GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Content Area:

Visual & Performing Arts

Grade Level:

5

Module Title:

Music

        

LEARNING TARGETS

NJ STUDENT LEARNING STANDARDS

1.1  The Creative Process:  All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles

       that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

1.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role,

      development, and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures.

1.3  Performance:  All students will synthesize those skills, media, methods, and technologies appropriate

       to creating, performing, and/or presenting works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies pertains to all four arts

      disciplines, and is comprised of two strands related to the mode of response: A. Aesthetic

      Responses and B. Critique Methodologies. This standard addresses two ways students may

      respond to the arts, including (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of

      methodologies for critique

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Reading basic music notation contributes to musical fluency and literacy. Musical intelligence is related to ear training and listening skill, and temporal spatial reasoning ability is connected to listening skill.

1.1.5.B.1

Identify the elements of music in response to aural prompts and printed music notational systems.                                                                              

The elements of music are building blocks denoting meter, rhythmic concepts, tonality, intervals, chords, and melodic and harmonic progressions, all of which contribute to musical literacy.

1.1.5.B.2

Demonstrate the basic concepts of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, chords, and melodic and harmonic progressions, and differentiate basic structures.                  

                                                     

Art and culture reflect and affect each other.

1.2.5.A.1

Recognize works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art as a reflection of societal values and beliefs. 

Characteristic approaches to content, form, style, and design define art genres.

1.2.5.A.2

Relate common artistic elements that define distinctive art genres in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Sometimes the contributions of an individual artist can influence a generation of artists and signal the beginning of a new art genre.

1,2,5,A.3

Determine the impact of significant contributions of individual artists in dance, music, theatre, and visual art from diverse cultures throughout history.

Complex scores may include compound meters and the grand staff.

1.3.5.B.1

Sing or play music from complex notation, using notation systems in treble and bass clef, mixed meter, and compound meter.

Proper vocal production and vocal placement improve vocal quality. Harmonizing requires singing ability and active listening skills. Individual voice ranges change with time.

1.3.5.B.2

Sing melodic and harmonizing parts, independently and in groups, adjusting to the range and timbre of the developing voice.

Music composition is governed by prescribed rules and forms that apply to both improvised and scored music.

1.3.5.B.3

Improvise and score simple melodies over given harmonic structures using traditional instruments and/or computer programs.

Decoding musical scores requires understanding of notation systems, the elements of music, and basic compositional concepts.

1.3.5.B.4

Decode how the elements of music are used to achieve unity and variety, tension and release, and balance in musical compositions.

Works of art may be organized according to their functions and artistic purposes (e.g., genresmediums, messages, themes).

1.4.5.A.1

Employ basic, discipline-specific arts terminology to categorize works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art according to established classifications. 

Formalism in dance, music, theatre, and visual art varies according to personal, cultural, and historical contexts.

1.4.5.A.2

Make informed aesthetic responses to artworks based on structural arrangement and personal, cultural, and historical points of view.

Criteria for determining the aesthetic merits of artwork vary according to context. Understanding the relationship between compositional design andgenre provides the foundation for making value judgments about the arts.

1.4.5.A.3

Demonstrate how art communicates ideas about personal and social values and is inspired by an individual’s imagination and frame of reference (e.g., personal, social, political, historical context).

Identifying criteria for evaluating performances results in deeper understanding of art and art-making.

1.4.5.B.1

Assess the application of the elements of art and principles of design in dance, music, theatre, and visual artworks using observable, objective criteria.  

While there is shared vocabulary among the four arts disciplines of dance, music, theatre, and visual art, each also has its own discipline-specific arts terminology

1.4.5.B.3

Use discipline-specific arts terminology to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art. 

Levels of proficiency can be assessed through analyses of how artists apply the elements of art and principles of design.

1.4.5.B.4

Define technical proficiency, using the elements of the arts and principles of design.

Artists and audiences can and do disagree about the relative merits of artwork. When assessing works of dance, music, theatre and visual art, it is important to consider the context for the creation and performance of the work (e.g., Who was the creator? What purpose does the artwork serve? Who is the intended audience?).

1.4.5.B.5

Distinguish ways in which individuals may disagree about the relative merits and effectiveness of artistic choices in the creation and performance of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.  

Grade 5 Students will…

  • Identify and perform steady beat and off-beat in duple (2/4, 3/4, 4/4) compound (6/8) and cut-time (2/2) meter. Read and perform: dotted quarter- note/eighth note; eighth-note rest.
  • Identify Tone qualities produced by symphony orchestra, concert band, Son Jarocho (Mexican), Gamelan (Indonesian), marching band, dance band, military band, rock band, synthesized sounds, electric guitar, a capella singing.
  • Identify Motive, ballad, 12-bar blues, theme/variations, march, overture, finale, and movement.
  • Identify, read and sing: melodic patterns using solfege syllables of the diatonic scale, in higher and lower octaves; whole and half steps.  
  • Derive and ID Bb (Fa) in key of F, F# (Ti) in the key of G.
  • Identify accents, pizzicato, slurs, phrasing.
  • On pitched barred instruments and/or recorder, perform three-part pieces in duple and triple meter, notated in treble and bass clef, using note values from 16th-note to whole note/rest, including syncopations; and pitches in diatonic scales w/chromatic additions; and dynamic & tempo changes.
  • Read and sing melodies using note values from 16th-note to whole note/rest, including syncopations; and pitches in diatonic scales w/chromatic additions; and dynamic & tempo changes.
  • Sing two-part songs, descants, harmonies in parallel thirds or other harmonies, using correct posture, vocal placement, and breathing technique.
  • Compose, notate, and perform a two-section piece (AB, ABA, etc.) for barred instrument, recorder, or Garageb using a variety of note values and pentatonic pitches, over a bass melody.
  • Perform unison songs, descants, and harmonizing parts in 3rds, alone and with others, using proper vocal placement and breathing techniques in the range of A4 – F5 (making allowances for emerging cambiata voices).  Sing accurately in octaves. Demonstrate proper posture and breathing techniques to produce a uniform vocal tone quality and respond to expressive cues from a conductor.
  • Sing choral music from complex notation, in unison and two-parts, reading from choral octavos. (treble and bass clef, mixed meter, and compound meter).
  • Improvise a melody or rhythm over a given harmonic progression.
  • Compose and score an 8-bar melody in either a major or minor key, using note and rest values as small as the 16th note played in 3/4 and/or 4/4 time, and resolving to the home tone.  
  • Describe and demonstrate unity and variety, tension and release, and balance in musical composition.
  • Categorize a series of 8-10 pieces into different styles (e.g., jazz, classical, romantic, folk, patriotic, popular music, etc.) using graphic organizers, manipulatives, or other tools.  
  • Identify/analyze the structure of various musical forms (e.g., verse/refrain, chorus format, sonata, etc.) from varied cultures, time periods or musical genres.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how music reflects the ideas of a composer and/or performer based on the historical, cultural, and personal characteristics of each musician.  Make connections to the pieces when warranted.
  • Describe what constitutes a quality vocal performance (e.g., posture, breath support, intonation, diction, vowel placement, etc.) and interpretive elements (e.g., dynamics, phrasing, emotion, etc.) and apply these attributes to performance.
  • Use a graphic organizer or other tool to show common performance traits (e.g., technical fluency, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, etc.) in generally accepted great performances of music.  Choose performances in three different styles (e.g., YoYo Ma’s recording of a Bach Cello Suite, John Coltrane’s Giant Steps, Ravi Shankar in a traditional Hindustani sitar raga).
  • Evaluate a student group performance on three criteria using a student created vocabulary list

     (e.g., interpretation, articulation, technique, intonation).

  • Describe three ways that individuals can agree or disagree about the merits of a musical performance based on technical and interpretive perspectives, the composer and his/her intent, and if the intent was realized.
  • Compare and contrast the function of music from various and distinct historical periods (e.g., music from the Revolutionary War with music from the Civil War).
  • Compare and contrast how rhythm, melody, and harmony are utilized in a variety of genres and cultures (e.g., European classical music, jazz, Hindustani, West African Rock etc.).

  • Identify major characteristics of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and early modern music as impacted by famous composers representative of their era (e.g., Baroque composers such as Vivaldi, Handel, or Bach; Hayden, Mozart, Beethoven, or Schubert as exemplifying the Classical period; Romantic composers such as Chopin, Brahms, Dvorak, Tchaikovsky or Rachmaninoff; and Modern composers such as Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Copeland, or Gershwin; and looking into the future with video games, rap, and pop.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment:  

  • Formative Assessment strategies
  • Rubrics
  • Unit Assessments
  • Performance Assessments:  

Equipment Needed:

  • Music
  • Technology
  • Teacher identified equipment

Teacher Resources:

  • NJ Model Curriculum
  • NJCCCS

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Flexible grouping  
  • Pairing of students of similar ability  
  • Student centered activities  
  • Learning stations  
  • Small group discussions  
  • Problem solving situations
  • Adaptive Equipment

504s

  • Flexible grouping  
  • Pairing of students of similar ability  
  • Student centered activities  
  • Learning stations  
  • Small group discussions  
  • Problem solving situations
  • Adaptive Equipment

ELLs

  • teaching key aspects of a topic.
  • Eliminate nonessential information .
  • using videos, illustrations, pictures, and drawings to explain or clarify.
  • allowing products (projects, timelines, demonstrations, models, drawings, dioramas, poster boards, charts, graphs, slide shows, videos, etc.) to demonstrate student’s learning; .
  • allowing students to correct errors (looking for understanding) .
  • allowing the use of note cards or open-book during testing .
  • decreasing the amount of work presented or required

G/T

  • teaching key aspects of a topic. Eliminate nonessential information .
  • using videos, illustrations, pictures, and drawings to explain or clarify.
  • allowing products (projects, timelines, demonstrations, models, drawings, dioramas, poster boards, charts, graphs, slide shows, videos, etc.) to demonstrate student’s learning;
  • allowing students to correct errors (looking for understanding) .
  • allowing the use of note cards or open-book during testing . decreasing the amount of work presented or required

At-Risk Failure

  • Projects designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student need
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities and support
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills based on student needs
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Directions written and read/explained thoroughly and in chunks
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers and other organizational aides
  • Student Success Team and implementation of RTI Interventions
  • Set goal plan with reachable goals and pathways and collaboration with parents
  • One-on-one conference with teacher to include feedback on work and progress toward meeting goals

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and

      Preparation 

SOC.6.1.4.D.13 Describe how culture is expressed through and influenced by the behavior of people. SOC.6.1.4.A.15 Explain how and why it is important that people from diverse cultures collaborate to find solutions to community, state, national, and global challenges. SOC.6.1.4.D.18 Explain how an individual’s beliefs, values, and traditions may reflect more than one culture. SOC.6.1.4.D.15 Explain how various cultural groups have dealt with the conflict between maintaining traditional beliefs and practices and adopting new beliefs and practices.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.2 Develop a Personalized Student Learning Plan with the assistance of an adult mentor that includes information about career areas of interest, goals and an educational plan.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.
  • 9.2.8.B.7 Evaluate the impact of online activities and social media on employer decisions.

Unit 1 Overview (Ongoing) History and Culture


This unit the students will learn how history and culture have and impact on the creation of music process . The students will also learn about historically significant composers.

NJSLS

VPA.1.2.5.A.CS1 Art and culture reflect and affect each other.

VPA.1.2.5.A.1 Recognize works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art as a reflection of societal values and beliefs.

VPA.1.2.5.A.CS2 Characteristic approaches to content, form, style, and design define art genres.

VPA.1.2.5.A.2 Relate common artistic elements that define distinctive art genres in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

VPA.1.2.5.A.CS3 Sometimes the contributions of an individual artist can influence a generation of artists and signal the beginning of a new art genre.

VPA.1.2.5.A.3 Determine the impact of significant contributions of individual artists in dance, music, theatre, and visual art from diverse cultures throughout history.

Exit Skills

By the end of this unit Students Should be able to:  

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

The students will be able to:  

Unit 2 Overview (Ongoing) Aesthetic Response


In this unit the students will learn the proper responses to and methods of critiquing a musical performance. The students will also learn appropriate behaviors for participating in a concert and being part of the audience.

NJSLS

VPA.1.4.5.A.CS1 Works of art may be organized according to their functions and artistic purposes (e.g., genres, mediums, messages, themes).

VPA.1.4.5.A.1 Employ basic, discipline-specific arts terminology to categorize works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art according to established classifications.

VPA.1.4.5.A.CS2 Formalism in dance, music, theatre, and visual art varies according to personal, cultural, and historical contexts.

VPA.1.4.5.A.2 Make informed aesthetic responses to artworks based on structural arrangement and personal, cultural, and historical points of view.

VPA.1.4.5.A.CS3 Criteria for determining the aesthetic merits of artwork vary according to context. Understanding the relationship between compositional design and genre provides the foundation for making value judgments about the arts.

VPA.1.4.5.A.3 Demonstrate how art communicates ideas about personal and social values and is inspired by an individual’s imagination and frame of reference (e.g., personal, social, political, historical context).

VPA.1.4.5.B.CS1 Identifying criteria for evaluating performances results in deeper understanding of art and art-making.

