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Comprehensive Community Plan 2022 Final SJC.docx
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The Indiana Commission to Combat Drug Abuse

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Behavioral Health Division

Comprehensive Community Plan

County: St. Joseph County

LCC Name: The Partnership for a Drug-Free SJC (Formerly Partnership for the Education & Prevention of Substance Abuse (PEPSA)

LCC Contact: Robin Vida, MPH, CHES

Address: 227 W. Jefferson Blvd., 8th Floor, County-City Building

City: South  Bend

Phone: (574) 245-6749

Email: rmeleski@sjcindiana.com

County Commissioners: Andrew Kostielney, Dave Thomas, & Deborah Fleming

Address: 227 W. Jefferson Blvd., 7th Floor

City: South Bend        

Zip Code: 46601

Vision Statement        

What is your Local Coordinating Council’s vision statement?

Mission Statement        

What is your Local Coordinating Council’s mission statement?

Membership List

#

Name

Organization

Race

Gender

Category

4

Amy Cressy

Prosecutor's Office

Caucasian

Female

Local Government

5

Becky Savage

525 Foundation

Caucasian

Female

Parent

7

Brian Mounts

Alcohol and Addiction Resource Center

Caucasian

Male

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

8

C. M. Dittmar

New Carlisle Police Department

Caucasian

Male

Law Enforcement

9

Christina Gardner

Oxford House

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

10

Christine Pochert

Rotary Club

Caucasian

Female

Civic Organization

11

Cindy Finney

Victory Clinical Services

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

12

Colleen Kielton

Vibrance Center

Caucasian

Female

Business

13

Courtney Hensel

St. Joseph Regional Med Center

Caucasian

Female

Healthcare

14

Cynthia Guest

St. Joseph County Police Department

African American

Female

Law Enforcement

15

Dayna Baxter

Family Justice Center of St. Joseph County

Caucasian

Female

Criminal Justice

16

David Wells

Prosecutor's Office

Caucasian

Male

Local Government

17

Debra Stanley

Imani Unidad

African American

Female

Self-Help

18

Denise Sellers

HOPE Ministries

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

19

Derrick White

Penn High School

Caucasian

Male

Education

20

Diane Schmeltz

YWCA

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with the expertise in the field of substance abuse

21

Dr. Brandon Zabukovic

Primary Care Partners South Bend

Caucasian

Male

Healthcare

22

Elisabeth Jackson

Youth Service Bureau

Female

Youth Serving Organization

23

Ellen Kyes

Robinson Community Learning Center

Female

Youth Serving Organization

24

Emily Sussman

Freedom Recovery

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

25

Erica Sun

St. Joseph Regional Medical Center

Caucasian

Female

Healthcare

26

Fred Preston

St. Luke of God and Christ Church

African American

Male

Religious Organization

27

Glenda Rae Hernandez

Caucasian

Female

Other - Community Activist

28

Heather Parmelee

WNDU

Caucasian

Female

Media

29

James Baxter

Ivy Tech

Caucasian

Male

Education

30

Jane Woodward-Miller

Judge

Caucasian

Female

Criminal Justice

31

Jennifer Carter

Beacon Health Systems

Caucasian

Female

Healthcare

32

Jeremy Michal Linton

Indiana University South Bend

Caucasian

Male

Education

33

Jesse Carlton

Adult Probation

Caucasian

Male

Criminal Justice

34

John Horsley

Oaklawn

Caucasian

Male

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

35

Jon Hauser

Young People in Recovery

Caucasian

Male

Other - Self Help

36

Julia Shapiro

Life Treatment Centers

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

37

Kayley Hagberg

Aids Ministries

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

38

Kayla Miller

South Bend Police Department

Caucasian

Female

Law Enforcement

39

Kelly Sanford

YWCA

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

40

Kiana Jackson

Youth Service Bureau

African American

Female

Youth Serving Organization

41

Kristin Fee

Adult Probation

Caucasian

Female

Criminal Justice

42

Lani Vivirito

Center for the Homeless

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

43

LaTorya Greene

St. Joseph Regional Medical Center

African American

Female

Healthcare

44

Leroy King

Goodwill Industries of Northern Indiana

African American

Male

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

45

Linda Jung-Zimmerman

Upper Room Recovery

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

46

Lori Smith

Family Justice Center

Caucasian

Female

Criminal Justice

47

Maggie Gibney

Imani Unidad

Caucasian

Female

Other - Community agency

48

Mara Trionfero-Lucas

University of Notre Dame

Female

Education

49

Marcella Preston

Outreach Ministries

African American

Female

Religious Organization

50

Margaret Goldsmith

Oaklawn

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

51

Maria Stancati

Dismas House

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

52

Mary Morgan

Morgan Counseling Services

Cauasian

Female

Business

53

Matt Kaczmarek

Dismas House

Caucasian

Male

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

54

Matt McVeigh

Prosecutor’s Office

Caucasian

Male

Criminal Justice

56

Nicole Smigielski

Life Treatment Center

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

57

Olivia Western

VA Hospital

Caucasian

Female

Veteran Organization

58

Pat Gilbert

Real Services

Caucasian

Female

Other - Community Organization

60

Rachel Boone

Dismas House

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

62

Robin Vida

St. Joseph County Dept. of Health

Caucasian

Female

Local Government

63

Sandra Pontius

Tobacco Control St. Joseph County

Caucasian

Female

Healthcare

65

Sheila Miller

Life Treatment Center

African American

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

66

Stephanie Steward--Bridges

South Bend Community Schools

African American

Female

Education

67

Stephanie Wolfe

Aids Ministries

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

68

Steve Camilleri

Center for the Homeless

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in the field of substance abuse

69

Steve Toepp

Michiana Recovery

Caucasian

Male

Other - Self Help

70

Tara Panio

Upper Room Recovery

Caucasian

Female

Local agency with expertise in recovery field

71

William Redman

Sheriff - St. Joseph County Police Dept

Caucasian

Male

Law Enforcement

72

Janet Whitfield-Hyduk

Drug Free Communities Grant Coordinator

Caucasian

Female

Other

LCC Meeting Schedule:

Please provide the months the LCC meets throughout the year: January - December; odd months are membership focused meetings, even months are planning, learning, brainstorming meetings

Community Needs Assessment: Results

The first step in developing an effective substance use and misuse reduction plan is to assess your community. A community assessment tells you about your community’s readiness to implement prevention, treatment, and justice-related programs to address substance use and misuse. An assessment also provides an overview of the risk and protective factors present in the community, helping your coalition plan more effectively.

Community Profile

County Name

St. Joseph County

County Population

272,916

Schools in the community

3 main school districts with over 50 schools, several private schools, one smaller district (3 schools) at the County line with Marshall County

Medical care providers in the community (hospitals, health care centers, medical centers/clinics, etc.)

2 main health systems; one large provider-owned provider system; several private providers

1,070 people to 1 provider (Countyhealthrankings.org)

Mental health care providers in the community (hospitals with psychiatric/behavioral health units, mental health clinics, private/public providers, etc.)

1 large community mental health center; various private providers

420 people to 1 provider (Countyhealthrankings.org)

Service agencies/organizations

Hundreds of not-for-profits, social service agencies, and governmental entities addressing social needs

(County has over 1,500 NFP organizations)

Local media outlets that reach the community

3 main local media stations (WBST, WNDU, ABC57), various radio including Latino radio and public broadcasting

What are the substances that are most problematic in your community?

opiates, synthetic drugs, marijuana, alcohol, tobacco, cocaine, methamphetamines

List all substance use/misuse services/activities/programs presently taking place in the community

Beacon Health System- Overdose Lifelines, Draw the Line, Respect the Line

Oaklawn- Botvin Life Skills, addictions recovery and treatment, Peer Recovery Coaches, Mobile Response Team, Crisis Response Team

Oxford House

Upper Room Recovery

Life Treatment Center

YWCA

525 Foundation- Drop2Stop Campaign, Wise Up Campaign

St. Joseph County Department of Health- Narcan Distribution, OD Response plan, IN Cares/ECHO

Smoke Free SJC

Alcohol, Addictions Resource Center (AARC)- Youth program, Lose the Most Campaign

Victory Clinic

Bowen Behavioral Health

Community Risk and Protective Factors

Use the list of risk and protective factors to identify those present in your community. Identify the resources/assets and limitations/gaps that exist in your community related to each. The lists are not all-inclusive and others may apply.

Risk Factors Examples: trauma and toxic stressors; poverty violence; neighborhood characteristics; low neighborhood attachment; community disorganization; community norms and laws favorable toward drug use, firearms, and crime; availability of alcohol and other drugs; weak family relationships; family substance use; peer substance use; mental health problems; families moving frequently from home to home; limited prevention and recovery resources.

Protective Factors Examples: strong family relationships; neighborhood economic viability; low childhood stress; access to health care; access to mental health care; community-based interventions; restricted access to alcohol and other drugs including restrictive laws and excise taxes; safe, supportive, and connected neighborhoods; meaningful youth engagement opportunities; local policies and practices that support healthy norms and child-youth programs; positive connection to adults.[1]

Risk Factors

Resources/Assets

Limitations/Gaps

Perceived risk of alcohol/drug use

1.Expanison of education & awareness programs

2.DFC grant action plan that addresses youth alcohol & marijuana use

3. Lots of community supports that we could coordinate into place

1. Reaching the most at-risk community

2. being able to identify a message that resonates with all

3. Marijuana legalization in all surrounding states

Mental health, ACEs, Trauma

1. Robust community effort in place to address ACEs

2. Providers that are willing to be “outside the box” to address needs

3. Community providers in place that are aware of impacts of trauma

4. Strong local system of care

5. New effort to connect ACEs, suicide and overdoses being led by local Dept. of Health.

1. Getting everyone on board with same plan

2. Eagerness to address issues quickly leads to disconnects and duplicate efforts

3.Keeping qualified providers in the area

4. Reaching our most at-risk community members

Community norms favorable toward drug use in most at-risk individuals (“this is just what we do” mentality)

1. Growing community support for substance use as a strategy to deal with trauma

2. More grant funding to support more robust efforts

3. Growing group of citizens for brain science education

1.Some community members still see substance use as a power of “will”; very large stigma

2. Access to gatekeepers

Protective Factors

Resources/Assets

Limitations/Gaps

Increase in access to community activists/mentors

1. Lots of community groups available to build people

1.training to ensure mentors/activist remain consistent with  youth

Variety of youth-focused engagement programs & strategies

1. Activities are being offered by various community partners

2. Youth are being asked to the table as a voice more frequently

1. Access to most at-risk youth

2. Youth seeing benefit of programming

3. Increase risk perception of alcohol/drug use by youth and adults

1.Strong connection with law enforcement to “help” rather than prosecute

2. DFC grant to assist in addressing this & more resources

1. Easy access to drugs/alcohol still exists

2. Campaign that will reach and resonate with all in our county

Making A Community Action Plan

Now that you have completed a community assessment and have identified the risk and protective factors that exist, you can develop a plan of action. The Comprehensive Community Plan (CCP) is a systematic and community-driven gathering, analysis, and reporting of community-level indicators for the purpose of identifying and addressing local substance use problems.

Step 1: Create problem statements, and ensure problems statements are in line with statutory requirements

Step 2: Ensure your problem statements are evidence-informed, then prioritize

Step 3: Brainstorm what can be done about each

Step 4: Prioritize your list, and develop SMART goal statements for each

Step 5: List the steps to achieve each goal

Step 1: Create + Categorize Problem Statements

Create problem statements as they relate to each of the identified risk factors.

Risk Factors

Problem Statement(s)

Perceived risk of alcohol/drug use

Youth and adults in St. Joseph County use and abuse alcohol and drugs (including tobacco)

Mental health, ACEs, trauma

Youth and adults misuse prescription pain medications

St. Joseph County residents have a high level of depression and anxiety

Community norms are favorable towards use/misuse

Youth and adults use and misuse marijuana

Youth and adults have high rates of tobacco

Youth and adults have high rates of alcohol consumption

Step 2: Evidence-Informed Problem Statements

Identify your top three problem statements using local or state data. Ensure that there is a problem statement for each co-equal funding category (e.g., prevention/education; intervention/treatment; and criminal justice services and activities).

Problem Statements

Data That Establishes Problem

Data Source

Youth and adults in St. Joseph County use and abuse alcohol and drugs (including tobacco)

It’s estimated that just about 50% of Indiana residents 12 years of age or older had used alcohol in the past month

64% of local 12th graders report it would be easy for them to access alcohol

35% 18-35 y.o. reported binge drinking in the past 30 days, 27% of 26 & older reported binge drinking in the last 30 days (both higher than National average)

The average age of Overdose Death in SJC was between 25 and 55

SEOW Report

SABG Profile SJC

SEOW Report

SJC Department of Health annual report  

Youth and adults misuse prescription pain medications

Opioid misuse admissions increased from 15.5% to 33%

Approximately 3.6% of 9-12th graders stated using prescription drugs

On average, about 32% of youth in 6th-12th grade reported feeling sad for 2+ weeks

Regional Drug Use in IN report 2019

SABG Profile SJC

IN Youth Survey

Youth and adults use and misuse marijuana (including synthetic drugs)

An estimated 10% of Indiana residents 12 and older used marijuana in the past month

17% of 12th graders reported using marijuana in the last month

15% of SJC 12th graders have reported marijuana use in last month

SEOW Report

IN Youth Survey

SABG Profile SJC

Step 3: Brainstorm

Consider the resources/assets and limitations/gaps that were identified for each risk factor, and list what actions can be taken for each identified problem statement.

Problem Statements

What can be done (action)?

Youth and adults in St. Joseph County uses and abuses alcohol and drugs (including nicotine, synthetics, etc.)

1. Implement comprehensive programming to address risks of use and abuse of illicit drugs and include alcohol use

2. Educate about the science behind substance use disorder  

3. Provide opportunities for youth to connect to healthy support systems

4. Reduce stigma around recovery and treatment for youth & adults by providing education & awareness about substance use disorder & mental health

Youth and adults misuse prescription pain medications & illicit opiate drugs

1. Provide access to more permanent dropbox locations for Rx medications

2. Continue to educate on the dangers of excess Rx meds that are not needed or being used

3. Educate on the risks of taking Rx medications that are not yours, experimenting, “prescription drugs are safe” mentality

4. Reduce stigma around substance use disorder and its links to trauma and mental health

Youth and adults use and misuse marijuana (including synthetic drugs)

1. Provide education on the dangers of marijuana use and impacts on a developing brain

2. Increase access to opportunities for youth to engage in positive behaviors

3. Identify and measure the impact (including the incidence and prevalence) of synthetic drugs on youth and adults

Step 4: Develop SMART Goal Statements

For each problem statement, prioritize your list of what can be done. Choose your top two actions for each. Then, develop goal statements that demonstrate what change you hope to achieve and by when you hope to achieve it.

Problem Statement #1

Goal 1

Increase the access and implementation of comprehensive substance use prevention education & curriculum to 20% of all schools or youth serving organizations in our County as measured by the county's 2022/23 needs assessment.

Goal 2

Decrease the number of people 12 and older in SJC reporting drug use or alcohol use by 3% by 2022/23 as reported in the State Epidemiological Profile Report.

Problem Statement #2

Goal 1

Decrease the number of youth that report misusing prescription drugs by 5% as reported by the Indiana Youth Survey by 2022.

Goal 2

Decrease the number of individuals that report to ER with an overdose by 10% as measured by the St. Joseph County Department of Health 2022 annual report.

Problem Statement #3

Goal 1

Decrease the number of youth at high risk on perceived drug use scale by 5% by 2022 as it is measured by the Indiana Youth Survey.

Goal 2

Decrease the number of youth at high risk of parents attitudes favorable to drugs scaled by 3% by 2022 as it is measured by the Indiana Youth Survey.

Step 5: Plans to Achieve Goals

For each goal, list the steps required to achieve each

Problem Statement #1

Steps

Goal 1

Increase the access and implementation of comprehensive substance use prevention education & curriculum to 20% of all schools/youth serving organizations in our County as measured by the county's 2022 needs assessment.

1. Meet with community partners doing programming to identify gaps, current assets, and identify programming

2. Meet with school/youth leaders to develop & discuss implementation

3. Implementation programming at identified schools and/or organizations

Goal 2

Decrease the number of people 12 and older  in SJC reporting drug use or alcohol use by 3% as reported in the State Epidemiological Profile Report.

1. Increase access to permanent drug dropoff boxes

2. Increase awareness of prescription drug abuse through mass education campaign, educational sessions, etc.

3. Work toward a comprehensive drug detox center in our community

4. Identify funding for drug detox center or for services to act as drug detox center

Problem Statement #2

Steps

Goal 1

Decrease the number of youth that report misusing prescription drugs by 5% as reported by the Indiana Youth Survey by 2021.

1.  Work with the 525 Foundation to extend educational reach through presentations, youth summit, etc.  

2. Advocate for access to Rx pill drop boxes; reduce access to unused medications

3. Educate on dangers of prescription drugs

Goal 2

Decrease the number of individuals that report to ER with an overdose by 10% as measured by the St. Joseph County Department of Health 2022 annual report.

1. Increase access to the available doses of Narcan in the community

2. Increase education on how to use Narcan & Aaron’s law and its benefits in fitting OUD

Problem Statement #3

Steps

Goal 1

Decrease the number of youth at high risk on perceived drug use scale by 5% by 2022/23 as it is measured by the Indiana Youth Survey.

1. Identify youth groups (through DFC grant) and gatekeepers in youth community

2. Work with identified youth groups and gatekeepers to provide opportunities for positive youth engagement

Goal 2

Decrease the number of youth at high risk of parents attitudes favorable to drugs scaled by 3% by 2022/23 as it is measured by the Indiana Youth Survey.

1. Identify parents and educate them on youths perceived thoughts on favorable use to help parents advocate against drug use

2. Host youth and parent summits to discuss community issues such as drug and alcohol use and empower them to make changes

IV. Fund Document

The fund document allows the LCC to provide finances available to the coalition at the beginning of the year. The fund document gauges an LCC’s fiscal wellness to empower their implementation of growth within their community. The fund document also ensures LCCs meet the statutory requirement of funding programs within the three categories of (1) Prevention/Education, (2) Treatment/Intervention, and (3) Criminal Justice Services and Activities (IC 5-2-11-5).

Funding Profile

1

Amount deposited into the County DFC Fund from fees collected last year:

$55,787.00

2

Amount of unused funds from last year that will roll over into this year:

$4,932.69

3

Total funds available for programs and administrative costs for this year (Line 1 + Line 2):

$60,719.69

4

Amount of funds granted last year:

$67,034.00

Additional Funding Sources (if no money is received, please enter $0.00)

A

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA):

$0.00

B

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

$0.00

C

Bureau of Justice Administration (BJA):

$0.00

D

Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP):

$0.00

E

Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH):

$0.00

F

Indiana Department of Education (DOE):

$0.00

G

Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA):

$0.00

H

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA):

$0.00

I

Local entities:

$0.00

J

Other:

$0.00

Categorical Funding Allocations

Prevention/Education:

$

Intervention/Treatment:

$

Justice Services:

$

Funding allotted to Administrative costs:

Itemized list of what is being funded

Amount ($100.00)

Coordinator compensation

$

Office supplies

$

Funding Allocations by Goal per Problem Statement:

Problem Statement #1

Goal 1: $

Goal 2: $

Problem Statement #2

Goal 1: $

Goal 2: $

Problem Statement #3

Goal 1: $

Goal 2: $


[1]Risk and protective factors extracted from IUPUI Center for Health Policy Community Conditions Favorable for Substance Use, April 2018.