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Course Description Guide

2020 - 2021

The Plymouth High School faculty and staff are pleased to present our course offerings for 2020-2021 school year.  This guide will be of assistance to you in planning your academic program for this year and for the rest of your high school career.  Please take the time to read through the guide carefully, noting specific course descriptions, prerequisites, and recommended grade levels.

Contents  

Core 40 Diploma  

Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma

Core 40 with Technical Honors Diploma 

College & Career Opportunities at PHS

Advisory

Summer School

Agriculture

Business & Technology Education

English

Family and Consumer Sciences

Health/Physical Education 

Mathematics

Music

Performing Arts

Science

Social Studies

Special Education

Student Office Assistant/Study Hall/Learning Center 

Technology Education

Visual Arts

World Languages 

Area Vocational Programs 

Weidner School of Inquiry 

Alternative High School and Credit Recovery Programs 

Multidisciplinary Courses


CORE 40  (back to top)

English/Language Arts

8 credits

English 9, 10, 11, and 12

Mathematics

6 credits

2 credits:  Algebra I

2 credits:  Geometry

2 credits:  Algebra II

(Integrated Math may be substituted by administrative approval)

*STUDENTS MUST  BE ENROLLED IN A MATH OR APPLIED MATH EACH YEAR OF HIGH SCHOOL.

Science

6 credits

2 credits:  Biology I

2 credits:  Integrated Chemistry/Physics, OR Chemistry I, OR Physics

2 credits:  any Core 40 science course

Social Studies

6 credits

2 credits: World History/Civilization

2 credits: US History

1 credit:  US Government

1 credit:  Economics

Directed Electives

5 credits

Career Pathway Course:  a logical sequence from a technical or career area

World Languages:  Chinese, Spanish

Fine Arts:  Music, Drama, Art, Student Publications

Physical Education

2 credits

1 credit:  PE I (1 semester)

1 credit:  PE II (1 semester)

Health and Wellness

1 credit

Elective Courses

8 credits

Any additional courses

TOTAL

42 CREDITS

Other Requirements

Students in the Classes of 2022 & 2021 will need to pass the ISTEP 10+ English/Language Art and ISTEP 10+ Mathematics (or a similar test as mandated by the Indiana Dep’t of Education). They will also take an ECA in Biology I.  Students in the Classes of 2023 & 2024 will need to meet a Graduation Pathway (see p 7)

NOTE: ALL REQUIREMENTS MUST BE COMPLETED BEFORE A STUDENT MAY PARTICIPATE IN THE COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM AND RECEIVE A DIPLOMA.

CORE 40: with ACADEMIC HONORS  (back to top)

The Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma is the most rigorous course of study required by the state of Indiana for high school graduation.  Students earning this diploma must complete requirements above and beyond those required for the Core 40 diploma.

English/Language Arts

8 credits

English 9, 10, 11, and 12

Mathematics

8 credits

2 credits:  Algebra I

2 credits:  Geometry

2 credits:  Algebra II

2 credits:  Pre-Calculus

*STUDENTS  MUST BE ENROLLED IN A MATH OR APPLIED MATH  COURSE EACH YEAR OF HIGH SCHOOL.

Science

6 credits

2 credits:  Biology I

2 credits:  Integrated Chemistry/Physics, OR Chemistry I, OR Physics

2 credits:  any Core 40 science course

Social Studies

6 credits

2 credits: World History/Civilization

2 credits: US History

1 credit:  US Government

1 credit:  Economics

World Languages

6 -8 credits

6 credits of one language OR eight credits of two different languages    

Fine Arts

2 credits

Art, Music, Drama, Student Publications

Physical Education

2 credits

1  credit:  PE I (1 semester) AND 1  credit:  PE II (1 semester)

Health and Wellness

1 credit

Elective Courses

5 – 10 credits – depending on Math and World Language options.

Any additional courses – Career Pathway Sequence Recommended

Other Requirements

Earn a grade of a “C-” or better in courses that will count toward the diploma.  Have a grade point average of a “B” or better.  

Complete one of the following:

A. Earn 4 credits in 2 or more AP courses and take corresponding AP exams

B. Earn 6 verifiable transcripted college credits in dual credit courses from the approved dual credit list.

C. Earn two of the following:

1. A minimum of 3 verifiable transcripted college credits from the approved dual credit list,

2. 2 credits in AP courses and corresponding AP exams,

D. Earn a composite score of 1250 or higher on the SAT and a minimum of 560 on math and 590 on the evidence based reading and writing section

E. Earn an ACT composite score of 26 or higher and complete written section

TOTAL

47 CREDITS

Other Requirements

Students in the Classes of 2022 & 2021 will need to pass the ISTEP 10+ English/Language Art and ISTEP 10+ Mathematics (or a similar test as mandated by the Indiana Dep’t of Education). They will also take an ECA in Biology I.  Students in the Classes of 2023 & 2024 will need to meet a Graduation Pathway (see p 7)

NOTE: ALL REQUIREMENTS MUST BE COMPLETED BEFORE A STUDENT MAY PARTICIPATE IN THE COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM AND RECEIVE A DIPLOMA

CORE 40: with TECHNICAL HONORS  (back to top)

The Core 40 with Technical Honors Diploma is the most rigorous course of study, both academically and technically, required by the state of Indiana for high school graduation.  Students earning this diploma must complete requirements above and beyond those required for the Core 40 Diploma

English/Language Arts

8 credits

English 9, 10, 11, and 12

Mathematics

6 credits

2 credits:  Algebra I

2 credits:  Geometry

2 credits:  Algebra II

*STUDENTS  MUST BE ENROLLED IN A MATH OR APPLIED MATH COURSE EACH YEAR OF HIGH SCHOOL.

Science

6 credits

2 credits:  Biology I

2 credits:  Integrated Chemistry/Physics, OR Chemistry I, OR Physics

2 credits:  any Core 40 science course

Social Studies

6 credits

2 credits: World History/Civilization

2 credits: US History

1 credit:  US Government

1 credit:  Economics

Physical Education

2  credits

1  credit:  PE I (1 semester) AND 1 credit:  PE II (1 semester)

Health and Wellness

1 credit

College & Career Pathway

6 credits (must include industry certification and/or dual credits - see “other requirements”)

Electives

11 credits

Other Requirements

Earn a grade of “C-” or above in all required courses, and

Have a grade point average of “B” or above, and

Earn 6 credits in the college and career preparation courses in a state-approved College & Career Pathway and one of the following:

1. State approved, industry recognized certification or credential, or

2. Pathway dual credits from the approved dual credit list resulting in 6 transcripted college credits  

Complete one of the following,

  1. Any one of the options (A - F) of the Core 40 with Academic Honors
  2. B. Earn the following scores or higher on WorkKeys: Reading for Information – Level 6, Applied Mathematics – Level 6, and Locating Information - Level 5.
  3. Earn the following minimum score(s) on Accuplacer: Writing 80, Reading 90, Math 75.
  4. Earn the following minimum score(s) on Compass: Algebra 66 , Writing 70, Reading 80.

TOTAL

47 CREDITS

Other Requirements

Students in the Classes of 2022 & 2021 will need to pass the ISTEP 10+ English/Language Art and ISTEP 10+ Mathematics (or a similar test as mandated by the Indiana Dep’t of Education). They will also take an ECA in Biology I.  Students in the Classes of 2023 & 2024 will need to meet a Graduation Pathway (see p 7)

ALL REQUIREMENTS MUST BE COMPLETED BEFORE A STUDENT MAY PARTICIPATE IN THE COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM AND RECEIVE A DIPLOMA.

Indiana Graduation Pathways Website                

COLLEGE READINESS OPPORTUNITIES AT PHS

2020-2021 (back to top)

Students at PHS have several opportunities to potentially earn college-level credits while still in high school.  Doing so will save both TIME and MONEY when you reach the post-secondary level.  We encourage you to consider the options carefully, noting your responsibilities for enrollment, payment, etc.  The following is a summary of opportunities:

Plymouth High School AP Courses/ Programming

Advanced Placement Courses: AP Psychology, AP Spanish Language & Culture,  AP English Language & Composition, AP Statistics, AP Biology, AP MicroEconomics, AP Physics I: Algebra-based

Advanced Placement (AP) courses are college-level courses and require corresponding exams in May of the year the student is enrolled in the class.  There is a cost factor for each exam for which the student is responsible, with a few exceptions (e.g. students enrolled in courses for which the Dep't of Education covers the cost, which is determined every year). The cost for the 19/20 school year will be determined at the beginning of the school year, but usually is approximately $92  (there is a reduced cost for those who qualify for textbook assistance).  Students who earn a 3, 4, 5 on the cumulative standardized exam given in May could earn credits from their respective colleges of choice.

Plymouth High School Dual Credit Programming

Ivy Tech Community College

Information on website

Indiana University

Advanced College Project

Information on website

Offered courses

See detailed list below

Chemistry 2 and Honors English 12

Credentialing Process

See detailed list of each courses’ credentialing requirements below

2.7 minimum GPA to earn dual credit

Cost

No charge to all students

No charge to students who receive free or reduced lunches.  Full pay lunch students pay $25 per credit. (Average of $75 per course).  This cost is compared to a per credit fee of $288 at an IU campus with a 3 credit course running $864. This course is an incredible value at $25 per credit.

Course transferability

Check with your higher ed institution of choice

Check Indiana Core Transfer Library

Course Registration Process

Complete ITCC dual credit application one time. Rosters submitted by PHS

Student online registration via IU

Rosters submitted by PHS

Withdrawal Process

Students with a score below 70% are advised to withdraw from the dual credit course by the withdrawal date. Students may still earn the high school credit.

Enrolling in dual credit  courses will result in an official IU or Ivy Tech course transcript, and the student's  grade will become part of  his/her permanent college academic record.  These classes are considered “dual credit” because students will earn both high school and college credits simultaneously.  Students are allowed to take the high school course for high school credits without applying for college-level credits

DETAILED LIST/CREDENTIALING REQUIREMENTS FOR PHS DUAL CREDIT COURSES

IN Department Of Education Course

Dual Credit Course

College Credits

Ivy Tech

IU ACP

Credentialing Requirements

AP Test Opt In

Advanced Speech

COMM101

3

X

Test Scores or Senior GPA 2.6

Ag Power, Structure & Technology

AGRI 106

3

X

None

AgriBusiness Management

AGRI 102

3

X

None

Animal Science

AGRI 103

3

X

None

Aviation I

AVIT 120

6

X

Digital Electronics

EECT 112

3

X

None

Calculus

MATH 211

4

X

Earned credit in Math 136 and 137

Student may opt into AP test.

Chemistry 2

CHEM 101/121

5

X

2.7 Cumulative GPA

CNA (Health Science Education II)

HLHS107

5

X

Test Scores or Jr/Sr GPA*

Natural Resources

AGRI 115

3

X

None

Culinary I

HOSP 101

2

X

Culinary I

HOSP 102

3

X

Health Science Education (Health Science I)

HLHS100

3

X

Test Scores or Jr/Sr GPA*

Honors English 12

W131/L202

3/3

X

2.7 Cumulative GPA

Medical Terminology (Health Science I)

HLHS101

3

X

Test Scores or Jr/Sr GPA*

Physics

PHYS 101

4

X

Earned credit in Math 136 and 137

Student may opt into AP test.

Pre-Calculus

Math 136/137

3/3

X

Test Scores *

Precision Machining I

MTCC 101/103

3/3

X

None

Precision Machining II

MTCC 106/107

3/3

X

Precision Machining I

Radio and TV

VISC 105

3

X

Test Scores or Jr/Sr GPA*

Spanish 3

SPAN 101/102

4/4

X

Test Scores or Jr/Sr GPA*

US Government

POLS 101

3

X

Test Scores or Jr/Sr GPA*

US History

HIST 101/102

3/3

X

Test Scores or Jr/Sr GPA*

Welding Technology I

WELD 100/108

3/3

X

None

Welding Technology II

WELD 109/207

3/3

X

Welding Technology I

Advisory Period  (back to top)

Advisory  is assigned by grade.  It meets daily during fourth period.  During this time students will work on various goals dependent on the day:

Tuesdays:  Advisory Curriculum - College/Career Readiness and/or Social/Emotional Learning Wednesdays/Thursdays:  Academic Interventions

Fridays:  Club Meetings

SUMMER SCHOOL  (back to top)

Why Take Summer School?

        

Make up failed courses! (Especially courses that have graduation qualifying exams).         

        Get Ahead—Make time to take an extra class in the fall.

When it is offered?

Daily from 8:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. for 6 weeks (3 weeks each session)

Courses traditionally offered are:

Algebra I                                 

Geometry

U. S. History

U. S. Government:  classroom or online                

Economics:  classroom or online

English 9-12 – credit recovery (GradPoint, computer-based)

Biology

Supervised Ag Experience

             PE I and PE II

ATTENDANCE POLICY:

Each student is obligated to attend each scheduled class.  Vacations and camps should NOT be scheduled during summer school.  A student will be dropped from the class if he/she is absent more than two times per session.  Three tardies are equal to one absence.


AGRICULTURE  (back to top)

Agribusiness Management

2 Semesters (required) - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 9-12

Dual College Credit

Elective

Recommended Prerequisite: Intro to Agriculture, Food,  and Natural Resources

Agribusiness Management provides foundation concepts in agricultural business. It is a two semester course that introduces students to the principles of business organization and management from a local and global perspective, with the utilization of technology. Concepts covered in the course include; accounting and record keeping, business planning and management, food and fiber, forms of business, finance, management, sales and marketing, careers, leadership development. Students will demonstrate principles and techniques for planning, development, application and management of agribusiness systems through a supervised agriculture experience (work based learning) programs.

Ag Power, Structure, and Technology

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 9-12

Dual College Credit

Elective

Recommended Prerequisite: Intro to Agriculture, Food,  and Natural Resources

Agriculture Power, Structure and Technology is a two semester, lab intensive course in which students develop an understanding of basic principles of selection, operation, maintenance, and management of agricultural equipment in concert with the utilization of technology. Topics covered include: safety, electricity, plumbing, concrete, carpentry, metal technology, engines, emerging technologies, leadership development, supervised agricultural experience, and career opportunities in the area of agriculture power, structure, and technology.

This course counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

ANIMAL SCIENCE

2 Semesters - 2 Credits        

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Dual College Credit

Prerequisite: None

Animal Science is a two-semester program that provides students with an overview of the animal agriculture industry. Students participate in a large variety of activities and laboratory work including real and simulated animal science experiences and projects. All areas that the students study may be applied to both large and small animals. Topics to be covered in the course include: history and trends in animal agriculture, laws and practices relating to animal agriculture, comparative anatomy and physiology of animals, biosecurity threats and interventions relating to animal and human safety, nutrition, reproduction, careers, leadership, and supervised agriculture experiences relating to animal agriculture.

                                                                           

SUPERVISED AGRICULTURAL EXPERIENCE (SAE) 

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  FFA Membership

*NOTE: This course is offered during summer school only

Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) is designed to provide students with opportunities to gain experience in the agriculture field(s) in which they are interested. Students will experience and apply what is learned in the classroom, laboratory and training site to real-life situations with a standards-based plan for learning. Students work closely with their agriculture teacher(s), parents and/or employers to get the most out of their SAE program.

BUSINESS &   TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION  (back to top)

INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING

2 Semesters - 2 Credits        

Grade Level:  10-12

Prerequisite:  None

Core 40, Academic Honors and Technical Honors Elective

Introduction to Accounting introduces the language of business using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting. Emphasis is placed on accounting principles as they relate to both manual and automated financial systems. This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision-making.

BUSINESS LAW AND ETHICS

2 Semesters - 2 Credits        

Grade Level:  10-12

Core 40, Academic Honors and Technical Honors Elective

Prerequisite:  None

Business Law and Ethics provides an overview of the legal system in the business setting. Topics covered include: basics of the judicial system, contract, personal, employment and property law. Application of legal principles and ethical decision-making techniques are presented through problem-solving methods, case review, and situational analyses.

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 9-12

Core 40, Academic Honors and Technical Honors Elective

Prerequisite:  None

                          

Principles of Business Management focuses on the roles and responsibilities of managers as well as opportunities and challenges of ethically managing a business in the free-enterprise system. Students will attain an understanding of management, team building, leadership, problem-solving steps and processes that contribute to the achievement of organizational goals. The management of human and financial resources is emphasized.

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

2 semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: None

Principles of Marketing provides a basic introduction to the scope and importance of marketing in the global economy. Emphasis is placed on oral and written communications, mathematical applications, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills as they relate to advertising/promotion/selling, distribution, financing, marketing-information management, pricing, and product/service management.

SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING 

2 semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 11-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing

Sports and Entertainment Marketing is a specialized marketing course that develops student understanding of the sport/event industries, their economic impact, and products; distribution systems and strategies; pricing considerations; product/service management, and promotion. Students acquire an understanding and appreciation for planning. Throughout the course, students are presented problem-solving situations for which they must apply academic and critical-thinking skills. Participation in cooperative education is an optional instructional method, giving students the opportunity to apply newly acquired marketing skills in the workplace

INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP

 

2 semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 9-10

Elective

Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Entrepreneurship provides an overview of what it means to be an entrepreneur. Student will learn about starting and operating a business, marketing products and services, and how to find resources to help in the development of a new venture. This course is ideal for students interested in starting their own art gallery, salon, restaurant, etc.

DIGITAL APPLICATIONS AND RESPONSIBILITY A/B 

2 semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: None

Digital Applications and Responsibility prepares students to use technology in an effective and appropriate manner in school, in a job, or everyday life. Students develop skills related to word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and communications software. Students learn what it means to be a good digital citizen and how to use technology, including social media, responsibly. Students expand their knowledge of how to use digital devices and software to build decision-making and problem-solving skills.

COMPUTER SCIENCE I

2 Semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 11-12

Prerequisite:  NONE

Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a science course requirement for all diplomas

Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

Note:  The AP Exam is an option for students enrolled in this course; there is a fee for the test

                          

Computer Science I introduces the structured techniques necessary for the efficient solution of business-related computer programming logic problems and coding solutions into a high-level language. The fundamental concepts of programming are provided through explanations and effects of commands and hands-on utilization of lab equipment to produce accurate outputs. Topics include program flow-charting, pseudo coding, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving problems. The course covers creating file layouts, print charts, program narratives, user documentation, and system flowcharts for business problems; algorithm development and review, flowcharting, input/output techniques, looping, modules, selection structures, file handling, control breaks, and offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment.

COMPUTER SCIENCE III: CYBERSECURITY

2 Semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 11-12

Prerequisite:  Computer Science I

Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a science course requirement for all diplomas

Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

Computer Science III: Cybersecurity introduces the secure software development process including designing secure applications, writing secure code designed to withstand various types of attacks, and security testing and auditing. It focuses on the security issues a developer faces, common security vulnerabilities and flaws, and security threats. The course explains security principles, strategies, coding techniques, and tools that can help make software fault tolerant and resistant to attacks. Students will write and analyze code that demonstrates specific security development techniques. Students will also learn about cryptography as an indispensable resource for implementing security in real-world applications. Students will learn foundations of cryptography using simple mathematical probability. Information theory, computational complexity, number theory, and algebraic approaches will be covered.

ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

2 Semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 11-12

Prerequisite:  Introduction to Accounting

Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

Advanced Accounting expands on the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting covered in Introduction to Accounting. Emphasis is placed on accounting principles as they relate to both manual and automated financial systems. This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision-making.

BUSINESS MATH

2 semesters - 2 Credit        

Grade Level: 11-12

General Diploma - Math; Elective - Core 40, AHD, and THD

Prerequisite: Algebra I 

Fulfills a Mathematics requirement for the General Diploma or Certificate of Completion only

Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

Business Math is a course designed to prepare students for roles as entrepreneurs, producers, and business leaders by developing abilities and skills that are part of any business environment. A solid understanding of math including algebra, basic geometry, statistics, and probability provides the necessary foundation for students interested in careers in business and skilled trade areas. The content includes mathematical operations related to accounting, banking and finance, marketing, and management. Instructional strategies should include simulations, guest speakers, tours, Internet research, and business experiences.

WORK-BASED LEARNING CAPSTONE                        

Up to 2 Semesters, 1-2 periods per day - 2-4 Credits        

Grade Level:  12        

Elective

Prerequisites: a minimum of 4 credits of introductory and advanced career and technical education courses related to a student’s pathway and to the work site placement

Work Based Learning Capstone is a stand-alone course that prepares students for college and career. This strategy builds students’ skills and knowledge in their chosen career path. Work Based Learning Capstone experiences occur in workplaces and involve an employer assigning a student meaningful job tasks to develop his or her skills, knowledge, and readiness for work. A clear partnership agreement and training plan is developed by the student, teacher, and workplace mentor/supervisor to guide the student’s work based experiences and assist in evaluating achievement and performance. In stand-alone WBL Capstone courses, students have the opportunity to apply the concepts, skills, and dispositions learned in their pathways in real world business and industry settings. Therefore, at least 4 credits in a student’s pathway would be prerequisite to the student enrolling in the stand-alone WBL course. Work Based experiences need to be in an industry setting closely related to a student’s CTE pathway. Instructors must have a clear partnership agreement and training plan for each student participating in Work Based experiences. When a course is offered for multiple hours per semester, the amount of authentic work experience needs to be increased proportionally

Interactive Media - Marketing

2 Semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

Marketing is a hot business right now, no matter where you look, marketers, are trying to get your attention. From social media, publications, TV, radio, billboards, and beyond, marketers are vying for your attention. During this course, PCSC Marketing Director Judi Lykowski will teach you about these platforms as she puts you in the driver's seat to test out your marketing ideas in a team approach. During the class you will learn about digital marketing careers, entry-level marketing jobs, colleges that offer marketing degree programs, and you'll be able to network with Michiana marketing professionals who will visit the class to guest speak. You will leave the class knowing if you have a passion to pursue a career in the marketing world. If you do - great news! You can take the 2nd-semester advanced level the following semester! Upperclassman wanting to pursue a career in multimedia marketing can seek to take the third semester of this course as an independent study on a case by case basis.

Radio & Television I

2 Semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 9-12

Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Prerequisite:  None

Radio and Television I focuses on communication, media and production. Emphasis is placed on career opportunities, production, programming, promotion, sales, performance, and equipment operation. Students will also study the history of communication systems as well as communication ethics and law. Students will develop oral and written communication skills, acquire software and equipment operation abilities, and integrate teamwork skills. Instructional strategies may include a hands-on school-based enterprise, real and/or simulated occupational experiences, job shadowing, field trips, and internships.

Radio & Television II

2 Semesters - 1 credit per semester

Recommended Grade Level: 10 -12

Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Prerequisite:  Radio & Television I

Radio and Television II prepares students for admission to television production programs at institutions of higher learning. Students train on professional equipment creating a variety of video projects. During this second-year program students integrate and build on first-year curriculum while mastering advanced concepts in production, lighting and audio.

ENGLISH  (back to top)

ENGLISH 9: FRESHMEN LITERATURE

1 Semester - 1 Credit        

Grade Level:  9

Required (along with Eng 9: Critical Thinking & Argumentation)

Prerequisite:  None

English 9, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9-10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, focusing on literature within an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write, responses to literature, expository (informative), narrative, and argumentative/persuasive compositions, and sustained research assignments. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

ENGLISH 9: CRITICAL THINKING & ARGUMENTATION

1 Semester - 1 Credit        

Grade Level:  9

Required (along with Eng 9: Freshmen Literature)

Prerequisite:  None

Critical Thinking and Argumentation is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts. CTA is a study of logical reasoning and communication. CTA will challenge students to think critically and analytically on topics ranging from local to global issues. Students will learn to create, question, and defend arguments. Active class participation is essential, including persistent questioning, rational discussion, and reasoned argumentation. While writing will be an expectation in the class, the primary format for sharing information will be using the spoken word including (1) peer responses, (2) small group sharing, (3) full class discussions, (4) small group presentations, (5) and student-authored individual presentations.

In CTA, students will be expected to make comments reflecting the development of a logical line of reasoning extending from a clear point of view, and involving evidence of support involving data, examples, anecdotes, documents, and information from a variety of sources). CTA students will use the same Standard English conventions for oral speech that they use in their writing. CTA is an essential step in preparation for other high school courses, post-secondary experiences, and the development of communication skills for the 21st century.

ENGLISH 10

2 Semesters - 2 Credits        

Grade Level:  10

Required

Prerequisite:  English 9

The English 10 course emphasizes grammar, composition, vocabulary, and literature.  Major literary genres include poetry, drama, the novel, short stories, and non-fiction.  Students apply specialized literary vocabulary both to evaluate literary compositions and to discuss their own written work.  They write texts using appropriate rhetorical strategies to produce narration, exposition, persuasion, and description, as well as to synthesize research information and to produce technical documents.  Students are required to document independent reading.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11

Prerequisite:  English 9 and 10; Students should be able to read and comprehend college-level texts and apply the conventions of standard written English in their writing

Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for grade 11 for all diplomas

AP English Language and Composition is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. The course focuses on the development and revision of evidence-based analytic and argumentative writing and the rhetorical analysis of nonfiction texts. The course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.

ENGLISH 11 A/B

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11

Required unless student enrolls in AP English Language and Composition

The English 11 course is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication. Students analyze, compare, and evaluate works of historical or cultural significance in American literature, balancing poetry, fiction, nonfiction and visual media. Students write narrative, analytical, persuasive, expository, summary, and more sustained research assignments incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, charts and tables and write and produce a video for YouTube. Students write workplace documents, resumes, application essays, and cover letters. Students are required to document independent reading.

ENGLISH 12 A/B

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  12

Required unless student enrolls in English 12 ACP

Taught in both a traditional classroom and through an on-line class

The English 12 course emphasizes composition, vocabulary, World literature, and documented research.  Major literary genres include poetry, short stories, plays, novels, film and essays.  Students trace the development of major works of literature and use principles of literary criticism to evaluate meanings.  They employ rhetorical strategies to develop in-depth responses and develop presentations based on documented research.  Students present their findings in varied ways, including multi-media presentations.  Students are required to document independent reading.  

ENGLISH 12 HONORS ADVANCED COLLEGE PROJECT (ACP)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  12

By Application per Indiana University Standards

Prerequisite:  English 11 or AP English Language and Composition

The Advance College Project is a partnership program between Indiana University and Plymouth High School.  ACP English provides senior English credit to qualified high school students while simultaneously allowing students to purchase up to six hours of college credit from IU.  Semester A is W131, freshman composition (3 hours), and semester B is L202, the introduction to literature course (3 hours).  The IU credit is transferable to many other colleges nationwide, providing students earn a grade of “C” or higher.  Students may enroll in the class for high school credit only; they are not required to enroll in the college course.  The high school course receives weighted grades.

In semester A/B, students in W131 examine issues in varied disciplinary fields and cultivate reading, writing, and analytic skills.  Students summarize arguments, identify the structure of claims, and examine the strength of evidence offered in support of those claims. Through a sequence of analytical responses, students demonstrate not only that they comprehend the argument of experts, but they can also formulate, articulate, and defend claims of their own.

In semester B/C, students in L202 explore the process of literary analysis.  Students use techniques for close reading, develop a framework for articulating and supporting interpretations, and work with an array of classic and contemporary texts including short story, poetry, drama, film, and novels. Students do extensive reading, write in response to literature, raise significant questions of themselves and of the text, and discover interrelationships among the works studied. The ultimate goal is for students to formulate precise, thoughtful, and in-depth responses to their reading, using the analytical powers they developed in W131.

DEBATE:  Speech

1 or 2 Semesters - 1 or 2 Credits  

Grade Level:  10-12

Elective

The student will have the opportunity to work on specialty, competitive, speaking events of his/her own choosing.  Along with the instructor, a student will design his/her own course of study.  The areas of choice will include: extemp, oratory, debate, congress, and oral interpretation.  There will be work, writing, research, and performance projects each grading period.  Students in this class will work to attain NSDA  advanced degrees, which will come from competition at speech and debate tournaments.

Students may take this class for credit more than once. 

ADVANCED SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION, Dual Credit

1 Semester class - 1 high school credit AND 3 college credits (See page 6 of this book for specific credentialing requirements)

Grade Level: 11-12

May substitute for required Speech or be in addition to required Speech.

Also counts for English required credits.

Prerequisite:  None

Speech is a class designed to help students build confidence in expressing ideas before classmates and other audiences.  The course will emphasize development of pleasing and articulate speech, provide practice in proper non-verbal skills, and instruction in constructing well-organized, interesting speeches.  Numerous short speeches will be designed to inform, entertain, and persuade an audience.  Radio and video equipment will be used.  The use of outlines and manuscripts will be worked with.  The IVY TECH syllabus will be incorporated into this course for dual credit.

CRITICAL THINKING AND ARGUMENTATION

1 semester - 1 high school credit

Grade Level: 12

May substitute for required Speech or be in addition to required Speech.  

Also counts for English required credits.  

Prerequisite:  None

Critical Thinking and Argumentation should challenge students to think critically and analytically.  Active class participation is essential.  Students will research, logically develop, and present their persuasive arguments through speeches and presentations.  

This course can be taken in conjunction with ADVANCED SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION to complete a senior year of English credits

ENGLISH AS A NEW LANGUAGE [ENL]

English as a New Language, an integrated English course incorporating both the Indiana Academic Standards for English Language Arts and the WIDA English Language Development (ELD) Standards, is the study of language, literature, Composition, and oral communication for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students. The purpose of the course is to achieve proficiency in  listening, speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Standard English.  Students study English vocabulary used in fictional text and content-area texts, speak and write English so that they can function within the regular school setting and an English-speaking society, and deliver oral presentations appropriate to their respective levels of English proficiency.

ELL ENGLISH I A/B

2 Semesters – 2 credits

Grade Level:  9–12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Limited English Proficient (LEP) Level 1 – 3 as determined with WIDA ACCESS test, Program Director’s Consent

This class focuses on learning and practicing both spoken and written English.  The class is conducted in English.  Introduction to basic English grammatical sentence structure is presented through literature readings, writing practice, and oral communication.   Supplementary material will assist students in increasing comprehension and vocabulary.  Students will be required to read outside of the classroom.

ELL ENGLISH II A/B

2 Semesters – 2 credits

Grade Level: 9–12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Limited English Proficient (LEP) Level 1 – 3 as determined with WIDA ACCESS test, Program Director’s Consent

ENL II is a continuation of learning and practicing both spoken and written English.  The class is conducted in English. Students’ knowledge of language conventions and grammatical sentence structure will improve while students’ spoken and written English proficiency will increase through more in depth daily reading, writing, and oral communication practice.  Students will be required to read outside the classroom.

LANGUAGE ARTS LAB (ELL)

2 Semesters – 2 credits

Grade Level:  10–12

Elective

Prerequisite: Limited English Proficient (LEP) Level 1 – 4 as determined with WIDA ACCESS test, Program Director’s Consent

ELL Language Arts Lab offers students advanced practice in spoken and written English, with emphasis on application of reading comprehension and writing skills to other content area classes.

LANGUAGE ARTS LAB

2 Semesters – 1 or 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9 - 12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Teacher Recommendation and/or Administrative Placement

A lab course designed to help  students who have not yet developed proficiency in application of the reading- language arts standards.  Students gain reading and writing skills necessary to perform successfully in school and community.  Individualized instruction dominates the teaching strategies employed focusing on reading and writing. Labs consist of the following parts:

  1. Review Homework/Re-teach (answer students’ questions about what they did in English the day before,  help students individually or in small groups, help with difficult assignments)
  2. Monitored time to complete work or catch up, check organization, assignments and grades).
  3. Pre-Teach (introduce concepts that will be taught in their English classes in the next few days, activate their prior knowledge)
  4. Basic ISTEP Skills/Mastery of Standards (work on important basic skills as outlined in the 5 standards)

Students will be enrolled in this course simultaneously with their general education English course.

STUDENT MEDIA - Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced

1-8 Credits        

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective, fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors.

Prerequisite: None

Student Media, a course based on the High School Journalism Standards and the Student Media Standards, is the continuation of the study of journalism. Students demonstrate their ability to do journalistic writing and design for high school media, including school newspapers and yearbooks, and a variety of other media formats. Students follow the ethical principles and legal boundaries that guide scholastic journalism. Students express themselves publicly with meaning and clarity for the purpose of informing, entertaining, or persuading. Students work on The Mayflower yearbook and Ye Pilgrim newspaper so that they may prepare themselves for career paths in journalism, communications, writing or related fields.

CREATIVE WRITING

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level: 11-12

Elective

Creative Writing, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies for prose and poetry.  Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, the nuances of language and vocabulary, English language conventions, an awareness of the audience, the purposes for writing, and the style of their own writing.  Creative Writing Project:   Students complete a project, such as a short story, a narrative or epic poem, a persuasive speech or letter, a book review, a script or short play, or other creative compositions, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and writing progress in the Creative Writing course content.  

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE  (back to top)

INTRODUCTION TO FASHION & TEXTILES

1 semester- 1 Credit

Grade Level 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

This course addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the textiles and fashions arenas.  Topics include exploration of textiles and fashion industries; elements of science and design in textiles and apparel; textiles principles and applications; social, psychological, cultural and environmental aspects of clothing and textiles selection; clothing and textile products for people with special needs; critical thinking applied to consumer options for fashion, textiles, and related equipment and tools; care and maintenance of textile products, equipment, and tools; impacts of technology; construction and alteration skills; contemporary issues, including global applications.  

In each course, students will be required to construct a minimum of three sewing projects and purchase the materials needed for their projects.

ADVANCED NUTRITION AND WELLNESS

2 semesters - 2 credits 

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: A passing grade in the “A” part is required to continue into “B”.

Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is a sequential course that addresses more complex concepts in nutrition and foods, with emphasis on contemporary economic, social, psychological, cultural and global issues.  Topics include nutrition and wellness for individuals and families across the life-span; community and world food concerns, including hunger; impacts of technology on nutrition, foods, and related tools and equipment; management of food-related resources; acquiring, organizing, and evaluating information about foods and nutrition; and exploration of careers in all aspects of the food industry.  Laboratory experiences, which emphasize advanced applications, are required.

CULINARY ARTS & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

2 semesters

Grade Level: 10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Advanced Nutrition and Wellness

Dual Credit Class with IVY TECH - anticipated approval 2/20

Course Description/Objective: Prepare students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of careers in the hospitality industry. This course builds a foundation that prepares students to enter the Advanced Culinary Arts or Advanced Hospitality courses.

Major topics include: Introduction to the hospitality industry; food safety and personal hygiene; sanitation and safety; regulations, procedures, and emergencies; basic culinary skills; culinary math; and food preparation techniques and applications. Instruction and laboratory experiences will allow students to apply principles of purchasing, storage, preparation, and service of food and food products; apply basic principles of sanitation and safety in order to maintain safe and healthy food service and hospitality environments; use and maintain related tools and equipment; and apply management principles in food service or hospitality operations.

Intensive laboratory experiences: Commercial applications in both the classroom lab and the school cafeteria are a required component of this course of study. Student laboratory experiences may be either school-based or "on-the-job" or a combination of the two. Work-based experiences in the food industry are strongly encouraged. A standards-based plan guides the students’ laboratory experiences. Students are monitored in their laboratory experiences by the Culinary Arts and Hospitality teacher. Articulation with postsecondary programs is encouraged. During the course of the semester students will also get hands on experience through catering events both in the school and in the community.

CULINARY ARTS II: CULINARY ARTS (BAKING)

2 semesters

Grade Level: 11-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts & Hospitality Management A/B

Dual Credit Class with IVY TECH - anticipated approval 2/20

Course Description/Objective: Prepares students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of careers in the food industry, including (but not limited to) food production and services; food science, dietetics, and nutrition; and baking and pastry arts.

Major Topics: Basic baking theory and skills, introduction to breads, introduction to pastry arts, nutrition, nutrition accommodations and adaptations, cost control and purchasing, and current marketing and trends.

Instruction and Intensive Laboratory Experiences: Commercial applications of principles of nutrition, aesthetic, and sanitary selection; purchasing, storage, preparation, and service of food and food products; using and maintaining related tools and equipment; baking and pastry arts skills; managing operations in food service, food science, or hospitality establishments; providing for the dietary needs of persons with special requirements; and related research, development, and testing.

INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY ARTS I

2 semesters - 2 credits 

Grade Level: 10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Advanced Nutrition and Wellness

Introduction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway, in order to build basic culinary arts knowledge and skills. It is especially appropriate for students with an interest in careers related to Hospitality, Tourism, and Culinary Arts. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended. Topics include basic culinary skills in the foodservice industry, safety and sanitation, nutrition, customer relations and career investigation. Students are able to explore this industry and examine their own career goals in light of their findings. Laboratory experiences that emphasize industry practices and develop basic skills are required components of this course

ADVANCED CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

2 semesters - 2 credits 

Grade Level:  10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: A passing grade in the “A” part is required to continue into “B”.

Advanced Child Development A  is an introductory course for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers that draw on knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from conception/prenatal through age 3. It includes the study of prenatal development and birth; growth and development of children; child care giving and nurturing; and support systems for parents and caregivers. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Authentic applications such as introductory laboratory/field experiences with young children and/or service learning that build knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.

Advanced Child Development B addresses the child from age 2-6 in the above-mentioned developmental processes.  Caring for children with special needs; parental resources, services, and agencies; and career awareness.  High school students are required to successfully plan, prepare, instruct, and evaluate an 8-week play-school program for children ages 4 and 5. Advanced Child Development is for those students interested in life foundations, academic enrichment, and/or careers related to knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. It builds on the Child Development course, which is a prerequisite. Advanced Child Development B includes the study of professional and ethical issues in child development; child growth and development; child development theories, research, and best practices; child health and wellness; teaching and guiding children; special conditions affecting children; and career exploration in child development and nurturing. A project based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning, introductory laboratory/field experiences with children in preschool settings, and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.

ADULT ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

1 Semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  11, 12

Elective

Prerequisite: None

This course builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors students will need as they prepare to take the next steps toward adulthood in today’s ever-changing society.  A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes in the study of individual and family issues.  The focus is on becoming independent, contributing, and responsible participants in family, community, and career settings.  Topics include living independently and family formation; analysis of personal standards, needs, aptitudes and goals; integration of family, community, and career responsibilities; consumer choices and decision-making related to nutrition and wellness, clothing, housing, and transportation; financial management; relationship to technology and environmental issues to family and consumer resources; and community roles and responsibilities of families and individuals.

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS 

1 Semesters - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9, 10

Elective

Prerequisite: None

Interpersonal Relationships is an introductory course that is especially relevant for students interested in careers that involve interacting with people. It is also valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. This course addresses knowledge and skills needed for positive and productive relationships in career, community, and family settings. Major course topics include communication skills; leadership, teamwork, and collaboration; conflict prevention, resolution, and management; building and maintaining relationships; and individual needs and characteristics and their impacts on relationships. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of interpersonal relationships. Direct, concrete language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education for all career areas that involve interacting with people both inside and outside of a business/organization, including team members, clients, patients, customers, and the general public.

HUMAN AND SOCIAL SERVICES I 

2 Semesters/2 class periods - 4 Credits

Grade Level:  11, 12

Elective

Recommended Prerequisite: Advanced Nutrition and Wellness, Interpersonal Relationships, Advanced Child Development

Human and Social Services I is an introductory/exploratory course for students interested in careers in human and community services and other helping professions. Areas of exploration include family and social services, youth development, and adult and elder care, and other for-profit and non-profit services. This project-based course will help students integrate higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes to conduct investigations in human and social services at the local, state, national, or global/world level. Research and development, interdisciplinary projects, and/or collaboration with postsecondary faculty, community agencies or organizations, or student organizations are appropriate approaches. Students will be introduced to human and social services professions through presentations from a variety of guest speakers, job shadowing, field trips and introductory and exploratory field experiences. Case studies, role play, and application of professional codes of ethics will be utilized reflecting the challenges of working in diverse communities. Service learning experiences are highly recommended. Achievement of applicable FACS, academic, and employability competencies will be documented through a student portfolio.  

HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION  (back to top)

HEALTH & WELLNESS EDUCATION

1 semester - 1 Credit

Recommended        Grade        Level:  9–12 (usually taken by sophomores at PHS)

Required

Recommended Prerequisite: 8th Grade Health Education

Fulfills        the Health & Wellness requirement for        all diploma types

                          

Health and Wellness, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for Health and Wellness and provides the basis to help students adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. Health education should contribute directly to a student’s ability to successfully practice behaviors that protect and promote health and avoid or reduce health risks. Through a variety of instructional strategies, students practice the development of functional health information (essential concepts); determine personal values that support health behaviors; develop group norms that value a healthy lifestyle; develop the essential skills necessary to adopt, practice, and maintain health-enhancing behaviors. This course includes the application of priority areas in a planned, sequential, comprehensive health education curriculum. Priority areas include: promoting personal health and wellness, physical activity, and healthy eating; promoting safety and preventing unintentional injury and violence; promoting mental and emotional health, a tobaccofree lifestyle and an alcohol- and other drug-free lifestyle; and promoting human development and family health. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills of health and wellness core concepts, analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills, health-enhancing behaviors, and health and wellness advocacy skills.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION I 

1 Semester - 1 Credit

Required

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 (usually taken by freshmen at PHS)

Fulfills  half of the Physical Education requirement for all diplomas

Adapted physical education is offered, as needed, in the least restricted environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.

As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity.

                          

Physical Education I focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum that provides students with opportunities to actively participate in at least four of the following: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all of which are within the framework of the skills, knowledge and confidence needed by the student for a lifetime of healthful physical activity and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEPs and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.).

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II

1 Semester - 1 Credit

Required

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 (usually taken by freshmen at PHS)

Fulfills  half of the Physical Education requirement for all diplomas

Adapted physical education is offered, as needed, in the least restricted environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.

As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity.

