Special Educational Needs & Disabilities (SEND) Policy

Status:

Ratified

Drafted by:

Leighton Tellem

Ratified by Governors:

8th February 2018

The Governing Body is responsible for establishing and maintaining this policy and for ensuring that it is followed.  The Principal is responsible for implementing  and complying with this policy. The policy applies to the Principal and to all staff employed by the Academy.

Contents

Special Educational Needs & Disabilities (SEND) Policy

Contents

Aims:

Legislation

Objectives

Definitions

Roles and responsibilities

The SENDCo

The SEND Governor

The Principal

Subject Teachers

SEND information report

What areas of SEND do we provide for are provided for?

How do we identify students who require additional support and how do we assess their needs?

How do we consult with parents and students?

How do we assess and review the effectiveness of additional support?

Assess

Plan

Do

Review

How do we support students moving between phases?

What is our approach to teaching students with SEND?

How do we enable students with SEND to engage in all academy activities?

What other services does the academy work with?

What do I do if I have a concern about my child’s SEND provision?

How do I make a complaint with regard to my child’s SEND provision?

Contact details of support services for parents of students with SEND

What is the Local Authority’s offer?

Monitoring arrangements

Links with other policies and documents

Appendix 1 - Areas of Need

1. Communication and interaction

2. Cognition and learning

3.  Social, emotional and mental health difficulties

4.  Sensory and/or physical needs

Appendix 2 - Stages of Support Provision

Aims:

The aim of this policy is to promote the successful inclusion and progression of students with special educational needs and disabilities at Route 39 Academy. It reflects the Academy’s vision that students at Route 39 will be empowered to take control of their own learning and their own lives and be equipped to make positive choices.

The Academy recognises that barriers to learning may derive from physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and health related issues.

Our Special Educational Needs and Disabilities policy aims to ensure that:

Legislation

This policy and information report is based on the statutory ​Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Code of Practice 2015​​ ​and the following legislation:

Objectives

The objectives of the policy are to ensure that:

Definitions

A student has SEND if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be provided to them.

Students have a learning difficulty or disability if they have a:

Special educational provision is educational or training provision that is additional to, or different from, that provided to other children or young people of the same age by mainstream academies.

Roles and responsibilities

The SENDCo

The SENDCo will:

The SEND Governor

The SEND Governor will:

The Principal

The Principal will:

Subject Teachers

Each class teacher:

SEND information report

What areas of SEND do we provide for are provided for?

We have a commitment to inclusive education. As such, a wide range of Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) are catered for.

The 2015 SEND Code of Practice (CoP) identifies four broad areas. These are:

We provide support for all four areas. For further information, please see Appendix 1.

How do we identify students who require additional support and how do we assess their needs?

We are a small school and know our students extremely well. We assess and identify the needs of students in a number of different ways. These are outlined below:

In addition, our class teachers regularly assess the progress of their students and identify those whose progress:

We pay particular attention to the ‘attainment gap’, that is, the attainment of a student in relation to their peers. We identify those students:

If a student is not known to the SENDCo, but they are failing to make adequate progress, teachers will raise their concerns with the SENDCo. The SEND team will then investigate why this is happening.

It is important to clarify that progress in this context does not solely relate to academic attainment. It may include progress in areas such as social needs.

Slow progress and low attainment will not automatically mean that a student is recorded as having SEND support.

When deciding whether special educational provision is required, we consider:

We use all information to determine the support that is required to meet the student’s needs and whether this support can be provided by adapting our core offer, or whether something different and/or additional is needed.

How do we consult with parents and students?

At Route 39 Academy, we recognise the importance of working in partnership with parents. ​We inform parents at the earliest opportunity when considering additional provision.

Prior to implementing any intervention or additional support, we invite parents or guardians to a meeting in order to discuss any additional support. These conversations aim to make sure that:

Notes of these early discussions are added to the student’s record and given to their parents. We will formally notify parents when it is decided that a student will receive SEND support.

Please see Appendix 2 for further information with regard to the graduated stages of SEND support.

How do we assess and review the effectiveness of additional support?

With regard to additional support, we follow a graduated approach. Our support follows a four-part cycle of assess, plan, do, review.

Assess

Subject teachers work with the SENDCo to carry out a clear analysis of the student’s needs. This will draw on:

Plan

Appropriate provision is discussed and a formal plan put in place. The plan is time limited and its targets are specific and measurable.

Do

All teachers and support staff who work with the students are made aware of the student’s needs, the outcomes sought, the support provided, and any recommended teaching strategies or approaches.

Review

The effectiveness of additional support is reviewed regularly as follows:

In addition, we review the effectiveness of provision by:

How do we support students moving between phases?

We liaise closely with all parties to minimise the stress and anxiety caused to parents and students by a change of educational setting. We will work extremely hard to minimize any disruption to each student’s educational journey.

Our support includes:

What is our approach to teaching students with SEND?

