, and meet weekly to discuss with their instructor and classmates the work they have been completing in the community. The ability to work independently in an online working environment is essential to this course. Fields of study within this course could include, but are not limited to, studies in the following: culinary art, sewing and textiles, the fine arts (drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics); graphic design and print production, video and film editing, or an advanced study in an art form of the student's choice. Students will present their work at the end of the course during the Senior Art Show, as well as, presenting a final capstone presentation of their work to their instructor, classmates and mentors. * This course may also be offered for college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

Prerequisites:

Computer Graphic Design I & II, Photography I, II & III,

Television Production I & II

Computer Graphic Design provides an overview of various media in the exploration of digital art making or graphic design. It is appropriate for artists, designers, photographers, typographers and other students who have a general interest in learning MAC computer based design programs.

F0006010                        COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN I        

4 Credits

Semester

(Please note this course satisfies the Art graduation requirement)

Open to: Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: None (prior experience and knowledge in the arts recommended)

FCHS6012                        COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN II*        

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grade 11-12

Prerequisite: A grade of 75 or above in Computer Graphic Design I or permission of the instructor.

F0006015         3D DIGITAL DESIGN & ART                                

4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 11-12

Prerequisite:  Grade of 75 or above in Computer Graphic Design I

This course is an upper level art class in the digital strand.  Students will build on the technical skills attained in the foundations class ‘Computer Graphic Design I’ to learn 3D modeling software.  This course includes weekly hands-on instruction in Polygonal Modeling using Maya.  We will also cover 3D printing and basic animation.  Through working on a series of assignments during the semester you will learn how to apply the principles of three-dimensional design to the creation of models within a software-based 3D environment.  Projects include Intro to 3D space and modeling, animation, rigging and texturing, design for printing, character design & independent project.

 

F0006112                        PHOTOGRAPHY 1                                                
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  Fine and Practical Art course with a grade of 75 or above or with department head approval.

This course is designed for the interested photography student. Photo 1 covers all aspects of black and white photography within an artistic context. Students will also be introduced to digital cameras and Photoshop, mechanics and features of the 35mm SLR camera, digital point & shoot and SLR cameras. Students will learn film processing, printing photos in the darkroom as well as digitally processed photos. Students are expected to work independently, shooting photos after school, at home and during class (when specified).  Course work includes shooting assignments, photo history, weekly journals, and a research paper/presentation on a personally selected photographer and the art of photography.  Some cameras are available on loan for student use, but it is strongly recommended that you supply your own 35mm film camera and /or digital camera if possible. Students will be expected to pay a $10.00 lab fee at the beginning of the course.

FCHS6122                        PHOTOGRAPHY II*                                                
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Photography 1 with a grade of 75 or above or with department head approval.

This course is designed for the motivated photography student. This is a continuation of the Photography 1 course.  It covers all aspects of black and white photography while introducing more advanced film-based and digital techniques. Students will have the opportunity to explore different film and alternative photographic procedures along with large format printing of film and digital images.  Studio lighting will be introduced and used to gain a technical understanding of light and camera functions.  Emphasis will be placed on independently developed challenges for each project, weekly journals, and monthly “revisits” of missed photographic opportunities.  A cohesive portfolio of finished work will be expected of each student at the end of the term, including a digital portfolio.  Some cameras are available on loan for student use, it is strongly recommended that the student supply their own 35mm film camera and/or digital camera if possible. Students will be expected to pay a $10.00 lab fee at the beginning of the course. This course may also be offered for optional college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

FCHS6115                        PHOTOGRAPHY III*                                        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Photography II with a grade of 75 or above or with department head approval.

This course is designed for the passionate photography student. This student will be self-guided but will work in the structure of the Photography 2 class with much higher expectations in the quality of produced work and more advanced challenges will be given to Photo 3 students with each assignment.  A weekly journal is required along with review of missed photographic opportunities. Emphasis will be placed on student developed independent work.  An extensive portfolio of work is required for the culmination of the course. Some cameras are available on loan for student use, but it is strongly recommended that the student supply their own 35mm film camera and/or digital camera if possible.  Students will be expected to pay a $10.00 lab fee at the beginning of the course.  This course may also be offered for optional college credit; see DUAL ENROLLMENT.