Physical Education II focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum that provides students with opportunities to actively participate in four of the following areas that were not included in Physical Education I: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all of which are within the framework of the skills, knowledge and confidence needed by the student for a lifetime of healthful physical activity and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEPs and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.).

ASPE:  PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

1 semester - 1 Credit (can be taken more than once)

Required

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 (usually taken by freshmen at PHS)

Prerequisite: None

Plymouth High School students may earn physical education credit through an alternative supervised program (ASPE) during the fall, winter, spring, or summer sessions.  The credits earned through ASPE DO NOT count toward minimum course load requirements and IHSAA eligibility. One credit per semester/summer may be earned.  In order to earn 2 credits, a student must participate in two different sports.

ASPE has been approved ONLY for the following activities:

                                a.        All IHSAA recognized sports including cheerleading

                                b.        Summer Marching Band

                                c.         Winter Guard/Winter Drumline

ELECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION –  WEIGHT TRAINING

1 or 2 Semesters - 1 or 2 Credits

Grade Level: 10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Physical Education I and II and serious commitment to physical improvement

This is a course offered only for those with a strong interest in improving their physical potential and who want to work on a daily basis to reach their goal. Students will work somewhat at their own skill level, but many of the exercises will be physically demanding and exhausting so a serious commitment to physical improvement is a prerequisite for the course.

The purpose is to develop power, coordination and quickness as well as muscle strength and

endurance; all of which will prepare the student for a variety of activities and sports. Along with this will be a goal of improving balance, agility, flexibility, and running and jumping form and explosiveness. Included in this course will be an emphasis on stretching to increase flexibility and plyometric training.

MATHEMATICS  (back to top)

ALGEBRA I

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9 - 12

Prerequisite: None

Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

 Fulfills the Algebra I/Integrated Mathematics I requirement for all diplomas

Students pursuing Core 40, Core 40 with Academics Honors, or Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma should receive credit for Algebra I by the end of Grade 9

                          

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Algebra I is made up of 6 strands: Real Numbers and Expressions; Functions; LinearEquations, Inequalities, and Functions; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Exponential Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis and Statistics. These critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students will also engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

GEOMETRY

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9 –12

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Algebra I

Fulfills the Geometry/Integrated Mathematics II requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas and counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma

                          

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Seven critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Logic and Proofs; Points, Lines, Angles, and Planes; Triangles; Quadrilaterals and Other Polygons; Circles; Transformations; and Three-dimensional Solids. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

ALGEBRA II

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  10–12

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Geometry

Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

Fulfills the Algebra II/Integrated Mathematics III requirement for all diplomas

Algebra II builds on work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and allows for students to extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. Algebra II is made up of seven strands: Complex Numbers and Expressions; Functions; Systems of Equations; Quadratic Equations and Functions; Exponential & Logarithmic Equations and Functions; Polynomial, Rational, and Other Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.                          

PRE-CALCULUS/TRIGONOMETRY

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  10–12

Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry or Integrated Mathematics III

This course is offered for dual credit and students earn the honors bump

                          

Pre-Calculus extends the foundations of algebra and functions developed in previous courses to new functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level sequences and series. The course provides students with the skills and understandings that are necessary for advanced manipulation of angles and measurement. Pre-Calculus is made up of five strands: Polar Coordinates and Complex Numbers; Functions; Quadratic, Polynomial, and Rational Equations and Functions; Exponential and Logarithmic Equations and Functions; and Parametric Equations. Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. The course is designed for students who expect math to be a major component of their future college and career experiences, and as such it is designed to provide students with strong foundations for calculus and other higher-level math courses. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

CALCULUS

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of PreCalculus (B or higher grade suggested)

Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

This course is also offered for Ivy Tech dual credit and the AP Calulus AB  exam can be taken by student request

Calculus expands a student’s knowledge of topics like functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, and integrals. Additionally, students will review algebra and functions, modeling, trigonometry, etc. Calculus is made up of five strands: Limits and Continuity; Differentiation; Applications of Derivatives; Integrals; and Applications of Integrals. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

                          

AP CALCULUS BC 

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of AP Calculus AB (B or higher grade suggested)

Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas  Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

AP Calculus BC is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses and extends the content learned in AP Calculus AB to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and series. This course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions. The content of AP Calculus BC is designed to qualify the student for placement and credit in a course that is one course beyond that granted for AP Calculus AB.

STATISTICS, ADVANCED PLACEMENT

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11 - 12

Required - A Core 40, AHD, THD course with standards defined

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Algebra II; completion of PreCalculus suggested

Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas  Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

Statistics, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board.  The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.   Topics include: (1) exploring data: describing patterns and departures from patterns (2) sampling and experimentation: planning and conducting a study, (3) anticipating patterns: exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and (4) statistical inference: estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.  The use of graphing calculators and computer software is required. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

INTEGRATED MATH I 

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9-10

Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas

Fulfills the Algebra I requirement for all diplomas

Integrated Mathematics I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Integrated Mathematics I use properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades. The final unit in the course ties together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

INTEGRATED MATH II 

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  10-12

Prerequisite: Integrated Math I

Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas

Fulfills the Geometry requirement for all diplomas

Integrated Mathematics II focuses on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; by comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Integrated Mathematics I. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships. Circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, rounds out the course. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

INTEGRATED MATH III 

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  10-12

Prerequisite: Integrated Math II

Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas

Fulfills the Algebra II requirement for all diplomas

Integrated Mathematics III provides students the opportunity to pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. Finally, students bring together all of their experiences with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

MUSIC  (back to top)

BEGINNING CHORUS (Boys Choir; Mixed Choir)

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: None

Beginning Chorus (both Boys Choir  and Mixed Choir) is for the novice singer with little or no past training.  Instruction will cover ensemble and solo singing.  Participation in concerts is required to earn credit in this class.  Participation in solo and ensemble contest is an optional performance opportunity.  Participation in the choral festival and commencement program are at the discretion of the director.

Student evaluation will be based on daily performance grades, performance tests and concert attendance.

INTERMEDIATE CHORUS (Counterpoint/Girls)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Audition and Instructor Selection

Intermediate Chorus (Counterpoint) is a concert choir for experienced singers.  Continued training in solo and ensemble singing is a major part of this course.  Performance emphasis is on classical literature. Participation in concerts, solo and ensemble contest, choral festivals and other activities determined by the director are required to earn credit in this course

CHORAL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Audition and Instructor Selection

The Choral Chamber Ensemble is a concert and choir for experienced singers.  Continued training in solo and ensemble singing is a major part of this course.  Performance emphasis is on both classical and popular literature. Participation in concerts, solo and ensemble contest, choral festivals and other activities determined by the director are required to earn credit in this course.

INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE  (Piano; Guitar; Percussion)

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level: 11-12

Elective

Prerequisite: None

This is a beginning instrumental learning experience on either piano, guitar, or percussion.  The class will consist of a 35-minute group lesson followed by thirty minutes of individual practice time.  The twelve week class will cover beginning fingerings, simple notation, simple chords, a variety of cultural instruments within the percussion family, and will culminate in a short recital at the end of the semester.

ADVANCED CONCERT BAND - MARCHING

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Jr. High Band participation and Concert Band participation

Activities include home football games, parades, marching competitions, and band camp.  For students not enrolled in marching band, see electives below.  One credit is earned through required performances and playing exams.

DANCE PERFORMANCE (Color Guard)

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Through spring auditions.

Dance performance participates with the marching band through the first semester. Rehearsals begin in June and end in November.  Students in dance do not have to be members of the band.  Activities include home football games, marching competitions, dance camp, parades, and band camp, for the first semester, and non-competitive indoor performances the second semester. Students are encouraged, but not required to take both semesters.  One credit is earned through performances and sponsor directed tests.

INTERMEDIATE CONCERT BAND

2 Semesters - 2 Credits        

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Junior High Band participation

This band is for all students who display interest and talent in music and desire to participate in all phases of instrumental music.  One credit per semester is earned through required performances in all band activities, as well as written and playing exams.  Required activities include: all scheduled concerts and performances each semester.   Students are encouraged to take both semesters of band, as contests are midterm for the bands.

ADVANCED CONCERT BAND

2 Semesters - 2 Credits        

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Junior High Band participation

This band is an advanced ensemble for students who display a strong level of talent in music and desire to participate in all phases of instrumental music.  One credit per semester is earned through required performances in all band activities, as well as written and playing exams.  Required activities include: all scheduled concerts and performances each semester and ISSMA solo and ensemble contest.  Both semesters are required for participation unless approved by the band director.

JAZZ ENSEMBLE

1 or 2 Semesters - 1 or 2 Credits

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Teacher Permission

This course is for band students interested in learning to play jazz music.  One credit per semester is earned by participating in concerts, contests, written and playing exams.  Emphasis is placed on learning all phases of jazz music, i.e. solo playing, history, and instrumental techniques. Students may take one or both Semesters.

JAZZ ENSEMBLE II

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Enrollment in First semester Band, Beginning Instrumental Ensemble Experience, and/or Selection by Instructor through Audition

This course is for band students interested in playing advanced jazz music.   One credit per semester is earned by participating in concerts, contests, written and playing exams.  There is continued emphasis on solo playing, history, theory, and instrumental techniques.  Students must be enrolled in both Semesters.

MUSIC THEORY & COMPOSITION

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Participation in any music ensemble

Music Theory is a semester course designed to study the elements of music.  Students will learn basic writing and composition skills.  The final project will be a short arrangement or original composition displaying the skills and creative talents of each student.  Music Theory is open to students interested in expanding their knowledge of music beyond that of performance and/or are considering a career in music.  Either Music Theory or Music History is required for a major in music.

INDEPENDENT MUSIC THEORY & COMPOSITION II 

1 semester – 1 Credit

Grade Level:  11-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Music Theory

Independent study in music theory and composition is designed for the student who has already taken Music Theory and Composition and desires further instruction.  Skills in composition and aural training will be stressed, with many independent projects.  Students will have the opportunity to compose for a school ensemble as a final project.

MUSIC HISTORY & APPRECIATION

1 semester - 1 Credit         

Grade Level:  10-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

Music History is a one semester course designed to examine the role and importance of music in our lives.  Examination of music in different

cultures and through the perspective of performer, audience, and composer are included as well as the historical perspective of music development. Listening and creative activities are an integral part of this class.

Music History is open to any student who is interested in expanding their knowledge of music beyond that of performance and/or are considering a career in music.  Either Music Literature or Music Theory is required for a major in music.

INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA

1 or 2 Semesters – 1 or 2 credits

Grade Level:  9–12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Elementary/Jr. High Orchestra participation and Instructor Permission

This course provides students with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the string and/or full orchestra.  Instruction is designed so that students are enabled to integrate music study into other subject areas.  Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop various elements of musicianship.  Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading.  Activities may include recitals and/or public performance.

PERFORMING ARTS  (back to top)

THEATRE ARTS

2 semesters - 2 credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None - It is advised to take both semesters in one year; however, one semester only can be taken if necessary

Theatre Arts class is an introduction to the theatre.  Students will be introduced to theatre terminology, concentration skills, improvisational work, vocal skills, character development, stage terminology, and monologues.  Students will also sharpen their acting skills through acting exercises and scripted as well as memorized work.  Students are expected to be involved in out of class rehearsals and performances for a production during the semester.  

In the B part of the course, students will be introduced to theatre history, play reading, pantomime, varieties of drama, vocal analysis, stage movement, character study, and acting scene work.  Students will also sharpen their acting skills through acting exercises and scripted as well as memorized work.  Students are expected to be involved in out of class rehearsals and performances for a production during this semester

ADVANCED ACTING  

1 or 2 semesters – 1 or 2 credits  

Grade Level: 10 - 12

Elective

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theatre Arts A/B as well as instructor permission and probable audition.

This course will focus entirely on improving the fundamentals of character analysis and acting.  The class will meet during the first semester.  This class will produce our annual children’s show. Outside rehearsals will be required.

TECHNICAL THEATRE I

1 semester - 1 credit

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: None

Technical Theater will focus on the fundamentals of operating the auditorium.  Basic backstage skills such as theatrical lighting, sound, set design, and construction will be the focus.  Students will learn stagecraft theory and application for plays, musicals, concerts, and other various performance groups.  

Students will be required to attend an out-of-class theatrical production and critique a PHS production that semester.  

ADVANCED TECHNICAL THEATRE  

1 or 2 semesters – 1 or 2 credits  

Grade Level: 10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Technical Theatre I and application and interview with Instructor

The requirement for each class is successful completion of the preceding course, plus application and instructor interview. These courses will build upon each of the preceding courses in the area of technical theatre and stage productions from the backstage perspective.

Students will be required to attend several out-of-class work sessions, rehearsals, and shows.

Students will crew the shows for all school functions taking place in the auditorium (plays, music concerts, convocations, etc.) and for all outside groups who rent the auditorium.  

*Students are compensated for their work when outside groups rent the auditorium.

SCIENCE  (back to top)

BIOLOGY I (Life Science)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 9

Required

Prerequisite: None

Biology I is a course based on regular laboratory and field investigations that include a study of the structures and functions of living organisms and their interactions with the environment.  At a minimum, students enrolled in Biology I explore the functions and processes of cells, tissues, organs, and systems within various species of living organisms and the roles and interdependencies of organisms within populations, communities, ecosystems, and the biosphere.  Students work with the concepts, principles, and theories of the living environment. In addition, students enrolled in this course are expected to: (1) gain an understanding of the history and development of biological knowledge, (2) explore the uses of biology in various careers, and (3) investigate biological questions and problems related to personal needs and societal issues.

ADVANCED SCIENCE, COLLEGE CREDIT:  ACP BIOLOGY (Life Science)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 11, 12

Required

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry I

Counts as a Science Course for all diplomas

PHS is in the process of seeking ACP credentialing to begin the 20/21 school year.  This course is tentative based on approval by IU.

Advanced Science, College Credit: ACP Biology covers Indiana University’s ACP Biology (L100) course offered for  dual credit. Subjects covered will be Principles of biological organization, from molecules through cells and organisms to populations. Emphasis on processes common to all organisms, with special reference to humans.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY   (Life Science)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 10-12 (10th graders will need adminstrative approval and teacher rec)

Elective - Core 40 – AHD - THD life science

Prerequisite: Biology I  and recommended Chemistry 1

This is a two semester course which is recommended for students, who seek to receive a more concentrated exposure to anatomy and physiology than is provided in Advanced Biology. This class is primarily provided for students who are planning a health field career, seeking Core 40 credit, an Academic Diploma and a college-prep course.  

The curriculum includes concentrated dissections of a mammal and various mammal organs.  The dissections are coordinated with learning the physiology of each dissected organ or system.  The approach and level of sophistication is meant to provide a college-like environment which involves independent study, organization of laboratory situations, data interpretation, computer use, research and communication of ideas.  To accommodate student needs, traditional high school techniques are also utilized to promote the transition ton to a college approach.

EARTH/SPACE SCIENCE (Physical Science)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 10-12

Elective - Core 40 – AHD - THD physical science

Prerequisite:  Biology

The first semester deals with Basic Geology and Astronomy. We’ll explore the make-up of the Earth and our dependence on it. We examine various rock and mineral types and look at how their physical properties can give us clues to their formation and history. Astronomy will include a look at the planets, their relationship to the sun, Earth’s motions and its effects on our seasons. We’ll discuss current theories on the evolution of stars, galaxies and the behavior of space.

The second semester delves into Hydrology, Oceanography, Meteorology, and Geology. Hydrology will  focus on the action of groundwater and running water in the creation of various landforms. Oceanography combines a physical look at the world’s oceans, and a conservation approach to marine organisms. Meteorology involves the study of weather, climate and the atmosphere. We’ll investigate earthquakes, volcanoes and their connection to the movement of the crust. We’ll study the formation of mountains, and subsequent erosion of them. Earth’s history on a geological time scale and fossil evidence of Earth’s past will be explored.

INTEGRATED CHEMISTRY- PHYSICS(L)  (Physical Science)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

 (1 credit for Chemistry, 1 Credit for Physics)

Grade Level: 8-9

Elective - Core 40 – AHD - THD physical science

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Integrated Chemistry-Physics is a laboratory-based course in which students explore fundamental chemistry and physics principles.  Students enrolled in this course begin to conceptualize the general architecture of the atom and the roles played by the main constituents of the atom in determining the properties of materials.  They investigate through the process of scientific inquiry and problem solving, the structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions, forces, motion and the interaction between energy and matter.   Students will gain some understanding of how the scientific enterprise operates through examples of historical events.

Sequence of Semesters does not matter.  Either the chemistry or physics semester can be taken first and the other to follow.  Students do not have to take both Semesters.

The physics semester will introduce basic mechanics and electricity/magnetism.  Emphasis will be on problem solving using mathematical skills.  The chemistry semester will focus on learning the chemical language and problem solving skills.  Concepts to be introduced include the ones mentioned above plus heat energy and nuclear chemistry.

CHEMISTRY I  (Physical Science)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits        

Grade Level:  10- 11-12

Elective – Core 40 – AHD - THD physical science

Recommended Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Geometry and Integrated Chemistry Physics

Students begin to conceptualize with models the general structure of matter and the roles played by the main parts of the atom in determining the properties of matter.  Students will (1) investigate chemical questions and problems related to personal needs and societal issues, (2) learn and practice laboratory safety, (3) gain and understanding of the history of chemistry and (4) explore the uses of chemistry in various careers.  This course is mathematically based and is recommended for college bound students.

ACP CHEMISTRY II  (L)(Physical Science)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits  

Grade Level:  11-12

Elective – Core 40 – AHD – THD physical science

Prerequisite:  Chemistry I and Algebra II

ACP chemistry II is a dual credit class. Upon completion, credit will be given for Chem 101 (3 credits) and Chem 121 (2 credits) through Indiana University.  In order to be eligible for IU credit, the student must maintain a gpa of 2.7 or higher.  The content includes: (1) structure of matter: atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, molecular models, nuclear chemistry; (2) states of matter: gases, liquids and solids, solutions; and (3) reactions: reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.

AP PHYSICS I: ALGEBRA-BASED(L) (Physical Science)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 11-12

Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra I or Integrated Math I (PHS recommends completion of Alg II)

Counts as a Science Course for all diplomas  

Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

AP Physics 1 is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. AP Physics 1: Algebra-based is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits.

PLTW Principles of Biomedical Sciences 

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9 or permission from instructor

Elective

Prerequisite:  Biology I or concurrent enrollment in Biology I required

                                        

PLTW Principles of the Biomedical Sciences provides an introduction to this field through “hands-on” projects and problems. Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bioinformatics. Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. A theme through the course is to determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person. After determining the factors responsible for the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. Key biological concepts included in the curriculum are: homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, and defense against disease. Engineering principles such as the design process, feedback loops, fluid dynamics, and the relationship of structure to function will be included where appropriate. The course is designed to provide an overview of all courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in the subsequent courses.  

                                

PLTW Human Body Systems

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level: 10

Elective

Prerequisite:  Principles of Biomedical Sciences                

                                        

PLTW Human Body Systems is a course designed to engage students in the study of basic human physiology and the care and maintenance required to support the complex systems. Using a focus on human health, students will employ a variety of monitors to examine body systems (respiratory, circulatory, and nervous) at rest and under stress, and observe the interactions between the various body systems. Students will use appropriate software to design and build systems to monitor body functions.

SOCIAL STUDIES (back to top)

WORLD HISTORY & CIVILIZATION

2 Semesters - 2 Credits        

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

World History and Civilization is strongly recommended for college bound students. This course emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Key events related to people and places as well as transcultural interaction and exchanges are examined in this course. Students are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. They will examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice and process skills of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes. There will be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.

U. S. HISTORY A/B 

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11-12

Required

Prerequisite:  None

This two-semester course builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of American history and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. After reviewing fundamental themes in the early development of the nation, students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History. Students develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time.

U. S. HISTORY  A/B , DUAL CREDIT 

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

This course is offered for Ivy Tech dual credit.

This course in United States History is designed for junior students that have previously demonstrated exceptional abilities or achievements in academics during their first two high school years.  Class size will be limited. The course has a chronological frame from 1492 to the present and focuses on multiple causation and change in United States history over time. A variety of historical themes are examined in order to place the history of the United States into larger analytical contexts. Students are expected to analyze and interpret primary sources and develop awareness of multiple interpretations of historical issues in secondary sources. Historical events and issues in U.S. history are to be examined from multiple perspectives.

PSYCHOLOGY, ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

Psychology, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes. Topics include: (1) history and approaches, (2) research methods, (3) biological bases of behavior, (4) sensation and perception, (5) states of consciousness, (6) learning, (7) cognition, (8) motivation and emotion, (9) developmental psychology, (10) personality, (11) testing and individual differences, (12) abnormal psychology, 13) treatment of psychological disorders, and (14) social psychology  A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

U. S. GOVERNMENT

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  12

Required

Prerequisite:  None

This course provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States. Responsible and effective participation of citizens is stressed. Students understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and governments and understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens and how these are part of local, state, and national government. Students examine how the United States Constitution protects rights and provides the structure and functions of various levels of government. How the United States interacts with other nations and the government’s role in world affairs will be included. Using primary and secondary resources, students will articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues. As a result, they will be able to explain the role of individuals and groups in

government, politics, and civic activities and the need for civic and political engagement of citizens in the United States. This course is one-half of the senior social studies requirement of government and economics.

U. S. GOVERNMENT , DUAL CREDIT

1 semester - 1 Credit        

Grade Level:  12

Required

Prerequisite:  None

This course is offered for Ivy Tech dual credit        

This course in United States Government is designed for senior students that have previously demonstrated exceptional abilities or achievements in social studies.  Class size will be limited.  Content emphasizes higher level thinking skills, project development and presentation, and independent study and group work.  Basic government curriculum will be expanded.  This course is one-half of the senior social studies requirement of government and economics.

ECONOMICS

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level: 12

Required

Prerequisite:  None

This course examines the allocation of resources and their uses for satisfying human needs and wants. The course analyzes economic reasoning and behaviors of consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, institutions, governments, and societies in making decisions. Students will explain that because resources are limited, people must make choices and understand the role that supply, demand, prices, and profits play in a market economy. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity and economic reasoning, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national economic performance, the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Current events will be included throughout the year.  This course is one-half of the senior social studies requirement of government and economics.  Current events will be included throughout the course.

AP Microeconomics 

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  12

Required

Prerequisite:  None        

Microeconomics, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. The purpose of the AP course in microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, with the economic system.  It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.   Topics include (1) Basic Economic Concepts, (2) The Nature and Functions of Product Markets, (3)Factor Markets, and (4) Market Failure and the Role of Government.  A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

Indiana Studies 

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

Indiana Studies is an integrated course that compares and contrasts state and national developments in the areas of politics, economics, history, and culture. The course uses Indiana history as a basis for understanding current policies, practices, and state legislative procedures. It also includes the study of state and national constitutions from a historical perspective and as a current foundation of government. Examination of individual leaders and their roles in a democratic society will be included and student will examine the participation of citizens in the political process. Selections from Indiana arts and literature may also be analyzed for insights into historical events and cultural expressions.

Ethnic Studies

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

Ethnic Studies provides opportunities to broaden students’ perspectives concerning lifestyles and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States. This course will either focus on a particular ethnic group or groups, or use a comparative approach to the study of patterns of cultural development, immigration, and assimilation, as well as the contributions of specific ethnic or cultural groups. The course may also include analysis of the political impact of ethnic diversity in the United States.

SPECIAL EDUCATION  (back to top)

All PHS students will be enrolled in General Education Courses with the exception of those students who are on a Certificate of Completion Graduation Track as defined by GEI/LEP/IEP Conference Committee.

APPLIED ENGLISH 9

2 Semesters        

Grade Level:  9

Required

Prerequisite:  None

Applied Units: 4 units maximum

Counts as an English/Language Arts Requirement for the Certificate of Completion        

Applied English 9 is an integrated English course based on the Indiana Content Connectors for English/Language Arts in Grades 9-10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and communication, focusing on literature and nonfiction within an appropriate level of complexity for each individual student. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to a variety of texts. Students form responses to literature, expository (informative), narrative, and argumentative/persuasive compositions, and research tasks when appropriate. Students deliver ability-appropriate presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

APPLIED ENGLISH 10

2 Semesters         

Grade Level:  10

Required

Prerequisite:  Applied English 9

Applied Units: 4 units maximum

Counts as an English/Language Arts Requirement for the Certificate of Completion        

Applied English 10 an integrated English course based on the Indiana Content Connectors for English/Language Arts in Grades 9-10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and communication, focusing on literature and nonfiction within an appropriate level of complexity for each individual student. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to a variety of texts. Students form responses to literature, expository (informative), narrative, and argumentative/persuasive compositions, and research tasks when appropriate. Students deliver ability appropriate presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

APPLIED ENGLISH 11

2 Semesters

Grade Level:  11

Required

Prerequisite:  Applied English 10

Applied Units: 4 units maximum

Counts as an English/Language Arts Requirement for the Certificate of Completion        

Applied English 11, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Content Connectors English/Language Arts in Grades 9-10 and applicable employability skills. This course is a study of language, literature, composition, and communication focusing on literature with an appropriate level of complexity for each individual student. Students analyze, compare and evaluate a variety of classic and contemporary literature and nonfiction texts, including those of historical or cultural significance. Students write narratives, responses to literature, academic responses (e.g. analytical, persuasive, expository, summary), and research tasks when appropriate. Students analyze and create visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, charts, and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access online information.

APPLIED ENGLISH 12

2 Semesters

Grade Level 12

Required

Prerequisite:  Applied English 11

Applied Units: 4 units maximum

Counts as an English/Language Arts Requirement for the Certificate of Completion        

Applied English 12, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Content Connectors English/Language Arts in Grades 9-10 and applicable employability skills. This course is a study of language, literature, composition, and communication focusing on literature with an appropriate level of complexity for each individual student. Students analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of classic and contemporary literature and nonfiction texts, including those of historical or cultural significance. Students write narratives, responses to literature, academic responses (e.g. analytical, persuasive, expository, summary), and research tasks when appropriate. Students analyze and create visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, charts, and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access online information.

APPLIED DEVELOPMENTAL READING

2 Semesters

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Instructor Permission

Applied Developmental Reading is a supplemental course that provides students with individualized, specially designed instruction to support success in completing course work aligned with the Indiana Academic Standards or Content Connectors for English/Language Arts

APPLIED BUSINESS MATH

2 Semesters

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Instructor Permission

Applied Business Math is a course designed to prepare students for roles as entrepreneurs, producers, and business leaders by developing abilities and skills that are part of any business environment. A solid understanding of application of money management skills, navigating industry specific technology and apps, establishing and managing budgets, and maintaining inventory for products and other necessary skills that provides the foundation for students interested in careers in business related fields and everyday life. The content includes basic mathematical operations related to accounting, banking and finance, marketing, management, and retail. Instructional strategies should include simulations, guest speakers, tours, Internet research, and business experiences.

APPLIED BIOLOGY

2 Semesters

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Instructor Permission

Applied Biology I is a course based on the following core topics: cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity; genetics and evolution. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation, by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory, and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

APPLIED US HISTORY

2 Semesters

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Instructor Permission

Applied United States History is a course that builds upon concepts of U.S. History and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. After reviewing fundamental themes in the early development of the nation, students identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States. Students trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History. Students develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand specific topics or the cause for changes in the nation over time.

APPLIED PE I/II

2 Semesters

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Instructor Permission

Applied Physical Education II focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum that provides students with opportunities to actively participate in four of the following areas that were not covered in Physical Education I: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all which are within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes individual progress and performance-based skill evaluation.

APPLIED PREPARING FOR COLLEGE AND CAREERS

2 Semesters

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Instructor Permission

Applied Preparing for College and Careers addresses the knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to be prepared for success in college, career, and life. The focus of the course is the impact of today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities. Topics to be addressed include twenty-first century life and career skills; higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, values, and goals; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members; planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work; and managing personal resources. This course includes reviewing the 16 national career clusters and Indiana's College and Career Pathways, in- depth investigation of one or more pathways, reviewing graduation plans, developing career plans, and developing personal and career portfolios. A project-based approach, including computer and technology applications, cooperative ventures between school and community, simulations, and real life experiences, is recommended.

APPLIED BASIC SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

1 or 2 Semesters – 1, 2 or 3 credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Instructor Permission

Applied Units: 8 units maximum  

Counts as an Employability Requirement, Capstone Course or Elective for the Certificate of Completion

Applied Basic Skills Development is a multidisciplinary course that provides students continuing opportunities to develop basic skills including: (1) reading, (2) writing, (3) listening, (4) speaking, (5) mathematical computation, (6) note taking, (7) study and organizational skills, and (8) problem-solving skills, (9) employability skills, which are essential for high school achievement and post-secondary outcomes. Determination of the skills to be emphasized in this course is based on Indiana’s standards and Content Connectors, individual school corporation general curriculum plans, and the student’s Individualized Education Programs (IEP) or other individualized plans. Skills selected for developmental work provide students with the ability to continue to learn in a range of different life situations and may be applied using instructional practices related to community based instruction.

STUDY HALL  (back to top)

STUDENT OFFICE ASSISTANT

1 or 2  Semesters – 0 credits

Grade Level: 9 -12

Students may assist in the various school offices during their study hall period. Students must be responsible and qualified.

Students wanting to work in a office should apply with their counselor.  

STUDY HALL 

1 or 2  Semesters - 0 Credits

Grade Level: 9-12

Elective

This class period is a time for students to do homework and prepare for class.  The library is also available to students during their study hall time.

Study hall should be used by students who are willing to study and use their time wisely.  This should not be a time for sleeping or for wasting time.  We encourage students to use their time wisely and to get all of the education possible for a bright future for themselves.

LEARNING CENTER

1 or 2  Semesters – 0 credits

Grade Level:  9–12

Elective

The Learning Center is designed to help ALL students who feel that they might need academic support.  It incorporates time for students to do homework and prepare for class along with academic assistance.

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION  (back to top)

INTRODUCTION TO MANUFACTURING

2 semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective                        

Prerequisite:  None        

Introduction to Manufacturing is a course that specializes in how people use modern manufacturing systems with an introduction to manufacturing technology and its relationship to society, individuals, and the environment. An understanding of manufacturing provides a background toward developing engineering & technological literacy. This understanding is developed through the study of the two major technologies, material processing and management technology, used by all manufacturing enterprises. Students will apply the skills and knowledge of using modern manufacturing processes to obtain resources and change them into industrial materials, industrial products and consumer products Students will investigate the properties of engineered materials such as: metallics; polymers; ceramics; and composites. After gaining a working knowledge of these materials, students will study six major types of material processes: casting and molding; forming; separating; conditioning; finishing; and assembling.

INTRODUCTION TO ADVANCED MANUFACTURING & LOGISTICS

2 semester - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective                                                

Prerequisite:  None

This course is offered for Ivy Tech dual-credit; this course is offered every other year (17-18, 19-20, 21-22).                                

Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics is a course that specializes in how people use modern manufacturing systems with an introduction to advanced manufacturing and logistics and their relationship to society, individuals, and the environment. Students apply the skills and knowledge of using modern manufacturing processes to obtain resources and change them into industrial materials, industrial products and consumer products Students investigate the properties of engineered materials such as: metallics; polymers; ceramics; and composites. Students study six major types of material processes: casting and molding; forming; separating; conditioning; finishing; and assembling. After gaining a working knowledge of these materials, Students are introduced to advanced manufacturing, logistics, and business principles that are utilized in today’s advanced manufacturing industry. Students gain a basic understanding of tooling, electrical skills, operational skills, inventory principles, MSDS’s, chart and graph reading and MSSC concepts. There is also an emphasis placed on the flow process principles, material movement, safety, and related business operations. Students have the opportunity to develop the characteristics employers seek as well as skills that will help them in future endeavors.

INTRODUCTION TO CONSTRUCTION

2 semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None        

Introduction to Construction is a course that will offer hands-on activities and real world experiences related to the skills essential in residential, commercial and civil building construction. During the course students will be introduced to the history and traditions of construction trades. The student will also learn and apply knowledge of the care and safe use of hand and power tools as related to each trade. In addition, students are introduced to blueprint reading, applied math, basic tools and equipment, and safety. Students will demonstrate building construction techniques, including concrete and masonry, framing, electrical, plumbing, dry-walling, HVAC, and painting as developed locally in accordance with available space and technologies. Students learn how architectural ideas are converted into projects and how projects are managed during a construction project in this course. Students study construction technology topics such as preparing a site, doing earthwork, setting footings and foundations, building the superstructure, enclosing the structure, installing systems, finishing the structure, and completing the site. Students also investigate topics related to the purchasing and maintenance of structures, special purpose facilities, green construction and construction careers.

INTRODUCTION TO TRANSPORTATION

2 semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

Introduction to Transportation is an introductory course designed to help students become familiar with fundamental principles in modes of land, sea, air, and space transportation, including basic mechanical skills and processes involved in transportation of people, cargo and goods. Students will gain and apply knowledge and skills in the safe application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems as it relates to the transportation industries. Content of this course includes the study of how transportation impacts individuals, society, and the environment. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant transportation related activities, problems, and settings.

VISUAL ARTS  (back to top)

INTRODUCTION TO 2-D ART

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  None

Introduction to 2-D Art emphasizes creativity and good design using a wide variety of materials,  techniques, and a range of activities.  It serves as a basis for art instruction, covering the elements and principles of visual expression, color theory, planning stages of art, and critiquing artwork. Projects will include several different drawing, painting, and two dimensional mediums. This course is a prerequisite for most of the other art courses.

ADVANCED 2-D ART

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to 2-D Art

Students will build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to 2-D Art.  Techniques will further be used to create a portfolio of artwork using various art media that may include colored pencils, charcoal, scratchboard, ink, printmaking, cut paper, and watercolor paint.  Art history,  subject matter series, critiques and aesthetics are also emphasised. A sketchbook is encouraged, but not required for out-of-class assignments. Students must take this course as a prerequisite for some other art courses.

DRAWING 

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to 2-D Art and Advanced 2-D Art

Basic drawing skills may be developed in many different ways using a variety of materials.  Different drawing media would include pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, pastels, and oil crayon.  Subject matter would include inanimate objects, objects of nature, photo references, creative drawing and figure drawing. Techniques covered are shading, hatching, crosshatching, scribble-drawing or gesture and contour drawing.  A sketchbook is also required for out-of-class assignments.  The student will visit art museums, galleries, studios and community resources and explore various career options related to drawing.

PAINTING 

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Introduction to 2-D Art and Advanced 2-D Art

Students taking this class engage in learning experiences that include art history, art criticism, aesthetics and production of artwork.  Painting is a course designed to develop individual expression and understanding of painting.  Students may explore watercolor, oil, acrylic, tempera, mixed media and possibly other painting medium.  Some study of the famous masters will also be introduced.  Students at this level produce a portfolio consisting of abstract and realistic paintings.  Art museums, galleries, studios and community resources are utilized.

SCULPTURE 

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to 2-D Art or Introduction to 3-D Art

This course is designed to further develop the student’s skills and techniques using various three dimensional art materials and techniques. Students will have the opportunity to explore creating works of art in various sculpting mediums including plaster craft, polymer clay, paper mache, and a variety of others. Students may get the opportunity to choose some of the mediums they experience. Emphasis will be placed on concept development, creating sturdy structures, proper use of medium techniques, and craftsmanship.  Learning experiences will include art history, art criticism, aesthetics and production that lead to creating a portfolio of artwork.

CERAMICS 

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to 2-D Art or Introduction to 3-D Art

Students will become familiar with the methods of hand built construction with clay, including pinch, coil and slab. Emphasis will be placed on design elements, clay preparation, clay construction and glazing techniques. Students will also engage in learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, and aesthetics.

STUDIO ART

1 or 2 Semesters - 1 or 2 Credits

Grade Level: 11 or 12

Elective

Prerequisite: 8 credits in art with an A average, Instructor Permission, Portfolio

A junior or senior art student will be responsible for planning his/her own art program. An art department teacher must provide approval before being accepted into this course.  At least six samples of the prospective student’s artwork and previous art class grades should be shown to the instructor before the student will be accepted. The accepted student will then be responsible for carrying out his/her art program under the supervision of an assigned art instructor.  At the end of each semester, a portfolio of four to eight pieces of artwork will be developed depending on medium, size, and concept.  This course should be requested only by those students who are seriously interested in art and can work independently. A sketchbook is required for this course.

DIGITAL DESIGN

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Intro to   2-D Art

This class is designed to introduce students to graphic arts software. Students will further develop traditional art concepts while creating imagery on the computer. Attention will be directed towards aesthetics and creative concepts as well as artwork as it applies towards the graphic design industry and specific purposes. Coursework is designed to encourage student’s individual expression while successfully completing lesson objectives in a series of required and choice projects. The majority of this course will focus on Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator, however other digital art software may be explored.

ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN

1 or 2 Semesters - 1 or 2 Credits

Grade Level:  10-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Digital Design

This course is designed to further develop the student’s skills and techniques using  graphic arts software. Students will create computer graphics incorporating multi-media, digitized imagery. Students may explore career options related to computer graphics and create digital artworks that serve the community, school, or other venues.  Students at this level produce works for a portfolio due at the end of two Semesters. Computer animation and 3-D software programs may be available to learn and explore.

INTRODUCTION TO 3-D ART 

1 semester - 1 Credit

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Introduction to 3-D Art class serves as a basis for art instruction, covering the elements and principles of visual expression, color theory, planning stages of art, and critiquing artwork. Students will learn to demonstrate beginning skills in construction through additive and subtractive methods of three dimensional art with exposure to a variety of  mediums. This course is a prerequisite for most of the other 3-D  art courses.

ADVANCED DRAWING

1 or 2 Semesters - 1 or 2 Credits        

Grade Level:  10-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Introduction to 2-D Art, Advanced 2-D Art, and Drawing

During this course, the art student will explore the area of drawing to a deeper degree by spending more time on the various drawing media and techniques.  The nature of this course allows for successive Semesters of instruction at an advanced level.  Although formal training will be available when needed, emphasis will be placed on the student's individual and creative exploration of the areas in which he/she is interested.  A sketchbook will also be required for out-of-class assignments.  Students at this level produce artwork for a portfolio due at the end of each semester.  These students also will visit museums, galleries and studios, and community resources are utilized.

ADVANCED PAINTING

1 or 2 Semesters - 1 or 2 Credits        

Grade Level:  10-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Introduction to 2-D Art, Advanced 2-D Art, and  Painting

This course is designed to further develop the student’s skills and techniques using various painting medium including tempera, watercolor, acrylic and oil paints.  Emphasis will be placed on composition and concept development.  In special situations, a student may acquire permission to work independently with instruction available.  Students may be responsible for supplying some of their own materials for this course.  Learning experiences will include art history, art criticism, aesthetics and production that lead to creating a portfolio of artwork.

ADVANCED CERAMICS 

1 or 2 Semesters – 1 or 2 Credits

Grade Level:  10- 12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Introduction to 3-D Art and Ceramics

The course will be structured to build on previous knowledge and allow a student to pursue more personal interest. Emphasis will be placed on differentiated instruction, depending upon the student’s interest and ability level.  Students will develop greater skills using handbuilding and throwing techniques. They will also further their knowledge pertaining to firing procedures. They will also gain an understanding of functional ceramic ware as well as sculptural ceramics throughout different civilizations and time periods. Students further develop skills in recognizing, reasoning, and synthesizing aesthetic questions with respect for others' opinions and ideas, and demonstrate advanced skills in construction through additive and subtractive ceramic building methods.  Students will be expected to produce several portfolio quality projects.

WORLD LANGUAGES  (back to top)

SPANISH I/CHINESE I

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

No Prerequisite

Spanish I/Chinese I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Spanish/Chinese language learning, and to various aspects of Spanish/Chinese-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write short passages with guidance. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as reading isolated words and phrases in a situational context and comprehending brief written or oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish/Chinese-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Chinese/Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

SPANISH II/CHINESE II

2 Semesters - 2 Credits  

Grade Level:  10-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Chinese I, Spanish I

Chinese II/Spanish II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish/Chinese language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Chinese/Spanish-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish/Chinese language and culture outside of the classroom.

SPANISH III/CHINESE III

This course is offered for Ivy Tech dual-credit  (Spanish only)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish II, Chinese II

Spanish III/Chinese III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish/Chinese language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending detailed written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of Chinese/Spanish-speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding Chinese/Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

SPANISH IV, ADVANCED PLACEMENT

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Successful Completion of Spanish III

This course focuses on the preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in Spanish Language.  Students who enroll in this course have successfully completed basic instruction in the language and wish to develop their proficiency in four language skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and who wish to further explore the varied cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.  The class is conducted exclusively in Spanish; all students are expected to use the target language consistently during the class period.  This course is comparable to a fifth or sixth-semester college or university Spanish language course.

CHINESE IV, A/B 

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Grade Level:  11-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Successful Completion of Spanish III                 

                                                        

Chinese IV, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, provides a context for integration of the continued development of language skills and cultural understanding with other content areas and the community beyond the classroom. The skill sets that apply to the exchange of written and oral information are expanded through emphasis on practicing speaking and listening strategies that facilitate communication, such as the use of circumlocution, guessing meaning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts, and using elements of word formation to expand vocabulary and derive meaning. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of Chinese-speaking culture through explaining factors that influence the practices, products, and perspectives of the target culture; reflecting on cultural practices of the target culture; and comparing systems of the target culture and the student’s own culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas through the design of activities and materials that integrate the target language and culture with concepts and skills from other content areas. The use and influence of the Chinese language and culture in the community beyond the classroom is explored through the identification and evaluation of resources intended for native Chinese speakers.

                                                        
AREA VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS  (back to top)

NETWORKING I

2 Semesters, 2 periods per day – 6 Credits

Grade Level:  11-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Good communication and basic keyboarding skills; Completion of the Vocational Co-op Application and Selection by the Instructor

The Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP) credential is a professional credentialing program for individuals who will focus on a broad range of issues on the Windows 7 client operating system, desktop applications, mobile devices, networking, and hardware support. Earning this credential is the ideal way to demonstrate your ability to use Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008  to excel in a job relevant in today's market.

