SS8 Social Studies                                                                                                                                Page  of

Units:

Unit 1: Colonial Development

Unit 2: Creating a Colonial Identity

Unit 3:  Road to Revolution

Unit 4: The American Revolution

Unit 5: Articles to Constitution

Unit 6: New Nation

Unit 7: Sectionalism

Unit 8: Manifest Destiny

Unit 9: Civil War



 


Unit Title

Unit 1: Colonial Development

Timeframe 

22

Unit Summary

The colonists adapted ideas from their European heritage and from Native American groups to develop new political and religious institutions and economic systems.  The slave labor system and the loss of Native American lives had a lasting impact on the development of the United States and American culture.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Why do people migrate?
  • What was life like in the colonies?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Forces and voluntary migration explored, along with the characteristics of the colonies.  Focus on geographical impact on the social, political and economic lives of those living in the area.

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Reasons for migrations
  • Life in the New England Colonies, Middle Colonies, Southern Colonies, Backcountry

Know

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1.  Explain how demographics (i.e., race, gender, and economic status) affected social, economic, and political opportunities during the Colonial era.
  2. Determine factors, the impacted emigration, settlement patterns, and regional identities of the colonies.
  3. Compare the practice of slavery and indentured servitude in Colonial labor systems.
  4. Analyze the impact of triangular trade on multiple nations and groups.
  5. Compare and contrast the voluntary and involuntary migratory experiences of different groups of people, and explain why their experience differed.
  6. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  7. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
  8. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Triangular Trade Map

A Trip Through the Colonies

Summative/ Benchmark

#MyColonialLife Instagram Project

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 1 Assessments

4.1 RSG: 20 points                                                        5.1 RSG: 20 points

4.2 RSG: 20 points                                                        5.2 RSG: 20 points

4.3 RSG: 20 points                                                        5.3 RSG: 20 points

4.4 RSG: 20 points                                                        News Article Comparison: 40 points (4 times)

News Article Comparison: 40 points (4 times)               JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points

JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                                 JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points (3 times)

JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points (3 times)              Benchmark Challenge: 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1 - 3:  Welcome Back!

Day 4:  Mr. Betts: Moving to the Colonies / Why did people move to the colonies? / “An Early Call for Settlers” Activity (Rate arguments for moving to America) /  “Skills Needed in English Settlements”  Cooperative Activity

Day 5:  Map Identification of the 13 Colonies /  Analyze characteristics of each region http://www.history.com/topics/thirteen-colonies  /  Map Practice :  http://online.seterra.com/en/vgp/3044

Day 6:  Mr. Betts Video- Puritans / Anne Hutchinson Primary Source Activity  /  Religious Toleration Activity

Day 7:  Mr. Betts video –Quakers / Analyzing Data on Middle Colonies Activity  /  “William Penn’s Holy Experiment” Activity  /  Middle Colonies Map Interpretation Activity

Day 8:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Migration.  Why do people leave their homes to start over?

Day 9:  “Slaves and the Southern Colonies” DBQ Activity  /  “The South Depends on Slavery” Point of View Activity

Day 10:  Backcountry Mini WebQuest:  http://www.landofthebrave.info/the-backcountry.htm

Day 11:  Mr. Betts: Triangular Trade  /  “Triangular Trade” Map Activity  /  Analyzing “Slave Trade Profits” Activity

Day 12:  AMISTAD: Triangular Trade Activity

Day 13:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Migration.  What are the experiences of those that migrate from their homes?

Day 14:  “Life in the Colonies” /  “Woman’s Day Magazine-Colonial America Activity”  /  “Women in Slavery” Primary Source Activity

Day 15:   “An Eyewitness Account of the Crossing of Indentured Servant”  /  “Life of An Indentured Servant” Primary Source Activity  /  “Slave Laws” Editorial Activity

Days 16:  A Trip Through the Colonies-Journal Writing Activity

Day 17:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Migration.  How do immigrants adjust to life in a new area?

Days 18-22 #MyColonialLife Instagram Project CRP11   Use technology to enhance productivity. 8.1.8.B.1  Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. Telecollaborative  project, blob, school web).

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.8.A.2.c

Explain how demographics (i.e., race, gender, and economic status) affected social, economic, and political opportunities during the Colonial era.

6.1.8.B.2.a

Determine factors, the impacted emigration, settlement patterns, and regional identities of the colonies.

6.1.8.C.2.a

Compare the practice of slavery and indentured servitude in Colonial labor systems.

6.1.8.C.2.c

Analyze the impact of triangular trade on multiple nations and groups.

6.1.8.D.2.b

Compare and contrast the voluntary and involuntary migratory experiences of different groups of people, and explain why their experience differed.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA.R1.  Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connections from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

NJSLSA.R4.  Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

NJSLSA.R7.  Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.R8.  Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.8.F.1 Explore a local issue, by using digital tools to collect and analyze data to identify a solution and make an informed decision.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.

 


Unit Title

Unit 2: Creating a Colonial Identity

Timeframe 

21 Days

Unit Summary

The colonists adapted ideas from their European heritage and from Native American groups to develop new political and religious institutions and economic systems.  The slave labor system and the loss of Native American lives had a lasting impact on the development of the United States and American culture.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What is culture?
  • What colonial experiences helped to shape the nation we live in today?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The events that shaped early American culture.  Focusing on early demographics and literature, roots of a representative government and the impact of the French and Indian War.  

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Early American Culture, Roots of Representative Government, and French and Indian War

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Compare and contrast how the search for natural resources resulted in conflict and cooperation among European colonists and Native American groups in the New World.
  2. Determine the roles of religious freedom and participatory government in various North American colonies.
  3. Explain how and why early government structures developed, and determine the impact of these early structures on the evolution of American politics and institutions.
  4. Explain the system of mercantilism and its impact on the economies of the colonies and European countries.
  5. Analyze the power struggle among European countries, and determine its impact on people living in Europe and the Americas.
  6. Identify key steps in a text's description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).
  7. Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
  8. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Quiz

Celebrating Differences

Summative/ Benchmark

Colonial Identity and Culture Assessment

Benchmark 1 Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 1 Assessments

4.1 RSG: 20 points                                                        5.1 RSG: 20 points

4.2 RSG: 20 points                                                        5.2 RSG: 20 points

4.3 RSG: 20 points                                                        5.3 RSG: 20 points

4.4 RSG: 20 points                                                        News Article Comparison: 40 points (4 times)

News Article Comparison: 40 points (4 times)               JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points

JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                                 JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points (3 times)

JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points (3 times)              Benchmark Challenge: 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  Google Question: What is “culture”?  /  Chapter 5 Sec. 1 Guided Reading

Day 2:  18A “Rules for Student Behavior”  /  18B “Schedule for the Day – New Amsterdam School”  /  Chapter 5 Section 1  Formative Review

Day 3:  Quick Quiz – Map of 13 Colonies  /  Video: Ben & Me – with Questions

Day 4: Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Culture.  What is culture?

