SECTA Course Catalog 2021-2022

SECTA

Course Catalog

2021-2022

Southeast Career Technical Academy   |   5710 Mountain Vista Street   |   702-799-7500

www.secta.us

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION

HOW TO USE THIS CATALOG

SOUTHEAST CAREER TECHNICAL ACADEMY’S WEBSITE

SOUTHEAST CAREER TECHNICAL ACADEMY’S 504 / IEP SUPPLEMENTARY HOME SERVICES PLAN

INFINITE CAMPUS (IC)

COUNSELING SERVICES

RELEASE OF STUDENT DIRECTORY INFORMATION

SCHOOL DISTRICT CALENDAR

ADMISSIONS AND CONTINUED ENROLLMENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

ENROLLMENT STANDARDS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

ATTENDANCE POLICIES

BEHAVIOR STANDARDS

TRANSPORTATION POLICIES

FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL

PROBATION

NON-RETURN INFORMATION

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

1. CORE ENROLLMENT EXPECTATIONS

2. TESTING

Required: College and Career Readiness Assessment

Optional: ACT National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC)

Optional: Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)

Optional: SAT

Optional: PSAT/NMSQT

3. DIPLOMA TYPES

MATRICULATION

ACADEMIC PLANNING

COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS

FOUR-YEAR COURSE PLANS

PROGRAMS AND PROGRESS

REQUIRED HIGH SCHOOL ACADEMIC LOAD

Exemptions for Merit:

Exemptions for Good Cause:

EARLY GRADUATION

SCHEDULE CHANGES

GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)

VALEDICTORIAN AND SALUTATORIAN

EARNING CREDIT

Internal Credit

High School Credit Taken in Middle School

Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), and International Baccalaureate (IB)

Career and Technical Education (CTE)

Dual Credit

Credit by Exam (CBE)

External Credit

Community Service

Online/Correspondence Course

Educational Travel Credit

Enrichment Program

Physical Education II Waiver

Music Equivalent Credit

Concurrent Credit

STUDENT-ATHLETES

ATHLETIC PROGRAMS

Physical Education II Waiver Credit

CCSD Athletic Eligibility Requirements

NCAA Initial Eligibility Requirements

CLUBS

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

PRE-REGISTRATION GUIDELINES

CLASS CHANGE REQUEST POLICY (After the deadline of August 01, 2020)

SCHEDULE CHANGES/DROPPING A CLASS

DUPLICATE COURSE WORK - REPEATING COURSES

POSTSECONDARY OPTIONS

NEVADA UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS

FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY

PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PRIVATE JUNIOR COLLEGE

CONTINUING EDUCATION CLASSES

LIFE SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAMS

APPRENTICESHIPS

CAREER, VOCATIONAL, OR TECHNICAL EDUCATION

JOB CORPS

CITY YEAR AND AMERICORPS

MILITARY

NEVADA SCHOLARSHIPS

MILLENNIUM SCHOLARSHIP

PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION

NEVADA PROMISE SCHOLARSHIP

NEVADA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CODE OF HONOR

NON-DISCRIMINATION AND ACCESSIBILITY NOTICE

TRANSCRIPT INTERPRETATION GUIDE

COURSE OF STUDIES

ENGLISH

MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

SOCIAL STUDIES

PE / HEALTH

ELECTIVES

INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION


GENERAL INFORMATION                                                       

Courses offered in the 2021-2022 school year are selected during spring pre-registration. Generally, if twenty-five or more students are pre-registered for a course, it will be offered the next school year; however, if during final registration fewer students are signed-up for a course, it may be canceled and those students will be rescheduled into alternate courses.

Students are reminded to discuss course selections with their parents, teachers, and counselor before pre-registration and to choose their classes carefully. Courses should be chosen which will challenge and prepare students for their career/technical major or college education.

Parents and students should be aware of Southeast Career Technical Academy’s commitment to providing a rigorous, relevant, and challenging curriculum. Student placement in classes will be based upon several factors: (a) teacher recommendation, (b) previous grades in similar courses, (c) parental guidance, and (d) interest of the student. Additionally, every effort will be made to appropriately place students in challenging courses, which coincide with the student’s assessed ability as indicated by his/her stanine scores or national percentile rank on standardized tests. It is essential that parents and students understand that changing class placements without significant extenuating circumstances will not occur.

HOW TO USE THIS CATALOG

Read the Course Catalog descriptions before pre-registering. Prerequisites are listed in the catalog to help students and parents make the best educational decisions possible.  Students must meet the prerequisites of a course before they can pre-register for that course. If a student does not meet the prerequisites, he/she must request permission to challenge the course before he/she may enroll. NOTE: A student who challenges a course must remain in the class for an entire year.

SOUTHEAST CAREER TECHNICAL ACADEMY’S WEBSITE

Southeast Career Technical Academy’s website, www.secta.us, is the central location for all school resources and information including admissions, daily announcements, majors, faculty, sports, clubs, and the school calendar, as well as, various resources in the Library and Counseling Office. In addition, there is a large section for college and career planning and an extensive scholarship section. Information is also available regarding admissions deadlines, college entrance exam dates, college recruiting visits to Southeast Career Technical Academy, financial aid and college loans, and the Selective Service System.  Each of the four classes, freshmen through seniors, also have specific information posted to help students make the most of their academic year.

SOUTHEAST CAREER TECHNICAL ACADEMY’S 504 / IEP SUPPLEMENTARY HOME SERVICES PLAN

Southeast Career Technical Academy has a designated Supplementary Home Services Plan in place. Students with a 504 or an IEP may qualify for Supplemental Home Services if the student misses 3 consecutive days of instruction within the block schedule of odd or even classes, (not calendar days). Supplemental Home Services will only be rendered if the absences result from the medical condition listed in the 504 or IEP. Students who qualify for SHS will receive 1 hour of Supplementary Home Services tutoring for every day missed, not to exceed 5 hours per week. Students will meet in a designated location: Public Library, 2797 N Green Valley Pkwy, Henderson (On the corner of Sunset and Green Valley Pkwy.), for the approved Supplementary Home Services tutoring. Supplementary Home Services tutoring only covers core class subjects: Math, Science, English, History.

INFINITE CAMPUS (IC)

Infinite Campus (IC) is the Clark County School District’s parent communication system for all students in grades K-12, providing up-to-date information regarding student attendance, gradebook assignments, links to teacher emails and class websites, announcements, cafeteria information and much more. For added convenience, parents with more than one student in CCSD may access all of their children’s information in English or in Spanish at various schools with one login ID, online or by telephone. Southeast Career Technical Academy parents and students can get their own Infinite Campus (IC) access account through Mrs. Stark. Mrs. Stark can be contacted via email at  boonela@nv.ccsd.net or reached at 799-7500 ext. 3053

COUNSELING SERVICES

School counselors provide assistance with the proper selection of classes and monitor academic performance. Throughout the school year, they meet with students and disseminate information about testing, career and employment opportunities, colleges, technical and business schools, the armed services, scholarships and financial aid. Much of this information is also duplicated and available online at www.secta.us. The counselors provide personal/social counseling by working with students, parents, school personnel, and community agencies.

Students are assigned to counselors by major and will remain with them through their senior year.  To see a counselor, a student should go to the Administrative Office before or after school or during lunch to sign up for an appointment. Students may also email their counselors. All faculty emails are available at www.secta.us

RELEASE OF STUDENT DIRECTORY INFORMATION

Federal legislation provides that all branches of the military have access to three directory information categories – names, addresses, and telephone listings – unless parents have advised the school that they do not want their student’s information disclosed without prior written consent. Clark County School District has developed a form for the purpose of allowing parents this option. CCF-823, Release of Student Directory Information, is available online to schools and parents or you may request a hard copy from the school office. Parents also have the opportunity to designate their directory information choices during on-line Infinite Campus registration, annually.

SCHOOL DISTRICT CALENDAR

This calendar is subject to change. Please review the current calendar online at: https://ccsd.net/district/calendar/ 

ADMISSIONS AND CONTINUED ENROLLMENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

ENROLLMENT STANDARDS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

ATTENDANCE POLICIES

after the student returns to school. If received beyond three (3) days, the absence will be

marked as unexcused.

○ Date of absence and time stamp from the attendance office, complete first and last name of the student, student ID number, approved reason, and signature of parent/guardian

BEHAVIOR STANDARDS

TRANSPORTATION POLICIES

FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL

Students not attending school on the first day of school may be withdrawn from Southeast Tech. Students will need to re-apply to Southeast Tech based on space availability. Students whose family situation does not allow for attendance of the first day of school, must follow district procedures and complete a “pre-arranged absence” form with the program assistant principal prior to the first day of school.

PROBATION

Students will be placed and notified of probation status at the conclusion of the 1st semester. Any student failing to meet the standards and policies listed below, may be placed on  probation status. Should the behavior, attendance or academic standards fail to be met during the 2nd semester, the student will be given a “non-return” status.

 

NON-RETURN INFORMATION

Any student who meets the criteria below will be non-returned for the following school year. Students, who make up failed credits, may appeal with the Admissions Office in August. Failed major courses cannot be made up.

GRADE

TOTAL F’s FOR ONE YEAR

CREDIT DEFICIENCY

MAJOR

9th

3

1.5 Credits

Failed one or more semesters

10th

3

1.5 Credits

Failed one or more semesters

11th

2

1 Credits

Failed one or more semesters

Notification of non-return status is given at the end of the third quarter and/or at the end of 2nd semester via certified mail.  Students will be placed on “non-return status” and must return to their zoned high school when one or more of the following conditions occur:

Students on “non-return status” may appeal with the Admissions office. Appeals will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Any student appealing the “non-return status” for grades must meet the following conditions:

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Complete coursework designed around your individual goals and the Core Enrollment Expectations
  2. Take the ACT with Writing in junior year, at no cost (or take the NAA for Alternative Diploma students)
  3. Earn a diploma

1. CORE ENROLLMENT EXPECTATIONS

The Clark County School District (CCSD) strives to prepare students for success in postsecondary education and in the workforce by providing access to a rigorous curriculum. The Core Enrollment Expectations are consistent with Nevada Revised Statute and aligned with the Governor Guinn Millennium Scholarship minimum core curriculum requirements. If the Core Enrollment Expectations do not align with a student’s academic plan, then a modified course of study must be agreed upon by the student’s parent/guardian and a school administrator or school counselor.

Core Enrollment Expectations                        Units

English                                                4

Mathematics (including Algebra II or higher)        4

Natural Science                                        3

Social Studies and History                                3

Total                                                        14

Students that successfully complete the Core Enrollment Expectations with a weighted grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.25 may qualify for the Governor Guinn Millennium Scholarship. Please see your school counselor for more information about the Millennium Scholarship.

SOURCES: NRS 389.018, Nevada Board of Regents, Nevada Treasurer’s Office

2. TESTING

Required: College and Career Readiness Assessment

All juniors will take the ACT with Writing exam in the spring. The college and career readiness assessment (ACT with Writing) is a requirement for graduation. Juniors will take the ACT in spring of the junior year at no cost. It is recommended that all students take ACT in the spring of the junior year, as most four-year colleges/universities require test scores for admission. In addition, some colleges/universities and NCAA Division I Initial Eligibility (for student-athletes) require a minimum score on the ACT to determine placement in freshman English and math courses. Finally, some universities determine scholarship eligibility based on ACT and/or SAT results.

Students attending college/university in Nevada can earn the Millennium Scholarship after successfully completing the core curriculum and earning at least a 21 composite score on the ACT. For more information, please see the Nevada Scholarships section of this guide.

It may be necessary to retake the ACT and/or SAT to increase scores. This may enable a student to avoid placement in a remedial math and/or English college course. Remedial courses at Nevada System of Higher Education institutions provide no college credit and are not paid for by the Millennium Scholarship program.

SOURCE: CCSD Regulation 5127, NRS 390.610

Optional: ACT National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC)

The ACT NCRC is a portable, evidence-based credential that certifies the essential skills for workplace success. Employers look for it from job candidates because it is a valid predictor of job performance. Students that earn a Silver or above for the ACT NCRC credential will also meet one of the qualifications for the College and Career Ready Diploma. Please contact your school counselor with additional questions.

Optional: Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)

The United States Department of Defense developed this test to administer to students all over the country. The test is typically scheduled during the school day and is normally at no cost to the student. Score reports received after taking the test can be useful in determining college and career pathways. This test is typically taken in grades 10-12. Students that earn a 50 or above on the ASVAB will also meet one of the qualifications for the College and Career Ready Diploma. Please contact your school counselor with additional questions.

Optional: SAT

The SAT is used by most colleges and universities to make admissions decisions. It is a multiple-choice test administered by the College Board. The purpose of the SAT is to measure college readiness by providing colleges with common scores to compare all students. Free online test preparation is available through Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org). This test is typically taken during the spring of grade 11 and fall of grade 12. There is a cost associated with this exam, but fee waivers may be available to those that qualify. Students that earn a 480 in Reading and a 530 in Math will also meet one of the qualifications for the College and Career Ready Diploma. Please contact your school counselor with additional questions.

Students attending college/university in Nevada can earn the Millennium Scholarship for completing the core curriculum and earning a combined reading, writing, and math score of 1070 or higher. For more information, please see the Nevada Scholarships section of this guide.

Optional: PSAT/NMSQT

The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is a great way to prepare for the SAT. Scores are used to identify National Merit Scholars and award merit scholarships. Score reports received after taking the test can be useful in determining which Advanced Placement (AP) coursework may be appropriate during high school. Free online test preparation is available through Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org). This test is typically taken in grades 8, 10, and 11. The examinations for students in grades 8 and 10 are at no cost. Please contact your school counselor with additional questions.

3. DIPLOMA TYPES

*

To satisfy either the Arts/Humanities/CTE state requirement for the standard diploma or the additional social studies requirement for the other diplomas, CCSD students must:

  • Pass semesters 1 and 2 of World History, or
  • Pass semesters 1 and 2 of Geography, or
  • Pass semester 1 of World History and semester 2 of Geography, or
  • Pass semester 1 of Geography and semester 2 of World History.

**

Flex credits can be: a 2nd or 3rd year CTE concentrator course in one program of study, or a 4th year of math (including Algebra II or higher), or a 3rd year of science, or a 3rd year of social studies.

***

For the College and Career Ready Diploma, students must:

  1. Complete requirements in the table above, including Algebra II or higher, with a 3.25 weighted GPA, and
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in two languages, or two (2) units in AP courses, IB courses, Dual Credit courses, CTE courses, Work Based Learning courses, or a world language course, and
  3. Earn at least one of the following endorsements:

College-Ready endorsement for students who successfully complete a college readiness assessment, and receive not less than remedial scores for initial (non-remedial) placement into college-level English and mathematics courses (use the Infinite Campus Student/Parent to view the Academic Plan Progress Report), or

Career-Ready endorsement for students who successfully complete the ACT National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) –level Silver or above, or successfully complete the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) – score 50 or above, or obtain a Career and Technical Education Skills Attainment Certificate, or

obtain a credential on Nevada’s Industry-Recognized Credentials List (OWINN).

SOURCES: NAC 390, CCSD Regulation 5127, Nevada Board of Regents

 

MATRICULATION

Grade classification for high school students is determined by years in school, not on credit earned. Students will be classified to the next grade level at the end of each school year. However, progress should be continuous and student advancement through the curriculum should be according to the student’s demonstrated ability rather than the student’s age or years in school.

SOURCE: CCSD Regulation 5123

ACADEMIC PLANNING

COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS

Students benefit from comprehensive school counseling programs that include college and career readiness standards. In addition to classroom lessons and family night events, students also meet individually with a school counselor to complete academic plans.

An academic plan is a four-year course plan that is built on a student’s individual strengths, weaknesses, interests, and their postsecondary goals.

FOUR-YEAR COURSE PLANS

All ninth-grade students must have an approved four-year academic plan in Infinite Campus.

The academic plan contains all of the planned courses a student will take in high school, and must be aligned to a specific diploma type.

The plan may also include, without limitation, the designation of a career pathway and enrollment in dual credit, career and technical education (CTE), Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), and Honors (H) courses.

The ninth-grade student and their parent or legal guardian are required to work in consultation with a school counselor to develop an academic plan, sign the academic plan, review the academic plan at least once each school year in consultation with a school counselor, and revise the plan if necessary. Please contact your school directly for instructions on how to approve your child’s academic plan online.

For students enrolling in high school after ninth grade, an academic plan will be created with appropriate grade level modifications.

The academic plan must be used as a guide for the student and the parent or legal guardian to plan, monitor, and manage the student’s educational development and make determinations of the appropriate course of study.

If a student does not satisfy all of the requirements in their academic plan, then they are still eligible to graduate and receive a high school diploma if requirements for a diploma are otherwise satisfied.

SOURCES: CCSD Regulation 5127, AB 117

PROGRAMS AND PROGRESS

Graduation Programs: Students are assigned to a graduation program in Infinite Campus to allow students, parents/guardians, and school counselors to track progress towards completing the four-year academic plan and earning a diploma.

Academic Programs: Students are also assigned to additional programs to track progress on other postsecondary readiness goals. Common academic programs include:

Parents and students can review progress online using Campus Student and Campus Parent.

REQUIRED HIGH SCHOOL ACADEMIC LOAD

The State of Nevada requires all high school students to be enrolled as follows:

* The Nevada Department of Education establishes the standards for students that are considered college and career ready. Please see your school counselor for details, or review the Nevada Department of Education guidance memo.

SOURCES: NAC 387.345, AB 7

Exemptions for Merit:

1) Students in grade 12 must be enrolled in a minimum of six (6) classes unless they meet any one of the following criteria:

a) The student is on track to complete an Advanced Diploma, with no more than four (4) credits remaining; or

b) The student is on track to complete an Advanced Honors Diploma, with no more than four (4) credits remaining; or

c) The student is on track to complete a College and Career Ready Diploma as determined by successfully meeting at least one of the following requirements:

Advanced Placement Coursework:

i) Completed two (2) honors courses in core academic areas with a B average or higher by their 5th semester; or

ii) Completed one (1) Advanced Placement (AP) course with a 3.0 GPA or higher or a 3 or higher on the assessment by their 5th semester; or

iii) Enrolled in two (2) or more AP courses with a 2.0 GPA or higher by their 5th semester

International Baccalaureate Coursework:

iv) Completed one (1) International Baccalaureate (IB) course with a 3.0 GPA or higher

Dual Credit Coursework:

v) Completed one (1) or more dual-credit courses with a 3.0 GPA or higher

Career and Technical Education Coursework:

vi) Completed a Level 2 or Level 3 CTE course with a 3.0 GPA or higher in the CTE program of study and on-track to complete the program of study by graduation

Work-Based Learning:

vii) Completed one (1) work-based learning course aligned to Nevada’s high-priority, in-demand occupations

Assessments and Credentials:

viii) Completed the ACT with a minimum score of 18 on English AND 22 in Mathematics

ix) Completed the SAT with a minimum score of 500 in Critical Reading AND 500 in Mathematics

x) Completed the ACT National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) with a score of Silver or better

xi) Completed the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) with a score of 50 or better

xii) Obtained a Career and Technical Education Skills Attainment Certificate

xiii) Obtained an industry-recognized credential on Nevada’s Eligible Industry Credentialing List

OR

Exemptions for Good Cause:

2) The student qualifies for one of the following good-cause exemptions that have been defined by CCSD:

a) The student works in order to support the family financially

b) The student cares for children for their family

c) The student cares for an impaired parent or family member

d) The student has an IEP or 504 that requires the student have a reduced academic load

SCHEDULE CHANGES

To ensure students receive enough instruction to earn credit, schedule changes are not permitted after the first 18 school days of each semester for face-to-face courses.

After the first 18 school days, schedules may only be changed with administrative approval. Exceptions to the above may only be made through administrative channels for unique and unusual circumstances. Distance learning and online coursework (e.g. Apex) allow students to earn credit through digital instruction and are excluded from these schedule change guidelines.

Last Day for Credit in Face-to-Face Instruction for 21-22 School Year

Semester 1: TBD

Semester 2: TBD

GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)

The student’s Unweighted GPA is calculated on a traditional 4-point scale (A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0).

Bonus Points for successful completion of Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses will be added as follows, according to NAC 389.6625. This represents the student’s Weighted GPA.

*Mastery of AP and IB course content shall be determined by participation in the AP or IB examinations sponsored by the College Board and International Baccalaureate. Students are required to take the examinations for each course. Parents or guardians may waive this testing requirement by informing the school administration in writing.

For the Cohort of 2020, a maximum of fourteen (14) courses or twenty-eight (28) semesters of Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), and/or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses will receive Bonus Points. This creates a Weighted GPA cap of 4.800 as the highest possible GPA.

For the Cohorts of 2021 and beyond, there is no limit to the number of Honors, AP, or IB courses that will receive Bonus Points. This removes the Weighted GPA cap.

SOURCE: CCSD Regulation 5127, NAC 389.6625

VALEDICTORIAN AND SALUTATORIAN

Valedictorians, students with the highest Weighted GPA in the graduating cohort, and Salutatorians, students with the second highest Weighted GPA in the graduating cohort, will be identified as candidates at the end of the fall semester for each cohort year.

Final Valedictorians and Salutatorians will be determined upon completion of all high school graduation requirements by the last day of school.

SOURCE: CCSD Regulation 5127

EARNING CREDIT

In general, students must complete 60 hours of instruction in a course to earn 0.5 credits at the end of each semester. The Clark County School District (CCSD) has a variety of ways for students to earn credit.

SOURCE: NAC 389.040

Internal Credit

Students are enrolled in courses at their school of full-time enrollment to earn the majority of credit needed for graduation. Your high school has a list of all the courses being offered for internal credit in this catalog. That list contains core subject areas and elective courses. Additional internal credit examples are listed below.

High School Credit Taken in Middle School

Certain coursework taken in middle school (grades 6-8) may be counted as credit required to graduate from high school. Common courses include, but are not limited to:

Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), and International Baccalaureate (IB)

The CCSD Honors, AP, and IB course offerings are designed to challenge students to enroll in more demanding and rigorous coursework and to improve advanced academic achievement of students demonstrating accelerated educational potential.

Mastery of AP and IB course content shall be determined by participation in the AP or IB examinations sponsored by the College Board and International Baccalaureate. Students are required to take the AP or IB examinations for each course.

Parents or guardians may waive the testing requirement related to AP and IB by informing the school administration in writing.

SOURCE: CCSD Regulation 5127

Career and Technical Education (CTE)

Career and Technical Education in Nevada is organized into six (6) program areas and course sequences. Each high school in CCSD may offer different programs and course sequences. Please review the section Courses and Descriptions for details on CTE courses. Additional information can be found online at: http://www.doe.nv.gov/CTE/ 

Nevada CTE Program Areas:

  1. Agricultural and Natural Resources
  2. Business and Marketing Education
  3. Education, Hospitality, and Human Services
  4. Health Science and Public Safety
  5. Information and Media Technologies
  6. Skilled and Technical Sciences

Dual Credit

A dual credit course is either taken at a local college/university or at a CCSD school where both high school and college credit are earned. Dual credit coursework is no longer considered external credit beginning with the 2018-2019 school year. There are three (3) ways to earn dual credit listed below. Students should work with their school counselor if they wish to include dual credit courses into their Academic Plans.

Regular Dual Credit: Students take coursework outside of the regular school day from an accredited college/university. There is typically a cost. Students must complete a CCF-856: Dual Credit Application before enrolling in any dual credit coursework.

Cooperative Agreement Dual Credit (e.g. Jumpstart): Students take a college-level course at the school of full-time enrollment that is taught by an approved instructor. There is typically a cost of around $75 per semester, and students must have a 3.0 Unweighted GPA. The CCF-856, Dual Credit Application, is not needed for programs with a formal cooperative agreement with CCSD.

CTE College Credit: Students complete state-approved programs in CTE to earn postsecondary credit at no cost to the student. CTE College Credit is articulated credit, the high school coursework aligns to postsecondary courses, and the teacher of record is a high school CTE teacher. The CCF-856, Dual Credit Application, is not needed. Instead, students complete a separate application through the college of their choice (e.g. CSN).

To qualify for the CTE College Credit, students must:

Families can use Campus Student/Parent Progress Report to track progress towards a CTE program (career tech program) online. Students that complete a CTE program of study according to the criteria are eligible to earn the CTE College Credit within three years of graduating from high school and upon admission to the postsecondary institution. The amount of credit is dependent upon the state standards for each high school CTE program and how the standards align to the college courses for a certificate or degree in a related career pathway.

Credit by Exam (CBE)

Students can earn credit for courses in which they demonstrate mastery of course material. CBE is not a credit retrieval option. To be eligible to take a CBE, the student must not have previously been enrolled in the course and received a progress grade. Nevada Learning Academy (NVLA) offers a variety of options for CBE. For more details, please visit www.nvlearningacademy.net.

CBE Policies

Courses Available for CBE

External Credit

External credits may be granted for coursework completed outside of the Clark County School District (CCSD) while a student is enrolled in CCSD during the school year and over the summer. A maximum of six (6) external credits can be applied toward graduation from high school. A maximum of three (3) external credits can be earned in the combined core areas of English, mathematics, science, and social studies.

External credits in the following categories must be pre-approved with supporting documentation by a student’s school of full-time enrollment. The school determines which supporting documentation is accepted, but all external credits must be from accredited institutions. Students may request the External Credit Application (CCF-850) from a school counselor.

Community Service

0.5 elective credit will be granted for volunteering 60 hours (1.0 credit for 120 hours) of time at a school-approved community agency (1 credit max).

Online/Correspondence Course

High school credit will be granted for high school coursework completed at accredited institutions.

Educational Travel Credit

0.5 elective credit will be granted for a 21-day educational trip/tour (1.0 credit for 42 days). Students are required to submit a log with general descriptions of sites visited detailing items of interest, the student’s reactions, and photographs of the student at the sites. A parent or guardian may sign logs for educational travel credit supporting documentation.

Enrichment Program

Elective credit will be granted for successful completion of academically accelerated coursework at accredited institutions.

Physical Education II Waiver

1.0 Physical Education credit (required for graduation) will be waived for 120 hours of activity completed under the direct supervision of a qualified instructor/coach who is a credentialed or licensed professional in that activity. The Physical Education II Waiver may only be issued if credit for Physical Education II has not been granted. To be approved, this activity must be geared toward competition. Students cannot earn a PE II Waiver if they failed the PE II course.

Music Equivalent Credit

High school credit will be granted for private music lessons. A student is limited to 0.5 credit for each school year (1 credit max). The instructor must be certified, or demonstrate membership in one of the following organizations: The National Association for Music Education, The American Music Teachers Association, The Must Teachers National Association, The Suzuki Music Teachers Association, or a faculty member at a college, university, or school of the arts.