The MCITP credential is in high demand in the business world.  This widely recognized technical certification indicates that the individual has the skills necessary to lead organizations in the successful design, implementation, and administration of the most advanced Windows operating systems of Windows 7 and Microsoft Server Products.

At the completion of this program, the students shall be employable in entry-level network administrator jobs or be ready to move into the post-secondary programs of computer technology.  This program provides the necessary training to take the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist and MCITP tests.

This is a blended-learning environment.  Students enrolled in this course will not attend class every day. The class will meet at Plymouth High School Tuesday and Thursday mornings, 8-10 AM.

NETWORKING II: INFRASTRUCTURE

2 Semesters, 2 periods per day – 6 Credits

Grade Level:  11-12

Elective

Prerequisite:  Networking I; Completion of the Vocational Co-op Application and Selection by the Instructor

Networking II: Infrastructure focuses on learning the fundamentals of networking, routing, switching and related protocols. In this course, students learn both the practical and conceptual skills that build the foundation for understanding basic networking, routing and switching. Students are introduced to the two major models used to plan and implement networks: OSI and TCP/IP. The OSI and TCP/IP functions and services are examined in detail. Students will learn how a router addresses remote networks and determines the best path to those networks, employing static and dynamic routing techniques.

This is a blended-learning environment.  Students enrolled in this course will not attend class every day.  The class will meet at Plymouth High School Tuesday and Thursday mornings, 8-10 AM.

COSMETOLOGY I AND II 

2 Semesters, 4 periods per day - 6 Credits

Grade Level: 11-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Pass pre-admissions test, an Interview and Instructor’s Permission

Class Location & Calendar:  Knox Beauty School is on IN 8.  Students will follow the Knox School Calendar.

Cosmetology is taught at the Knox Beauty School in Knox, Indiana.  Students will have to provide their own transportation to class.  Cosmetology includes segments in cutting, styling, perming, coloring, manicuring, pedicuring and facials.  The course includes both scientific and artistic ability.  Within the 1500 hour course, the student will discover the necessity of acquiring knowledge of all phases of personal development, sterilization and sanitation, anatomy and physiology.  Two years are required to successfully complete the Cosmetology course.  At that time, students will be ready to take the state licensing exam.

HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION I 

2 Semesters, 2 periods per day –6 Credits

Grade Level: 11-12

Elective Recommended:  Biology, Chemistry, Algebra I- Requires Application & Instructor Permission

**Student enrolled In this course will have opportunity to earn 6 dual credits through Ivy Tech  Community College

**American Heart CPR required for clinical rotations, will offer in-class

Class Location: Plymouth High School. Students will follow the Plymouth High School schedule.

Students are responsible for own transportation.

This is a three period, two semester course.  Health Science Education I content includes a core of entry level skills such as patient nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory and public health.  Course content includes an introduction to health care systems, anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. An in-school laboratory provides hands-on, simulated experiences.  Students will have the opportunity to participate in HOSA, which allows them to compete for scholarships.  Students will job shadow each unit at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center and Miller’s Merry Manor under the supervision of nurses, aides, therapists, and doctors. Successful completion of this course provides students with the certificate in technical achievement in bioscience..  

HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION II: NURSING 

2 Semesters, 2 periods per day - 6 Credits

Grade Level - 12

Elective

Prerequisites:  Health Science Education I  - Requires Application & Instructor Permission

**Student enrolled In this course will have opportunity to earn 5 dual credits through Ivy Tech  Community College

***Students enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to take the State Certification Exam to be a Certified Nurse Assistant

**American Heart CPR required for clinical rotations, will offer in-class

Class Location & Calendar: Plymouth High School and Knox High School.  Students will follow the Plymouth/Knox School Calendar (instructor will provide instructions)

Students are responsible for their own transportation.

Health Science Education II is a three period, two semester course.  Health Science Education II course content includes the competencies that prepare the student for a specific occupation within a health career cluster which is CNA. This course builds on those competencies acquired in Health Science Education I and allows for more in-depth knowledge, skills, and attitudes to be developed in a specific occupation. Simulated in-school laboratory experiences are a part of this course and extended laboratory experience will be scheduled at a local nursing home.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY I & II 

2 Semesters, 4 periods per day - 6 Credits

Grade Level: 11-12

Elective

Prerequisite: Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Class Location & Calendar:  The SCILL Center, Knox, Indiana.  Students will follow the Knox School Calendar.

The automotive technology course is two semesters in length, and should be taken in both the junior and senior years for a total of six Semesters.  The class is taught at the SCILL Center that is just west of Knox, Indiana.  Over the two-year period, the course will cover automatic transmissions, brakes, electrical systems, engine performance, engine repair, heating and air conditioning, manual drive train and axles, and suspension and steering.  When completing the Automotive Technology program and successfully completing the required tests, students will be awarded the Automotive Service Excellence Certificate that will help them become employed in the Auto Service industry.   Students interested in this class should have a career interest in automotive service, good attendance, and transportation to the SCILL Center.

Job placement has changed dramatically with this class.  You can be placed as a mechanic (SCILL does work with you in job placement) but there are many other occupations/industries that will have a high level of interest in your ability to work with your hands.

CONSTRUCTION TRADES  I & II 

2 Semesters, 2 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  11-12        

Elective

Prerequisites:  None--However, for those students who are really focused on a trade in the Construction Area, any of the classes offered in the Construction Cluster and Design Process/Computer Design Area would be highly recommended.

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Vocational Building Trades is a vocational program designed to teach students the skills needed to construct residential buildings.  It is also designed to provide training toward an occupation that students could follow after graduation such as:  carpenter, electrician, mason, cement finisher, plumber, sheet metal worker, roofer, painter, drywall hanger, drywall finisher, or landscape worker.  Students in Building Trades will attend regular classes part of the school day and then report to the school operated construction site for the remainder of the day.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

2 Semesters, 3 Periods Per Day – 6 Credits

Grade Level:  11 or 12

Elective

Prerequisites:  Vocational Application required; Required minimum cumulative GPA of  1.7/4.0; Recommended courses: FACS course such as Child Development and Parenting, Orientation to Life and Careers

Expenses: Enrolled students are responsible for their own transportation to the vocational classroom and field placement assignment. The course fee is $20.00 and the student consents to a tuberculin test (TB) at no charge provided by the sponsor’s registered nurse.

Selection: Selection of qualified students will be guided by the following criteria:

Student’s career goal; GPA, attendance record; access to a reliable vehicle for personal transportation; and the recommendation of a guidance counselor.

Vocational Classroom Locations:  For Starke County students the vocational classroom is located at Knox Middle School and in session each Friday from 8:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. or 11:40 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Central time). Students attend either a morning or afternoon session. 

For Marshall County students the vocational classroom is located at Kaleidoscope Children’s Center, 1901 Pidco Drive, Plymouth and in session each Thursday from 8:30 a.m.-10:15 a.m. or 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. (Eastern time). Students attend either a morning or afternoon session.

Course Description: Early Childhood Education focuses on a child’s development from birth to age 5, a time of dramatic growth.  The course helps to prepare the student for a career in the fields of early education and special education in preschools, child care centers, before-and-after school programs and kindergarten classrooms.  Students who are interested in pursuing careers in social work, psychology or nursing will also benefit from the experience working with young children.  Course work includes intensive study of early childhood development including young children’s social, emotional, physical and cognitive development, health, safety and nutrition for young children, working with families of young children and designing early childhood education classrooms and activities in the areas of math, science, communication, art, social studies, and music.  

All enrolled students are assigned to a field placement classroom for real time experience working with young children the four other days of the school week. The field placement mentor teacher provides guidance, mentoring, and evaluation of the student. The combination of classroom instruction with field placement experience allows the student to put into practice newly acquired knowledge in real time with a professional teacher.  Field placement options include the following: Head Start preschool classrooms, public school preschool and special education classrooms,  child care centers and kindergarten classrooms.  Placements are available in Plymouth Knox, Walkerton, Lakeville, North Judson and Culver.   The instructor determines where each student will be placed.  Students will be placed near their home school in most cases.  

College Credit:  Qualifying first year students may earn six college credits at no cost from Ivy Tech State College which may be transferred to other colleges/universities. Second year students receive three additional transferable college credits and are eligible for a Child Development Associate (CDA) Credential.  The CDA is the most widely recognized credential in early childhood education (ECE) and is the best first step on the path of career advancement in ECE.  The professional CDA Credential is the only recognized, portable, reciprocal, competency-based credential of its kind in the country. The CDA commands a higher starting wage for those entering the field.

GRAPHIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGY

2 Semesters, 2 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  11-12        

Elective

Prerequisites:  None--However, for those students who are really focused on a trade in the Graphic Design area, any of the classes offered in Digital Design area would be highly recommended.

Class Location and Calendar:  Knox High School; Students will follow the Knox School Calendar

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Graphic Communications will include organized learning experiences that focus on theory and laboratory activities in pre-press, press and finishing operations.  Emphasis will be placed on elements of design and layout leading to computerized electronic image generation, plate preparation, pressroom operations, and finishing techniques.  Instructional activities will enhance student’s language arts skills through the use of proofreading, spelling, and punctuation exercises. The course will include actual production processes in conjunction with classroom assignments embracing the technologies of printing, publishing, packaging, electronic imaging, and their allied industries.

RADIO & TELEVISION I 

Grade Level:  9-12

2 Semesters (dual credit) 1 period per day - 2 Credits -

1 Semester 1 period per day - 1 Credit    Grade Level:  9-12

Elective

Prerequisites:  None

Students who are interested in exploring multimedia, TV or radio broadcasting area encouraged to enroll. Radio/TV Broadcasting provides instruction to develop and enhance competencies in various communication, marketing, media, production, and technical functions and tasks performed by employees, including management personnel, in radio/TV broadcasting and multimedia occupations.  Emphasis is placed on career opportunities in news and sports, production, programming, promotion, sales, play-by-play, broadcast equipment operation, broadcast regulations and laws, station organization, technical oral/written communication, and listening skills.  Instructional strategies include a hands-on school-based enterprise, with real and/or simulated occupational experiences, such as the operation of an in-school radio, television, production house, Internet and learning studio. Job shadowing, field trips, and internship can be arranged. Students can enroll in program for four years.

RADIO AND TELEVISION II

 

Required Prerequisites: Radio and Television I.

Grade Level: 9-12

Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required.

Radio and Television II prepares students for admission to television production programs at institutions of higher learning. Students train on professional equipment creating a variety of video projects. During this second-year program students integrate and build on first-year curriculum while mastering advanced concepts in production, lighting and audio.

CULINARY ARTS & HOSPITALITY

2 Semesters, 2 periods per day - 4 Credits        

Grade Level:  11-12        

Elective

Prerequisites:  None

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Location:  Plymouth High School

Culinary Arts & Hospitality I prepares students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of careers in the hospitality industry.  Major topics include:  introduction to the hospitality industry; food safety; regulations, procedures, and emergencies; basic culinary skills; culinary math; and food preparation techniques and applications; principles of purchasing, storage, preparation and service of food and food products; how to use and maintain related tools and equipment; apply management principles or hospitality operations and intensive laboratory experiences with commercial applications.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE  

2 Semesters, 3 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  11-12        

Elective

Prerequisites:  None

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Location:  Ancilla College

Criminal Justice includes specialized classroom and practical experiences related to public safety occupations such as law enforcement, loss protection services, and homeland security.  Training is based on standards and content similar to that provided by officially designated law enforcement agencies.  Instruction includes procedures for patrolling on foot or in an automobile during the day or at night; dealing with misdemeanors, felonies, traffic violations, and accidents; investigative and evidence collection procedures; making arrests; and testifying in court.  Students will have opportunities to use mathematical skills in crash reconstruction and analysis activities requiring measurements and performance of speed/acceleration calculations.  Additional activities simulating criminal investigations will be used to teach scientific knowledge related to anatomy, biology, and chemistry.  Oral and written communication skills should be reinforced through activities that model public relations and crime prevention efforts as well as the preparation of police reports.

WELDING TECHNOLOGY I

2 Semesters, 3 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  11-12        

Elective

Prerequisites:  None

This course offers the opportunity for dual credits

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Welding Technology I includes classroom and laboratory experiences that develop a variety of skills in oxy-fuel cutting and Shielded Metal Arc welding.  This course is designed for individuals who intend to make a career as a Welder, Technician, Sales, Designer, Researcher or Engineer.  Emphasis is placed on safety at all times. OSHA standards and guidelines endorsed by the American Welding Society (AWS) are used. Instructional activities emphasize properties of metals, safety issues, blueprint reading, electrical principles, welding symbols, and mechanical drawing through projects and exercises that teach students how to weld and be prepared for college and career success.  

WELDING TECHNOLOGY II

2 Semesters, 3 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  12        

Elective

Prerequisites:  None

This course offers the opportunity for dual credits

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Welding Technology II includes classroom and laboratory experiences that develop a variety of skills in GasMetal Arc welding, Flux Cored Arc Welding,Gas TungstenArc welding, Plasma Cutting and Carbon Arc. This course is designed for individuals who intend to pursue careers as Welders, Technicians, SalesReps, Designers, Researchers or Engineers. Emphasis is placed on safety at all times. OSHA standards and guide-lines endorsed by the American Welding Society (AWS) are used. Instructional activities emphasize properties of metals, safety issues, blueprint reading, electrical principles, welding symbols, and mechanical drawing through projects and exercises that teach students how to weld and be prepared for college and career success.

PRECISION MACHINING I & II

2 Semesters, 3 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  11-12        

Elective

Prerequisites:  Precision Machining II you must complete Precision Machining I

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Precision Machining I is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the precision machining processes used in industry, manufacturing, maintenance, and repair. The course instructs the student in industrial safety, terminology, tools and machine tools, measurement and layout. Students will become familiar with the setup and operation of power saws, drill presses, lathes, milling machines, grinders and an introduction to CNC (computer controlled) machines.