F0006005        TELEVISION PRODUCTION I (Broadcasting)
4 Credits Semester

Open to:  All Grades

Prerequisite: Interview with teacher (computer skills also helpful)

Please note: This course satisfies the ART graduation requirement, or can be taken for elective credit in Art.

Television Production is designed to encourage students to develop the necessary skills to write, film, and perform all aspects of a television broadcast. In addition, students will learn to program the various technical equipment, film effectively, create special effects, news-cast, work with Adobe Photoshop to create graphics, edit films using iMovie and FinalCut Pro, and air their broadcasts to the greater Brattleboro community. The students will be responsible for creating and airing a live broadcast at least three times a week.  In addition to the broadcasts, students will compose short films, commercials and documentaries and will also be expected to film school events such as sport games.  Students in this class must be motivated and self-directed with the ability to adapt to unexpected change. They must also be able to work closely as part of a team. Solid communication skills (public speaking, reading and writing), and strong computer skills are strongly recommended.

E0006005                        TELEVISION PRODUCTION I  English (Broadcasting)

4 Credits Semester

Open to:  All Grades

Prerequisite: Interview with teacher (computer skills also helpful) & Completion of English 1 and English 2

Please note:  This course satifsfies English credit upon successful of English 1 and English 2

Television Production is designed to encourage students to develop the necessary skills to write, film, and perform all aspects of a television broadcast. In addition, students will learn to program the various technical equipment, film effectively, create special effects, news-cast, work with Adobe Photoshop to create graphics, edit films using iMovie and FinalCut Pro, and air their broadcasts to the greater Brattleboro community. The students will be responsible for creating and airing a live broadcast at least three times a week.  In addition to the broadcasts, students will compose short films, commercials and documentaries and will also be expected to film school events such as sport games.  Students in this class must be motivated and self-directed with the ability to adapt to unexpected change. They must also be able to work closely as part of a team. Solid communication skills (public speaking, reading and writing), and strong computer skills are strongly recommended.

F0006006                        TELEVISION PRODUCTION II (Program Development)

4 Credits Semester

Open to:  Grades 10 – 12

Prerequisite: Television I grade 80 or better

Television Production II is designed to encourage students to develop their interests in video production for BUHS  television.  Students are required to submit a final video portfolio featuring work completed in TV1 and TV2.   Students work closely with TV1 students and assist in the daily broadcast.

E0006006                        TELEVISION PRODUCTION II English (Program Development)
4 credits Semester

Open to:  Grades 10 – 12

Prerequisite: Television I grade 80 or better & Completion of Engilsh 1 and English 2

Please note:  This course satifsfies English credit upon successful of English 1 and English 2

Cannot take both TV 1 for English credit and TV 2 for English credit (one or the other)

Television Production II is designed to encourage students to develop their interests in video production for BUHS  television.  Students are required to submit a final video portfolio featuring work completed in TV1 and TV2.   Students work closely with TV1 students and assist in the daily broadcast.

F0006450                        INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART        
2 or 4 Credits

Semester

Open to:  Students who have completed all the courses in a particular field of study. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and Department Head

An independent project in art requires of the student a strong sense of purpose and personal responsibility. This is not intended to duplicate existing courses. Content should be determined by the student in close consultation with the instructor prior to submitting the application to Mr. Perrin. The Art faculty is limited to no more than 3 independent students at any time, so Independent Studies will be competitive and limited.


MUSIC

F0006505                        BAND        
4 Credits

Full Year/alternating days

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  Audition and permission of instructor

A performance course designed to foster an understanding and love of music and music making as well as instrumental skills, artistic expression and creativity. In large and small ensemble settings, band students will explore various musical styles and genres with a focus on standard and contemporary concert band literature as well as orchestral transcriptions, chamber music, arrangements of Broadway and movie scores, pop and rock music. Instrument lessons scheduled during the school day are required for all band members and enable instruction to be differentiated for various instruments and ability levels. Individual achievement is monitored and guided through the use of performance assessments, both in the form of recorded playing tests and live solo performances. Band students have opportunities to explore creativity through experiences with composition. A regular routine of practice is required as is attendance at all group performances most of which happen outside of the school day.

