PROGRAM OF STUDIES

2019-2020

BRISTOL CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL

 Be Creative

Be Conscientious

Be Collaborative

Be Committed

Bristol Public Schools

Program of Studies

2019-2020

Contents

BRISTOL PUBLIC SCHOOLS MISSION STATEMENT

STATEMENT OF CORE VALUES/MISSION

LOOKING AHEAD FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE

COLLEGE INFORMATION

NEW ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR  CONNECTICUT STATE SCHOOLS

COLLEGE CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) / UCONN EARLY COLLEGE EXPERIENCE-ECE

COLLEGE CAREER PATHWAYS (CCP)

HIGH SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY (PLTW)

Project Lead the Way - College Credit Options

AWARD OF HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAS

CREDITS

CATEGORIES

GRADE WEIGHTING

ADVANCED PLACEMENT/UCONN EARLY EXPERIENCE COLLEGE COURSES

INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM

PREREQUISITE COURSES

School Counseling SERVICES

REPORT CARDS

HOMEBOUND INSTRUCTION

SUMMER SCHOOL AND MAKEUP

BRISTOL TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAMS

SCHOOL CHOICE OPTIONS

ONLINE COURSEWORK

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE

COURSE WITHDRAWAL/DROP

SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES

ADVANCEMENT VIA INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATION (AVID)

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

ART

BUSINESS & FINANCE

ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

ENGLISH

MATHEMATICS

MUSIC

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

SCIENCE

SOCIAL STUDIES

WORLD LANGUAGES

CAREER RESOURCE CENTER

BRISTOL TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY:

Art Courses

DRAWING AND PAINTING 1

DRAWING AND PAINTING 2

DRAWING AND PAINTING 3

DRAWING AND PAINTING 4

PRINTMAKING 1

PRINTMAKING 2

PORTFOLIO COURSE

AP STUDIO ART

DESIGN I

DESIGN II

SCULPTURE 1

SCULPTURE 2

POTTERY 1

POTTERY 2

FIBER

PHOTOGRAPHY AS ART

Business & Finance

BUSINESS & FINANCE PHILOSOPHY

Business & Finance Courses

COLLEGE CAREER PATHWAY PROGRAM:

ACCOUNTING 1

ACCOUNTING 2

ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

INFORMATION PROCESSING 1

INFORMATION PROCESSING 2

COMPUTER PROGRAMING & VIDEO GAME DESIGN

PERSONAL FINANCE AND INVESTMENT

SMALL BUSINESS OWNERSHIP

WEBSITE DESIGN

COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR THE 21st CENTURY   1

COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR THE 21st CENTURY   2

Engineering & Technology

ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY PHILOSOPHY

Engineering & Technology Courses

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

DESIGN & ENGINEERING: Project Lead the Way

COLLEGE CAREER PATHWAY PROGRAM – Technology Studies

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN

INTRO TO COMPUTER ASSISTED DESIGN

CAD & SOLID MODELING

CIVIL ENGINEERING & ARCHITECTURE

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES

COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

VIDEO PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES

TELEVISION PRODUCTION

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPTS

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

CONSTRUCTION APPLICATIONS

MANUFACTURING AND OTHER TECHNOLOGIES

ENERGY AND POWER

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY

AUTOMATION AND ROBOTICS

TOOLS & MATERIALS

MANUFACTURING DESIGN

Family & Consumer Sciences

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES PHILOSOPHY

Family & Consumer Sciences Courses

COLLEGE CAREER PATHWAY PROGRAM – Early Childhood Education

INTRODUCTORY FOODS & NUTRITION

ADVANCED FOODS & NUTRITION

APPLIED FOOD SCIENCE

CHILD, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 1

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 2

INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT/UCONN

ENGLISH

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

English Courses

ENGLISH 1

ENGLISH 1 ACCELERATED

ENGLISH 1 ACADEMIC

ENGLISH FOUNDATIONS 1

ENGLISH SKILLS FOR SUCCESS

ENGLISH 2

ENGLISH 2 ACCELERATED

ENGLISH 2 ACADEMIC

ENGLISH FOUNDATIONS 2

ENGLISH 3

ENGLISH 3 ACCELERATED

ENGLISH 3 ACADEMIC

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AP

ENGLISH 4

ENGLISH LITERATURE/AP/UCONN

ENGLISH 4 ACCELERATED

ENGLISH 4 ACADEMIC

ENGLISH ELECTIVES

CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE**

CREATIVE WRITING **

DRAMA 1

DRAMA 2

MEDIA LITERACY

JOURNALISM: WRITING & PUBLISHING

MYTHOLOGY**

SAT LITERACY PREP**

MATHEMATICS

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

Mathematics Courses

MATH FOUNDATIONS 1, 2, and 3 (Skinny Block)

ALGEBRA 1 ACADEMIC

ALGEBRA 1 ACADEMIC WITH ALGEBRA I FOUNDATIONS (2 Credits)

ALGEBRA 1 ACCELERATED

GEOMETRY ACADEMIC

GEOMETRY ACCELERATED

ALGEBRA 2 ACADEMIC

ALGEBRA 2 ACADEMIC WITH ALGEBRA 2 FOUNDATIONS (2 Credits)

ALGEBRA 2 ACCELERATED

ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL DECISION MAKING

STATISTICS ACADEMIC

SAT MATHEMATICS PREP

PRE-CALCULUS ACADEMIC

PRE-CALCULUS ACCELERATED

STATISTICS AP

CALCULUS ACCELERATED

CALCULUS AP/UCONN-AB

CALCULUS AP/UCONN-BC

MUSIC

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

DEPARTMENT GOALS

Music Courses

MUSIC HISTORY

AMERICAN MUSIC STUDIES (The History of Popular Music)

MUSIC HISTORY (The History of Classical Music)

MUSIC THEORY

MUSIC THEORY I

MUSIC THEORY II

MUSIC THEORY AP

MUSIC ENSEMBLE GROUPS

CONCERT CHOIR

CHORUS 1

BAND

OTHER MUSIC COURSE OFFERINGS

PIANO/KEYBOARD

GUITAR (ACOUSTIC)

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

SCIENCE COURSES

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

BIOLOGY

BIOLOGY AP

CHEMISTRY

CHEMISTRY AP

PHYSICS

PHYSICS/UConn

PHYSICS C Mechanics and PHYSICS C Electricity & Magnetism AP/UCONN

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AP

BIOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

SOCIAL STUDIES

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

Social Studies Courses

WORLD HISTORY

MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY

CIVICS

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

U.S. HISTORY AP

U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS AP

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY AP

WORLD HISTORY AP

MICROECONOMICS AP

ECONOMICS

GEOGRAPHY AND CULTURE OF LATIN AMERICA AND AFRICA

GEOGRAPHY AND CULTURE OF ASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST

GLOBAL ISSUES

LAW AND JUSTICE

CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGY

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

PSYCHOLOGY AP

SOCIOLOGY

WORLD LANGUAGES

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

World Language Courses

MODERN LANGUAGES

FRENCH 1 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

FRENCH 2 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

FRENCH 3 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

FRENCH 4 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

ITALIAN 1 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

ITALIAN 2 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

ITALIAN 3 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

ITALIAN 4 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

SPANISH 1 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

SPANISH 2 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

SPANISH 3 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

SPANISH 4 ACADEMIC AND ACCELERATED

SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 5 AP

LATIN 1 (Accelerated)

LATIN 2 (Accelerated)

LATIN 3:  INTRODUCTION TO LATIN LITERATURE (Accelerated)

LATIN 4:  LATIN LITERATURE (Accelerated)

MULTICULTURAL EXPRESSIONS

AP CAPSTONE

AP SEMINAR

AP RESEARCH

    ADDITIONAL AP ELECTIVE OFFERING

COMPUTER SCIENCE AP

SCHOOL COUNSELING CREDIT PROGRAMS

WORK EXPERIENCE

SENIOR INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

SERVICE LEARNING

COLLEGE CAREER PATHWAY PROGRAM

HIGH SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS PROGRAM

SHELTERED ENGLISH INSTRUCTION

ELL ENGLISH

ELL SOCIAL STUDIES

ELL PHYSICAL SCIENCE

ELL MATH

ELL ALGEBRA

ELL GEOMETRY

ELL SUPPORT

Sheltered Content Area Instruction Courses English Language Learners

BRISTOL TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER

GENERAL INFORMATION

APPLICATIONS

PLACEMENT

Bristol Technical Education Center Courses

AIR-CONDITIONING/ REFRIGERATION & HEATING

AUTO MECHANICS

CAD/CAM/DRAFTING

FOOD TRADE/BAKERY

MACHINE TOOL/COMPUTER NUMERICAL CONTROL

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

WELDING

DRIVER EDUCATION

NCAA Freshman Eligibility Standards

INFORMATION CONCERNING TITLE IX OR EDUCATION AMENDMENTS OF 1972

BRISTOL PUBLIC SCHOOLS MISSION STATEMENT

To maintain a safe and secure learning environment that provides all students with the necessary knowledge and skills to successfully complete college, other post high school education or training.

 STATEMENT OF CORE VALUES AND BELIEFS (MISSION STATEMENT):

BCHS promotes an environment wherein all members of its community employ 21st century skills to become creative thinkers, conscientious problem-solvers, collaborative learners and committed citizens in a global society.

BCHS LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

Global Awareness and Civic Responsibility:

o   Students will demonstrate an understanding of civic, environmental, and financial responsibility by employing skills necessary to be active and productive citizens.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving:

o   Students will solve problems through research, analysis, application, evaluation and creativity.

Communication:

o   Students will use a variety of methods to communicate facts and ideas effectively in a clear and well-reasoned manner.

Collaboration:

o   Students will be conscientious and respectful while working together in a variety of settings to achieve a common goal.

Media and Information Literacy:

o   Students will use technology to access, evaluate, and apply appropriate information while participating in authentic learning experiences.

 Life and Career Skills:

o   Students will take initiative and personal responsibility for setting life and career goals and following through in an ethical and responsible manner.

School Motto:

Be Creative, Be Conscientious, Be Collaborative, Be Committed

LOOKING AHEAD FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS

One of the many goals of the Bristol Public Schools is to prepare all students for post-secondary education.  The program of study at the high school is so structured as to enable students to achieve a secondary education opportunity if:

  1. Students plan their program of study carefully.
  2. Students demonstrate the ability, the maturity, and the motivation to perform the required work.

Careful program planning by parents and students is of critical importance.  The course of study followed while in high school is the foundation upon which future success will be based.

The high school course of study allows students to select those courses they and their parents deem appropriate for their future.

Of course, changes in plans occur after students enter high school, but it is much better for students to plan their courses wisely so that they will not be held back by the necessity of frequently changing their plans.          

The high school curriculum permits students to select courses that best fit their plans.  It is important that students carefully read those sections of this booklet dealing with graduation requirements, credits, and the departmental course descriptions.

Both parents and students are encouraged to seek assistance and suggestions from the school counseling department staff.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The Bristol Board of Education requires total credits as listed below to graduate.

*Shaded areas indicate upcoming changes to State Graduation Requirements.

Minimum Graduation Requirements for Class of 2019

Required Subject Areas

Credits

Required Courses

English

4

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (or English 3R and Writing Portfolio, Creative Writing, Mythology or Contemporary Literature)

All students are required to meet a performance standard for Evidenced-Based Reading and Writing

Mathematics

3

All students are required to meet a performance standard for Mathematics

Social Studies

3

Modern American History, 1CR

Civics, .5CR

Physical Education

2

.5 each year

Science

2

Vocational/Fine Arts

1

Health

.25

Additional Elective credits beyond Subject Areas

10

Required Total Credits

25.25

Minimum Graduation Requirements for

Classes of 2020 and 2021

Required Subject Areas

Credits

Required Courses

English

4

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (or English 3R and Writing Portfolio, Creative Writing, Mythology or Contemporary Literature)

All students are required to meet a performance standard for Evidenced-Based Reading and Writing

Mathematics

3

All students are required to meet a performance standard for Mathematics

Social Studies

3

Modern American History, 1CR

Civics, .5CR

Physical Education

2

.5 each year

Science

3

2020 - Including 1 credit in Chemistry OR Environmental Science

2021 - Including 1 credit in Chemistry

Vocational/Fine Arts

1

Health

.25

Additional Elective credits beyond Subject Areas

9

Required Total Credits

25.25

Minimum Graduation Requirements for Class of 2022

Required Subject Areas

Credits

Required Courses

English

4

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (or English 3R and Writing Portfolio, Creative Writing, Mythology or Contemporary Literature)

All students are required to meet a performance standard for Evidenced-Based Reading and Writing

Mathematics

3

All students are required to meet a performance standard for Mathematics

Social Studies

3

Modern American History, 1CR

Civics, .5CR

Physical Education

2

.5 each year

Science

3

Students must take physical science, biology, and chemistry.  

Career and Technical Education

1

Courses in Engineering and Technology, Business and Finance, Family Consumer Science

Arts

1

Courses in Art, Music

Health

.25

Additional Elective credits beyond Subject Areas

8

Required Total Credits

25.25

Minimum Graduation Requirements for Class of 2023

Required Subject Areas

Credits

Required Courses

Humanities

9

Modern American History, 1 credit

Civics, .5 credits

English

4

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (or English 3R and Writing Portfolio, Creative Writing, Mythology or Contemporary Literature)

Social Studies

3

Must earn Modern American History, 1CR

Civics, .5CR

World Languages

1

Fine Arts

1

Courses in Art or Music

STEM

9

Mathematics

4

Science

3

Students must take physical science, biology, and chemistry.

Career and Technical Education

1

Courses in Engineering and Technology, Business and Finance, Family Consumer Science

STEM Elective

1

Courses in Math, Science, CTE, Business and Finance, Family Consumer Science

Physical Education and Health

Physical Education

2

Health

1

Credit in Mastery-Based Diploma Assessment

1

Additional Elective credits beyond Required Subject Areas

4.25

Required Total Credits

25.25

Grade Placement

Credit Load

Grade 9 to 10:  must earn 5.75 credits

Grade 10 to 11: must earn 11.75 credits

Grade 11 to 12: must earn at least 17.25 credits

Students will be required to take a minimum of six credits and .5 credit in Physical Education in each grade, plus ¼ credit in Health (9th grade).

In addition to credit and course requirements, students will be expected to meet two performance standards in literacy and mathematics.  

Literacy and Mathematics Performance Standards

  • Literacy:  Within the content of the course in which the student is enrolled, he/she will satisfactorily demonstrate college and career readiness in the following domains:  Words in Context, Command of Evidence, Expression of Ideas, and Standard English conventions.
  • Mathematics:  Within the content of the course in which the student is enrolled, he/she will satisfactorily demonstrate college and career readiness in the following domains:  Heart of Algebra, Problem Solving and Data Analysis, Passport to Advanced Math, and Additional Topics in Mathematics.
  • Exemptions:   Students will be exempt from the district performance standard if they have one of the following for each standard:

Graduation Performance Standards for ELA and Math

The literacy and math graduation requirements will be met when students satisfy the following standards:

 

Class of 2019 and later:

Meet the SAT benchmarks for the CT Next Generation accountability system in :

·         Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

·         Math

   

OR

Earn an equivalent score  on a district alternative assessment

  • Transfers:  If a student transfers into the Bristol Public Schools after completing at least three years in a high school in another district, he/she may be exempted from Bristol’s performance standards requirement for graduation.
  • Special Needs:  Students with special needs may be exempt from district  performance standards for graduation as described in Board of Education’s graduation policy if so indicated in their Individual Education Plan.

Students in the 9th and 10th grade must take a core course of studies as listed below:

9th

10th

English 1

World History

Algebra 1 or Geometry

Physical Science

English 2

Modern American History

Geometry or Algebra 2

Biology

Opportunities to Extend Your Learning

Internships through the Career Center provide Grade 12 students with a semester-long trial period within a career field. To ensure that a student is ready for a semester-long internship, several short-term experiences in the field of interest are recommended.  The student is not expected to handle responsibilities of a fully skilled or "in-training" employee.

RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE

GRADE 9                        Credits

English I                                1

World History                        1

Algebra I or Geometry                1

World Language*                        1

Physical Science                        1

Elective        ***                        1

Physical Education                        .5

Health                                 .25

GRADE 11                        Credits

English III                        1

Social Studies Elective(s)                1

Algebra II/Math Elective                1

Chemistry or Enviro-Science        1

Language*                        1

Elective        ***                        1

Civics**                                .5

Physical Ed                         .5

GRADE 10                        Credits

English II                                1

Modern American History                1

Geometry or Algebra II                1

World Language*                        1

Biology                                1

Elective        ***                        1

Physical Ed                         .5

GRADE 12                                    Credits

English IV                        1

Social Studies Elective(s)                        1

Math Elective                        1

Science/Engineering Elective        1

Elective        ***                        1

Physical Ed                         .5

Fourth Year of a Language or Elective

*World language courses are taken sequentially. Students electing to take a world language should continue in the language of the previous year. Two to three years of one world language are expected for admission to most colleges.

** Civics is required.  

***Information Processing 1&2 are recommended for all students to improve their 21st century skills.  

COLLEGE INFORMATION

Admission requirements for colleges vary greatly, but general guidelines like those below can be very helpful for students planning their program at Bristol Eastern High School. Be sure to consult with counselors on a regular basis and to read the college, university, and trade school catalogues to be sure that you are taking the number and types of courses that will meet their specific requirements for admission.

Most Selective Colleges

  • English—4 credits
  • Mathematics—4 credits
  • Science—3 credits
  • Social Studies—3 credits
  • World Language—3 to 4 years of the same language
  • Fine Arts—Recommended
  • Extracurricular activities that indicate leadership and initiative
  • Top 10-20% of the class
  • SAT I scores in the 655 to 800 range on each test (verbal/math/writing)
  • ACT minimum score of 29
  • GPA A to B+
  • Computer Competency

Highly Competitive Colleges

  • English—4 credits
  • Mathematics—3 or 4 credits
  • Science—3 credits
  • Social Studies—3 credits
  • World Language—3 years of the same language
  • Fine Arts—Recommended
  • Extracurricular activities that indicate leadership and initiative
  • Top 20-35% of the class
  • SAT I scores in the 620 to 654 range on each test (verbal/math/writing)
  • ACT minimum score of 27 to 28
  • GPA B+ to B
  • Computer Competency

Very Competitive Colleges

  • English—4 credits
  • Mathematics—3 credits
  • Science—2 credits
  • Social Studies—2 credits
  • World Language—3 years of the same language
  • Fine Arts—Recommended
  • Extracurricular activities that indicate leadership and initiative
  • Top 35-50% of the class
  • SAT I scores in the 573 to 619 range on each test (verbal/math/writing)
  • ACT minimum score of 24 to 26
  • GPA B to B-
  • Computer Competency

Competitive Colleges

  • English—4 credits
  • Mathematics—3 credits
  • Science—2 credits
  • Social Studies—2 credits
  • World Language—2 years of the same language
  • Fine Arts—Recommended
  • Extracurricular activities that indicate leadership and initiative
  • Top 50-65% of the class
  • SAT I scores in the 500 to 572 range on each test (verbal/math/writing)
  • ACT minimum score of 21 to 23
  • GPA B- to C+
  • Computer Competency

COLLEGE CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) / UCONN EARLY COLLEGE EXPERIENCE-ECE

Students may receive college credit by passing specific assessment requirements for Advanced Placement courses or from the University of Connecticut. These are separate programs with different requirements that must be met.  There are fees for these courses. These courses are identified in the handbook. These courses are college-level courses that require summer reading and added responsibilities.

COLLEGE CAREER PATHWAYS (CCP)

College Career Pathways is a national program that attempts to better connect high school students with college.  Students who apply to the Tunxis Community College (CCP) program may earn college credits by successfully completing courses in the dual-enrollment program.  College credits earned may be applied to certificate or degree programs at Tunxis Community College, or transferred to other colleges and universities.

HIGH SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP

The program is open to high school juniors and seniors who have an overall “B” average, are recommended by their school counselor, and have appropriate placement scores.  Recommended students will be eligible to take one course per semester free of charge (General Fund tuition and fees).  Students taking on campus classes will be responsible for their transportation to campus and book expenses.  Students taking online classes will be responsible for their book expenses.

Admission to individual classes is dependent upon space availability, budgetary funding and students having met any prerequisite requirements.  Students will be notified by the director of Admissions as to whether they are accepted into the class.  This program is affiliated with Tunxis Community College.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY (PLTW)

Project Lead the Way - a pathway to careers in engineering and technology

In partnership with the University of New Haven, the Engineering & Technology and Science Departments have implemented a nationally recognized pre-engineering program known as Project Lead the Way (PLTW). This pathway to engineering and technology careers provides a flexible four-year sequence of classes that will fit into any student schedule and provide practical opportunities for students to apply and practice what they learn as part of their mathematics classes. The chart below identifies a recommended sequence of PLTW classes along with the concurrent math requirement for the classes highlighted in grey:

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Introduction to Engineering Design

Principles of

Engineering

Digital

Electronics

Civil Engineering & Architecture*

Biotechnical Engineering**

Algebra 1

Geometry

Algebra 2

Although the full sequence of courses is recommended, students may elect individual classes as long as they meet the mathematics requirements for that class. Project Lead the Way prepares students to be innovators and to make meaningful, pioneering contributions to our world.

Project Lead the Way - College Credit Options

Students who successfully complete the end of course exam in each PLTW course may earn 3 college credits from the Tagliatela College of Engineering at the University of New Haven or other university. The college does require a fee for processing the college credit. *College credit for Civil Engineering & Architecture is through Rochester Institute of Technology. **College credit for Biotechnical Engineering is through the University of Texas at Tyler.

The PLTW experience develops motivated, well-rounded students by instilling confidence, stressing the importance of self-discovery, encouraging innovative problem solving and critical thinking, teaching team building, and rewarding creativity. The program is fun and students gain a critical opportunity to put their math skills to work in almost every class.

AWARD OF HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAS

Students who complete all graduation requirements shall receive a diploma at the June commencement.  Individuals who have not satisfied the June graduation requirements may be granted a diploma upon the satisfactory completion of those requirements at a later date, by the school principal, provided that the student has successfully earned appropriate credit in a summer course or summer courses comparable (as determined by the principal) to the subject (s) in which the student was deficient.

CREDITS

A credit is given for successfully completing a year’s work in a subject that meets 90 sessions per year.  One-half credit is given for courses that meet 45 sessions per year and ends after one semester.  While in the process of selecting courses, students and parents are urged to consider those subjects and levels which will challenge individual academic talents.

CATEGORIES

Most courses in the areas of English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science and World Languages are classified by groupings.  The criterion for such placement is determined by a combination of the following factors.

  1. Recommendation by previous teachers and/or departmental criteria.
  2. Grade achieved in previous courses.
  3. Consultation with the student’s counselor.

Accelerated and/or Advanced Placement (AP) courses are open only to students who perform at an exceptional level in a given subject area.  

Students must maintain at least a minimum average of “83” in their current accelerated level course to be placed in an Accelerated/Advanced Placement level offering.  

Students in academic level courses who desire to advance to the Accelerated/Advanced Placement level must maintain a minimum average of “93” in their current academic level course.

GRADE WEIGHTING

The purpose of grade weighting is to arrive at a meaningful class rank and determine eligibility for the National Honor Society.   All courses are weighted according to the following four categories:

The category for each subject is included with course descriptions of all courses found in the Program of Studies.

 

Numeric

Grade

Category

AP

Category 1

Accelerated

Category 2

Academic/

College prep

Category 3

Instructional Support

97-100

93-96

90-92

87-89

83-86

80-82

77-79

73-76

70-72

67-69

65-66

less than 65

5.4

5.1

4.7

4.2

3.8

3.4

2.9

2.5

2.1

1.7

1.2

0

4.8

4.5

4.2

3.7

3.4

3.0

2.6

2.25

1.9

1.5

1.1

0

4.3

4.0

3.7

3.3

3.0

2.7

2.3

2.0

1.7

1.3

1.0

0

4.0

3.7

3.3

3.0

2.7

2.3

2.0

1.7

1.3

1.0

.5

0

EXCLUDING AN ELECTIVE COURSE FROM GPA AND CLASS RANK

Requests to exclude grade from GPA and Class Rank:

*Exclusive to students with a GPA higher than 4.3.

**No limit to the number of times a student may request to exclude a grade.

                        

ADVANCED PLACEMENT/UCONN EARLY EXPERIENCE COLLEGE COURSES

All students are encouraged to strive to take these collegiate level courses, but students and their parents must understand and accept the added responsibilities that accompany the opportunity to earn college credits.  Students taking these courses must:

Course Withdrawal Conditions:

Students taking an AP/UCONN course will be required to pay the AP testing fee of approximately $85 by the first Monday in June prior to the start of the course unless one of the following situations exists:

Students who have not paid the AP fee or met any of these options will be withdrawn from these classes.

Designated high school courses are offered in conjunction with the University of Connecticut for college and high school credit.  Acceptance into the college credit program is determined by the University of Connecticut guidelines.  Accelerated/AP criteria also must be met for admission into these programs for high school credit.  Students will be charged per course credit by UCONN.

INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM

An Independent Study program is available after the freshman year.  The purpose is to extend and enrich the curriculum by permitting able and interested students to pursue in depth a topic or field of study not offered in the school’s curriculum.  Enrollment is open to any student with a history of success (grade B or better) in a related field.  Details are available from your school counselor.

PREREQUISITE COURSES

Prerequisite courses are those courses that must be passed before electing a sequential course.  There may be a minimum grade requirement, or teacher/department head approval.  The requirements will be indicated in the course description.

SCHOOL COUNSELING SERVICES

The school counseling  department is the place where students go to talk about themselves, their future educational/career goals, or personal concerns.  With counselor assistance, students may analyze test results, discuss their strengths and weaknesses and choose courses that best fit their needs, abilities, interests and future plans.

Students are encouraged to initiate meetings with their counselors as the need arises.  All students are urged to pre-schedule appointments with the counselor through the secretary for an appropriate time (i.e., study hall or before or after school).  The secretary is available from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Students are assigned to teams in the 9th grade at both high schools and a counselor is assigned to that team.  In most cases, the counselor remains with the student throughout the four years of high school.  Counselors encourage a cooperative approach—student, parent, teacher, counselor working together to help assure optimum student success and achievement during the high school years.

SCHOOL COUNSELING LIBRARY MATERIALS – In addition to the extensive library of higher education catalogues, the school counseling library contains supplementary aids to facilitate vocational and higher education planning.  These include files of vocational briefs, brochures, books on many institutions, career reference books, college planning guides, and computer systems for interest surveys, aptitude tests, or college and vocational searches.

CAREER COUNSELING – Career Counseling is offered through the School Counseling Department.  It is designed to help students investigate career paths, learn about further educational opportunities, and make final decisions and plans for their future.  All students have the following activities available to them in making these critical decisions:

COMPUTERIZED SCHOOL COUNSELING SERVICES – Naviance is an online resource that will be used to assist students with career development and college planning options by connecting students to information occupations, the armed services, two and four year colleges and financial aid.

SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION – Federal, state and local financial information is distributed annually to seniors.  Additionally, reference material on merit or need based aid is available in the school counseling office.

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS TESTING – There are two national college admissions testing programs:

  1. The College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) which sponsors the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I) and subject area tests (SAT II) or
  2. The American College Testing (ACT) program.  The CEEB program is more prevalent in this area of the country.  The Bristol high schools are testing sites for the CEEB.  Students should check college catalogues to see which program is preferred by the college in which they are interested.

REPORT CARDS

All report cards and progress reports are mailed home each marking period.

HOMEBOUND INSTRUCTION

Any pupil is eligible for instruction at home or in the hospital if an absence due to illness is to extend ten (10) consecutive school days, or when it is known in advance that the absence will exceed that time.  To obtain this service, the student’s parents should call the counselor.  A form obtained from the counselor, must be completed and signed by a physician.  The Department of Special Education assigns tutors and initiates a program when

the form is returned to the counselor and the student qualified.

SUMMER SCHOOL AND MAKEUP

The Bristol Summer School is an excellent method for making up lost credit or for taking courses for enrichment.  Admission to a remedial summer school course for credit will be permitted to students previously enrolled in the same course, but who (1) have not received credit for that course or (2) have passed with a grade of 65 or higher either semester 1 or semester 2 of the full year course during the school year.  If a student fails one semester of the full year course in summer school, the student must take the full year course again during the school year or the full course again in summer school.

To meet proficiency standards in the summer school course and to therefore receive credit for the course, students shall:

  1. Meet the attendance policy as specified in the summer school rules and regulations.
  2. Receive a passing grade of 65 or higher for the summer school class.

The grade for credit awarded through the summer school program consists of 20% assessment and 80% coursework.  When a student participates in the summer school course for either semester 1 or semester 2 of a full year course and passes the semester half of the course in summer school, the student shall receive ½ credit for the summer school course and ½ credit for the semester passed during the school year.  The ½ credit awarded for the summer school course and the ½ credit awarded for the semester passed during the school year is only applicable to the remedial summer school courses. The summer school grade is not averaged with the final course grade for the full year course.

To receive credit for a failed required course, if the summer school course is taken in other area summer schools, the student must receive a grade of 65 or higher on the mid-year and final assessments administered during the school year for the Bristol course.

BRISTOL TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAMS

The Bristol Technical Education Center offers a variety of training programs for high school students in Bristol.  The programs and entry requirements are described in the Career and Vocational Education section of the booklet.

SCHOOL CHOICE OPTIONS

Parents and students are encouraged to explore other educational opportunities that are offered in the school district locally and regionally.  These options include magnet, charter, lighthouse and vocational-technical schools; Open Choice and inter-district programs; and vocational agriculture centers.  Contact the School Counseling Department t for further information on these School Choice options.

ONLINE COURSEWORK

Courses available online may be accepted for high school credit.  Students interested in pursuing this option should consult with their school counselor and the administrator overseeing independent studies for information and approval status before enrolling in these courses.

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE

Change of schedule will not be considered after the last day of school.  Students wishing to change a course after schedules are finalized must file a “Student Request for Schedule Change” form with their counselor.  No change in schedule will be made to allow for early release from school.

Students who fail a course or fail to meet sequential requirements to continue in the course or area, and who do not plan to attend summer school or follow another approved summer program MUST REQUEST CHANGES IN ELECTIVES BEFORE THE ABOVE DEADLINE.   Otherwise, they will be assigned to alternate courses if indicated on the election card or at the discretion of the counselor.

COURSE WITHDRAWAL/DROP

Any student who drops or withdraws from a class during the school year will be given a “WP” if he/she has at least a “65” at the time of withdrawal and a “WF” if the grade is below a “65” at the time of withdrawal.  If a student drops a course before the midpoint of the first marking period he/she will receive a “W” regardless of his/her average.

SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES

The Special Services Department provides a full range of support and related services to students requiring special education assistance during the school day.  The Planning and Placement Team (PPT) of which the student’s parent is a member, determines whether a student is eligible to receive special education and related services.  At the PPT meeting an Individual Education Program (IEP) will be developed if the student is eligible to address the individual educational needs of the student. A description of programs is available upon request through the Special Services Department.  Please feel free to contact the Special Services Department at (860) 584-7050.

ADVANCEMENT VIA INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATION (AVID)

AVID Philosophy

AVID is a college readiness system designed to increase school wide performance and open access to the most rigorous curricula, such as accelerated and advanced placement courses, to more students.

AVID’s mission is to close the achievement gap by preparing all students for college readiness and success in a global society.  AVID aims to improve the performance of all students, especially those who have not traditionally succeeded in completing college entrance requirements: students who are underrepresented in four-year colleges and universities, students in the academic middle, and students who are the first in their family to go to college.

The AVID Elective

AVID elective is a full year academic course that prepares students for the rigors of college and provides them with academic skills, content knowledge, and social adaptability needed for college success. Students enrolled in AVID elective learn organizational and study skills, incorporate critical thinking strategies and ask probing questions, work collaboratively with peers and college tutors for academic support, and participate in enrichment and motivational activities that foster a college-going culture.  AVID students often become academically successful leaders and role models for other students.  AVID-trained teachers use research based methods of effective instruction including writing, inquiry, collaboration, and reading strategies (WICR).

AVID elective is a voluntary, selective program.  Students must meet specific criteria for acceptance into the program.  Recruitment is a collaborative process by the AVID site team and includes a review of student records, teacher and student input, socio-economic and demographic considerations, parental support, and willingness by potential students to enroll in rigorous courses, follow the AVID curriculum, and commit to at least one year in AVID elective.  Students who remain in the program at least three years are most likely to demonstrate academic improvement and will be most likely to meet the goal of four-year college enrollment if the student remains in the AVID program in his or her senior year of high school.  

Grades: 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Category:  2

Pre-Requisite:  Students must meet specific criteria for acceptance into the program.

School(s)

Course

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

3

9

10

11

12

BC-BE

AVID Elective 1

1

X

X

BC-BE

AVID Elective 2

1

X

X

BE-BC

AVID Elective 3

1

X

X

BE-BC

AVID Elective 4

1

X

X

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

2018 - 2019

Students will select courses from the following list, keeping in mind the material sequence, prerequisites, plus their abilities and interests.  Students should develop with the counselor an individual program that will best serve their future plans.  Course descriptions and explanations follow this list.  All courses are weighted according to three categories.  The category is listed in this column next to each subject.

ART

Course

Course

Number

Credits  

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

AP Studio Art

061411

1

X

X

X

Design 1

061371

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Design 2

061831

.5

X

X

X

Draw & Paint 1

061012

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Draw & Paint 2

061022

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Draw & Paint 3

061032

.5

X

X

X

X

Draw & Paint 4

061042

.5

X

X

X

X

Fiber

061392

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Photography As Art  

061402

.5

X

X

X

Portfolio

061352

.5

X

X

X

Pottery 1

061112

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Pottery 2

061122

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Printmaking 1

061312

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Printmaking 2

061322

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Sculpture 1

061212

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Sculpture 2

061222

.5

X

X

X

X

X

BUSINESS & FINANCE

Course

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

Accounting 1

091101

1

X

X

X

X

Accounting 2

091111

1

X

X

X

Introduction to Marketing

091512

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

.5

X

x

X

X

X

Business Management

091412

.5

X

X

X

X

Information Processing

091422

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Information Processing 2

091431

.5

X

X

X

X

X

*Learn to Lead

140022

.25

X

X

X

X

X

*Personal Career Planning

140012

.25

X

X

X

X

X

Personal Finance & Investment

091462

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Communication Skills for the 21st Century 1

091251

.5

X

X

X

X

Communication Skills for the 21st Century 2

091261

.5

X

X

X

X

Computer Program/Video Game

091321

.5

X

X

X

X

Small Business Ownership

091472

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Web Site Design

091482

.5

X

X

X

X

*Not offered at BCHS

ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

Course

Course

Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

Architectural Concepts

081822

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Architectural Design

081832

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Automation & Robotics

081442

.5

X

X

X

X

X

CAD & Solid Modeling

081331

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Civil Engineering and Architecture - PLTW

081821

1

X

X

X

X

Communication Technology

081902

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Construction Technology

081082

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Construction Applications

081922

.5

X

X

X

X

Digital Electronics - PLTW

081811

1

X

X

X

X

Intro to Computer Assisted Design

081321

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Energy & Power Technologies

081942

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Introduction To Engineering Design - PLTW

081551

1

X

X

X

X

X

Manufacturing Design

    081912

.5

X

X

X

X

Principles of Engineering - PLTW

081801

1

X

X

X

X

X

TV Production

081642

.5

X

X

X

X

Tools and Materials  

081862

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Transportation Technology

081932

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Video Production Techniques

081632

.5

X

X

X

X

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

Course

Course

Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

Introduction to Foods & Nutrition

101042

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Advanced Foods & Nutrition

101052

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Applied Food Science

101062

.5

X

X

X

Child, Family and Community

102202

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Early Childhood Education 1

102211

.5

X

X

X

Early Childhood Education 2

102221

.5

X

X

X

Individual & Family Development/UCONN

101215

1

X

X

X

ENGLISH

Course

Course

Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

3

AP

9

10

11

12

Contemporary Literature

011122

.5

X

X

X

Creative Writing

011152

.5

X

X

X

X

Drama 1

011182

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Drama 2

011192

.5

X

X

X

X

X

ELL English

011440

1

X

X

X

X

X

English 1 Academic

011012

1

X

X

English 2 Academic

011022

1

X

X

English 1 Accelerated

011011

1

X

X

English 2 Accelerated

011021

1

X

X

English 3 Academic

011052

1

X

X

English 3 Accelerated

011051

1

X

X

English 4 Academic                    

011042

1

X

X

English 4 Accelerated

011041

1

X

X

English Language AP

011055

1

X

X

X

English Literature AP/UCONN

011454

1

X

X

X

Journalism

011242

.5

X

X

X

X

*Skills for Success – English

011138

.5

X

X

Media Literacy

011082

.5

X

X

X

X

Mythology

011252

.5

X

X

X

X

SAT Literacy Prep

015122

.25

X

X

X

X

*Not offered at BCHS

MATHEMATICS

Course

Course Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

3

AP

9

10

11

12

Advanced Mathematical Decision Making

021172

1

X

X

Algebra 1 Academic

021012

1

X

X

Algebra 1 Accelerated

021011

1

X

X

Algebra 2 Academic

021032

1

X

X

X

X

Algebra 2 Accelerated

021031

1

X

X

X

Calculus Accelerated

021051

1

X

X

Calculus  AB/AP/UCONN

021165

1 - 1.5

X

X

Calculus  BC/AP/UCONN

021175

.5 - 1

X

X

Geometry Academic

021022

1

X

X

Geometry Accelerated

021021

1

X

X

X

Math Foundations  1 (Skinny)

021017

.25-.5

X

X

Math Foundations 2  (Skinny)

021018

.25-.5

x

X

Math Foundations 3  (Skinny)

021043

.25-.5

x

X

Algebra 1 Foundations (Double Block)

021012E

1

x

x

Algebra 2 Foundations (Double Block)

021112E

1

x

x

Pre-Calculus Academic

021042

1

X

X

X

Pre-Calculus Accelerated

021041

1

X

X

X

Statistics Academic

021272

1

X

X

X

Statistic AP

021075

1

X

X

X

SAT Mathematics Prep

015222

.25

X

X

X

X

X

MUSIC

Course

Course Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

American Music Studies

071432

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Band

071302

1

X

X

X

X

X

Chorus I

071200

1

X

X

Concert Choir

071202

1

X

X

X

X

Guitar

071422

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Music History/Classical

071072

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Music Theory AP

071031

1

X

X

X

X

Music Theory 1

071012

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Music Theory 2

071022

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Piano/Keyboard

071412

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Music Technology

071442

.5

X

X

X

X

X

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Course

Course Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

Health

151202

.25

X

X

Phys Ed 9

151002

.5

X

X

Phys Ed 10/11/12

151032

.5

X

X

X

X

SCIENCE

Course

Course Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

3

AP

9

10

11

12

Anat. & Physiology Academic

031132

1

X

X

X

Biology Academic

031042

1

X

X

Biology Accelerated

031041

1

X

X

X

Biology AP

031045

1

X

X

X

Biotechnical Engineering - PLTW

039901

1

X

X

X

Chemistry Academic

031072

1

X

X

X

Chemistry Accelerated

031071

1

X

X

X

*Chemistry AP

031055

1

X

X

X

X

Chemistry ECE

031076

2

X

X

X

X

Computer Science AP

032225

1

X

X

X

X

ELL Science

031453

1

X

Environmental Science Academic

031192

1

X

X

X

Environmental Science AP

031195

1

X

X

X

Physical Science Academic

031212

1

X

X

Physical Science Accelerated

031211

1

X

X

Physics Academic

031102

1

X

X

X

Physics/Uconn

031365

1

X

X

X

Pysics C Elec. and Mag AP/UCONN

031155

Physics C Mechanics

031135

2

X

X

*Not offered at BCHS

SOCIAL STUDIES

Course

Course Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

3

AP

9

10

11

12

Civics    

041042

.5

X

X

X

X

Economics  

041122

.5

X

X

X

X

ELL Social Studies

041440

1

X

Geog. & Cult. of Latin America & Africa  

041182

.5

X

X

X

X

Geog. & Cult. of Asia & the Middle East  

041192

.5

X

X

X

X

Global Issues  

041152

.5

X

X

X

X

Law & Justice  

041172

.5

X

X

X

X

Modern Am. History  Accelerated

041061

1

X

X

Modern Am. History  Academic

041062

1

X

X

Contemporary Psychology  

041252

.5

X

X

X

X

Developmental Psychology  

041262

.5

X

X

X

X

Psychology AP

041205

1

X

X

X

X

Sociology

041242

.5

X

X

X

X

U.S. History  AP

041115

1

X

X

X

X

U.S. Gov. & Politics AP

041125

1

X

X

X

X

Microeconomics AP

041165

1

X

X

X

X

World History Accelerated

041011

1

X

X

World History Academic

041012

1

X

X

Human Geography AP

041155

1

X

X

X

X

X

World History AP

041135

1

X

X

X

X

WORLD LANGUAGES

Course

Course Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

French 1 Academic

051012

1

X

X

X

X

X

French 1 Accelerated

051011

1

X

X

X

X

X

French 2 Academic

051022

1

X

X

X

X

French 2 Accelerated

051021

1

X

X

X

X

French 3 Academic

051032

1

X

X

X

French 3 Accelerated

051031

1

X

X

X

French 4 Academic

051042

1

X

X

French 4 Accelerated

051041

1

X

X

Italian 1 Academic

051112

1

X

X

X

X

X

Italian 1 Accelerated

051111

1

X

X

X

X

X

Italian 2 Academic

051122

1

X

X

X

X

Italian 2 Accelerated

051121

1

X

X

X

X

Italian 3 Academic

051132

1

X

X

X

Italian 3 Accelerated

051131

1

X

X

X

Italian 4 Academic

051142

1

X

X

Italian 4 Accelerated

051141

1

X

X

Latin 1 Accelerated

051511

1

X

X

X

X

X

Latin 2 Accelerated

051521

1

X

X

X

X

Latin 3 Accelerated

051551

1

X

X

X

Latin 4 Accelerated

051561

1

X

X

Spanish 1 Academic

051212

1

X

X

X

X

X

Spanish 1 Accelerated

051211

1

X

X

X

X

X

Spanish 2 Academic

051222

1

X

X

X

X

Spanish 2 Accelerated

051221

1

X

X

X

X

Spanish 3 Academic

051232

1

X

X

X

Spanish 3 Accelerated

051231

1

X

X

X

Spanish 4 Academic

051242

1

X

X

Spanish 4 Accelerated

051241

1

X

X

Spanish 5 AP

051255

1

X

X

X

X

Multicultural Expressions Academic

052012

.5

X

X

X

X

X

Multicultural Expressions Accelerated

052011

.5

X

X

X

X

X

AP CAPSTONE

Course

Course Number

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

Seminar AP

110005

1

x

X

X

Research AP

110015

1

X

X

X

ADDITIONAL AP ELECTIVES

Computer Science AP

032225

1

X

X

X

X

CAREER RESOURCE CENTER

         

Course

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

Bristol Hospital Internship

1

X

Career Internship Program

1

X

Service Learning

1

X

Work Experience

1

X

BRISTOL TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER

         

Course

Credits

Category

Grade Level

1

2

AP

9

10

11

12

Air Conditioning/Refrigeration/Heating

1

X

Auto Mechanics

1

X

Machine Tool/Computer Numerical Control

1

X

Digital Electronics

1

X

Welding

1

X

Food Trade/Bakery        

1

X

Includes 1 credit math and English, 5 credits shop/theory, 1 credit U.S. History (American Humanities) for students who have not completed this course previously.

ART

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

Education in visual art is essential for all students.  As one of the last disciplines where students use their hearts, hands, and minds together, art education bridges the gap between thought and production.  Art provides fun experiences that build self-esteem, and requires higher order thinking skills while stimulating the creative process.

Art is a universal language, through which students express their ideas, emotions, and opinions visually.  While learning about other cultures through art, students become more open and aware of human experiences and universal themes.  This enables students to function as responsible citizens in a visually stimulating 21st century, and fosters a life-long love of art.

Art students who learn to think critically and make aesthetic judgments while training their eyes to see beauty begin to understand that art is, in every way, a part of their everyday lives.

What career options might I have with a background in the Arts?

Advertising Design

Graphics Designer

Layout Artist

Production Artist

Broadcast Design/Motion Graphics

3D Animator

AV Production Specialist

Creative Director

Special Effects Designer

Creative Services Coordinator

Business of Art & Design

Gallery Owner/Director

Marketing Analyst

Media Supervisor

Art Appraiser

Consumer Insights Manager

Computer Animation

3D Character Sculptor

3D Lighting Director

Live-Action Animator

Production Rendering

Technical Director

Concept Artist

Dynamics Scripter

Digital Film

Assistant Editor

Assistant Producer

Boom Operator

Dialogue Editor

Film Editor

Screenwriter

Production Coordinator

Photography & Digital Imaging

Aerial Videographer

Broadcast Photojournalist

Continuity Photographer/TV

Darkroom Technician

Digital Imaging Technician

Director of Photography/Film

Portrait Photographer Interior Lighting Designer

Trade Show Designer

Game Art & Design

2D Pixel Artist/Games

3D Artist/Mobile Games

Cinematic Animator

Game Systems Designer

Morphing Artist

Graphic & Interactive

Communication

Acrobat Specialist

Art Book Designer

Billboards and Signage Artist

Digital Production Artist

Flash Developer

Corporate Marketing Designer

Illustration

Advertising Comp/Layout Artist

Costume Designer

Creative/Fashion Director

Editorial Cartoonist

Biomedical Illustrator

PhotoShop Artist

Set Designer/TV/Film

Marketing Artist

Interior Design

3D Rendering Specialist

Design & Merchandising

Exhibition Designer

Fabric Designer

Fine Arts (painting, printmaking,

sculpture, ceramics)

Exhibiting/ Studio Artist

Printmaker

Sculptor/Muralist

Art Courses

ART

The art program consists of visually oriented activities, which incorporate craftsmanship and beauty in personal expression.  Art courses provide students with opportunities to become skilled in expressing ideas visually, and to gain understanding of the tradition of image making, and of the power of visual language.  In applying principles involving line, shape, form, color, value and texture, new awareness and expression evolves.  Students learn that personality, feelings and emotions are as important as knowledge and ideas to produce effective artwork.

Click the link below to go to the Bristol Public School Visual Art Google Site for grades K-12. Click on the tab for your school to view student work for each course. Click on the tab labeled, A little about the staff:,to meet the teachers. https://sites.google.com/a/bristolk12.org/bristol-public-schools-elementary-art

DRAWING AND PAINTING 1  

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Illusions of Depth

Prerequisite:  None

Drawing will be studied as an important means of expression.  Students will experience various kinds of drawing materials and techniques, including pencil, pen and ink, and pastel, in completing assignments in drawing from life and imagination.  Various aspects of line and composition will be explored.  Work outside of the class will be necessary.

DRAWING AND PAINTING 2        

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Color and Proportion

Prerequisite:  Drawing & Painting 1

Students will have experience with various kinds of paint, surface texture and color media.    References to the history of painting will be made as they apply to skills and techniques of painting, composition, proportion and color harmony.  Students will create a self-portrait.  Homework drawings will be assigned and critiqued.  Students will be expected to properly present completed work.

DRAWING AND PAINTING 3        

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Observation/Imagination       

Prerequisite:  Drawing & Painting 2

Emphasis will be on lengthier studies of subject matter (landscape, still-life and figure).  Mastering drawing and painting tools will be further developed.  Students will express ideas with clarity and feeling utilizing observation and incorporating imagination.

DRAWING AND PAINTING 4        

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Interpreting Our World       

Prerequisite:  Drawing & Painting 3

Emphasis will be on individualized student goals.  The primary goal will be the development of the student’s own imagery and personal expression through selected media.  Continued study will be made of significant painters in art history.

PRINTMAKING 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Reproduced Images       

Prerequisite:  None

Emphasis will be made on relief (raised), intaglio (incised) and planographic (flat surface printing) methods of printmaking.  In-depth study will be made of the relief and intaglio methods of printmaking.  These methods could include linoleum cut, collagraph, embossing, drypoint, and monoprints.  Students will complete assignments geared to improving drawing and design skills, and increasing the student’s ability to solve problems with originality.  Selected work will be properly presented.

PRINTMAKING 2

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Excessive Images       

Prerequisite:  Printmaking 1

In-depth study will be made to the relief, intaglio and planographic methods of printmaking.  These methods could include linoleum cut reduction, woodcut, collagraph, embossing, drypoint, masking and monoprints.  Students will complete drawing and designing assignments in preparation for each print, with an emphasis on creative problem solving.  Selected work will be properly presented.

PORTFOLIO COURSE

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  1 credit in visual arts and/or permission of art instructor

This course is expressly for students who wish to prepare a portfolio in visual art.  Students will complete a portfolio and applications necessary to attend schools of higher learning.  Students will create assigned and self-motivated artwork, and prepare artwork for presentation.  Cameras will be provided; students will supply their own digital storage.  

AP STUDIO ART        

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Prerequisites-2 credits in visual art and/or permission of art instructor

This course is for highly motivated art students who wish to prepare a portfolio in visual art, have completed two full credits in visual art, and/or have the recommendation of the art instructor.  Students will complete two portfolios.  The first portfolio will be a body of artwork that demonstrates the student’s range of artistic experiences.  The second portfolio will be a body of artwork that demonstrates artistic growth based on a personal theme.  Students will prepare work for presentation.  Cameras will be provided; students will supply their own digital storage.  In addition to serving as an admission requirement for those students who wish to attend art school, the portfolio that results from the full year AP Studio Art course will be submitted to the College Board for a performance based assessment.  Students may obtain college credit for this work.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

DESIGN 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Focus: Elements of Art and Principles of Design       

Prerequisite:  None

Students will be confronted with problems in selection and arrangement of design elements. Two and three-dimensional design will be studied as the interpretive organization of form, color, and space, and as the production of visual images to inform, describe and motivate. A variety of materials and techniques will be used to create functional and decorative objects. Assignments could include: creating a package or container; illustrating an idea; designing a poster, advertising layout, logo, business card or fabric design. Digital media may also be explored. Assignments will have an emphasis on the elements of art and principles of design.

DESIGN 2

Grades:  11-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Focus: Digital Information Design       

Prerequisite:  Design I

Students will be presented with design challenges that utilize typography, images, and illustrations to communicate visually and inform an audience through print publications. Projects explore creative problem solving that requires students to research their market, identify trends, consider their target market and develop their client's’ visual identity. They will also have an opportunity to critique professional graphics as well as those created by their peers to analyze the effectiveness of design solutions. Projects will focus on the design process to include client research, planning through thumbnails, and the use of graphic programs such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator to finalize their designs.

SCULPTURE 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Three-Dimensional Art       

Prerequisite:  None

Principles and concepts of drawing will be extended into the third dimension (3-D).  Additive methods (modeling), subtractive methods (carving and chiseling), and constructive methods (assemblage, found materials, soft sculpture), will be introduced.

SCULPTURE 2

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Excessive 3-D       

Prerequisite:  Sculpture 1

In-depth study will be made of some of the sculptural methods introduced in Sculpture 1.  Modeled clay work will be cast in plaster.  Materials may include clay, wood, plaster, cloth, stone, and other materials, which can be carved, modeled or cast.  Significant sculptors in art history will be critiqued.

POTTERY 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Hand-building Methods       

Prerequisite:  none

Students will learn basic techniques in hand building clay forms and vessels (pinch, slab, and coil).  Students will deal with fundamental techniques of surface decoration and glaze application, drying and firing procedures, and display of finished work.

POTTERY 2

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Wheel Thrown       

Prerequisite:  Pottery 1

Students will develop skill in producing wheel-thrown forms and vessels and will be introduced to various methods to create handles and covers.  Students will combine two or more methods to create functional clay forms and vessels.  Emphasis will be on care and use of equipment.  Extended procedures in glaze decoration will be learned.

FIBER

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Textural Design       

Prerequisite:  None

Students will use fibers as an artistic medium to create decorative and functional objects.  Areas of study could include: Batik, weaving, basketry, felting, paper casting, and marbled, stenciled and painted textiles.  Emphasis will be placed on effective use of the principles of design. Students will demonstrate the ability to see projects through from conception to completion.  Assignments may require work outside of class.

PHOTOGRAPHY AS ART

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Focus: Film/Digital

Prerequisite:  See description below

Traditional photography (35mm camera), digital photography and use of the Adobe Photoshop program will be explored. Photography will be used as an expressive art medium. Emphasis will be on picture-taking as a new way of seeing  and understanding the environment.

Experimental darkroom processes and innovative photographic techniques will be encouraged. All picture-taking will be done outside of class time. Students will be responsible for purchasing their film and paper. Students are encouraged to bring their own device (BYOD).

Additional studio fees apply.

Business & Finance

BUSINESS & FINANCE PHILOSOPHY

The Business Department curriculum enables students to acquire and strengthen literacy, numeracy, decision-making and computer skills through a series of three coordinated course pathways:  Accounting, Computer Information Systems and Business Management.  Students will actively use technology as a tool to gather, analyze and communicate information, solve problems and make responsible, ethical decisions. Our focus will be to assist and encourage each student to use education to develop leadership, interpersonal and technological skills necessary for post-secondary, professional and personal success in a competitive global marketplace. State mandated graduation requirements necessitate that students take at least one credit in business and finance, family consumer sciences, engineering and technology education, or fine arts in order to graduate

What career options might I have with a background in Business and Finance?

Business Analysis

Business Consultant

Computer Systems Analyst

E-Commerce Analyst

General Manager

Market Research Analyst

Product Manger

Operations Manager

Business Management

Chief Executive

Entrepreneur

Financial Manager

Hospital Manager

Human Resource Manager

Receptionist

Stock Broker

Sports & Entertainment Manager

Public Relations Specialist

Financial Management

Auditor

Accountant

Administrative Assistants

Bookkeeper

Actuaries

Loan Officer

Financial Analyst

Insurance Underwriter

Tax Technicians

Marketing & Communications

Advertising Manager

Assistant Store Manager

Department Manager

Sales Representative

Marketing Manager

Market Researcher

International Marketing Manager

Retail  and Wholesale Buyer

Information Support

Electronic Publication Specialist

Database Analyst

Database Developer

Help Desk Technician

Technical Support Engineer

Systems Integrator

Multimedia Developer

Web Designer

Stenographer

Human Resources

Compensation Manager

Corporate Trainer

Conciliator/Mediator

Human Resource Manager

Industrial Relations Manager

Occupational Analyst

Organizational Psychologist

OSHA Compliance Officer

Personnel Recruiters

Business & Finance Courses

COLLEGE CAREER PATHWAY PROGRAM

Accounting/Computer Information Systems

Students have the opportunity to earn college credit for the Accounting and Computer Information Systems Pathways (Algebra 2, Chemistry, Information Processing 1 & 2, Accounting 1 & 2 and Communication Skills for the 21st Century 1 & 2).  Please see your business teacher or school counselor for more information.

ACCOUNTING 1

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category:1

Prerequisite:  Algebra 1

This course is highly recommended for all students who wish to pursue a degree in any area of business in college.  Students receive an introduction to basic accounting concepts and principles, with an emphasis on their practical application - recording, classifying, and summarizing financial information that flows within a business enterprise.  The accounting cycle is examined within the areas of sales, purchases, cash, receivables, and payroll.

Students may earn three college credits through the Tunxis Community College's College Career Pathways (CCP) program.

*This course description is pending approval from the Board of Education.

ACCOUNTING 2

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  Accounting 1 with “75” average or higher  

Students in this class may get a head start on their college classmates while still in high school. Accounting 2 reinforces the concepts and procedures learned in Accounting 1 and takes a more in-depth look at advanced theory and practice.  Topics include the financial statement preparation process for balance sheets; income statements; accounting for cash; receivables; inventories; plant and intangible assets, liabilities and stockholders’ equity.

Students may earn three college credits through the Tunxis Community College's College Career Pathways (CCP) program.

*This course description is pending approval from the Board of Education.

INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of marketing.   An on-line simulation will be used to examine the  four  “P’s” of marketing:  product development, price structure, place (distribution channels), and promotion through advertising.

*SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING (New for 2020)

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Introduction to Marketing

This course is designed to study marketing principles and concepts in the sports and entertainment industry.  In this second phase of the marketing program, instructional topics will include an orientation to the sports and entertainment industry, economics, event execution, career opportunities, decision making, event marketing, advertising and promotion, and legal aspects/contracts.  Students will use technology to complete class assignments, simulations, and projects.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Are you a people person?  A leader?  Can you work with others to solve problems and get things done?  Then business management may be for you.  Managers are needed in a wide cross-section of businesses, from large industrial companies, government and non-profit organizations to small service-oriented franchises and the self-employed.  You will learn how to plan, organize, lead, coordinate and control all or part of a business operation:  human resources, production, strategic planning, marketing, finance, and information technology (MIS).  Communication, presentation and computer skills will be emphasized.

All students are strongly encouraged to take Information Processing.

INFORMATION PROCESSING 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Computer literacy and competence is an essential skill set in today's world. This course gives students a strong foundation in technology skills that are crucial to all students in pursuit of academic and career success. Students will learn how to use computer technology to access and organize information, and how to effectively use the Microsoft Office Suite programs such as Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Students will also learn how to use the Microsoft Windows operating system to help them in their work, as well as basic computer graphics, selected utilities and online collaborative applications such as Google Docs.  It is highly recommended all students take this course.

*This course description is pending approval from the Board of Education.

INFORMATION PROCESSING 2

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  Information Processing 1 with a grade of 75 or better, or teacher’s permission

The ability to use Microsoft Office is a vital skill in today’s world for both college and careers. Through this course, students will build upon the foundational skills developed in Information Processing 1. Students will learn advanced features in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Microsoft Word topics include: columns, templates, wizards, merging, advanced tables and charts. Microsoft Excel topics will include: creating spreadsheets, analyzing worksheet data, goal seeking, and what/if analysis. Microsoft PowerPoint topics will include advanced graphics and media techniques, tables and charts, and creating professional presentations by adding audio, video, and sound to slideshows.

COMPUTER PROGRAMING & VIDEO GAME DESIGN

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Do you like to play video games? Do you have ideas for an awesome video game? Then start developing your skills so you can unleash your creative genius on the video game universe. In this fast paced course students will learn the basics of video game programming and will start making video games that you and your friends can play on any PC. Course work will involve work in Javascript and computer graphics. Strong computer skills are a must. Students who are not already “very proficient” in the use of computers should consider taking Information Processing 1 first.

LEARN to LEAD

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .25

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Learn to Lead provides students with a better understanding of their own leadership style as well as the style of others in order to better prepare them for life post-secondary education.  These skills will allow students to be more successful in the workplace as they will be better prepared to work with a diverse work population.

PERSONAL CAREER PLANNING

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .25

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Choosing the right career is one of the most important decisions students will make.  This course provides an opportunity for students to investigate their own interests and abilities as they prepare for the world of work in our dynamic global economy.  These classroom experiences will allow students to make decisions to help them achieve their career and personal goals.

PERSONAL FINANCE AND INVESTMENT

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Paper or plastic?  Cash or credit?  You’re the BOSS!  Learn to take charge of your personal finances instead of letting your money control you.  Students will learn to set goals, perform mathematical calculations, and make responsible decisions regarding money management and investment strategies to achieve financial independence.  Topics will include budgeting, banking, consumer spending, credit and installment loans, payroll and taxes, purchasing/leasing cars, real estate ownership, insurance, investing in stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and portfolio management.

SMALL BUSINESS OWNERSHIP

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Do you dream about owning and running a small business?  Will your business become the next new latte or iPod and make you a millionaire?  Experience the excitement of starting a small business.  Learn how ownership has been the key to success for some of the world’s wealthiest people.  You will design a business plan, market your product, learn operational techniques, maintain financial records, understand risk management, develop investment strategies, and make decisions based on ethical and legal practices.

WEBSITE DESIGN

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

If you enjoy spending hours surfing the Internet, then why not find out how the web sites you click on are designed in this advanced computer course.  Create and publish your own web site using special web site design software, web page and text editors, and graphic arts software.  Understand and apply graphics, design, layout and navigation techniques.  Evaluate the layout and design of selected sites on the Internet.  Explore career opportunities as a web site designer or web master for a large corporation.  Previous experience with HTML and/or web site development software is advantageous, but not required.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR THE 21st CENTURY   1

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  None

Do you have something to say?  What does it take for you to be heard?  Is anyone listening?  They will when you learn to control the situation and capture your audience through effective communication.  Understanding the power you have in your voice is an important key to success, whether it’s preparing for a college interview, landing that first job, or achieving top-level status in today’s high-profile professions.

This course introduces you to the basic principles of interpersonal communication by applying observation, listening, verbal, and non-verbal techniques that will conquer your nerves and enable you to communicate with confidence in a clear, concise manner.  Workshops will focus on improving research, reading, writing, and composition skills vital to preparing and delivering powerful oral presentations.  Topics will include how to persuade others, win over an audience, avoid misunderstandings, resolve conflicts, and express your opinions in a positive way to achieve desired results.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR THE 21st CENTURY   2

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Prerequisite: Communication Skills for the 21st Century 1

What does it take for you to push yourself outside your comfort zone?  Individuals who speak intelligently and confidently in public consistently achieve greater academic and professional success in today’s competitive environment.  This course is a continuation of Communication Skills for the 21st Century 1 and is directed toward students who wish to become leaders.  

You will use previously acquired oral communication skills to master your ability to speak before small and large groups by applying critical thinking strategies, learning to self-assess, and accepting and responding to constructive criticism.  Well-known public speakers will be studied to recognize and understand the importance of choosing the right topic, using humor to engage your audience, and giving presentations that leave a lasting impression.  You will model leadership qualities through physical presentation, voice modulation, body language, and articulation.  The focus will be toward helping you move from novice to pro as a public speaker.

Engineering & Technology

ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY PHILOSOPHY

Engineering and Technology Education is a program of classroom and laboratory experiences that prepare students to be technologically literate.  Engineering and Technology Education classes allow students to experiment, design, construct and evaluate.  Students use tools, machines, materials and processes, which, in addition to developing an understanding of technology, assist students in making informed and meaningful career choices.  Students can also prepare for entry into associate degree and baccalaureate programs in technology.  Engineering and Technology Education courses are available to any interested student regardless of curriculum path.  

What career options might I have with a background in Engineering and Technology Education?

Architecture & Construction

Architect

Building Inspector

CAD Technician

Carpenter

City Planner

Construction Manager

Electrical Inspector

Environmental Designer

Estimator

General Contractor

Interior Designer

Safety Director

Surveyor

Urban Planner

Landscape Architect

Restoration Technician

Roofer

Property & Real Estate Manager

HVAC Technician

Engineering

Aerospace Engineer

Agricultural Engineer

Architectural Engineer

Automotive Engineer

Biomedical Engineer

Chemical Engineer

Civil Engineer

Computer Engineer

Electrical/Electronics Engineer

Industrial Engineer

Landfill Engineer

Mechanical Engineer

Mining Engineer

Nuclear Engineer

Petroleum Engineer

Photographic Engineer

Safety Engineer

Solar Energy Engineer

Test Engineer

Film & Television

Audio/Video Engineer

Advertising Copywriter

AV Production Specialist

Broadcast Photojournalist

Broadcast Technician

Camera Person

Control Room Technician

Creative Director

Digital Imaging Technician

Director of Photography

Film Editor

Film Animator

Radio/TV Program Writer

Special Effects Designer

TV Production Director

TV Artist

Lighting Designer

Set Designer

Title Designer

Manufacturing

Automation Technician

CAD Technician

Drafter

Industrial Designer

Robot Technician

Robotics Programming

Tool Designer

Tool & Die Maker

Machinists

Materials Engineer

Metallurgist

Process Control Technician

Production Manager

Quality Control Technician

Transportation

Air Traffic Controller

Avionics Technician

Airplane Pilot

Civil Engineer

Airport Manager

Dispatcher

Freight Inspector

Locomotive Engineer

Logistics Manager

Urban and Regional Planner

Marine Cargo Inspector

Motor Vehicle Inspector

Ship and Boat Captain

Warehouse Manager

Technology

Acoustics Engineer

Computer Network Specialist

Electrical/Electronics Technician

Energy Transmission Engineer

Fire Safety Engineer

Hazardous Waste Technician

Industrial Safety Engineer

Systems Analyst

Software Engineer

Laser Systems Technician

Nuclear Reactor Operator

Product Design Engineer

Photonics Engineer

Polymer Engineer

Engineering & Technology Courses

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The Engineering and Technology Department offers courses in the areas of Information and Communications, Construction, Energy, Power and Transportation, and Design and Engineering.  State-mandated graduation requirements necessitate that students take at least one credit in the arts or career/technical education in order to graduate.  The Engineering and Technology Education Department offers courses in any of the areas mentioned above as a way to fulfill that requirement.

DESIGN & ENGINEERING: Project Lead the Way

The Engineering and Technology Department is working with University of New Haven to implement a pre-engineering program that prepares students for a rigorous college curriculum in Engineering and Engineering Technology.  Project Lead the Way seeks to connect high school math instruction with preliminary experiences in engineering design, electronic circuit logic, engineering principles, and modern manufacturing methods.  Students who successfully complete this program and an additional examination are eligible to receive college credit from partner colleges including University of New Haven and Rochester Institute of Technology.  Additional information about this program can be obtained at http://www.pltw.org.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Corequisite:  Concurrent enrollment in grade appropriate mathematics class.

A Project-Lead-the-Way course, this helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering technology.  Students will explore various technology systems and manufacturing processes to learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people. The course “Principles of Engineering” also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Corequisite:  Concurrent enrollment in grade appropriate mathematics class.

A Project-Lead-the-Way course, this teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process.  Models of production solutions are created, analyzed and communicated using solid modeling computer design software.

CIVIL ENGINEERING & ARCHITECTURE

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Corequisite:  Concurrent enrolment in grade appropriate mathematics class.

A Project-Lead-the-Way course, this involves the study of the design and construction of residential and commercial building projects. The course includes an introduction to many of the varied factors involved in building design and construction including building components and systems, structural design, stormwater management, site design, utilities and services, cost estimation, energy efficiency, and careers in the design and construction industry.  

The major focus of this class is to expose students to the design and construction of residential and commercial building projects, design teams and teamwork, communication methods, engineering standards, and technical documentation.  Students who successfully complete the end of course exam may obtain college credit for this course from Rochester Institute of Technology.

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Corequisite:  Concurrent enrolment in grade appropriate mathematics class.

A Project-Lead-the-Way course, this provides the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as, mobile phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras and high-definition televisions. Students are introduced to the process of combinational and sequential logic design, engineering standards and technical documentation.  This course is designed for students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

INTRO TO COMPUTER ASSISTED DESIGN

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  None.

This course introduces students to design and drafting in the manufacturing professions.  Its primary focus is on the use of drafting tools, basic drawing types and appropriate manual drafting techniques.  Students will apply geometric theory by producing orthographic and pictorial drawings.  Students will also be introduced to computer aided drafting (CAD).

CAD & SOLID MODELING

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  Intro to Computer Assisted Design

In this course, the student will be guided through the transformation of an idea into a physical product using computer-aided design (CAD).  Topics will include the creation of lines, arcs, points, symbols, text; methods of grouping, reusing, and manipulating these objects; and the development, modification, storage and presentation of complex drawings.

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Architectural Concepts

Students in this course will use computer aided drafting (CAD) and model-making techniques to further study architectural design. A set of residential addition plans and a scale model will be prepared and evaluated. Students will use CAD to produce drawings that apply their knowledge of building codes, residential design and construction techniques.

Informational and Communications Technologies

COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None.

This course will expose students to a wide variety of communications technologies, including graphic, electronic, audio and video communications.  The outcome will be an introduction to the terminology, systems and processes used in these fields supported by hands-on activities.  Students will also explore careers and social impacts in the rapidly growing communications technology field.

VIDEO PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course will cover the concepts, tools and activities essential to getting started in video production without prior knowledge of the field.  Various software programs will be explored and incorporated into video segments.  Students will become familiar with the use of video cameras, video shooting techniques, editing equipment, three point lighting, and studio production.  Cameras and supplies are supplied by the department.

TELEVISION PRODUCTION

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Video Production

The television production course stresses the importance of teamwork.  Through a variety of production projects, students will experience the duties of key positions within a television studio.  From pre-production to post production, students will participate in a variety of production roles including: scriptwriter, storyboard designer, performer, anchor, camera operator, floor manager, audio director, teleprompter, technical director, assistant technical director, graphic designer, editor, director, and producer.

This advanced course will focus on both studio and field production techniques.  Students will have an opportunity to develop TV production skills and post-production techniques.  Students will be expected to assist with the TV production of community and school events.  Field assignments may require providing your own transportation.

Construction Technology

ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPTS

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Students in this course will use manual and computer aided drafting (CAD) techniques to study architectural design. A set of residential house plans will be drawn and evaluated. Major topics will include residential design, floor planning, foundation planning, section drawing and elevations.

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY        

Grades: 9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None.

This course introduces students to modern construction techniques and organization.  Students will apply their knowledge by constructing scale models of both residential and commercial structures such as homes and bridges.  Other topics include non structural elements such as plumbing, heating and electrical wiring, and business considerations, including building codes, zoning, and permits.

CONSTRUCTION APPLICATIONS

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Construction Technology

In this course, students build upon their prior work, constructing a full- size residential structure, as well as scale models of civil or commercial structures.  Additional emphasis is placed on construction management and careers; the structure and organization of the construction industries, and the development of documentation such as bills of materials and cost estimates.

Manufacturing and Other Technologies

ENERGY AND POWER

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None.

This course is an introduction to modern energy and power systems. Students will identify and select energy and power sources and apply application theories using hands-on projects. The culminating activity for this course requires the student to design and construct a working system that uses several power sources. Instructional topics will include power grids, fuel cells, with additional explorations of the relationships between environmental, health and safety issues and energy/power systems.

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY

Grades: 9-12

Credit: .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None.

Through their work on hands-on activities, students will demonstrate an ability to select, use, and evaluate land, air, space, and marine transportation systems.  Students will design, construct, and test working models of vehicles in each mode of transportation, and will investigate the history and development of transportation systems.  Other topics include transportation infrastructure; safety and security, and the future of personal and mass transit.

TOOLS & MATERIALS

Grades: 9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None.

This laboratory-based exploratory course introduces students to a variety of materials and to the tools and machines used to process them. Materials utilized may include woods, metals, and plastics. A variety of manufacturing processes will be surveyed, including separating, forming, combining, joining, conditioning, and finishing.  The hands-on instructional aspects of this course focus on proper operating procedures and safe operation of tools and machines.

AUTOMATION AND ROBOTICS

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite: Successful completion with a minimum of a C in Tools and Materials or Introduction to CAD or Introduction to Engineering Design or Principles of Engineering

Students will examine the history, development, and applications of machine control in automation and robotics.  Hands-on activities are designed to develop introductory skills necessary for students to design, create, and test robots and machines.  Students will also learn the basics of programming for robotic behaviors and Computerized Numerical machine Control (CNC) while developing an understanding of electrical principles and logic.

This course is the second level in a 3 part sequence designed to prepare students for an industry Certification as well as prepare them for post secondary training, education, and careers. Careers in industries such manufacturing, medical, aeronautical & space, and maritime.  

*This course description is pending approval from the Board of Education.

MANUFACTURING DESIGN

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisites: Successful completion with a minimum of a C in Automation & Robotics AND

CAD & Solid Modeling or Introduction to Engineering or Tools & Materials or Principles of Engineering

Students will learn the skills used in cutting edge manufacturing and other related fields to transform CAD drawings and diagrams into tangible products through programming. Materials, processes, tolerances, dimensions, and machine application will be used to generate toolpaths utilizing MasterCam  for various CNC applications. Students will follow the application-based training of Mastercam University and may earn certification recognized nationally and internationally in the industry.

This is the last course in a 3 part sequence designed to prepare students for industry with the option to earn a Certification as well as prepare them for post secondary training, education, and careers. Careers in industries such manufacturing, medical, aeronautical & space, and maritime.  

*This course description is pending approval from the Board of Education.

Family & Consumer Sciences

Family & Consumer Sciences courses offer necessary skills and knowledge to promote wellness.  Foods classes offer nutrition information, food preparation techniques, and a foundation for careers in food services.  Child Development classes include information for understanding family relationships, the growth and education of children, and well as careers involving children.  The University of Connecticut Course, (Individual and Family Development HDFS190) is offered to juniors and seniors with a strong interest in human development and the impact of the family system on a person’s development.  State mandated graduation requirements necessitate that students take at least one credit in  the arts, business & finance, family consumer sciences, or engineering and technology education.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES PHILOSOPHY

The vision of the Bristol Family and Consumer Sciences Program is to enable students to develop skills to manage their own personal, family and career lives.  Family and Consumer Sciences Teachers will integrate academic learning with hands-on applications of content material to benefit and enhance the education of all students.

What career options might I have with a background in Family and Consumer Sciences?

Education & Training

Child Care Worker

Elementary Teacher

Educational Researcher

Librarian

Preschool Teacher

Preschool Worker

Principal

Secondary Teacher

School Psychologist

School Administrator

Speech-Language Pathologist

Special Education Teacher

Teacher Assistants

Human Services

Correction Officer

Counselor

Community Youth Worker

Employment Counselor

Family Center Manager

Funeral Director

Grief Counselor

Social Worker

Rehabilitation Counselor

Recreation Worker

Nutritional Counselor

Psychologist

Parks and Recreation Manager

Hospitality & Foods

Baker

Catering & Banquet Manager

Chef

Clinical Dietician

Director of Visitor Services

Events Manager

Hotel Manager

Concierge

Tour & Travel Coordinator

Tourism Developer

Nutritionist

Restaurant Manager

Reservation Agent

Family & Consumer Sciences Courses

Family & Consumer Sciences courses offer necessary skills and knowledge to promote wellness across the lifespan.  Foods classes offer nutrition information, food preparation techniques, and a foundation for careers in food services.  Child Development classes include information for understanding family relationships, the growth and education of children, and well as careers involving children.  The University of Connecticut Course, (Individual and Family Development HDFS190) is offered to juniors and seniors with a strong interest in human development and the impact of the family system on a person’s development.

INTRODUCTORY FOODS & NUTRITION

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Explore the various fields of food and nutrition.  Knowledge of health, nutrition practices, shopping and meal planning, cost analysis, special diets, as well as career exploration in the various culinary fields are include.  Labs concentrate on preparing foods.

ADVANCED FOODS & NUTRITION

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Intro. Foods & Nutrition

This course is a continuation of Introductory Foods and Nutrition. Students will apply nutrition and wellness concepts to promote a healthy lifestyle for individuals and families across the lifespan.  Completion of this class will impart students with knowledge, skills and confidence to succeed in higher education.

APPLIED FOOD SCIENCE

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Advanced Foods & Nutrition

Applied Food Sciences is for students with a career interest in food science, dietetics, food production services, and/or hospitality. This course will engage career-bound students in a variety of commercial and professional experiences that include menu planning, food marketing, food costing, and food preparation associated with mass production.  Students who successfully complete this course may be eligible for Connecticut Food Handlers Certificate.  

CHILD, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Children, Family and Community is a course that focuses on the stages of early childhood development. Additionally students will explore careers working with children, such as, education, child development specialist, social services, psychology, speech –language pathologist, pediatric nursing, and child law advocate. While providing an orientation to early childhood development, emphasis will be on current issues related to families, community, and cultural diversity.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 1

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  None

Early Childhood Education 1 is a course designed to introduce students to the essential elements of early childhood education.  Understanding how children develop, the importance of play, guidance techniques, creating supportive family and community relationships, and respecting diversity are all topics explored in the class.  

        

Note: This class is part 1 of a CCP opportunity to earn college credit with Tunxis Community College.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 2

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  .5

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  Early Childhood Education 1

Early Childhood Education 2 is a course that familiarizes students with the content areas and domains they will need to understand and integrate when creating enjoyable, playful, educational experiences for young learners.  This class includes a lab component where students are responsible for creating lessons and teaching preschool students.  

Note:  This course is part of the College Career Pathway (CCP) program which may provide college credit from Tunxis Community College.

INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT/UCONN

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Application process

Individual and Family Development will provide students with an understanding of individual and family development over the lifespan.  The course will focus on the developing individual in the context of the family system and the changes that occur in family systems over time.  The course will include an internship component.  Students may be eligible for three (3) UCONN credits provided the students achieve a minimum of C for the course work and they complete forty (40) internship hours.  Students who seek college credit will be charged a fee per credit by the university.  Students entering this program will be interviewed prior to acceptance and must carry school accident insurance as well as provide their own transportation to internship sites.  

Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

ENGLISH

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

The English curriculum should help students to discover, through the acquisition of writing, reading and oral communication skills, an understanding and appreciation of how literature and literary nonfiction reflect and influence the world in which they live.  Critical thinking and writing skills, demonstrated by various tasks ranging from research papers and essays to creative writing and multi-media projects, support students in reaching the  departmental goals of becoming fluent writers, speakers and critical thinkers, able to recognize the context in which literature and writing is situated. Students examine multiple genres of literature in order to deepen their understanding of themselves and their world.  

The prescribed four-year sequence is as follows:

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Required

Courses

English I

English II

English III or

AP English Language & Composition

Writing Portfolio 1&2

English IV

or  English IV ECE,

AP English Literature/ Composition

Electives

Drama I

Drama II

English Foundations I

Creative Writing

Journalism

Mythology

Media Literacy

Drama I

Drama II

English Foundations II

Creative Writing

Contemporary Lit

Journalism

Mythology

Media Literacy

Drama I

Drama II

SAT Literacy

Creative Writing

Contemporary Lit.

Journalism

Mythology

Media Literacy

Drama I

Drama II

What career options might I have with a background in English?

Business         

Sales and Marketing Manager        

Public Relations Office

E-commerce Coordinator Technical Writer

Training and Development

Consultant

Government

Attorney

Paralegal Assistant

Public Administrator

Grant Writer

Speech Writer

Communications Director

Education

English Teacher

Theater Arts Teacher

Journalism Teacher

College Professor

College Recruiter

Print/Web Media and Publishing        

Editor         

Journalist

News Writer         

Press Secretary         

Webmaster

Theater, Television & Film

Actor

Author

Screenwriter

Producer

Events Manager

Creative Consultant

English Courses

The aim of the English curriculum is to graduate students who have mastered the following competencies:  (1)  to communicate in an articulate, effective, and organized manner through speaking and writing, (2)  to read, research, listen, and view actively and critically, (3)  to read, evaluate, and respond to literature and literary nonfiction.  Each student must select a minimum of one credit each year.  A total of four credits are required for graduation.

ENGLISH 1

Grades:  9

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  None

English 1 is a full-year course for all freshmen focused on the interrelationship of reading, researching, writing, speaking, listening and thinking skills. Students study a variety of literary genres (i.e., novel, short story, drama, poetry, non-fiction, epic) and respond to this literature through a variety of writing experiences.  Topics also include study of the structure of the English language, vocabulary development and enrichment.

ENGLISH FOUNDATIONS 1

Grades:  9

Credit:  .5

Category: 3

Prerequisite:  None

English Foundations 1 is a support class for freshmen who require help bringing their reading and writing up to a level which will allow them to succeed in English 1.  The program emphasizes reading skills such as developing a purpose for reading, understanding the central idea of a text, and monitoring reading for comprehension.  The course is not a tutorial program, but instead focuses on the concurrent transfer of skills from English Foundations 1 to English 1.  This course does not count for English credit towards graduation.

ENGLISH SKILLS FOR SUCCESS

Grades:  9

Credit:

Category: 3

Prerequisite:  None

This is a study skills course designed for freshmen who have either failed core courses or who pose a significant risk of failing. For half of the class, students learn effective habits of mind and skills in time management and goal-setting, meant to empower them to become successful in English and other courses. For the second half of class, students have the opportunity to apply the skills they are learning to their current coursework with the support of an English teacher and aid from tutors.

ENGLISH 2

Grades:  10

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  English 1

English 2 is a full-year course for all sophomores that introduces students to the relationship between American literature and American history.  In addition, study is continued in the development of reading, researching, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking skills.  Students read a variety of literary genres – both fiction and nonfiction -- and respond to the literature in a variety of writing modes.  Work is also continued in the structure of the English language, vocabulary development and enrichment.  Students are placed in a class according to their ability and performance.

ENGLISH 3

Grades:  10

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  English 2

American Humanities continues the relationship between American literature and the historical context from which it has emanated.  A variety of literary forms including novels, drama, poetry, short story, and non-fiction reflects the diversity of American society.  Students explore thematic issues through research and discussion of readings in areas of society, culture, religion, race, politics, materialism, individualism, nature and the American Dream.  Students consider these themes and significant literary movements like romanticism, realism, and transcendentalism in the context of contemporary life.  The English component also includes a review of language essentials, vocabulary and composition.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AP

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  “83” or better in English 2/3 Acc. or “93” or better in English 2/3 Acad.; or Dept. recommendation.

An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes.  Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

ENGLISH 4

English 4 is a full-year course for all seniors that continues to explore the relationship between literature and culture.  Students read British and world literature to explore a wide range of topics.  Students read and research a variety of genres and respond to the literature in various writing modes.  Work is also continued in the structure of the English language, vocabulary development and enrichment.  Students are placed in the class according to their ability and performance.

ENGLISH LITERATURE/AP/UCONN

Grades:  12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Eng. Lang. AP, “83” or better in English 3 Acc. or “93” or better in English 3 Acad. or dept. recommendation.  

Designed for the capable student who enjoys reading and has mastered the mechanics of communication skills, this course also puts considerable emphasis upon expository writing and the preparation and writing of the research paper.  Some students selected for this course are recognized by the University of Connecticut and may receive four semester hours from the University of Connecticut in addition to high school credit.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

ENGLISH 4 ACCELERATED

Grades:  12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  :  “83” or better in English 3 Acc. or “93” or better in English 3 Acad.; or Dept. recommendation.

English 4 Accelerated is a full-year course designed for students who have been in accelerated classes during their high school career and wish to continue in a program with rigorous reading and writing requirements, but without the emphasis on Advanced Placement testing.  The course is both thematic and chronological, providing a survey of British literature while matching classic and modern works through themes.

ENGLISH 4 ACADEMIC

Grades:  12

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  English 3

English 4 Academic is a full-year course which includes a survey of British literature, a review of grammar fundamentals, work in vocabulary building, reading skills, expository writing skills, and development of interpretive abilities.  This course is designed to prepare students for college.

ENGLISH ELECTIVES

Each course is one-semester, meeting weekly and offering .5 credits in English.  All electives include composition and vocabulary in relation to the materials studied.  Those electives indicated by asterisks (**) are strongly recommended for the college-bound student although they are not necessarily limited to such students.

CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE**

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course aims to acquaint students with current trends in contemporary literature and to generate interest in the art of reading for pleasure.  Designed for the above-average student who likes to read, the course examines recurrent themes in modern fiction through careful analysis of such literary techniques as symbolism and imagery.  The class completes a unit (novel, play, groups of essays, book of poetry, or anthology of short stories) approximately every two weeks.  The class revolves around discussion of the ideas contained in each work of literature rather than plot.  Other requirements are short quizzes, a few short essays, a test on each unit, and final exam.

CREATIVE WRITING **

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is designed for the above-average writer.  Individuals taking the course should have a serious interest in writing and should be open to experimenting with all forms of written expression such as short stories, dramatic scripts, poetry, informal vignettes commenting on any subject of interest to the writer, and reflective of his/her own personal viewpoint and style.  Discussion, criticism, and sharing of ideas are prime objectives toward the student’s development of talent, style, and constructive self-criticism. Strong emphasis will be made on the use of technology as a tool for writing.

DRAMA 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

The purpose of this course is to introduce students  to the world of theater:  play reading, interpretation, acting, and technical theater.  The emphasis is on staging and acting techniques, including the use of dramatic voice and body language.  A wide assortment of activities including the creation of skits, interpretation of plays and team-building exercises will be offered.  Students are required to memorize monologues and dialogues and to perform them in front of an audience of peers.

DRAMA 2

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is an intense study of play production and performance.  After a review of basic theater techniques and scene study, students read and analyze a play to be produced.  Students are responsible for all aspects of production:  performance, set design, costumes, props and makeup.  The scenes and plays selected vary depending upon the class size, experience and ability of each group.  The program is designed for a student with special interest in play production.  The course culminates in a final production.                                

MEDIA LITERACY

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is intended for any student interested in exploring the dynamics of films.  Media can now be considered some of the most powerful cultural forces on the planet.  Media products entertain us, inform us, and help us stay connected to our community and the world.  The goal of this course is to inform students about the role of media, its various forms, purposes, and techniques.  Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills, responding to various forms of media and writing.

JOURNALISM: WRITING & PUBLISHING

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course acquaints students with a variety of journalistic activities, using the computer as a tool for writing and publishing. Though news writing and editing is the primary focus, other areas explored  include photography and illustrations, advertising and sales, layout and design, publishing and distribution.  No previous computer experience is required, but students taking this course should be recommended by an English teacher.

MYTHOLOGY**

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is a study of myths and legends of Greek, Roman, Norse, and Celtic origin.  It seeks to develop an historical perspective of the early European continent.  An effort is made to point out the contribution of these myths and legends to the present day Anglo-American culture with a view toward understanding allusions in literature.

SAT LITERACY PREP**

Grades: 10-12

Credit:  .25

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  English I and English 2

This course is modeled after the redesigned SAT and focuses on “Evidence Based Reading and Writing” which includes three sections: reading, writing and language, and the SAT essay. Students will study a variety of genres in literature and in informational texts.  Students will read closely, analyze texts, revise and edit a range of texts to improve the expression of ideas, and correct the use of standard English conventions.  In addition, students will write a clear analysis of the effectiveness of an argumentative essay.  

MATHEMATICS

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

The philosophy of the mathematics department is to develop mathematically literate and productive students who can effectively and efficiently apply mathematics in their lives to make informed decisions about the world around them. To be mathematically literate, one must understand major mathematics concepts, possess computational facility and have the ability to apply these understandings to situations in daily life. The opportunity to think critically and creatively to solve problems is important to deepen mathematical knowledge and foster innovation.  A rich mathematical experience is essential to provide the foundational knowledge and skills that prepare students to be mathematically literate, productive citizens. Through their experience, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the skills and content knowledge in each of the following conceptual categories:

Suggested course sequencing:

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

ELL Math

ELL Algebra

Algebra 1

Alg 1 w/ Algebra 1  Foundations

Math Foundations 1

ELL Algebra

ELL Geometry

Geometry

Math Foundations 2

ELL Geometry

Algebra 2

Alg 2    w/ Algebra 2 Foundations

Math Foundations 3

Statistics

SAT Math Prep

Pre-Calculus

Advanced Mathematical  Decision Making

Statistics

Geometry

Algebra 2

Pre-Calculus

AP Statistics

SAT Math Prep

Calculus

AP Calculus AB/BC

AP Statistics

What career options might I have with a background in Mathematics?

Computer Industry

Database Development

Computer Applications Engineer

Software Designer

Programmer

Computer Technician

Engineering

Aerospace Engineer

Electrical Engineer

Mechanical Engineer

Photonics Engineering -

(Fiber-optics, telecommunications)

Retail

Technical Sales

Business Development

Buyer

Sales and Marketing Manager

Financial and Insurance Institutions

Systems Analyst

Financial Planner Accountant

Actuary

Underwriter

Government

Auditor

Researcher

Public Relations

Healthcare

Physical Therapist

Biostatistician

Health Policy Consultant

Education

Elementary Teacher

Secondary Teacher

College Professor

Mathematics Courses

The mathematics curriculum has been developed to prepare all students to be ready for college and careers with an emphasis on algebra, functions and modeling. The goals of the mathematics department are to develop mathematically proficient students by providing experiences that develop students’ ability to:  

Most mathematics courses are offered in accelerated and academic levels. Students are required to take three years of mathematics at either level and are highly encouraged to take a fourth year to meet the admission requirements of many colleges and universities.  

The accelerated mathematics program is offered to capable and interested students who have displayed superior ability and achievement in previous mathematics courses. The purpose of this program is to provide an opportunity for acceleration and enrichment.

To select a sequential accelerated mathematics course, a student should have a grade of “83” or better in his/her previous mathematics course and/or received the recommendation of the mathematics department. If a student has completed Algebra I in eighth grade, he/she may be able to select Calculus in their senior year after successfully completing the first three years of the sequence. Students who successfully complete the study of Calculus should obtain a mathematical experience equivalent to, at best, one year beyond the standard college preparatory mathematics sequence and may be able to obtain advanced placement credit upon matriculating at a college or university.  

All mathematics courses will make extensive use of graphing calculator technology. It is strongly recommended that all students enrolled in mathematics courses own a TI-84 graphing calculator.

MATH FOUNDATIONS 1, 2, and 3 (Skinny Block)

Grades:  9-11

Credit: .25 - .5

Category: 3

Prerequisite:  Placement by recommendation of school counselor and math department.

This course is intended to provide support for students who require help bringing their math skills up to a level which will allow them to succeed in Algebra 1, Geometry or Algebra 2.  The course will provide additional support for content and materials presented in the student’s math class. The course is not a tutorial program, but instead focuses on the transfer of skills from Math Foundations to the student’s Algebra 1, Geometry or Algebra 2 courses.  Students will be placed in this class based on past performance on mastery tests and previous mathematics courses.  This course may not be used toward the mathematics requirement for graduation.

ALGEBRA 1 ACADEMIC

Grade:  9

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Students should have a solid foundation in operations with real numbers and an understanding of linearity.  Emphasis is on the development of linear and exponential functions and statistics. Students will explore functions using multiple approaches and representations including tables, graphs, equations and verbal descriptions. Exploration of real world applications in modeling problems involving the use of equations, inequalities, and systems will be completed. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout this course.  Topics studied will involve non-calculator and TI-84+ graphing calculator activities as well as content related computer programs.

ALGEBRA 1 ACADEMIC WITH ALGEBRA I FOUNDATIONS (2 Credits)

Grade:  9

Algebra 1 Academic              

Credit: 1

Category: 2

Algebra I Foundations

Credit: 1

Category: 3

Prerequisite:  Placement by recommendation of math department and guidance

This mathematics foundations course, taken in conjunction with Algebra I academic, will meet on consecutive days.  This course will simultaneously focus on building prerequisite skills and algebraic concepts for successful completion of Algebra I.  This course is intended to provide support for students who require help bringing their math skills up to a level which will allow them to success in Algebra I.  Students will be placed in this class based on past performance on mastery tests and previous mathematics courses.  Only the Algebra I credit will be used toward the eligibility requirement and will be applied toward the mathematics requirement for graduation.

ALGEBRA 1 ACCELERATED

Grade:  9

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  Grade of 93 or better in Grade 8 math/ Department recommendation

Students should have a solid foundation in operations with real numbers and an understanding of linearity.  Emphasis is on the development of linear, exponential, quadratic, absolute value, and piecewise functions.  Students will explore functions using multiple approaches and representations including tables, graphs, equations and verbal descriptions. Students will also explore real world applications in modeling problems involving the use of equations, inequalities, and systems. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout this course.  Topics studied will involve non-calculator and TI-84+ graphing calculator activities as well as content related computer programs. The accelerated section proceeds at a faster pace with the requirement that students work more independently.

GEOMETRY ACADEMIC

Grade:  10

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Algebra 1.  Department recommendation for level.

This course helps to extend students’ understanding of geometry from middle school to complex situations, analyzing geometric relationships, constructing geometric figures, and the development of formal mathematical arguments.  Students study the properties of geometry from a modern approach analyzing transformations of figures such as triangles, circles and quadrilaterals and making connections between algebraic and geometric representations.   The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout this course. Some  topics studied will involve the use of content related computer software programs. 

GEOMETRY ACCELERATED

Grades:  9-10

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  Grade of 83 or better in Alg. 1 Acc or Department recommendation

This course helps to extend students’ understanding of geometry from middle school to complex situations, analyzing geometric relationships, constructing geometric figures, and the development of formal mathematical arguments.  Students study the properties of geometry from a modern approach analyzing transformations of figures such as triangles, circles and quadrilaterals and making connections between algebraic and geometric representations.   The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout this course. The accelerated section proceeds at a faster pace with the requirement that students work more independently. Some topics studied will involve the use of content related computer software programs.

ALGEBRA 2 ACADEMIC

Grades:  10-11

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Algebra 1 and Geometry

This course supports the further development of functions including polynomial, rational and radical functions.  Students will also solve complex equations, extend their understanding of real numbers to complex numbers and polynomials  through problem solving and modeling scenario.  Students will be prepared for a fourth year mathematics course as a result.  The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout this course. Topics studied will involve non-calculator and TI-84+ graphing calculator activities as well as content related computer programs.

ALGEBRA 2 ACADEMIC WITH ALGEBRA 2 FOUNDATIONS (2 Credits)

Grade:  11

Algebra 2 Academic              

Credit: 1

Category: 2

Algebra 2 Foundations

Credit: 1

Category: 3

Prerequisite:  Placement by recommendation of math department and school counselor

This mathematics foundations course, taken in conjunction with Algebra 2 academic, will meet on consecutive days.  This course will simultaneously focus on building prerequisite skills and algebraic concepts for successful completion of Algebra I.  This course is intended to provide support for students who require help bringing their math skills up to a level which will allow them to success in Algebra I.  Students will be placed in this class based on past performance on mastery tests and previous mathematics courses.  Only the Algebra 2 credit will be used toward the eligibility requirement and will be applied toward the mathematics requirement for graduation.

ALGEBRA 2 ACCELERATED

Grades: 10-11

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Prerequisite: Grade of “83” or better in Alg. 1 Acc. and Geometry Acc. This course may be taken concurrently with Geometry Acc with Dept. Recommendation

This course supports the further development of functions including polynomial, rational and radical functions.  Students will also solve complex equations, extend their understanding of real numbers to complex numbers and polynomials through problem solving and modeling scenario.  Students are held to higher standards of competence and logic and are prepared for Pre-calculus as a result.  The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout this course. Topics studied will involve non-calculator and TI-84+ graphing calculator activities as well as content related computer programs.  The accelerated section proceeds at a faster pace with the requirement that students work more independently.

ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL DECISION MAKING

Grade:  12

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite: Grade of “75” or better in Algebra 2

This course is designed to challenge students to develop critical skills for success in college and careers.  Students will be asked to investigate, do research, collaborate with other classmates and write about their findings and present solutions to problems in applied situations.  They will work through mathematical topics including statistics in the media, using functions to make decisions, managing data, network graphs and understanding credit, debt and investments.  Emphasis will be placed on modeling real world scenarios with mathematics so that students can become critical consumers of every day data, knowledgeable decision makers and mathematical thinkers who can solve problems related to a wide range of situations.  This course is an alternative to pre-calculus intended for college bound students.  

STATISTICS ACADEMIC

Grades:  11-12

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Algebra 2. This course may be taken concurrently with Algebra 2 with teacher recommendation.

This is a high school level statistics course.  The purpose of the course in statistics is to introduce students to statistical thinking, data gathering and interpretation.  Students are engaged in learning how statisticians contribute to our understanding of the world and helps students to become more discerning customers of the statistics they encounter in the real world.  Activities, applications, and data explorations give students an opportunity to investigate, discuss, and make use of statistical ideas and methods.  Topic include four major areas:  analyzing data, producing data, chance, and inference.

SAT MATH PREP

Grade:  10-12

Credit:  .25

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Algebra I  and Geometry

This course will provide students with a review of the mathematics used on college preparatory tests such as the SAT and ACT.  The course will provide students with the opportunity to take practice tests as well as to assess and review areas of weakness in preparation for taking college placement tests.  The course may not be used toward the mathematics requirement for graduation.

PRE-CALCULUS ACADEMIC

Grades:  11-12

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Grade of “75” or better in Algebra 2 Acad. or Dept. recommendation

This course is the fourth course in the college preparatory mathematics sequence.  It is a prerequisite for the analytic geometry and calculus course offered by colleges.  Topics studied are algebraic functions, logarithms and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, as well as statistics and probability.  Topics studied will involve non-calculator and TI-84+ graphing calculator activities as well as content related computer programs.

PRE-CALCULUS ACCELERATED

Grades:  11-12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  Grade of ”83” or better in Algebra 2 Accelerated or Dept. recommendation

This course is the prerequisite for the analytic geometry and calculus course offered by colleges as a freshman mathematics course.  Topics studied are polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, circular and trigonometric functions, and polar coordinates.   Topics studied will involve non-calculator and TI-84+ graphing calculator activities as well as content related computer programs.

STATISTICS AP

Grades:  11-12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:

Grade 11 students may take AP Statistics if they are concurrently enrolled in Pre-Calculus accelerated with a  grade of “83” or better in Algebra 2 Accelerated and teacher recommendation.

Grade 12 students may enroll in AP Statistics  with a grade of “83” or better in Algebra 2 Accelerated and  teacher recommendation.

This course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus based, and college course in statistics.  The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes, including exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.  Students who successfully complete the course and exam may receive credit, advanced placement, or both for a one-semester introductory college statistics course.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

CALCULUS ACCELERATED

Grade:  12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Prerequisite:  Grade of “75” or better in Pre-Calculus  or Dept. recommendation.

This course will give an introduction and overview of the topics generally covered in a first semester college course in calculus.  The course will cover continuity and limits of functions and applications of differential and integral calculus of one variable.  There will be emphasis on the use of the graphing calculator in problem solving.  This course is not intended as a replacement for college calculus, but will provide the mathematical background needed by individuals planning on a college major in business, humanities or social sciences which

generally require a course in introductory calculus or statistics.

Pending class enrollment, the following variations of Calculus AP/Uconn-AB and Calculus AP/Uconn-BC may be offered for the following credits and may differ by school.

CALCULUS AP/UCONN-AB

Grade:  12

Credit Options:

  • 1 Credit - Semester 1 and 2: Every other day.
  • 1 Credit - Semester 1:  Every day.
  • 1.5 Credits - Semester 1: Every day.  Semester 2: Every other day.

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Grade of “83” or better in Pre-Calc. Acc. or Dept. recommendation

An excellent knowledge of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry is necessary for this study.  This course is equivalent to the analytic geometry and calculus course offered by colleges as a freshman course.  Upon completing this course, students may apply for advanced placement.  Topics covered are analytic geometry, functions, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, transcendental, hyperbolic functions, and various methods of integration.  Applications of the derivative and integral are also covered leading to the fundamental theorem of Integral Calculus.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

CALCULUS AP/UCONN-BC

Grade:  12

Credit Options:  

  • .5 Credit - Semester 2:  Every other day.
  • 1 Credit - Semester 2: Every day.

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Grade of “83” or better in Pre-Calc. Acc. and Dept. recommendation

An excellent knowledge of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry is necessary for this study.  Calculus BC is a full-year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable.  It includes all topics taught in Calculus AB plus additional topics.   The additional topics include parametric, polar, and vector functions, applications of derivatives including L’Hospital’s Rule, applications of integrals, anti-differentiation of improper integrals, polynomial approximations and series. The content of Calculus BC is designed to qualify the student for placement and credit in a course that is one course beyond that granted for Calculus AB.  A Calculus AB sub-score will be reported based on performance on the portion of the Calculus BC Exam devoted to Calculus AB topics.

Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

MUSIC

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

Music is a vital component in developing the whole child.  Music education offers a unique learning opportunity to explore individual creativity, artistic expression and in-depth understanding of past and present cultures in our diverse world.

A comprehensive music education will enable students to develop their musical abilities through self-discipline and focus, leading to increased confidence in learning across the entire curriculum.

We believe that all students should have a comprehensive, balanced, and sequential curriculum of in-school instruction in music education in accordance with national, state and local standards, and that an education in music will develop the life-long learning abilities and aesthetic skills necessary to contribute to a more cultured, educated society.

DEPARTMENT GOALS

Through a planned, sequential curriculum, Bristol Public Schools will educate each student in conjunction with the National Standards for music education enabling students to create, perform, and respond to music.  Students should be able to demonstrate skills and knowledge in each of the following standards:

It is the goal of the Bristol Music Department to produce independent, disciplined, literate and informed life-long consumers and producers of music.

*Courses are available to all students as electives; frequently band and choral students plan to participate in the Music Program for all four years.

What career options might I have with a background in music?

Careers in Arts and Media, Government, Education and Human Services, or Retail, Tourism, Recreation, and Entrepreneurial Clusters.

  • Agent
  • Business Manager
  • Accompanist
  • Audio Engineer/Mixer
  • Band/ Symphony/Orchestra
  • Conductor
  • Choral Director

Critic

Dancer

Entertainer

Event Planner

Music Teacher

Musician

Music Store Manager

Music Therapist

Performer

Promoter

Public Relations and

Advertising

Singer

Studio Engineer

Talent Scout

Theater Director

Music Courses

MUSIC HISTORY

AMERICAN MUSIC STUDIES (The History of Popular Music)

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is an overview of popular music. Students will listen to, respond to, and explore representative styles of music including folk, jazz, blues, rock and roll, Broadway, and today’s styles.

MUSIC HISTORY (The History of Classical Music)

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is an overview of the history of music from the Middle Ages to the early 20th century. Course material will include composers such as Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven. Students will listen to, respond to, and explore representational works of each time period. This course is especially recommended for students interested in pursuing a post-high school music degree.

MUSIC THEORY

MUSIC THEORY 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course provides a basic understanding of the elements of music including: clefs, scales, intervals, melody, rhythm, and chords. Ear training, notation, and music literacy are integral components of the class.

MUSIC THEORY 2

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Music Theory 1 or permission of instructor

This course is a continuation of Music Theory 1.  It will expand a student’s vocabulary and understanding of music through the analysis of harmonic and melodic structure as well as more advanced melodic and rhythmic techniques.  The last part of the semester will deal with instrumentation, orchestration, and arranging skills.  At the conclusion of this course, students will have a strong background in the general theoretical principles of music.  This course will prepare students for AP Theory and college entrance exams for music majors.

MUSIC THEORY AP

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Music Theory II or Teacher Recommendation

This is an aggressive course geared to the serious music student who values music as a significant part of their education. This course will focus on the student’s ability to acquire strong skills in ear-training, dictation, and analysis of music. This is the culminating class of the music theory track.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

MUSIC ENSEMBLE GROUPS

CONCERT CHOIR

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is an ensemble of mixed voices that enjoy singing and want to learn more about the art of choral literature and vocal techniques. The choir performs throughout the year and may include a concert tour.  Students are required to attend all performances as part of the choral curriculum.  Student participation in Concert Choir or Chorus 1 is required to participate in extra-curricular vocal performing groups.  

CHORUS 1

Grades:  9

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This chorus is limited in size to allow greater individual attention to grade nine students.  Students will develop vocal techniques to improve their voice. They will learn how to read musical notation and follow their part in open score. The choir will perform in concerts throughout the year and join with Concert Choir in an extended work in the second semester. Students are required to attend all performances as part of the choral curriculum.   Student participation in Concert Choir or Chorus 1 is required to participate in extra-curricular vocal performing groups.

BAND

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Students must be proficient on a traditional band instrument.

Band is an instrumental ensemble that performs music of varied styles in concert halls, as well as parades and football games. The band performs throughout the year and may include a concert tour.  Students are required to attend all performances as part of the band curriculum.   Student participation in Band is required to participate in extra-curricular Instrumental performing groups.  Bass, Guitar, and Piano students are exempt from this requirement.

OTHER MUSIC COURSE OFFERINGS

PIANO/KEYBOARD

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

The development of piano/keyboard skills will be explored using a varied repertoire of piano literature with progressive levels of difficulty.  Students will have an opportunity to perform individually and in keyboard ensembles.  Four areas of study that will be explored through the use of the piano/keyboard are:  sound exploration, development of piano technique, basic music theory, and composition.  Individual projects relating to history, culture and style will also be required.

GUITAR (ACOUSTIC)

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Students will have an opportunity to perform a varied repertoire of guitar literature and will use various guitar techniques: strumming, picking, and chording.  Students will read tablature and standard notation for guitar.  Individual performance a well as ensemble performance will be utilized.  Understanding of basic music theory, the guitar’s importance in music history, and proper maintenance and care will also be covered.  Students do not need to have their own guitar.

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is an introductory course in music technology. Course content builds a knowledge base in several areas: basic audio systems operations, digital audio, MIDI, music sequencing, and music notation. Students will discover and explore introductory concepts used in music sequencing, notation and recording. Students will use technology to produce MIDI sequences, film scores, loop-based arrangements and compositions, and digital multi-track audio recordings. No prior musical experience is needed, however, having training on an instrument or voice is helpful.

In this course students will master the creative tools and techniques required to compose, record, remix, improvise, produce and edit musical ideas, as well as learn about basic musical forms.

INDEPENDENT STUDIES:  Independent studies are available to students.  Students wishing to work independently on specific topics in music should seek instructor and school counseling to establish specific goals, objectives, guidelines and work to be completed.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

The primary goal of physical education is to increase individual growth patterns through a sequential development program.  Through the medium of physical activity we seek to promote kinesthetic awareness, cooperation, understanding of individual differences, improved self-esteem and interest in lifelong activities.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Grades:  9

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

Students will participate in activities that will work on improving physical fitness, self-esteem and team building skills.  They will be given a solid foundation about the importance of exercise and health relative to physical fitness in the prevention of future health problems.  They will assess personal needs, interests, abilities and opportunities related to physical fitness.  Improving individual skills in small game activities will also be emphasized.  All students must participate in state-mandated physical fitness assessments.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Grade 9 Physical Education

A selective curriculum within the required program, offering an opportunity to develop intermediate and advanced skills in activities personally selected.  The curriculum is designed to allow students to select from a variety of activities:

  1. Team sports, e.g., basketball, soccer, volleyball
  2. Individual and health related activities, e.g., weight training, weight control, walk/jog, aerobic conditioning activities
  3. Lifetime, leisure activities, e.g., badminton, golf, and tennis

The year will be divided into time units.  The students will select pre-determined activities based on interest.  These activities will be available according to season, available space, staff and facilities.  All students must participate in state-mandated physical fitness assessments.

HEALTH

Grades:  9

Credit:  .25

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  None

The health curriculum is based on the Connecticut Health and Balanced Living Curriculum Framework.  This course utilizes a proactive approach that serves as a catalyst for young people to analyze and evaluate their own lifestyle habits and then synthesize and apply strategies towards achieving an optimal level of physical, social, mental and emotional health.

Students receive instruction in mental and emotional health, nutrition, alcohol and other drug prevention, human sexuality and disease prevention as part of a Health Education program at the high school level.  Two components of the health curriculum are the content strands of Human Growth and Development and HIV/AIDS education.  In these lessons, the teacher helps students develop an understanding of the human body and positive health decision making.  An outline of the objectives to be covered in ninth grade is printed below.  We encourage you to discuss the topics with your child while the unit is being taught.

Grade 9 students will learn about:

  1. Choice and its effect on the ensuing responsibilities and consequences regarding behaviors relating to sexuality
  2. How to distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources pertaining to human sexuality
  3. Effects of abstinence, birth control and abortion as it relates to the functioning of the reproductive system
  4. High risk behaviors/consequences and health lifestyles
  5. Identifying, locating, assessing and evaluating medically appropriate resources for information and/or treatment of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS

In accordance with the Connecticut General Statutes, parents may choose to exempt their children from family life and AIDS education.  If you are interested in pursuing this option, please contact your child’s building administrator in writing.

SCIENCE

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

The overarching goal of our science curriculum is to ensure by the end of 12th grade, all students have some appreciation of the beauty and wonder of science; possess sufficient knowledge of science and engineering to engage in public discussions on related issues; are careful consumers of scientific and technological information related to their everyday lives; are able to continue to learn about science outside school; and have the skills to enter careers of their choice, including (but not limited to) careers in science, engineering, and technology.

Advanced Placement courses are offered in biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science.  These courses require an in-depth study with either independent reading and research and/or the preparation of papers and reports.

Revision to High School Science Pathways beginning 2019-20

Typical Progressions in Science Beginning in 2019-2020:

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Academic Pathway

Physical Science

Aca Biology

Principles of Chemistry

Anatomy & Physiology

Biology /(AP)

Chemistry/ (AP/ECE)

Environmental Science /(AP)

Physics /(AP)

Biotechnical Engineering

Accelerated  Pathway

Physical Science

Biology

Acc Biology ACC

Acc/AP/ECE Chemistry

Anatomy & Physiology

Biology AP

Environmental Sci AP

UCONN Physics

Physics AP

Biotechnical Engineering

Accelerated Physical Science and Biology

Physical Science

Biology

AP/ECE Chemistry

Biology AP

Environmental Sci AP

UCONN Physics

Physics AP

*Colored boxes denote required courses within pathway.  This will ensure ALL students gain access to science content required by the NGSS.  

What career options might I have with a background in Science?

Other

Agriculture Specialist

Technical Sales Person

Water Quality Inspector

Soil Scientist

Landscape Designer

Architect

Web Site Designer

Government Agencies & Law

Lawyer

Forensics Specialist

Conservation Scientist

Public Health Director

City Planner

Defense System Specialist

NASA Employee

Police Officer

Detective

Patent Attorney

Astronaut

Manufacturing/Engineering

Engineer:

(Mechanical, Electrical, Civil,

Aerospace)

Photonics Specialist

Fiberoptics Specialist

Telecommunications Specialist

Computer Scientist

Programmer

Recycling Specialist

Hazard Evaluator

Safety Officer

Metallurgist

Pharmaceutical Engineer

Materials Engineer

Scientist

Biologist

Chemist

Physicist

Geologist

Genetic Engineer

Astronomer

Biomedical Engineer

Biochemist

Astrophysicist

Genetic Researcher

Inventor

Meteorologist

Space Scientist

Teacher

College Professor

Health Care

Physical Therapist

Physician

Physician’s Assistant

Surgeon

Nurse

Emergency Medical Technician

Media and Publishing

Science Writer or Editor

Medical/ Health/Science Reporter

Technical Writer

Animal Care

Veterinarian

Kennel Care

Marine Biologist

Science Courses

The science curriculum is built around three dimensions.  These dimensions are (1) science and engineering practices, (2) cross-cutting concepts that unify the study of science and engineering through their common application across fields, and (3) core ideas in four disciplinary areas: physical science; life sciences; earth and space sciences; and engineering, technology, and application of science. All science courses are laboratory-oriented.

The goals of the Science Department are to engage students in the practices of science by:

Every student must earn (3) credits in science for graduation including 1 credit in chemistry or environmental science.  Departmental recommendation is required for all accelerated courses.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Grades:  9

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  None

This course is first in a sequence designed to prepare students for the Next Generation Science Standards Assessment in Grade 11.  Topics will include: Geology, Astronomy, Physics, Energy Transformation, and Transmission of Data.  Intriguing laboratory experiments will allow students to analyze real-world problems and to better understand how science is relevant to their lives.

BIOLOGY

Grades:  9 ACC/10

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  Pass Physical Science

This course is second in a sequence designed to prepare students for the Next Generation Science Standards Assessment in Grade 11.  Biology is the branch of science in which students will consider the characteristics common to all living things and how they maintain the living condition.  They will develop an understanding of the relationship between structure and function.  Students will explore the interplay between energy and matter through processes such as photosynthesis and respiration and interactions within a community of organisms.  They will explain the structure of DNA and all the roles it plays in controlling cells.  DNA contributes to the variety among organisms and provides an explanation of species evolution.  Students will also investigate the human organism and its relatedness to other living things.  Laboratory activities are incorporated to support the idea and concepts explored in the classroom.

BIOLOGY AP

Grades:  11-12

Credit:  1

Category:  AP

Prerequisite:  Acc. Bio, Grade of “83” or a grade of “93” Acad. Bio and are concurrently taking or have completed AP/Acc. Chemistry.

The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year.  AP Biology will include those topics regularly covered in college biology course for majors.  The college course in biology differs significantly from the usual first high school course in biology with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the kind of laboratory work done by students, and the time and effort required of students.  The textbook and labs will be the equivalent of those used by college students.  The topics covered include Molecules and Cells (25%), Heredity and Evolution (25%), and Organisms and Populations (50%).  Students will be required to take the Advanced Placement Examination in May.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

CHEMISTRY

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Principles of Chemistry - Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  Passed Physical Science and Biology.

This course is third in a sequence designed to prepare students for the Next Generation Science Standards Assessment in Grade 11. Atomic structure and quantitative relationships between atoms and molecules are stressed to explain chemical reactions.  Understanding the concepts of chemistry is developed through correlation of classroom and laboratory activities.

CHEMISTRY UCONN/AP

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  2

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Must be enrolled in or have taken Accel. Alg. 2 and  have an“83” average in Accel. Bio. or a “93” in Acad. Bio.  

Grade 10 students may take concurrently with Biology ACC with teacher recommendation and “83” average in Physical Science ACC.

Advanced Placement Chemistry is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory chemistry course.   This course enables students to undertake, in their first year, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where chemistry is a prerequisite.  Students will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and competence in dealing with chemical problems.  This course will contribute to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing,  with clarity and logic.  Understanding the concepts of chemistry is developed through the correlation of classroom and laboratory activities.  Students will be required to take the Advanced Placement Examination in May. Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

PHYSICS

Grades:  12

Credit:  1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Acad. Alg. I and Geometry   

This course is designed for students interested in a career in mathematics, science or engineering as well as those interested in a more extensive physical science background.  Laboratory activities are correlated with classroom work.

PHYSICS/UCONN

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Must have an “83” average in Acc.  Alg. 2 and must have previously taken or concurrently taking Acc. Pre-calculus, or  have permission of  instructor

Physics/ Uconn is equivalent to the first semester of an algebra-based college introductory physics course.  This course covers Newtonian mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, and electric circuits.  This course emphasizes laboratory investigations and focuses on experimental technique, data analysis and drawing inferences from observations and data.  Quantitative problem solving is also stressed. This course may qualify for UCONN credit.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

PHYSICS C Mechanics and PHYSICS C Electricity & Magnetism AP/UCONN

Grades:  12

Credit:  2

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Completed or enrolled in AP Calculus, completed accelerated Calculus as a junior, or have permission of instructor.

Advanced Placement Physics C is the equivalent of a two-semester, calculus-based college introductory physics course. This course covers Newtonian mechanics and electricity and magnetism. This course places heavy emphasis on quantitative problem solving and demands the student be comfortable applying the concepts of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. This course will also deepen the student’s understanding of calculus through real world applications. Students will be required to take both the AP Physics C Mechanics and AP Physics C Electricity and Magnetism examinations in May. This course may also qualify for UCONN credit.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Biology with a “75” average.

This course is designed for students who plan to enter a health-related career or have an interest in a more extensive exploration of human anatomy.  The relationship between structures and their functions is emphasized and examined through the use of models, preserved animals or their organs.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: 2

Prerequisite: Must have passed physical science and biology.

This course is third in a sequence designed to prepare students for the Next Generation Science Standards Assessment in Grade 11. This course is a lab-centered approach to developing a solid knowledge base to environmental issues of the community and globe.  The course will involve studies of the earth and the environment.  The course involves studies of the earth and the environment, ecological interactions, biomes, energy resources, land and water resources, and managing the environment.  Field trips and local environmental work will be an integral part of the

course.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AP

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  ”93” or above in Acad. Alg. 1, or “83” or above in Accel. Alg. 1; 93” or above in Acad. Biology or”83” or above in Accel. Biology.  Must have taken Chemistry or taking concurrently.

This course is designed to provide students with the interdisciplinary connections of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental issues resulting from both human and non-human induced causes. Students will then identify the threats linked with these issues and investigate possible solutions and preventative measures.  This course will include a demanding laboratory and field component designed to give students an authentic perspective on the scope of numerous environmental issues.  It is essential that students attend the three mandatory field investigation activities that will be offered once per quarter.  Students will be required to take the AP Environmental Science exam in the spring.  Due to the high rigor level associated with this course, students will be expected to complete outside class activities, including the summer assignment.   Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

BIOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

Grades:  11/12

Credit:  1

Category: 1

Prerequisite: Must have a “70” average in ACC Biology and a “90” in ACA Biology.

Biotechnical Engineering will expose students to the diverse fields of biotechnology including biomedical engineering, bio-molecular genetics, bioprocess engineering, agricultural and environmental engineering.  lessons engage students in engineering design problems that can be accomplished in a high school setting related to biomechanics, cardiovascular engineering, biomedical devices, human interface, bioprocesses, forensics and bio-ethics.  

SOCIAL STUDIES

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

The primary objective of the social studies program is to prepare students to become thoughtful individuals whose academic background and skills will enable them to function successfully in an increasingly complex, multicultural, and changing world.  The social studies program must provide students with an intellectual framework of knowledge, the skills necessary to process information, and the capacity to understand and appreciate people from backgrounds and cultures different from their own.  Further, the program is intended to develop an informed, discriminating citizenship essential to effective participation in the democratic processes of governance and the fulfillment of the nation’s democratic ideals.

While history forms the foundation for social studies, it is understood that concepts from other social sciences, including geography, economics, psychology, and sociology must be integrated through the department’s course offerings to provide students with a firm understanding of the principles and methodologies in the social studies discipline.

Typical Progression

1 credit in World History

1 Credit in Modern American History

.5 Credit in Civics

.5 Credit in a Social Studies Elective

What career options might I have with a background in History and Social Studies?

Business

Attorney

Government Relations

Lobbyist

Human Resources

Consulting

Corporate Communication

Government

Attorney

Paralegal Assistant

Public Administrator

Police Officer

Social Worker

Political Advisor

Foreign Service, Peace Corps Advocacy

Elected Official

Arts/Media

Historian

Archivist

Museum Curator

Editor

Journalist

Press Secretary

Education

Social Studies, History and Humanities

College Professor

Grant Writer

Teachers

Social Studies Courses

Listed below are the course offerings in the social studies department.  The previous social studies teacher will recommend a student’s future assignment to a social studies course level based on the student’s ability and performance.  All students selecting courses in the social studies department should expect to complete  assignments to develop skills in reading, writing, research, speaking and listening beyond the work indicated the course description.

WORLD HISTORY

Grades:  9

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  None.

Students study the history of the world’s people in the modern era.  The origins of different societies are examined, including the rise and growth of democracy and other forms of government.  Through this course, students use a variety of techniques to develop a better understanding of people, events and trends. Courses taken at the accelerated level in social studies are designed to prepare students to take Advanced Placement social studies courses by the time students graduate.

MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY

Grades:  10

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  Acc:  ”93” average in World Hist. Accel. and/or Dept. Recommendation

This class, which is required for graduation, examines the democratic principles and ideals of our past society as a basis for understanding present issues and problems confronting citizens of a changing nation. Students  study the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States from 1898  to the present.  Emphasis is placed on twentieth century life and events that have shaped our nation.  Courses taken at the accelerated level in social studies are designed to prepare students to take Advanced Placement social studies courses by the time students graduate.  

CIVICS

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Modern American History; Grade 10 with departmental permission

Civics is required for high school graduation. Students learn about the form and function of the American democratic system as well as the commitment and obligations of being a citizen. Having studied various political systems in earlier history courses, students analyze how the American republic has been designed to meet the evolving needs of a diverse society. As they learn about political concepts, students develop the literacy skills of political scientists and active citizens. To apply lessons of citizenship, students conduct a semester-long research project in which they create and execute an action plan to improve a self-selected issue of concern.  

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

U.S. HISTORY AP

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Course average of “93” in Modern American History Acad., or ”83” average in Accel. Grade 10 with departmental permission.

U.S. History classes examine the democratic principles and ideals of our past society as a basis for understanding present issues and problems confronting citizens of a changing nation.  Students  study the political, social, economic and cultural development of the United States from the time of early exploration through the modern era.  Emphasis is placed on the major themes and events that have shaped our nation.   Students enrolled in this course must take the common midterm and final assessment for Advanced Placement U.S. History.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS AP

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:Course average of “93” in World History, Civics or Modern American History Acad., or “83” in Accel., or course average of “83” in another AP course. Grade 10 with departmental permission.

AP U.S. Government and Politics is a college-level introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions,policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States.  Students will read and analyze U.S. foundational documents, supreme court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions between political institutions and behavior.  They will read and interpret data, develop evidence-based arguments, and engage in an applied civics or politics research based project. Successful completion of this course will satisfy the Civics graduation requirement. Students will be required to take the American Government and Politics Advanced Placement examination in May.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY AP

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  For freshmen: course average of “90” in grades 8 and 7 accelerated SS; standardized test scores; and  teacher recommendation. For grades 10-12: course average of “93” in World History, Civics or Modern American History Acad.; or “83” in Accel.; or course average of “83” in another AP course; and departmental permission.

The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns  and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth’s surface.  Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.  Students enrolled in this course must take the common midterm and final examination for Human Geography Advanced Placement.  Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

WORLD HISTORY AP

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Course average of “93” in         World History or        Mod. Amer. Hist. Acad. or “83” in Accel., or course average of “83” in another AP course, or Dept. Recommendation, or Standardized Test Scores (SBA or DRP).

Advanced Placement World History is the study of major world civilizations from 8000 B.C.E. to the present day. AP World History will examine the societies and cultures of Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, Africa, Europe and the Americas. This course requires extensive reading and writing as well as strict attendance at all classes. Students are required to examine the dynamics of continuity and change over all historical periods covered in the course. Students develop skills to be used in further historical studies and in the final AP World History Exam.   Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

MICROECONOMICS AP

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Algebra 1 and recommendations from Math, Social Studies, or Business teacher

AP Microeconomics, a full-year course, is designed to give students an understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system.  Students examine concepts such as supply and demand, factors of production, roles of labor and management, and the government’s impact on individual decision-making processes.  This course is recommended for college-bound students who want the opportunity to do advanced written analysis.  Participation in the Advanced Placement examination is a requirement of this course. Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

ECONOMICS

Grades: 10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite: Mod. Amer. History; Grade 10 with departmental permission

This course addresses the theory of economics and some practical applications of this knowledge.  It is intended for college-bound students or those students seeking additional training for the area of business, with average or above reading abilities.  Both macro and micro economics theories are  studied. The following major areas are included in this study:  (1) production and use of wealth, (2) money supply, (3) roles of industry, labor, and the consumer, (4) organization of business, (5) national productivity and economic measurements, and (6) credit, banking and the stock market.  

GEOGRAPHY AND CULTURE OF LATIN AMERICA AND AFRICA

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Mod. Amer. History or concurrent registration in Mod. Amer. History

This course provides students with an in-depth look at Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin/South America.  Students in this course will study each region historically, politically, culturally, and geographically in order to better understand of how other people live.  

GEOGRAPHY AND CULTURE OF ASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Mod. Amer. History or concurrent registration in Mod. Amer. History

This course provides students with an in-depth look at Middle East and Asia.  Students in this course study each region historically, politically, culturally, and geographically in order to better understand of how other people live.  

GLOBAL ISSUES

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Mod. Amer. History or concurrent registration in Mod. Amer. History

This course allows students to study various issues that affect our global community.  Topics include pandemics, globalization, and international conflicts. This course is designed for students with interests in current events and social studies and who wish to participate in a program with rigorous reading, writing, and research requirements.  Students conduct several research projects.

LAW AND JUSTICE

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Mod. Amer. History or concurrent registration in Mod. Amer. History

This course is designed for the college-bound student who has above-average reading skills.  Topics include the nature of crime, the nature of law in society, the personality of the criminal, the victims of crime, the problems of juvenile crime and the juvenile justice system, and the criminal justice system.  Civil law is studied regarding torts, consumerism, housing and family law.  

CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGY

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Mod. Amer. History or concurrent enrollment in Mod. Amer. History

This course uses a discussion format and deals with psychological theories as well as in-depth studies of personality, mental health, relationships, and character development.  Topics that could be covered in the course include: learning; motivation; memory; emotional development; altered states of consciousness; interpersonal relationships and aggression.

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Mod. Amer. History or concurrent registration in Mod. Amer. History

This course uses a discussion format and deals with psychological theories as well as in-depth studies of personality, mental health, relationships, and character development.  Topics that could be covered in the course include: personality theories; disturbances – breakdown and recovery in regards to personality and psychological disorders; adolescence to adulthood; lifespan and dying and death and grief.

PSYCHOLOGY AP

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Category: AP

Prerequisite:  Course average of “93” in World Hist. or Mod. Amer. Hist. Acad. or “83” in Accel. or course average of “83” in another AP course, or Dept. Recommendation, or Standardized Test Scores (SBA or DRP ).

AP Psychology is designed to expose students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.  This full-year course is the equivalent of a college-level general psychology course and is designed to prepare students for the AP examination.  The curriculum is intensive and sophisticated, requiring a strong level of commitment.  This course is designed to expose students to an array of subjects of interest that has one common thread: the student.  AP Psychology will be an academic odyssey as students traverse through such areas as:  psychological disorders, memory, brain function, psychological testing and experimentation, lifespan, states of consciousness, motivation and emotion, and major personality theories.   Please see page 19 for specific requirements regarding AP/UCONN courses.

SOCIOLOGY

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  .5

Category: 2

Prerequisite:  Mod. Amer. History or concurrent registration in Mod. Amer. History

This course is designed primarily for the student who plans to go to college and/or is preparing for a career in social work, counseling, or a similar field.  Sociology is the study of humans in groups and the ways in which people relate to each other in society.  Topics covered are human learning about society’s way of life and its rules; social institutions like the family; and social problems.  The methods used by sociologists will also be covered.  

WORLD LANGUAGES

DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY

Our primary goal is to help all students develop linguistic proficiency and cultural sensitivity in a second language of their choice.  We believe that all students can benefit from second language instruction.  We recognize that not everyone learns at the same rate or in the same way; nevertheless, we believe that all students should have the opportunity to develop language proficiency to a degree commensurate with their individual abilities.   In the 21st century, the ability to communicate effectively in a language other than English is increasingly important in today’s global society.  Also, we believe all students should have an awareness of other cultures as well as sensitivity and appreciation for the diversity around them.  We believe that the study of a second language and culture  will give them the tools to be successful in a ever increasing global market.

What career options might I have with a background in World Language?

Business

E-Commerce Developer

International Sales &

Marketing Officer

International Investment

International Banking Officer

Education

Elementary School Teacher

Middle School Teacher

High School Teacher

School Administrator

College Professor

Social Worker

Government

Foreign Service Officer

Intelligence Agent

Customs Official

Court Interpreter

Healthcare

Interpreter

Healthcare worker

Manufacturing

Biotechnology Researcher

Software Programmer

Retail

Import/Export Agent

Sales & Marketing Manager

Media

Journalist

Public Relations Specialist

Telecommunications

Translator

Reporter

News Commentator

Museums & Galleries

Art Conservator

Docent

Museum Director

Tourism

Travel Agent

Hotel Management

Tour Guide

World Language Courses

CLASSICAL LANGUAGE

Latin is one of the oldest subjects still taught in high school.  We are the heirs of the Romans.  Our language is 60% Latin derived.  The way we govern and judge ourselves comes from the Romans.  In contrast to the modern languages, Latin emphasizes reading comprehension. Students will demonstrate reading comprehension of Latin by translating and answering questions.

MODERN LANGUAGES

The world language program is available to those students who must meet college requirements or who are interested in developing all four skills of language:  listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.  A four-year sequence is offered in French, Italian, and Spanish.  The first two years of language study focus on the vocabulary and grammatical structures needed for daily communication.  At the advanced levels, the courses focus on creating longer discourse in writing and speaking and more advanced interactions.  At all levels, the study is enriched by materials that help to give the student a rich understanding of the countries and cultures studied in class.  

FRENCH 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  None

French 1 introduces the beginning student to the sound system and intonation patterns of French with special emphasis on the listening comprehension and speaking skills.  It acquaints students with the basic structures and trains them to use these structures in simple conversation.  It also helps to develop their ability to read and write within reasonable limits.  At the same time, it acquaints them with different aspects of French culture.

FRENCH 2

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  French 1

French 2 continues the development of the basic skills begun in the first year.  The comprehension and speaking skills are stressed, but with more attention being given to reading and writing.  The study of geography, history and culture of francophone world is continued.

FRENCH 3

Grades:  11-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  French 2

French 3 continues the content of the spoken language for listening comprehension and speaking, but the vocabulary and style of the written language are introduced to develop the reading and writing skills.  Students receive training in guided literary analysis and composition such as summaries, character sketches, and original dialogues.

FRENCH 4

Grades:  12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  French 4

French 4 is an extension of the work in French 3 except that now students devote more time to reading, writing and speaking than in any previous level.  Using excerpts from French literature along with other selected cultural and historical readings, students are expected to write original compositions using vocabulary appropriate to the materials.  Oral activities are also a part of the program to increase the students’ proficiency in the use of the language.

ITALIAN 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  None

Italian 1 introduces the beginning student to the sound system and intonation patterns of Italian with special emphasis on the listening comprehension and speaking skills.  It acquaints students with the basic grammatical structures and trains them to use these in simple conversation.  It also helps to develop their ability to read and write simple texts.  At the same time, it acquaints them with different aspects of Italian culture.

ITALIAN 2

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  Italian 1

Italian 2 continues the development of the basic skills begun in the first year.  The comprehension and speaking skills are stressed but with more attention being given to reading and writing.  The study of the geography and history of Italy, its people and customs is continued.

ITALIAN 3

Grades:  11-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  Italian 2

Italian 3 is designed to improve reading and writing proficiency through practice of these skills.  It includes a review of grammar, an introduction to some of the great works in Italian literature and a more extensive study of the geography and history of Italy, its people and customs.

ITALIAN 4

Grades:  12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  Italian 3

Italian 4 is an extension of the work in Italian 3, except that now students devote more time to reading, writing, and speaking than in any previous level.  Selections from various periods of Italian literature are read and studied.  Oral activities are also part of the program to increase individual initiative and group planning.

SPANISH 1

Grades:  9-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  None

Spanish 1 introduces the beginning student to the sound system and intonation patterns of Spanish with special emphasis on the listening comprehension and speaking skills.  It acquaints students with the basic grammatical structures and trains them to use these structures in simple conversation. It also helps to develop their ability to read and write within reasonable limits. At the same time, it acquaints them with different aspects of Spanish culture.  Spanish 1 emphasizes the basic skills of language, teaches the student the essential elements of grammar, and introduces the student to the Spanish speaking world.

SPANISH 2

Grades:  10-12

Credit:  1

Accelerated Category 1

Academic Category 2

Prerequisite:  Spanish 1

Spanish 2 aims at strengthening and enriching the students’ skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing, thereby facilitating and making more flexible all forms of expression.  Moreover, the students become further acquainted with the countries of the Hispanic world and their civilization.