INDUSTRIAL AUTOMATION AND ROBOTICS

2 Semesters, 3 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  11-12        

Elective

Prerequisites:  None

Class Location and Calendar:  Knox High School; Students will follow the Knox School Calendar

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Industrial Automation and Robotics I will be the first course in the new pathway in the current Manufacturing & Logistics Career Cluster. Students will gain skills to design and build basic robots that use sensors and actuators to solve specific problems and complete specific tasks. This will include introductory programming autonomous mode. Students will also learn to program a humanoid robot, tethered and in autonomous mode, able to react to specific circumstances and perform human-like tasks when programming is complete. This course will provide fundamental knowledge and skills in basic lasers, pneumatics, hydraulics, mechanics, basic electronics, and programmable logic controllers along with an understanding of career pathways in this sector

This is a highly technical course that prepares students for careers in the industrial automation and robotics pathway as applied in industrial settings.  Outcomes for this course include the following, but are not limited to: Theory and techniques of electric motor controllers; Installation, use, maintenance and troubleshooting of mechanical drive components; Understanding and use of various sensors and switches; Understanding and troubleshooting of hydraulic circuitry; Understanding and troubleshooting of pneumatic circuitry; Pneumatic, hydraulic, and mechanical controls; Troubleshooting the automation process

AVIATION FLIGHT

2 Semesters, 3 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  11-12        

Elective

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Aviation Flight familiarizes students with aviation technology and provides a historic overview of the field. This course also provides an overview of the careers and employment opportunities in the field of aviation. It prepares new student pilots for the maneuvers that are required to be performed during the Practical Test portion of the Private Check Ride. In addition to these maneuvers, the concepts of basic aerodynamics, aircraft systems, instrument operation, weight and balance, flight physiology and a basic working knowledge of aircraft power plants and their construction will be covered.  

Class Location and Calendar: PHS; Students will follow the Plymouth School Calendar

AVIATION OPERATIONS

2 Semesters, 3 periods per day - 6 Credits        

Grade Level:  12        

Elective

Requires Application & Instructor Permission

Aviation Operations provides students with a broad-based introduction to the field of aviation. Course activities include: familiarization with aviation technology; a historic overview of the field of aviation; exploration of the current aviation environment and careers and employment opportunities in the field. Topics are focused on aircraft manufacturing, airline operations, general aviation, air-freight, airport management, and government service. Additional topics covered include: aviation safety, human factors, regulations, and certification. This course is designed to enhance the students’ knowledge of the pertinent areas of aircraft basic science that comprise the scientific fundamentals applied in all areas of the aviation industry. The fundamental areas of the federal aviation regulations, pertinent to aviation operations, are also introduced in this course.

WEIDNER SCHOOL OF INQUIRY  (back to top)

9th Grade

Global Perspectives: (English 9, World History)

2 Semesters- 4 credits

This two block course fulfills English 9 and World History core requirements and uses language arts to explore historical events and their impact on our modern global world.  This interdisciplinary humanities course integrates a comprehensive academic survey of World History with ninth grade English. In this course, students will complete complex and challenging projects that focus on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to the development of ancient cultures and civilizations. Their work will include reading short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama related to the historic themes. They will write for a variety of purposes and audiences in a variety of formats.

BioArt (Biology, Introduction to 2-D Art)

2 Semesters – 3 Credits (2 Biology credits, 1 Art credit)

This integrated course blends a comprehensive academic survey of biology with an introduction to art. In this course, students will create works of art that demonstrate an understanding of biological concepts. Throughout the first semester, students will experience both laboratory and field work with an emphasis on an investigative approach to biological problems. From within the context of completing larger projects and artistic works, students will study ecology, cell and molecular structure, energy and metabolism, development and reproduction, and evolution. During the second semester, in collaboration with the biological concepts, students will create art in functional and non-functional two- and three-dimensional forms. Students will have creative experiences in art appreciation, studio, history, and criticism.

10th Grade:

10th Grade:  American Perspectives (English 10, Dual Credit US History - 6 Ivy Tech Dual Credits * pending credentialing requirements)

2 Semesters – 4 Credits

American Perspectives is a 2-block course that blends language arts and history to provide students an in-depth look at how United States history emphasizes national development from the late eighteenth century into the twenty-first century. After a brief review of the early development of the nation, students study the key events, people, groups and movements in the late nineteenth, the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and tech.

Chem Food Science (Chemistry I, Food Science)

Food Science (3 Ivy Tech Dual Credits)

2 Semesters – 4 Credits

Food Science is an integrated course that provides in-depth study of the application of science principles to scientific investigation of the importance of food science.  Introduction to principles of food processing, food chemistry and physics, nutrition, food microbiology, preservation, packaging and labeling, food commodities, food regulations, issues and careers in the food science industry help students understand the role that food science plays in securing a safe, nutritious and adequate food supply. . Students are expected to achieve academic standards and competencies from chemistry, biochemistry, biology, and some physics at the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation levels in this specialized area of study. Students develop critical reasoning, mathematical, and writing skills through a variety of higher-level learning strategies and laboratory experiments that require measuring, recording, graphing, and analyzing data; predicting and evaluating laboratory results; and writing laboratory reports. This course is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway, in order to build science proficiencies in chemistry, physics and biology.

11th Grade:

English 11 A/B

2 Semesters - 2 Credits  


The English 11 course includes an emphasis on in-depth writing, extensive reading, and

analysis of rhetoric. This course also includes foci on drama, novel, and short stories.

Students are required to do at least one research project per semester, sharing their

findings in a variety of ways including through oral presentations.

English 11 Advanced Placement -  A/B

2 Semesters - 2 Credits 

(ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION, ADVANCED PLACEMENT)

English Language and Composition, Advanced Placement, is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.

Physics/Ag Tech and Power (AP/Dual credit OR  regular track Physics)

Advanced Placement Physics I: Algebra-based (4 Ivy Tech credits IF student chooses AP/Dual Credit pathway)

Agriculture Mechanization (Pending 3 Ivy Tech Dual Credits)

2 Semesters – 4 Credits

This is a lab-intensive two semester course that broadens a student’s understanding of environmentally friendly energies;  basic principles of selection, operation, maintenance and management of agricultural equipment in concert while incorporating technology; the fundamental concepts and principles related to matter and energy, including mechanics, simple harmonic motion, wave motion, light, magnetism, electricity, velocity, acceleration, force, energy, momentum, and charge.

Physics 1: Algebra-based, Advanced Placement is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits.

• Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I or Integrated Mathematics I

• Credits: A 2 credit course, 1 credit per semester

• Counts as a Science Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

• Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course

Interactive Media

Integrated Across the Curriculum – 2 credits

Interactive Media prepares students for careers in business and industry working with interactive media products and services. This course is integrated across our curriculum. Each WSOI learner will start a digital portfolio and demonstrate Interactive Media proficiencies across all four years in WSOI.    This course emphasizes the development of digitally generated or computer-enhanced products using multimedia technologies.  Students will develop an understanding of professional business practices including the importance of ethics, communication skills, and knowledge of the “virtual workplace”.  

U. S. GOVERNMENT - (and Dual Credit - 3 Ivy Tech Dual Credits )

1 semester - 1 Credit

This course in United States Government is designed for senior students that have previously demonstrated exceptional abilities or achievements in social studies. Class size will be limited. Content emphasizes higher level thinking skills, project development and presentation, and independent study and group work. Basic government curriculum will be expanded. This course is one-half of the senior social studies requirement of government and economics.

ECONOMICS - (and AP Microeconomics)

This course in Economics is designed for senior students that have previously demonstrated exceptional abilities or achievement in social studies. Class size will be limited. Content emphasizes higher level thinking skill, project development and presentation, and independent study and group work. Basic economics curriculum will be expanded. This course in one-half of the senior social studies requirement of government and economics. Current events will be

included throughout the course.

12th Grade:

ADVANCED SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION - Dual Credit

ADVANCED SPEECH - COMMUNICATION, Dual Credit 

1 Semester - 1 high school credits AND 3 college credits  

Grade Level: 12

May substitute for required Speech or be in addition to required Speech.

Also counts for English required credits.

Prerequisite:  None

Speech is a class designed to help students build confidence in expressing ideas before classmates and other audiences.  The course will emphasize development of pleasing and articulate speech, provide practice in proper non-verbal skills, and instruction in constructing well-organized, interesting speeches.  Numerous short speeches will be designed to inform, entertain, and persuade an audience.  Radio and video equipment will be used.  The use of outlines and manuscripts will be worked with.  The IVY TECH syllabus will be incorporated into this course for dual credit.

CRITICAL THINKING AND ARGUMENTATION  

1 semester - 1 high school credit

Grade Level: 12

May substitute for required Speech or be in addition to required Speech.  

Also counts for English required credits.  

Prerequisite:  None

Critical Thinking and Argumentation should challenge students to think critically and analytically.  Active class participation is essential.  Students will research, logically develop, and present their persuasive arguments through speeches and presentations.  

This course can be taken in conjunction with ADVANCED SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION to complete a senior year of English credits

ENGLISH 12 HONORS ADVANCED COLLEGE PROJECT (ACP)

2 Semesters - 2 Credits

Grade Level:  12

By Application per Indiana University Standards

Prerequisite:  English 11 or AP English Language and Composition

The Advance College Project is a partnership program between Indiana University and Plymouth High School.  ACP English provides senior English credit to qualified high school students while simultaneously allowing students to purchase up to six hours of college credit from IU.  Semester A is W131, freshman composition (3 hours), and semester B is L202, the introduction to literature course (3 hours).  The IU credit is transferable to many other colleges nationwide, providing students earn a grade of “C” or higher.  Students may enroll in the class for high school credit only; they are not required to enroll in the college course.  The high school course receives weighted grades.

In semester A/B, students in W131 examine issues in varied disciplinary fields and cultivate reading, writing, and analytic skills.  Students summarize arguments, identify the structure of claims, and examine the strength of evidence offered in support of those claims. Through a sequence of analytical responses, students demonstrate not only that they comprehend the argument of experts, but they can also formulate, articulate, and defend claims of their own.

In semester B/C, students in L202 explore the process of literary analysis.  Students use techniques for close reading, develop a framework for articulating and supporting interpretations, and work with an array of classic and contemporary texts including short story, poetry, drama, film, and novels. Students do extensive reading, write in response to literature, raise significant questions of themselves and of the text, and discover interrelationships among the works studied. The ultimate goal is for students to formulate precise, thoughtful, and in-depth responses to their reading, using the analytical powers they developed in W131.

Math Series:  Single Period Classes

ALGEBRA I

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Algebra I provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for

students to succeed in advanced courses. In particular, the instructional program in this course

provides for the use of algebraic skills in a wide range of problem-solving situations. The concept

of function is emphasized throughout the course. Topics include: (1) operations with real

numbers, (2) linear equations and inequalities, (3) relations and functions, (4) polynomials, (5)

algebraic fractions, and (6) nonlinear equations.

GEOMETRY

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Geometry students examine the properties of two- and three-dimensional objects. Proof and

logic, as well as investigative strategies in drawing conclusions, are stressed. Properties and

relationships of geometric objects include the study of: (1) points, lines, angles and planes; (2)

polygons, with a special focus on quadrilaterals, triangles, right triangles; (3) circles; and (4)

polyhedra and other solids.

ALGEBRA II

2 Semesters – 2 Credits

Algebra II is a course that extends the content of Algebra I and provides further development of

the concept of a function. Topics include: (1) relations, functions, equations and inequalities; (2)

conic sections; (3) polynomials; (4) algebraic fractions; (5) logarithmic and exponential functions;

  1. sequences and series; and (7) counting principles and probability.

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION AND CREDIT RECOVERY 

Alternative High School (AHS):

The goal of AHS is to provide an alternative avenue by which each student attending may pursue excellence in academic knowledge, skills and behavior. The curriculum is standards-based and web-delivered. Each student has his or her own computer that they use to complete daily modules for a particular subject. Upon completion of the required course work, a credit will be given. AHS strives to prepare students for life after school by helping them finish their academic studies and teaching them to be productive members of the community.

Students who may qualify for the program are given consideration by communicating with their guidance counselor.  Consideration is given to the following student scenarios:

• Students who intend to withdraw or have withdrawn from school before graduation

• Students who have been or on the verge of expulsion

• Students who have not succeeded in the traditional learning environment

• Absenteeism or truancy

• Students are a parent or an expectant parent and are unable to regularly attend the traditional school program

•Credit recovery

The desired outcome of this program is that students in our program will finish the needed credits and earn their diploma.  A student may be removed from AHS or Credit Recovery for the following reasons:

• Lack of regular attendance

• Lack of adequate progress

• Lack of respect for other students and staff

• Violation of Plymouth High School Student Handbook

• Violation of PCSC Internet policy

Credit Recovery

PHS also implements period-by-period credit recovery classes that run throughout the regular school day and in some cases replaces a student's study hall. Any student who has failed a course has the option of “retaking” the course in the Credit Recovery Class. The curriculum is online-based (GradPoint) and consists of the core courses in English, Math, Science, and Social Studies as well as offering certain Electives. Upon completion of the required coursework, a credit will be given and the student will be assigned back to study hall or begin work on other needed credits to recover. Students who do not make adequate progress in credit recovery classes face the possibility of being removed and placed in study hall for the remainder of the semester. 

In some cases, students will be placed in this classroom setting for other reasons.  In these situations, students will not take this class as a credit recovery class, but as a new class.  These reasons include:

        • Transferring in from another school once the semester has already started

        • Early graduation goal

        • Course they need to take is not offered at the time they need it

MULTIDISCIPLINARY

EDUCATION PROFESSIONS I

2 Semesters/2 class periods

Grade Level 12

Elective

Prerequisite: recommended - Advanced Nutrition and Wellness, Advanced Child Development, and Interpersonal Relationships

PHS is seeking potential Dual Credit for this class with IU

Education Professions I provides the foundation for employment in education and related careers and prepares students for study in higher education. An active learning approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of education and related careers. The course of study includes, but is not limited to: the teaching profession, the learner and the learning process, planning instruction, learning environment, and instructional and assessment strategies. Exploratory field experiences in classroom settings and career portfolios are required components. A standards-based plan guides the students’ field experiences. Students are monitored in their field experiences by the Education Professionals I teacher.

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