Day 5:  Google Question: “What is an Almanac?”  /  Poor Richard’s Almanack – Analyze idioms to understand meaning.

Day 6:  Google Classroom – Background reading with quick quiz. (Last 2 paragraphs – Vol 2 pg. 1)  /  1A: Mercantilism

Day 7:  Google Classroom – Background reading with quick quiz. (1st 2 paragraphs)  /  Vol2 - 2A: Roots of Colonial Self-Government – Apply the English Bill of Rights to Colonial Situations.  /  2B:  Locke’s Ideas Influence Colonists – Using information from Locke’s writing, students will outline the “Social Contract” that will influence their behavior later.

Day 8:  20A: Peter Zenger – Students read the excerpt printed by Zenger and determine fact from opinion.  /  20B: The Zenger Trial – Students will act as the jury in this case, when a few selected students act out the trial.  

Day 9:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Culture.  What rights should everyone have?

Day 10:  Quiz:  Ch. 5 Sec. 1 & 2 and Map  / Culture Clash Reading

Day 11: Mr. Bett’s - French and Indian War  / Atlas Activity: French & Indian War

Day 12:  Google Classroom – Background reading with quick quiz. (Last 2 paragraphs – Vol 2 pg. 8)  /  2C – The Albany Plan of Union – Determine if Benjamin Franklin would approve or disapprove of given statements. /  Political Cartoon Analysis – Join or Die

Day 13: Chapter 5 Section 3 Guided Reading - Practice using reference materials to acquire information.  /  Ch. 5 Sec. 3 Reteaching Activity

Day 14:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Culture.  How does culture impact the rights people have?

Day 15-16:  19C:  “Salem Massachusetts” Using headlines and dialogue from the Salem witch trials – students will evaluate the role differences played in the accusation of witchcraft.  

Student will then identify a situation today in which people are victimized because they are “different”.  Then have them design a digital poster using the theme, “Celebrating our Differences”

Day 17:  Colonial Identity Study Guide

Day 18: Review Game – Heads-up Style – Students will receive a pack of playing cards, which will include terms, names and places of importance from the unit.  Their teammates will provide them with clues to guess the most words in 1 minute time.  Will repeat for teams and keep track of points.

Day 19:  Colonial Identity Test

Day 20:  Benchmark Review Game - Jeopardy.


Day 21:  Benchmark 1 Assessment

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.8.B.2.b

Compare and contrast how the search for natural resources resulted in conflict and cooperation among European colonists and Native American groups in the New World.

6.1.8.A.2.a

Determine the roles of religious freedom and participatory government in various North American colonies.

6.1.8.A.2.b

Explain how and why early government structures developed, and determine the impact of these early structures on the evolution of American politics and institutions.

6.1.8.C.2.b

Explain the system of mercantilism and its impact on the economies of the colonies and European countries.

6.1.8.D.2.a

Analyze the power struggle among European countries, and determine its impact on people living in Europe and the Americas.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA.R3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

NJSLSA.R6  Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

NJSLSA.R7.  Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.8.F.1 Explore a local issue, by using digital tools to collect and analyze data to identify a solution and make an informed decision.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 3:  Road to Revolution

Timeframe 

18 days

Unit Summary

Disputes over political authority and economic issues contributed to a movement for independence in the colonies.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What causes people to join together and revolt?
  • What caused our founding fathers to declare their independence from Great Britain?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The events that lead up to the American Revolution. Focus on the protests, strategy of colonial groups, and revolutionary literature. 

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Why there was Tighter British Control?
  • Why the Colonial Resistance Grows?
  • The Road to Lexington and Concord
  • Declaring Independence

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Examine the ideals found in the Declaration of Independence, and assess the extent to which they were fulfilled for women, African Americans, and Native Americans.
  2. Assess how conflicts and alliances among European countries and Native American groups impacted the expansion of the American colonies.
  3. Explain how taxes and government regulation can affect economic opportunities, and assess the impact of these on relations between Britain and its North American colonies.
  4. Explain how the consequences of the Seven Years War, changes in British policies toward American colonies, and responses by various groups and individuals in the North American colonies led to the American Revolution.
  5. Analyze how prominent individuals and other nations contributed to the causes, execution, and outcomes of the American Revolution.
  6. Explain why the Declaration of Independence was written and how its key principles evolved to become unifying ideas of American democracy.
  7. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
  8. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
  9. Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Reading Like a Historian Stamp Act Activity

RAFT - Reactions to the Boston Tea Party

Summative/ Benchmark

Road to Revolution Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 2 Assessments

6.1 RSG: 20 points                                             7.1 RSG: 20 points                                           8.1 RSG: 20 points

6.2 RSG: 20 points                                             7.2 RSG: 20 points                                           8.2 RSG: 20 points

6.3 RSG: 20 points                                             7.3 RSG: 20 points                                           8.3 RSG: 20 points

6.4 RSG: 20 points                                             7.4 RSG: 20 points

News Article Comparison: 40 points                   News Article Comparison: 40 points                 News Article Comparison: 40 points        

JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                      JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                    JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points

JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points                 JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points                JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points  

                                                                                                                                             Benchmark Challenge: 180 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  Pre-Revolutionary North American Map & Questions  /  3A:  Proclamation of 1763

Day 2:  Google Q:  How did the Proclamation Act of 1763 anger the colonists?  /  3D:  British Actions in the Colonies (Group Work)  /  Salutary Neglect

Day 3:  Google Q:  How did the British policy toward the American colonies changer after 1763?  /  Reading Like a Historian:  The Stamp Act

Day 4:  Google Q: Why were the colonists upset about the Stamp Act?  /  Continue RLAH – The Stamp Act

Day 5:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Revolution.  What makes people unhappy in their countries today?

Day 6: Ch. 6 Sec. 1 Reading Qs  /  4A/B:  Colonists React & Women in the Colonies

Day 7:  Define: Patriots, Loyalists and Neutral – Using Chromebooks  /  Patriot, Loyalist or Neutral?  Students will be divided into groups of 2 or 3, they will read scenarios and determine whether that person would be a patriot, loyalist or was neutral.

Day 8: Tea Act Excerpt with Questions  /  Liberty’s Kids:  The Boston Tea Party

Day 9:  Google Q:  Were the colonists justified in their responses to British restrictions?  /  Mr Bett’s Video:  Boston Tea Party  /  4E:  Loyalists React to the Boston Tea Party  /  RAFT – Write a letter posing as a loyalist reacting to the Boston Tea Party

Day 10:  Boston Massacre Play  /  Exit Ticket (Google Form):  How did the Sons of Liberty’s portrayal of the events in Boston inspire Anti-British feelings?

Day 11:  Ch. 6 Sec. 3 Guided Reading  /  Liberty’s Kids:  Lexington & Concord  /  Exit Ticket (Google Form):  What’s the significance of Lexington and Concord?

Day 12:  Break-up Note Scenario – (setting up Declaration of Independence)  /  5A:  Declaration of Independence – Point of View – Women & African Americans

Day 13:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Revolution.  How has the Declaration of Independence inspired other people in other nations?

Day 14:  Mr. Bett’s Video:  Causes of the American Revolution  /  Timeline of Events  /  Road to Revolution Review

Day 15:  Mr. Bett’s Video:  Declaration of Independence  /  Liberty’s Kids – Declaration of Independence

Day 16:  Road to Revolution Review Game – Jeopardy

Day 17:  Road to Revolution Assessment

Day 18:  Career Day

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.8.A.3.a

Examine the ideals found in the Declaration of Independence, and assess the extent to which they were fulfilled for women, African Americans, and Native Americans.

6.1.8.B.3.a

Assess how conflicts and alliances among European countries and Native American groups impacted the expansion of the American colonies.

6.1.8.C.3.a

Explain how taxes and government regulation can affect economic opportunities, and assess the impact of these on relations between Britain and its North American colonies.

6.1.8.D.3.a

Explain how the consequences of the Seven Years War, changes in British policies toward American colonies, and responses by various groups and individuals in the North American colonies led to the American Revolution.

6.1.8.D.3.d

Analyze how prominent individuals and other nations contributed to the causes, execution, and outcomes of the American Revolution.

6.1.8.D.3.b

Explain why the Declaration of Independence was written and how its key principles evolved to become unifying ideas of American democracy.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLAL.2 - Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

NJSLAL.5 - Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).

NJSLAL.6 - Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.8.F.1 Explore a local issue, by using digital tools to collect and analyze data to identify a solution and make an informed decision.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 4: The American Revolution

Timeframe 

14 Days

Unit Summary

Disputes over political authority and economic issues contributed to a movement for independence in the colonies.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What is it like to live in country at war?
  • How did the American rebels win the Revolutionary War?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The experiences of those living on the American homefront and fighting in the American Revolution.  Focus on strategy, political forces and societal sacrifice to achieve a common goal.  

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The Early Years of the War
  • The War Expands
  • The Path to Victory
  • The Legacy of the War

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Use maps, and other geographic tools to evaluate the impact of geography on the execution and outcome of the American Revolutionary War.
  2. Explain why New Jersey’s location played an integral role in the American Revolution.
  3. Analyze how prominent individuals and other nations contributed to the causes, execution, and outcomes of the American Revolution.
  4. Examine the roles and perspectives of various socioeconomic groups (e.g., rural farmers, urban craftsman, northern merchants, and southern planters), African Americans, Native Americans, and women during the American Revolution, and determine how these groups were impacted by the war.
  5. Analyze from multiple perspectives how the terms of the Treaty of Paris affected United States relations with Native Americans and with European powers that had territories in North America.
  6. Analyze the impact of George Washington as general of the American revolutionary forces and as the first president of the United States.
  7. Integrate  visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Quiz

American Revolution Battle Map

Summative/ Benchmark

American Revolution Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 2 Assessments

6.1 RSG: 20 points                                             7.1 RSG: 20 points                                           8.1 RSG: 20 points

6.2 RSG: 20 points                                             7.2 RSG: 20 points                                           8.2 RSG: 20 points

6.3 RSG: 20 points                                             7.3 RSG: 20 points                                           8.3 RSG: 20 points

6.4 RSG: 20 points                                             7.4 RSG: 20 points

News Article Comparison: 40 points                   News Article Comparison: 40 points                 News Article Comparison: 40 points        

JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                      JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                    JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points

JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points                 JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points                JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points  

                                                                                                                                             Benchmark Challenge: 180 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1: Mr. Bett’s: Stay with Me  /  Poem - Causes of the American Revolution  /  Ch. 7 Sec. 1 Notes

Day 2:  Art Analysis:  Washington crossing the Delaware  /  Washington’s Role in the Revolution    /  Fighting in the North

Day 3:  Ch. 7 Sec. 1 Reteaching  /  Ch. 7 Section 2 Notes /  Ch. 7 Sec. 2 Reteaching

Day 4:  The War and the People  /  Hall of Fame

Day 5:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Conflict.  How war impact the people living in that area?

Day 6:  Ch. 7 Sec. 1 & 2 Quiz  /  Ch. 7 Sec. 3 Notes & Guided Reading  /  Ch. 7 Sec. 3 Reteaching

Day 7:  Ch. 7 Sec. 4 Notes & Guided Reading  /  Ch. 7 Sec. 4 Reteaching

Day 8-9:  American Revolution Battle Map

Day 10:  National Geographic’s Geography Bee

Day 11:  Google Form:  Ch. 7 Review  /  American Revolution Review Sheet

Day 12:  American Revolution Review Sheet in partners

Day 13:  American Revolution Review Game - Jeopardy

Day 14:  American Revolution Assessment

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.8.B.3.c

Use maps, and other geographic tools to evaluate the impact of geography on the execution and outcome of the American Revolutionary War.

6.1.8.B.3.d

Explain why New Jersey’s location played an integral role in the American Revolution.

6.1.8.D.3.d

Analyze how prominent individuals and other nations contributed to the causes, execution, and outcomes of the American Revolution.

6.1.8.D.3.e

Examine the roles and perspectives of various socioeconomic groups (e.g., rural farmers, urban craftsman, northern merchants, and southern planters), African Americans, Native Americans, and women during the American Revolution, and determine how these groups were impacted by the war.

6.1.8.D.3.f

Analyze from multiple perspectives how the terms of the Treaty of Paris affected United States relations with Native Americans and with European powers that had territories in North America.

6.1.8.D.3.c

Analyze the impact of George Washington as general of the American revolutionary forces and as the first president of the United States.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLAL.R7.Integrate  visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 8th grade,

  •  9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 5: Articles to Constitution

Timeframe 

23 Days

Unit Summary

The fundamental principles of the United States Constitution serve as the foundation of the United States government today.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

How do governments impact the people?

How did we form the government we have today?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The steps taken by our founding fathers to develop the US Constitution.  Focusing on the Articles of Confederation, Federalists vs. Antifederalists, and the constitution itself.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The Confederation Era
  • Creating the Constitution
  • Ratifying the Constitution
  • Constitution Handbook

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the fundamental principles of the Constitution (i.e., consent of the governed, rule of law, federalism, limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, and individual rights) in establishing a federal government that allows for growth and change over time.
  2. Determine the role that compromise played in creation and adoption of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
  3. Compare and contrast the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution in terms of decision-making powers of national government.
  4. Evaluate the impact of the Constitution and Bill of Rights on current day issues.
  5. Determine the extent to which geography of the United States influenced the debate on representation in Congress and federalism by examining the New Jersey and Virginia Plans.
  6. Summarize the effect of inflation and debt on the American people and the response of state and national governments during this time.
  7. Analyze the debates involving the National Bank, uniform currency, and tariffs, and determine the extent to which each of these economic tools met the economic challenges facing the new nation.
  8. Identify key steps in a text's description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Reteaching Activity

Quiz

Constitution Scavenger Hunt

Summative/ Benchmark

Articles of Confederation DBQ

Benchmark 2 Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 2 Assessments

6.1 RSG: 20 points                                             7.1 RSG: 20 points                                           8.1 RSG: 20 points

6.2 RSG: 20 points                                             7.2 RSG: 20 points                                           8.2 RSG: 20 points

6.3 RSG: 20 points                                             7.3 RSG: 20 points                                           8.3 RSG: 20 points

6.4 RSG: 20 points                                             7.4 RSG: 20 points

News Article Comparison: 40 points                   News Article Comparison: 40 points                 News Article Comparison: 40 points        

JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                      JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                    JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points

JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points                 JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points                JS Challenge: Comp. Quiz: 60 points  

                                                                                                                                             Benchmark Challenge: 180 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  Video:  The Unfinished Nation – Discovery Education (27 mins)  /  Problems with the Articles of Confederation Activity

Day 2:  Guidance Scheduling with 8th Graders for HS

Day 3:  Google Q:  What are the Strengths and Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation?  /  Ch. 8 Sec. 1 Outline

Day 4:  Mr Bett’s: Articles of Confederation  /  Shays’ Rebellion

Day 5:  Ch. 8 Sec. 2 Notes – Google Classroom  /  Great Compromise Explained  /  Mr. Bett’s Video: Great Compromise

Day 6:  Mr. Bett’s: Articles of Confederation Problems  /  Ch. 8 Section 2 Quiz (Reteaching)

Day 7:  Chapter 8 Section 3 Guided Reading

Day 8:  Are you a Patrick Henry or James Madison?  /  Federalists Vs. Antifederalists

Day 9:  Play:  Our Founding Fathers

Day 10:  Chapter 8 Quiz  /  Benchmark 2 Assessment Review

Day 11 - 12:  Articles of Confederation DBQ Assessment

Day 13:  Benchmark 2 Assessment Review Game

Day 14:  Benchmark 2 Assessment (Counted toward 3rd MP)  /  The Constitution Endures

Day 15:  Mr. Bett’s: Differences between Declaration, Articles and Constitution  /  School House Rocks: The Preamble  /  Preamble - Put it into your own words

Day 16:  Google Question:  Who has the most power in our government?  /  The Articles – I, II & III Guided Reading

Day 17:  Chart of Terms & Requirements  /  Legislative Vs. Executive Vs. Judicial Branch explored.

Day 18:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Governments.  What types of governments are in the world today?

Day 19:  Google Question:  How many branches does our government have? Which branch is the most powerful?  /  Checks and Balances Graphic Organizer  /   Checks and Balances Practice – Which branch has that power and which branch(es) is it checking?

Day 20:  Mr Bett’s:  Bill of Rights  /  Brain Pop! Bill of Rights Video & Art Activity – draw a picture to represent each of the first 10 amendments

Day 21-22:  Constitution Scavenger Hunt

Day 23:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Governments.  What rights and freedoms do other governments guarantee?

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.8.A.3.b

Evaluate the effectiveness of the fundamental principles of the Constitution (i.e., consent of the governed, rule of law, federalism, limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, and individual rights) in establishing a federal government that allows for growth and change over time.

6.1.8.A.3.c

Determine the role that compromise played in creation and adoption of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

6.1.8.A.3.d

Compare and contrast the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution in terms of decision-making powers of national government.

6.1.8.A.3.g

Evaluate the impact of the Constitution and Bill of Rights on current day issues.

6.1.8.B.3.b

Determine the extent to which geography of the United States influenced the debate on representation in Congress and federalism by examining the New Jersey and Virginia Plans.

6.1.8.C.3.b

Summarize the effect of inflation and debt on the American people and the response of state and national governments during this time.

6.1.8.C.4.a

Analyze the debates involving the National Bank, uniform currency, and tariffs, and determine the extent to which each of these economic tools met the economic challenges facing the new nation.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLAL.3. Identify key steps in a text's description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

8.1.8.A.3 Use and/or develop a simulation that provides an environment to solve a real world problem or theory.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 6: New Nation

Timeframe 

19 Days

Unit Summary

George Washington and his administration were the new nation’s first, which meant that future presidents would look to his administration’s policies for guidance.  Many of the practices established during Washington’s administration became traditions that are still followed today.  George Washington opposed the idea of political parties, however two rival parties emerged during the 1790s.  The parties differed in their philosophies as to who should rule the country -- an elite group, or the “common people.”  The battle played out between the two parties with the elections of our second and third presidents - John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, expanding and restricting the role of the federal government.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

What is the role of government?

How did the first US Presidents shape our nation?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • How our nation’s first presidents and their policies shaped the country we live in today.  Focus on George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and their key policies while in office.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Washington’s Presidency
  • Challenges to the New Government
  • The Federalists in Charge
  • Jefferson Takes Office
  • The Louisiana Purchase and Exploration
  • The War of 1812

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Explain how and why constitutional civil liberties were impacted by acts of government (ie., Alien and Sedition Acts) during the Early Republic
  2. Explain how political parties were formed and continue to be shaped by differing perspectives regarding the role and power of federal government.
  3. Explain the changes in America’s relationship with other nations by analyzing policies, treaties, tariffs, and agreements.
  4. Explain the growing resistance to slavery and New Jersey’s role in the role in the Underground Railroad.
  5. Evaluate the extent to which leadership and decisions of early administrations of the national government me the goals established in the Preamble of the Constitution.
  6. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  7. Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
  8. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Lewis & Clark Journal

Quiz

Summative/ Benchmark

New Nation Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 3 Assessments

Constitution 1 RSG: 20 points        9.1 RSG: 20 points                            10.1 RSG: 20 points                    11.1 RSG: 20 points

Constitution 2 RSG: 20 points        9.2 RSG: 20 points                            10.2 RSG: 20 points                    11.2 RSG: 20 points

Constitution 3 RSG: 20 points        9.3 RSG: 20 points                            10.3 RSG: 20 points                    11.3 RSG: 20 points

Constitution 4 RSG: 20 points        News Comparison: 40  points (2)       10.4 RSG: 20 points                    Sect. Challenge: 20 points

Constitution Challenge: 20 points  JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points      Jefferson Challenge: 20 points    Nat. Challenge: 20 points

Writing Challenge: 100 points        JS Challenge: Comp Quiz: 60 points  JS Comp. Quiz: 60 points            

                                                                                                           News Article Comparison: 40 points

Benchmark Challenge: 200 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  BrainPop! George Washington  /  Washington’s Problems and Precedents

Day 2:  Google Q: List two ways Washington set precedents.  /  Washington’s Foreign policy

Day 3:  How did Washington feel about foreign alliances?  /  Brain Pop! Political Parties - explore our nation’s first political parties and their stance on historical topics.  Also explore how Washington’s position. /  Federalists vs. Democratic-Republicans - Explore the fundamental differences between the two political parties.

Day 4:  Google Q:  What were the first two political parties?  /  Video: XYZ Affair  /  Video: Alien & Sedition Acts  /  Alien and Sedition Acts Reviewed - students will analyze key elements of the Acts and determine where they stand on those issues.

Day 5:  Google Q:  What were the main political issues for the first presidents?  /  Chapter 10 Sec. 1 Notes:  Election of 1800 – Jefferson vs. Adams  /  Chapter 10 Sec. 1 Notes – using a textbook as an informational resource.

Day 6: Google Form – Background info about Adams vs. Jefferson from Vol 3, page 30 with comprehension questions.  /  6: Thomas Jefferson – Students will analyze Jefferson’s inaugural address and highlight his views on the role of government.

Day 7:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Governments.  Should our government take away rights if it will protect us?

Day 8:  Google Question: “How did Thomas Jefferson’s election mark a step forward toward increasing participation in American government?” / Hamilton/Burr Duel – Highlighting tensions between political parties and cultural acceptance of dueling in early America. / Got Milk Video Clip – Aaron Burr

Day 9:  Google Classroom:  Background info from Vol. 3 pg. 33 – John Marshall and Comprehension Questions  /  7A:  Marshall’s Decisions Impact on the New Nation – working in pairs, students will evaluate how Marshall as chief justice strengthened the Supreme Court’s role.

Analyzing legal issues, comprehension and understanding lasting impact.  /   7B:  John Marshall’s View of the Constitution – Interpreting political cartoons and state his interpretation of the Constitution.

Day 10:  Google Classroom Question:  What did Jefferson’s ideal America and government look like?  /  Chapter 10 Sec. 2 Notes: Louisiana Purchase – history and geography explained.  /  Chapter 10 Sec. 2 Guided Reading – Using the textbook as a resource to delve deeper into the topic.

Day 11-12:  NatGeo: Lewis & Clark – Great Journey West Video   /  Journal Assignment – Based on the video, create 7 journal entries describing events that took place on the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

Day 13:  Quiz:  Washington / Adams / Political Parties and Jefferson  /  Map:  Louisiana Purchase Outline Map and Questions analyzing map information

Day 14:  Atlas Activity: Louisiana Purchase  /  8D:  Sacagawea Assists Expedition to Louisiana Territory – highlighting the impact of a woman’s help for the Corps of Discovery, collaboration between cultural groups and cultural references.

Day 15: Chapter 10 Sec. 3 & 4 Guided Reading – Using textbook as information resource.  /  Graphic Organizer – Cause and Effect of the War of 1812

Day 16:  Mr. Bett’s Video:  War of 1812  /  Strange Little War – Take a closer look into the oddities of the War of 1812.  /  Battle Map – Geography reinforced while reviewing the major battles of the War of 1812.

Day 17:  New Nation Assessment Review Sheet

Day 18:  New Nation Review Game - Heads up Game

Day 19:  New Nation Assessment

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.8.A.3.e

Explain how and why constitutional civil liberties were impacted by acts of government (ie., Alien and Sedition Acts) during the Early Republic

6.1.8.A.3.f

Explain how political parties were formed and continue to be shaped by differing perspectives regarding the role and power of federal government.

6.1.8.A.4.a

Explain the changes in America’s relationship with other nations by analyzing policies, treaties, tariffs, and agreements.

6.1.8.D.4.c

Explain the growing resistance to slavery and New Jersey’s role in the role in the Underground Railroad.

6.1.8.D.3.g

Evaluate the extent to which leadership and decisions of early administrations of the national government me the goals established in the Preamble of the Constitution.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLAL.1  Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

NJSLAL.6  Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

NJSLAL.7  Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

8.1.8.A.3 Use and/or develop a simulation that provides an environment to solve a real world problem or theory.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.8.F.1 Explore a local issue, by using digital tools to collect and analyze data to identify a solution and make an informed decision.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 7: Sectionalism

Timeframe 

20 Days

Unit Summary

Early 1800s proved to be a time of unification and sectionalism in our nation.  There were three distinct regions - the North, the South and the West.  Each region had it’s own particular characteristics and identities that would shape regional differences.  These differences would later prove too difficult to overcome and will lead to the Civil War.  However, this was also a time of unification for the nation, building up a national economy and transportation system.

In the early 1800s, travel by land was slow and difficult as the system of roads was hardly adequate.  Merchants realized that in order to establish trade with markets in the West, a more efficient mode of transportation had to be established.  Thus, in the early 1800s, states started building canals.  Early boats did not have engines.  Horses or mules walked alongside the canals, pulling the boats.  Among the dangers for people who traveled on these boats were the low bridges that crossed the canals.  Crew members would occasionally yell, “Low Bridge!” to warn the passengers to duck so that they would not be knocked off the boat.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

How does technology impact our lives?

What early technological advancements led to regional differences in America?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The regional differences in early America between the north, the south and the west.  Focusing on technological advancements in factories, the south and their impacts on the lives in those regions.  Students will also explore the impact of building national roads and canals on the economic development of our young nation.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Early Industry and Inventions
  • Plantations and Slavery Spread
  • Nationalism and Sectionalism

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Explain how major technological developments revolutionized land and water transportation, as well as the economy, in New Jersey and the nation.
  2. Analyze how technological innovations affected the status and social class of different groups of people, and explain the outcomes that resulted.
  3. Evaluate the impact of the cotton gin and other innovations on the institution of slavery and on the economic and political development of the country.
  4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
  5. Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
  6. Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

RAFT: Lowell Mills

Underground Railroad WebQuest

Summative/ Benchmark

Sectionalism Assessment

Benchmark 3 Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 3 Assessments

Constitution 1 RSG: 20 points        9.1 RSG: 20 points                            10.1 RSG: 20 points                    11.1 RSG: 20 points

Constitution 2 RSG: 20 points        9.2 RSG: 20 points                            10.2 RSG: 20 points                    11.2 RSG: 20 points

Constitution 3 RSG: 20 points        9.3 RSG: 20 points                            10.3 RSG: 20 points                    11.3 RSG: 20 points

Constitution 4 RSG: 20 points        News Comparison: 40  points (2)       10.4 RSG: 20 points                    Sect. Challenge: 20 points

Constitution Challenge: 20 points  JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points      Jefferson Challenge: 20 points    Nat. Challenge: 20 points

Writing Challenge: 100 points        JS Challenge: Comp Quiz: 60 points  JS Comp. Quiz: 60 points            

                                                                                                           News Article Comparison: 40 points

Benchmark Challenge: 200 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  Google Question:  List the normal activities you complete in a day.  How would this list be different without technology?  /  Chapter 11 Sec. 1 Guided Reading – Practice using reference materials to acquire information.

Day 2:  Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Technology.  What type of technology do you think is essential for humans today?

Day 3:  Google Form: Ch. 11 Sec. 1 Reteaching : Review the key terms of early industry in America. Sign up for play parts when finished  /  Lowell Mill Girls – Play  /  Samuel Slater – Cicero Guided Reading: Closer look at his impact on America’s Industrial Revolution.

Day 4:  Google Form: Review Lowell Mill Girls  /  Interchangeable Parts – Cicero Guided Reading:  Closer look at the revolutionary invention of Eli Whitney and it’s impact on the North and South  /  RAFT – Lowell Mill Girl’s Diary:  Complete 3 diary entries from a Lowell Mill Girl’s perspective.

Day 5:  Before They Were Stars: Eli Whitney Review  /  Chapter 11 Sec. 2 Guided Reading – Practice using reference materials to acquire information.

Day 6:  Google Question: What was the Underground Railroad?  /  Cicero Map:  Underground Railroad  /  Introduce WebQuest

Day 7-8:  JS WebQuest:  The Underground Railroad

Day 9:  Google Question:  What is “patriotism”?  /  Chapter 11 Sec. 3 Guided Reading – Practice using reference materials to acquire information.

Day 10:  Google Form:  Identify if the statement is supporting nationalism or sectionalism  /  Nationalism Vs. Sectionalism – Read information and place into Venn Diagram  /  Economic Expansion Map – Geography reinforcement tied to nationals roads and canals

Day 11:  Mr. Betts: Missouri Compromise   /  Cicero Guided Reading – Missouri Compromise – Explore America’s attempt to avoid Civil War over slavery in 1820.

Day 12:  Monroe Doctrine Background Google Reading with quick comprehension Qs (Vol 3. pg. 66)  /  11A:  The Monroe Doctrine – identifying main ideas  /  11B:  The Mexican Perspective

Day 13:  Sectionalism Review Sheet

Day 14:  Sectionalism Review Game  / Benchmark 3 Assessment Review Sheet

Day 15:  Sectionalism Assessment  /  Benchmark 3 Assessment Review Sheet

Day 16:  Benchmark 3 Assessment Review Game

Day 17:  Benchmark 3 Assessment (Marking Period 4)


Day 18-20:  PARCC Assessment

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.8.C.4.b

Explain how major technological developments revolutionized land and water transportation, as well as the economy, in New Jersey and the nation.

6.1.8.C.4.c

Analyze how technological innovations affected the status and social class of different groups of people, and explain the outcomes that resulted.

6.1.8.C.3.c

Evaluate the impact of the cotton gin and other innovations on the institution of slavery and on the economic and political development of the country.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLAL.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

NJSLAL.6  Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

NJSLAL.8  Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 8: Manifest Destiny

Timeframe 

17 Days

Unit Summary

Westward movement, industrial growth, increased immigration, the expansion of slavery, and the development of transportation systems increased regional tensions.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

Why have governments targeted certain groups throughout history?

What events led to the formation of the 48 contiguous United States of America?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The governmental policies and conflicts that led to the formation of our nation.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The Politics and the People
  • Jackson’s Policies Toward Native Americans
  • Trails West
  • The Texas Revolution
  • The War with Mexico
  • The California Gold Rush

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Analyze how the concept of manifest Destiny influenced the acquisition of land through annexation, diplomacy, and war.
  2. Assess the impact of the Louisiana Purchase and western exploration on the expansion and economic development of the United States.
  3. Assess the impact of the Louisiana Purchase and western exploration on the expansion and economic development of the United States.
  4. Map territorial expansion and settlement, as well as the locations of conflicts with and resettlement of Native Americans.
  5. Analyze the push-pull factors that led to increases in immigration, and explain why ethnic and cultural conflicts resulted.
  6. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  7. Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
  8. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Andrew Jackson’s Twitter

Texas Revolution Battle Map

Summative/ Benchmark

Territorial Expansion Map Assessment with Questions

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 4 Assessments

12.1 RSG: 20 points                                13.1 RSG: 20 points                                15.1 RSG: 20 points    

12.2 RSG: 20 points                                13.2 RSG: 20 points                                15.2 RSG: 20 points    

12.3 RSG: 20 points                                13.3 RSG: 20 points                                15.3 RSG: 20 points    

12.4 RSG: 20 points                                13.4 RSG: 20 points                                15.4 RSG: 20 points                                    

News Comparison: 40  points                  JS Challenge: Comp Quiz: 60 points         News Comparison: 40  points

JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                                                                         JS Challenge: Comp Quiz: 60 points

16.1 RSG: 20 points                                17.1 RSG: 20 points                                18.1 RSG: 20 points

16.2 RSG: 20 points                                17.2 RSG: 20 points                                18.2 RSG: 20 points

16.3 RSG: 20 points                                17.3 RSG: 20 points                                18.3 RSG: 20 points

                                                             17.4 RSG: 20 points                                Benchmark Challenge: 260 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  Ch. 12 Sec. 1 – Adams V. Jackson – conflict explored.  /  Ch. 12. Sec.1 Guided Reading   /  Disney History: John Q. Adams  /  Disney History: Andrew Jackson

Day 2-3:   Question to answer at the end of Day 3:  Was Andrew Jackson’s election to the presidency a victory for the common people?  /  12A:  Jackson’s Inauguration – summarizing the feeling in America after Jackson won the election of 1828  /  12B:  Voting During the Age of Jackson – Analyze line graph to evaluate the elections of 1824 and 1828  /  12C:  On the Question of Andrew Jackson – political cartoon and chart of his presidential policies to evaluate his presidency.  /  Closure:  Answer question from day 2.

Day 4:  How should American Indians have responded to President Andrew Jackson’s policies?  /  13A:  On the Cherokee Question – Read description of conflict and provide advice using information given.

Day 5:  13B:  Trail of Tears – Use Newspaper article and first hand account of the Trail of Tears to understand the impact of the event  /  Outline Map: Trail of Tears

Day 6: Current Events - Pulitzer Center:  Topic Forced Removal.  Explore an example of forced removal -- Who, What, When, Where, Why, How, Lasting impact?

Day 7-8:  Andrew Jackson’s Twitter  - Students will create a Tweets as President Andrew Jackson about various events and problems during his presidency.

Day 9:  Mr. Betts Video: Manifest Destiny  /  Trails West Map – Geography representation of Westward Expansion with analytical questions.

Day 10:  Google Question:  What does “Manifest Destiny” mean?  /  Wagons West!  First hand accounts of westward expansion

Day 11: Current Events - Big History:  Topic Exploration.  Create a timeline, showing major thresholds of exploration in history.

Day 12:  Google Question:  Why are we supposed to “Remember the Alamo”?  /  Remember the Alamo

Day 13:  Map activity – Texas Revolution:  Diver further into the Texas Revolution, understanding the geography of the dispute.

Day 14: 23A:  A Day at the Mission of San Gabriel – Using an itinerary and map to understand California’s history as a Mexican province.  /  Chapter 13 Sec. 3 Guided Reading – The War with Mexico

Day 15:  Mr. Betts Video: Manifest Destiny  /  Chapter 13 Sec. 4 Guided Reading – The California Gold Rush

Day 16-17:  Territorial Expansion Map Performance Assessment

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.8.A.4.b 

Analyze how the concept of manifest Destiny influenced the acquisition of land through annexation, diplomacy, and war.

6.1.8.A.4.c

Assess the impact of the Louisiana Purchase and western exploration on the expansion and economic development of the United States.

6.1.8.B.4.a

Assess the impact of the Louisiana Purchase and western exploration on the expansion and economic development of the United States.

6.1.8.B.4.b

Map territorial expansion and settlement, as well as the locations of conflicts with and resettlement of Native Americans.

6.1.8.D.4.a

Analyze the push-pull factors that led to increases in immigration, and explain why ethnic and cultural conflicts resulted.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLAL.1  Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

NJSLAL.6 Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

NJSLAL.7  Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

8.1.8.A.3 Use and/or develop a simulation that provides an environment to solve a real world problem or theory.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.8.F.1 Explore a local issue, by using digital tools to collect and analyze data to identify a solution and make an informed decision.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 9: Civil War

Timeframe 

26 Days

Unit Summary

The Civil War resulted from complex regional differences involving political, economic, and social issues, as well as different views on slavery.  The Civil War and Reconstruction had a lasting impact on the development of the United States.  

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

What caused our nation to fight a Civil War?

What was the impact of that war on our nation?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The major events that led to the American Civil War.  Students will also evaluate the strategies used during the war, the outcome and the impact.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Regional Differences
  • Election of 1860
  • Secession
  • Life of soldiers and civilians
  • Emancipation Proclamation
  • Gettysburg
  • Lee’s Surrender and Aftermath
  • Lincoln’s Assassination

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Describe efforts to reform education, women’s rights, slavery, and other issues during the Antebellum Period.
  2. Explain the growing resistance to slavery and New Jersey’s role in the Underground Railroad.
  3. Explain how and why the Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address continue to impact American Life.
  4. Assess the various factors (i.e., geography, natural resources, demographics, transportation, leadership, and technology) that affected the course and outcome of the Civil War.
  5. Assess the human and material costs of the Civil War in the North and the South.
  6. Prioritize the causes and events that led to the Civil War from different perspectives.
  7. Analyze critical events and battles of the Civil War and determine how they contributed to the final outcomes of the war.
  8. Examine the roles of women, African Americans, and Native Americans in the Civil War.
  9. Analyze the effectiveness of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the United States Constitution from multiple perspectives.
  10. Compare and contrast the approaches of Congress and Presidents Lincoln and Johnson toward Reconstruction of the South.
  11. Analyze the economic impact of Reconstruction on the South from different perspectives.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Election of 1860

Civil War Battle Map

Civil War Portfolio

Summative/ Benchmark

Benchmark 4 Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 4 Assessments

12.1 RSG: 20 points                                13.1 RSG: 20 points                                15.1 RSG: 20 points    

12.2 RSG: 20 points                                13.2 RSG: 20 points                                15.2 RSG: 20 points    

12.3 RSG: 20 points                                13.3 RSG: 20 points                                15.3 RSG: 20 points    

12.4 RSG: 20 points                                13.4 RSG: 20 points                                15.4 RSG: 20 points                                    

News Comparison: 40  points                  JS Challenge: Comp Quiz: 60 points         News Comparison: 40  points

JS Challenge: Writing: 100 points                                                                         JS Challenge: Comp Quiz: 60 points

16.1 RSG: 20 points                                17.1 RSG: 20 points                                18.1 RSG: 20 points

16.2 RSG: 20 points                                17.2 RSG: 20 points                                18.2 RSG: 20 points

16.3 RSG: 20 points                                17.3 RSG: 20 points                                18.3 RSG: 20 points

                                                             17.4 RSG: 20 points                                Benchmark Challenge: 260 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards                            Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                                              Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                                                 iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                                         Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                                                Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1: Google Form:  Civil War Pre-Test  /  Notes:  Background & Causes of the Civil War – PowerPoint Presentation on the regional differences between North, South and the West.  /  Is Compromise the Best?  -- - Multicultural History Activity - In collaborative groups, students evaluate three scenarios that led to historical compromises -- Missouri Compromise, Compromise of 1850 and the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854.  Each group will come up with their own solution to the problem.  Then, they will read about the historical compromises that were actually drafted to correct the problems.  Each group will evaluate the historical solutions and determine -- Is Compromise the Best?

Day 2:  Mr. Bett's:  Missouri Compromise  /  Missouri Compromise - Interactive Map & Questions - Students will analyze the land area of the different regions, the demographics of each state and how this information came into play for the Missouri Compromise.

Day 3: Notes: A Less Than Perfect Union - Discussion of slavery, compromise and westward expansion and how these tensions weakened the young union.  /  Tensions Timeline - A deeper look into antebellum events that led our nation to civil war -- Compromise, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abolition Movement, Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott Decision. Questions review information as well as ask students to propose solutions to the problems.

Day 4:  Election of 1860 - Google Slides information about the election of Lincoln and the campaign strategies of the other candidates.  Google Slides presentation includes chart of electoral college vote breakdown and percentages, to help students complete a map of the election results. This activity will count as a quiz for the section, as the election was the culminating event of the regional differences and proved to be the final straw in breaking the union.

Day 5:  Mr Bett's:  The South has seceded  /  Secession - Multicultural History Activity -- Students will learn about the southern states seceding from the Union after Lincoln's election.  They will evaluate his options and discuss the advantages and disadvantages to each.  Then they will draft a letter of advice to President Lincoln.   /  Secession and War - Multicultural History Activity -- Students will analyze a map of the states that seceded from the union, then apply their historical knowledge to a political cartoon analysis of the reason for secession.

Day 6:  A Soldier's Life -- Students will read accounts of the lives of civil war soldiers to gain an understanding of the hardships faced during this war.

Day 7:  Lincoln on Slavery: 1862  - Multicultural History Activity - Students will read remarks made by Lincoln concerning slavery and his number one goal to preserve the union.  Students will then decide whether or not they agree or disagree with Lincoln.  /  Another Lincoln Decision - Multicultural History Activity - Students will evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of Emancipating the slaves.  They will then draft a letter advising the president on what they think he should do.

Day 8:  Emancipation Proclamation - Multicultural History Activity - Students will read a modified Emancipation Proclamation and answer the questions following the document.   /  Emancipation Painting Analysis - Multicultural History Activity -- Students will use their knowledge of the Emancipation Proclamation and history to analyze the painting.

Day 9:  Benchmark 4 Assessment Review Sheet

Day 10:  NJASK 8 Science Assessment

Day 11:  Benchmark 4 Assessment

Day 12: Civil War Battle Map - Students will read and analyze the major battles of the Civil War.  They will map the battles in an effort to understand the strategies of the Union and Confederacy.  

Day 13:  Gettysburg - Junior Scholastic Article.  Chart & map analysis as well as reading comprehension.

Day 14:  Lee Surrenders - Students will read the "Civil War Times" and answer questions that correlate with the reading.  Students will use charts, pictures, maps and make predictions using the article.

Day 15:  Wanted! The President's Killer - The class will walk through the facts surrounding President Lincoln's assassination and discuss the impact of this event on America.  *Portfolio Due*

Day 16:  Name Those Leaders - Students will read about the major leaders of the Civil War.  While working independently, teacher will check in with students and their progress on their portfolio.  /  The Aftermath - Students will independently read about the Aftermath of the Civil War.  While working independently, teacher will check in with students and their progress on their portfolio.

Day 17:  10 Things You Should Know about the Civil War - Read the Article and answer the questions that go with it.

Day 18:  Civil War Post-Test  /  Innovations  - Enrichment Activity - Students can read about innovations from the Civil War Era for extra points on their Portfolio.  /  Hospitals & Prisons - Enrichment Activity - Students can read about hospitals and prisons during the Civil War Era for extra points on their

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Creating America Textbook

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebook

Supplemental Resources

Pulitzer Center Resources

Grade 7 United States and New York State History - A Multicultural Perspective Volume II and III

Content Statement

Indicator

6.1.12.A.3.i

Examine the origins of the antislavery movement and the impact of particular events, such as the Amistad decision, on the movement.

6.1.8.D.4.b

Describe efforts to reform education, women’s rights, slavery, and other issues during the Antebellum Period.

6.1.8.D.4.c

Explain the growing resistance to slavery and New Jersey’s role in the Underground Railroad.

6.1.8.A.5.a

Explain how and why the Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address continue to impact American Life.

6.1.8.B.5.a

Assess the various factors (i.e., geography, natural resources, demographics, transportation, leadership, and technology) that affected the course and outcome of the Civil War.

6.1.8.C.5.a

Assess the human and material costs of the Civil War in the North and the South.

6.1.8.D.5.a

Prioritize the causes and events that led to the Civil War from different perspectives.

6.1.8.D.5.b

Analyze critical events and battles of the Civil War and determine how they contributed to the final outcomes of the war.

6.1.8.D.5.c

Examine the roles of women, African Americans, and Native Americans in the Civil War.

6.1.8.D.5.d

Analyze the effectiveness of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the United States Constitution from multiple perspectives.

6.1.8.A.5.b

Compare and contrast the approaches of Congress and Presidents Lincoln and Johnson toward Reconstruction of the South.

6.1.8.C.5.b

Analyze the economic impact of Reconstruction on the South from different perspectives.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLAL.1  Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

NJSLAL.2  Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

NJSLAL.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

NJSLAL.6  Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

NJSLAL.7  Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

NJSLAL.8  Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

8.1.8.A.4 Graph and calculate data within a spreadsheet and present a summary of the results

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.