VPA.1.4.5.B.1 Assess the application of the elements of art and principles of design in dance, music, theatre, and visual artworks using observable, objective criteria.

VPA.1.4.5.B.CS2 Decoding simple contextual clues requires evaluation mechanisms, such as rubrics, to sort fact from opinion.

VPA.1.4.5.B.2 Use evaluative tools, such as rubrics, for self-assessment and to appraise the objectivity of critiques by peers.

VPA.1.4.5.B.CS3 While there is shared vocabulary among the four arts disciplines of dance, music, theatre, and visual art, each also has its own discipline-specific arts terminology.

VPA.1.4.5.B.3 Use discipline-specific arts terminology to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

VPA.1.4.5.B.CS4 Levels of proficiency can be assessed through analyses of how artists apply the elements of art and principles of design.

VPA.1.4.5.B.4 Define technical proficiency, using the elements of the arts and principles of design.

VPA.1.4.5.B.CS5 Artists and audiences can and do disagree about the relative merits of artwork. When assessing works of dance, music, theatre and visual art, it is important to consider the context for the creation and performance of the work (e.g., Who was the creator? What purpose does the artwork serve? Who is the intended audience?).

VPA.1.4.5.B.5 Distinguish ways in which individuals may disagree about the relative merits and effectiveness of artistic choices in the creation and performance of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Exit Skills

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:  

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

By the end of this unit the students will demonstrate the ability to:  

Unit 3 Overview (35 days) Musicality


In this unit the students will learn about the aspects of music that make for an emotional enhanced performance.

NJSLS

VPA.1.1.2.B.CS1 Ear training and listening skill are prerequisites for musical literacy.

VPA.1.1.2.B.1 Explore the elements of music through verbal and written responses to diverse aural prompts and printed scores.

VPA.1.1.2.B.CS2 The elements of music are foundational to basic music literacy.

VPA.1.1.2.B.2 Identify musical elements in response to diverse aural prompts, such as rhythm, timbre, dynamics, form, and melody.

VPA.1.1.2.B.CS3 Music is often defined as organized sound that is dependent on predictable properties of tone and pitch. Musical notation captures tonality, dynamic range, and rhythm.

VPA.1.1.2.B.3 Identify and categorize sound sources by common traits (e.g., scales, rhythmic patterns, and/or other musical elements), and identify rhythmic notation up to eighth notes and rests.

VPA.1.1.2.B.CS4 Musical instruments have unique qualities of tonality and resonance. Conventional instruments are divided into musical families according to shared properties.

VPA.1.1.2.B.4 Categorize families of instruments and identify their associated musical properties.

Exit Skills

By the end of this unit students will be able to  

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

Students will demonstrate the ability to:  

Unit 4 Overview (35 days) Music Literacy


In this unit the students will learn how to read rhythm and pitches.

NJSLS

VPA.1.1.2.B.CS1 Ear training and listening skill are prerequisites for musical literacy.

VPA.1.1.2.B.1 Explore the elements of music through verbal and written responses to diverse aural prompts and printed scores.

VPA.1.1.2.B.CS2 The elements of music are foundational to basic music literacy.

VPA.1.1.2.B.2 Identify musical elements in response to diverse aural prompts, such as rhythm, timbre, dynamics, form, and melody.

VPA.1.1.2.B.CS3 Music is often defined as organized sound that is dependent on predictable properties of tone and pitch. Musical notation captures tonality, dynamic range, and rhythm.

VPA.1.1.2.B.3 Identify and categorize sound sources by common traits (e.g., scales, rhythmic patterns, and/or other musical elements), and identify rhythmic notation up to eighth notes and rests.

VPA.1.1.2.B.CS4 Musical instruments have unique qualities of tonality and resonance. Conventional instruments are divided into musical families according to shared properties.

VPA.1.1.2.B.4 Categorize families of instruments and identify their associated musical properties.

VPA.1.3.2.B.CS3 Playing techniques for Orff instruments develop foundational skills used for hand percussion and melodic percussion instruments.

VPA.1.3.2.B.3 Demonstrate correct playing techniques for Orff instruments or equivalent homemade instruments.

VPA.1.3.2.B.CS7 Basic conducting patterns and gestures provide cues about how and when to execute changes in dynamics, timbre, and timing.

VPA.1.3.2.B.7 Blend unison and harmonic parts and vocal or instrumental timbres while matching dynamic levels in response to a conductor’s cues.

Exit Skills

By the end of this unit students should be able to:  

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

By the end of this unit the students will demonstrate the ability to:  

Grade 5