Teachers are responsible and accountable for the progress and development of all students in their class. Provision for SEND includes:

Personalised and group programs include:

We adapt the learning environment to ensure all of our students’ needs are met. This includes:

How do we enable students with SEND to engage in all academy activities?

We do our best to ensure that any barriers to engagement in our academy’s activities are minimised. Pupils are given support to overcome any barriers that arise. We ensure that:

What other services does the academy work with?

The Academy has strong links with external support services. This includes educational psychology and advisory teams from the local authority and other organisations such as Virgin Care and Babcock Education.

Specialist outside agencies contribute to the reviews of students with significant speech and language difficulties, physical, visual and hearing impaired students. Joint meetings are held, as appropriate, to ensure effective collaboration in identifying and making provision for vulnerable students.

A Careers South West Personal Advisor is invited to attend all Year 11 Annual Reviews.

The SEND department is given an annual budget, which is based on the departmental improvement plan. In addition, we are able to apply to the Local Authority for additional funding for individual students when necessary.

What do I do if I have a concern about my child’s SEND provision?

If a student or parent has a concern with regard to SEND, they should contact the SENDCo using the contact details in this policy.

How do I make a complaint with regard to my child’s SEND provision?

If you wish to make a complaint about the SEND provision, please contact our SENDCo using the contact details in this policy. If you are still concerned, you can make an appointment to talk to the Principal. To make an appointment please contact the Principal’s PA,   on 01237 431969 or email pa@route39.org.uk. 

The parents of students with disabilities have the right to make disability discrimination claims to the first-tier SEND tribunal if they believe that our academy has discriminated against their child. They can make a claim about alleged discrimination regarding:

Contact details of support services for parents of students with SEND

The SENDCo is happy to support any parent who wishes to contact additional support services.

Devon Information Advice and Support for SEND (previously Devon Parent Partnership) can be found online at ​http://www.devonias.org.uk/

What is the Local Authority’s offer?

Devon’s Local Offer can be found on line at ​https://new.devon.gov.uk/send/

Monitoring arrangements

This policy and information report is reviewed and updated by the SENDCo annually. It will also be updated if any changes to the information are made during the year. It is approved by the Governing Body.

Links with other policies and documents

This policy links to our policies on:


Appendix 1 - Areas of Need

The four areas of need as identified in the 2015 SEND Code of Practice (CoP) identifies are summarized below.

1. Communication and interaction

Young people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) have difficulty in communicating with others. This may be because they have difficulty or delay in receptive and /or expressive language or do not understand or use social rules of communication (CoP 6.28)

Young people with ASD, including Asperger’s Syndrome and Autism, are likely to have particular difficulties with social interaction. They may also experience difficulties with language, communication and imagination, which can impact on how they relate to others.(CoP 6.29)

2. Cognition and learning

Support for learning difficulties may be required when young people learn at a slower pace than their peers, even with appropriate differentiation. Learning difficulties cover a wide range of needs, including moderate learning difficulties (MLD), severe learning difficulties (SLD), where children are likely to need support in all areas of the curriculum and associated difficulties with mobility and communication (CoP 6.30). Specific learning difficulties (SpLD), affect one or more specific aspects of learning. This encompasses a range of conditions such as dyslexia, dyscalculia and dyspraxia.

3.  Social, emotional and mental health difficulties

Young people may experience a wide range of social and emotional difficulties which manifest themselves in many ways. These may include becoming withdrawn or isolated, as well as displaying challenging, disruptive or disturbing behaviour. These behaviours may reflect underlying mental health difficulties such as anxiety or depression, self-harming, substance misuse, eating disorders or physical symptoms that are medically unexplained. Other children and young people may have disorders such as attention deficit disorder, attention deficit ​hyperactivity​ disorder or attachment disorder (CoP 6.32).

4.  Sensory and/or physical needs

Some young people require special educational provision because they have a disability which prevents or hinders them from making use of the educational facilities generally provided. These difficulties can be age related and may fluctuate over time. Many children and young people with vision impairment (VI), hearing impairment (HI) or a multi-sensory impairment (MSI) will require specialist support and/or equipment to access their learning, or habilitation support. Children and young people with an MSI have a combination of vision and hearing difficulties (CoP 6.34).


Appendix 2 - Stages of Support Provision

Route 39 Academy has a graduated response to meeting SEND that requires the initial use of classroom and Academy resources.

In most cases, the first step is that a student would join our Targeted Intervention Programme (TIP). TIP students receive specific targeted support in order to ameliorate a particular barrier to learning. TIP students do not always form part of the Academy's SEN cohort as these interventions do not always meet the threshold for the two categories of SEN outlined below.

At Route 39 we have two categories of SEN:

EHC Plan and Support students all have a Disability Access Fund (DAF) - My Plan that outlines their SEN needs and provision and is the school’s central SEN document. It gives the following information

EHC Plan and Support students typically receive enhanced provision, in addition to their universal teaching provision which may include the following: