STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics. STEAM affects every aspect of our lives. From the way we think, to the things we use everyday, STEAM is the reason we are the way we are.

When is STEAM week?

STEAM week will take place on the week of October 28th, 2019. Each day will correspond with a part of STEAM, for example, Monday is science, Tuesday is technology, etc.

What happens when I complete the activities?

The Bridgewater-Raritan Robotics Team is giving out certificates upon the completion of 3 or more activities in this packet. Once you have completed these activities, tag us #Team303 on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook (if you are unable to do this, email us a picture of your completed experiment to outreach@team303.com).

A grand prize will be given to one lucky participant of these challenges. To earn a better chance at winning, tag us on all social media platforms of your preference. This prize will be rewarded at Team 303’s annual STEAM fair on November 2nd, 2019.

To save paper this year, you can access the activity instructions at this address:

http://www.team303.com/steam/

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Monday: Invisible Ink

Use lemons to write secret messages!

Instructions:

  1. Squeeze the lemon juice into the saucer
  2. Add a few drops of water
  3. Mix the lemon juice and water using a spoon.
  4. Dip the swab to write a message on the white paper
  5. Once the paper dries, the writing should be invisible. Place paper near light bulb to read the message.

What Happens: The words appear on the page.

The Science Behind:

The juice of lemons contains carbon compounds. Carbon compounds are nearly colorless when you dissolve it in water. But, when you heat the carbon compound, carbon is produced, which is black.

Tuesday: Tough Newspaper

Your strongest blow can not budge this fearless newspaper!

Instructions:

  1. Place the ruler on the table so that 2 inches (5 cm) hangs over the edge.
  2. Spread a double sheet of newspaper over the ruler so the paper lies flat along the table edge.
  3. Strike the visible edge of the ruler as hard as you can.

What Happens: The newspaper doesn’t budge.

The Technology Behind:

Air pressure on the paper prevents it from moving. Air pushes down with almost 15 pounds of pressure on almost every inch of surface ( 1kg/square meter). For an average sheet of newspaper, the total resistance is about two tons!


Wednesday: How to Make an Egg Float

Find out why it is easier to swim in the ocean than in a freshwater lake or pool!

Instructions:

  1. Put water into the two glasses until they are half-way full.
  2. Add 5 tablespoons of salt into one glass and stir with a spoon.
  3. Drop the egg into the glass without salt.
  4. Drop the egg into the glass with salt and notice the difference.

What Happens: In fresh water, the egg sinks. In salt water, the egg floats.

The Engineering Behind:

The denser the liquid, the greater the upward lift (buoyancy). Salt makes the water denser, allowing for the egg to float.

Thursday: Why Penguins Stay Dry

The title says it all!

Instructions:

  1. Using crayons, color in the penguin.
  2. Dip the paintbrush in the water and apply it over the colored penguin.

What Happens: The penguin does not get wet.

The Art Behind:

The wax from the crayon prevents the paper from absorbing the water. Similarly, the wax on a penguin’s feathers repels the water and helps keep the penguins warm and dry.


\Friday: The Strongest Shape

Discover why the hexagon is the strongest shape

Instructions:

  1. Take a sheet of paper and fold it into a triangular prism.
  2. Use tape to hold the paper in the shape.
  3. Repeat steps 1-2 for the remaining 5 sheets of paper.
  4. Tape the 6 triangular prisms together, forming a hexagon.
  5. Place rolls of Duct Tape on top of the structure to test its strength.

What Happens: The hexagon-shaped structure does not get crushed underneath the roll of Duct Tape.

The Math Behind:

The hexagon is the strongest shape known. If you want something to hold a lot of weight pick a hexagon. In a hexagonal grid each line is as short as it can possibly be, giving more strength to the structure.

STEAM Week Activities, presented by BRHS Robotics Team, 2019