Band is a full year, four-credit class. Students enrolling in the class should be prepared to make this full year commitment to the ensemble they are joining. If a student needs to enroll in band for a single semester for two credits, permission must be granted by the teacher prior to the beginning of the school year.

FHON6505                        HONORS BAND        
4 Credits

Full Year/alternating days

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  Audition and permission of instructor

 

Visual and Performing Arts Academy Instrumental Music strand students must enroll in this class for their junior and senior years.  

The course is also open to band members who want a more rigorous curriculum.

Honors Band students rehearse and perform in the BUHS band and must complete all the same requirements as other band members.  In addition, they must:

F0006520        JAZZ ENSEMBLE        
2 Credits

Full Year, Evening

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  Audition and permission of instructor

A performance course focusing on the study of various jazz styles in a big band setting. The curriculum combines an applied study of repertoire with jazz theory and improvisation. Enrollment is strictly by audition and is limited to the standard jazz big band instrumentation of 2 alto saxes, 2 tenor saxes, 1 baritone sax, 4-5 trumpets, 4 trombones, piano, guitar, bass, and drums. Wind players and drummers must also be enrolled in Band. Music reading skills are required for all members. Jazz improvisation is a major component of the class. The class meets one night a week for two hours. The ensemble performs at all band concerts with occasional additional performances. Attendance at all evening rehearsals and performances is mandatory. Jazz Band is a full year, two-credit class. Students enrolling in the class should be prepared to make this year long commitment to the ensemble they are joining. No partial credit may be earned in this class.

F0006525        JAZZ WORKSHOP        
2 Credits

Full Year Evening

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  Audition or permission of instructor

A performance course designed to build an understanding of jazz performance skills including stylistic interpretation and improvisation. The course is open to players of all brass, woodwind and string instruments and also includes piano, guitar, bass, and drums.  Wind players and drummers must also be enrolled Band. Guitar, piano, and bass players must audition.  Music reading skills are required for all members. The class meets one night a week for two hours. The ensemble performs at all band concerts with occasional additional performances. Attendance at all rehearsals and performances is mandatory.

Jazz Workshop is a full year, two-credit class. Students enrolling in the class should be prepared to make this year long commitment to the ensemble they are joining.  No partial credit may be earned in this class.

F0005115        GUITAR/HISTORY OF ROCK        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 9-12

This course is designed to explore the history of Rock ‘n Roll by analyzing, studying and performing its songs.  We will be learning about cultural influences on Rock, listening to music representing different stages in its development, and performing songs by major artists. Students will be advancing individual guitar skills for both rhythm and lead guitar as well as discovering the basics of harmony used in Rock ‘n Roll. Guitars and our textbook, The History of Rock and Roll by David Shirley, as well as supplemental materials will be supplied for students.

F0006600        CHORUS        
4 Credits

Full Year/alternating days

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  Audition and permission of instructor

Chorus is a performance class designed to develop individual as well as choral vocal technique, music literacy, and an understanding of the musical heritage of diverse choral compositions.  In daily rehearsals, students will be challenged to develop their ability to read music as the ensemble prepares concert repertoire. Reading music is approached as much as possible at a beginning, intermediate and advanced level as this class hosts a wide spectrum of student competence in this artistic language.  In addition to developing skills and performing in three school concerts, students are expected to reflect on their musical growth through written assignments.

Chorus is a full year, four-credit class.  Students enrolling in the class should be prepared to make this yearlong commitment to the ensemble they are joining.  If a student needs to enroll in chorus for a single semester for two credits, permission must be granted by the teacher prior to the beginning of the school year.

FHON6600        HONORS CHORUS        
4 Credits

Full Year/alternating days

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Visual and Performing Arts Academy Vocal Music strand students must enroll in this class for their junior and senior years.  The course is also open to chorus members who want a more rigorous curriculum.

Honors Chorus students rehearse and perform in the BUHS Chorus and must complete all the same

requirements as other chorus members.  In addition, they must:

F0006550                         MADRIGALS        
2 Credits

Full Year/Evening

Open to:  Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  Audition and permission of instructor

“Madrigals” is a vocal performance course designed to offer vocal repertoire and course assignments that challenge music students who are already proficient in the basics of vocal technique, music literacy, and blending in a small choral setting with largely unaccompanied music. Madrigals meets one night a week for two hours with required attendance at all rehearsals and performances throughout the school year. They also perform at several venues around the Brattleboro area in addition to regularly scheduled school concerts.

Madrigals is a full year, two-credit class. Students enrolling in the class should be prepared to make this yearlong commitment to the ensemble they are joining.  No partial credit may be earned in this class.

F0006621        MUSIC THEORY        
4 Credits

Semester

Open to: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  Basic music background and interview with instructor

Visual and Performing Arts Academy students in a music strand must take this class.

This course is designed to give students a deep understanding of three fundamental aspects of music theory: rhythm, melody and harmony. A variety of composition projects are designed to follow instruction in these three areas, allowing students to create meaning of the information and apply it in authentic ways. Noteflight music notation program enables students to compose, edit and share their work. Inside Music web-based composition instructional units are used extensively. This rigorous class is best suited for students with some background in music. It is highly recommended for students planning to further pursue music after high school. Topics uncovered include meter, rhythm, time signatures, clefs, pitch notation, major and minor scales, melodic analysis, connections of text to music, motive, form, chords (diatonic and non-diatonic), connection of melody to harmony, chord progressions and analysis.

FCAP1001                        V.P.A. MUSIC CAPSTONE: AUDITION PREPARATION

4 Credits

Semester/Fall

Open to V.P.A. music students or other seniors planning to audition for college music schools.

V.P.A. music students must take either this course or the V.P.A. Music Capstone: Senior Recital.  They are encouraged to take both.

This course offers students planning to audition for music schools the opportunity to:

FCAP1002                        V.P.A. MUSIC CAPSTONE: SENIOR RECITAL

4 Credits

Semester/Spring

Open to senior V.P.A. music students only

V.P.A. music students must take either this course or the V.P.A. Music Capstone: Audition Preparation.  They are encouraged to take both.

This course offers the students the opportunity to prepare and perform a recital in the Spring.  The course will take them through the process of:

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The goal of physical education is to develop physically literate individuals that are invested in lifetime physical activity. Physical Education Curriculum is aligned with the National Physical Education standards and identifies what we want our students to know and be able to do.  Students must complete PE 1 before PE credit can be earned from other options.

Career Center Note: A student can receive physical education credit towards graduation through successful completion of one of the following Career Center programs. Please refer to the Career Center program of studies for specific course descriptions:

G0008010                         PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1                

Semester/alternating days

Open to:  Grades 9-12 Prerequisite:  None

Theory, Skill development, and participation in a wide variety of activities including individual and team sports, physical fitness programs, and leisure time activities.

G0008025                        PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2        
2 Credits

Semester/ alternating days (Can take this twice with department head permission)

Time Open to: Grades 10-12 Prerequisite:  PE 1
Theory, Skill development, and participation in a wide variety of activities including individual and team sports, physical fitness programs, and leisure time activities.

G0008028        FITNESS PE        
2 Credits

Semester/ alternating days (Can take this twice with department head permission)

Open to:  Grade 10-12 Prerequisite:  PE 1

Theory, Skill development and participation in life-long activities and personal workout programs to achieve and maintain a health enhancing level of physical activity and fitness.

G0008120        SPORTS OPTION        
2 Credits

alternating days /year long
Open to: Those who would be completing this option in their sophomore or junior years.  

This is not an option for students to complete during their freshman or senior years.

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of PE 1.  Students must have already earned 2 PE credits before choosing this option.

A physical education equivalent can be satisfied by successfully participating in and completing two (2) different JV or Varsity sports during the same school year. Students register for this course during course selection or prior to the start of 1st semester.  Course credit is given to students who complete 50 active hours of participation during practices or competitions and finish the season as a team member in good standing, as determined by the team coach.  In addition to the athletic participation, students will complete assignments as outlined by the Physical Education department designed to document their proficiency in physical education and their development as physically literate individuals, invested in lifetime physical activity.

This is a pass/fail course with no effect on GPA.  Furthermore, it does not count as a class to be used in determining full-time student status; therefore, it cannot be counted for athletic eligibility purposes.

G2AL1000        ADAPTIVE PE
2 Credits

Semester/ alternating days

Open to:  Grades 9-12 Prerequisite:  Per case manager

DRIVER EDUCATION

I0008200 Fall                        DRIVER TRAINING

I0008210 Spring

2 Credits

Period
Open to:  Grades 10, 11, 12        
Prerequisite:  15 years of age and Vermont Learner Permit before the start of class

This course consists of thirty hours of classroom instruction and six hours of behind the wheel training, plus observation of other student drivers.  Behind the wheel time will be assigned by the instructor.  Also, please note that students who wish to enroll in Driver Training must request the course during the course selection process the prior year or they will be placed at the bottom of the waiting list, regardless of date of birth.

This course often has a waiting list and that enrollment priority is given to seniors who submit a copy of their Vermont Learner Permit according to the timelines indicated below. Students are given priority by their grade level and then by their date of birth.  

If space allows after juniors and seniors are scheduled, sophomores will be offered the opportunity to take the course during the 2018 spring semester, depending on where openings exist.  Sophomores will be enrolled based on age (the oldest student by birth date will have the first opportunity and so forth) and must present a Vermont Learner Permit before the course begins.

Students enrolled in 1st semester Driver Training must submit a copy of their Vermont Learner Permit to the BUHS Counseling Department Office Manager by August 13, 2018, or be dropped from the class.

Students enrolled in 2nd semester Driver Training must submit a copy of their Vermont Learner Permit to the BUHS Counseling Department Office Manager by January 7, 2019, or be dropped from the class.

HEALTH EDUCATION

H0008500        HEALTH        

2 Credits

Semester/Alternating Days

Open to: All 9th Graders (required for graduation)

Health Education is a required course designed for ninth grade students. This course provides students with instruction in Health Education according to the Vermont Comprehensive Health Education Program.  It is designed to meet the developing needs of students in accordance with their stages of physical, mental, and social development as well as promote healthy choices.  Health Education addresses current issues through units on Nutrition, CPR/First Aid, Tobacco Awareness, Suicide Prevention, Abuse, Drug/Alcohol, Human Sexuality, HIV Education, and healthy relationships/decision making. An emphasis is placed on activities designed to build a positive self-image including health decision making skills, coping strategies, value clarification, and assertive and refusal training skills.

H0008502                        HEALTH 2        
2 Credits
Semester/Alternating Days   

Open to: Grades 11,12                                                

Health 2 is an elective course designed for students after they have completed the Health 1 course, which is a graduation requirement.  This class is designed to look deeper into topics that relate to teens on a daily basis focusing primarily on Human sexuality and Alcohol, Tobacco and Drug Prevention. There is also an emphasis on community health and will include a variety of projects around that component. 


SPECIAL EDUCATION

BUHS offers a comprehensive array of services to support each student who is eligible under Vermont regulations to a free and appropriate public education as outlined in the Special Education Law.  These courses are designed for students who require specialized instruction that is research-based as designated in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

Prerequisite: Must be specified in the Individualized Education Plan.

DMT21004        MATH FOUNDATIONS

2 credits

Semester/Period/daily

Tier two level math classes work on pre-algebra and algebra skills with the intent to transition into general education math classes. This course provides group and individual instruction according to a student’s IEP goals. This course provides alternative credit towards meeting the graduation requirement in mathematics for students who have a learning disability that impacts math performance which cannot be accommodated in the general education setting.

DMT31003        MATH FUNDAMENTALS

2 credits

Semester /Period/daily

Tier three level math classes work on basic numeracy and problem-solving skills. This course provides group and individual instruction according to a student’s IEP goals. The intent of this class is transition students into a Math Foundations Tier Two level class. This course provides alternative credit towards meeting the graduation requirement in mathematics.

DET21005        ENGLISH FOUNDATIONS

2 credits

Semester/Period/daily

Students in tier two level English classes work on applying basic reading and writing skills that are approaching grade level. The intent of this class is to transition students into general education English classes. This course provides group and individual instruction according to a student’s IEP goals. This course provides alternative credit towards meeting the graduation requirement in English for students who have a learning disability that impacts reading and writing performance which cannot be accommodated in the general education setting.

DET31002        ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS

2 credits
Semester /Period/daily

Students in tier three level English classes work on acquiring basic reading and writing skills that are substantially below grade level. This course provides group and individual instruction according to a student’s IEP goals. The intent of this class is to transition students into English Foundations Tier Two level class. This course provides alternative credit towards meeting the graduation requirement in English for students who have a learning disability that impacts reading and writing performance which cannot be accommodated in the general education setting.

D0001015                        PERSPECTIVES IN LEARNING SKILLS 9/10                    

2 credits

Semester/Period/daily

Tier two and three level small group, basic skills instruction in reading, writing and /or mathematics as designated in the IEP.  Students will learn a variety of strategies for active reading, note-taking, long-term project planning, and organizing material.

D0001020                        PERSPECTIVES IN LEARNING SKILLS 11/12                         

2 credits

Semester/Period/daily

Tier two and three level small group, basic skills instruction in reading, writing and/or mathematics as designated in the IEP. Students will learn proactive approaches to self-advocacy and establish short and long-term goals related to promoting effective self-management.  Research into options for post-secondary education and employment will also be addressed.

DET21006        READING TUTORIAL

2 credit

Semester /Period/Everyday

This tutorial focuses on phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The intent of this tutorial is to have students make progress towards grade level reading. Tier two level direct, specialized instruction in reading as designated in the IEP.

DET31003        READING TUTORIAL

2 credits
Semester / Everyday

This tutorial focuses on phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension that are substantially below grade level. The intent of this tutorial is to have students make progress on their individual IEP reading goals. Tier three level direct, specialized instruction in reading as designated in the IEP.

DST31001        SCIENCE FUNDAMENTALS

2 credits
Semester/Period/daily

Tier three level science course for students who are performing substantially below grade level and have learning needs that cannot be accommodated in the general education setting. This course provides group and individual instruction according to a student’s IEP goals. This course provides alternative credit towards meeting the graduation requirement in Science.

D2T31006                         CAREER EDUCATION 1                                        
4 credit
Semester /
Block

This course provides group and individualized instruction in the soft-skills required for effective job
performance and career readiness according to the goals specified in the IEP. Students in this course will work on acquiring the following soft skills: critical thinking and problem solving, teamwork, communication and collaboration, organization, self-awareness and self-advocacy. This course provides alternative credit towards meeting the graduation requirements.

D0T31008                         CAREER EDUCATION 2                                         
4 credits

Semester /Block

This course provides small group and individualized instruction in career awareness and career readiness.

Students will explore various career options. This course is intended to prepare students for a Tier Three work

study class.

D0T31007                         WORK STUDY                                                         
4 credits

Semester /Block

Tier three level practicum providing students with opportunities to apply soft-skills required for effective job

performance and career readiness according to the goals specified in the IEP. Students in this course will work on

applying the following soft skills: critical thinking and problem solving, teamwork, communication and

collaboration, organization, self-awareness and self-advocacy. This course provides alternative credit towards

meeting the graduation requirements.

DTU20502                        PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT 
2 credits                        
Semester/
Period/daily

Personal Development will help students identify strategies and other coping techniques to apply to social situations that may enhance their ability to access academic expectations and school relationship.  This course will consider Dialectical Behavioral Skills including; Mindfulness, Distress, Tolerance, Emotion Regulation, and Interpersonal Effectiveness skills.  Students will be able to apply these skills independently while identifying personal goals.  Students will learn how to self advocate, develop critical thinking skills, consider multiple perspectives and explore the negative impact of “all or nothing thinking.”

DCHS1000                         PERSPECTIVES IN LEARNING *                                         
4 credits

Landmark College (online offerings only)

Semester/Alt days

This dual enrollment course is designed to introduce students to theories related to the cognitive, social,

emotional, and cultural dimensions of learning. The purpose of the course is to foster self-awareness, critical

thinking, strategic learning, and self- advocacy. Metacognition and critical thinking will be prominent themes

throughout this course. Students will reflect on learning and teaching processes while applying learning strategies

that can be transferred to other courses of study as a proactive approach to self-advocacy. Strategies for active

reading, note-taking, test-taking, long-term project planning, and organizing materials will be modeled, practiced

and assessed. Students will be expected to critically read, discuss and utilize a body of high-interest reading for a

variety of academic tasks. In addition, students will learn about the laws that protect individuals with disabilities,

receive an in-depth orientation to the on-campus services that provide academic and emotional support, and

establish short and long-term goals related to promoting effective self-management. * This course is offered for college credit.  Credit is offered through Landmark College which requires a referral and admissions process.

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