Concurrent Credit

Concurrent credits are credits a student earns from another CCSD school while still attending the school of full-time enrollment. A student may not be enrolled in two or more instances of the same course at the same time. All concurrent course enrollments require prior approval from a school counselor. There is no limit on earning concurrent credits. See a school counselor for more information on concurrent credit options.

 

STUDENT-ATHLETES

ATHLETIC PROGRAMS

The following sports are offered at Southeast Tech. If Southeast Tech does not offer a sport the student wants to participate in, the student may play that particular sport at the student’s zoned school. Busing for sports is not available from Southeast Tech to the zoned school.

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Boys’ and Girls’ Soccer

Boys’ Basketball

Baseball

Girls’ Volleyball

Girls’ Basketball

Softball

Boys’ and Girls’ X Country

Boys’ and Girls’ Bowling

Boys’ and Girls’ Swimming/Diving

Girls’ Golf

Girls’ Flag Football

Boys’ Volleyball

Boys’ and Girls’ Tennis

Boys’ Golf

Physical Education II Waiver Credit

A waiver for Physical Education II shall be granted if a student has not earned Physical Education II credit and actively participates in a school-sponsored activity for 120 hours in interscholastic athletics, on a drill team, in a marching band, in a dance group, or on a cheerleading squad. Students cannot earn a PE II Waiver if they already took the PE II course (pass or fail).

Baseball – Varsity, Junior Varsity

Basketball – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team

Bowling – Varsity, B-Team

Cheerleading – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team

Cross Country – Varsity

Dance Group

Drill Team

Flag Football – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team

Football – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team

Golf – Varsity

Marching Band/Flags/Mascots

Soccer – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team

Softball – Varsity, Junior Varsity         

Swimming – Varsity         

Tennis – Varsity

Track – Varsity

Volleyball – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team

Wrestling – Varsity, Junior Varsity

SOURCE: NAC 389.488

CCSD Athletic Eligibility Requirements

Transfer Rules

Age Limitations

Physical Examinations

Residency Rules

Academic Requirements

Please visit www.ccsd.net to access the High School Athletic Eligibility Rules in greater detail

NCAA Initial Eligibility Requirements

Students that plan to compete in NCAA sports at a Division I college/university need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center to meet initial eligibility standards.

Please notify your school counselor if you are planning to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center. It is important for your school counselor to know this information and ensure your Academic Plan reflects the required coursework for eligibility as outlined below.

Students and families may contact the NCAA directly with additional questions about eligibility or the registration process: 1-877-262-1492.

To be eligible for competition in NCAA sports in the first year at a Division I school, students must graduate high school and meet all the following requirements:

  1. Complete 16 core courses:
  1. Four years of English
  2. Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
  3. Two years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if the high school offers it)
  4. One additional year of English, math or natural/physical science
  5. Two years of social science
  6. Four additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy
  1. Complete 10 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the seventh semester. Once the seventh semester begins, students may not repeat or replace any of those 10 courses to improve core-course GPA.
  2. Earn at least a 2.300 GPA in core courses.
  3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching the core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale, which balances test score and core-course GPA. Students that have a low test score will need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible. Students that have a low core-course GPA will need a higher test score to be eligible.

SOURCE: http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/play-division-i-sports 

CLUBS

Students are encouraged to get involved in the existing club activities or begin a new club/organization at Southeast Tech. Clubs are based on a Southeast Tech program and/or special interests of students and staff:

Ambassadors

BSU (Black Student Union)

Cheerleaders: Junior Varsity, Varsity

DECA

Dungeons and Dragons

Educators Rising

HOSA

National Honor Society (NHS)

National Science Bowl

Pep Club

Photo Club

SkillsUSA

Speech and Debate

Student Council

Sociedad Honoraria Hispánica

SOL (Student Organization of Latinos)

Spanish Club

Stem Group (Robotics)

TheatreClub                                    

Varsity Quiz                                                                

*Clubs are subject to change

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

PRE-REGISTRATION GUIDELINES

As part of the Graduate Profile, counselors make every effort to aid students in planning their high school program and project this program toward long-term goals. However, the ultimate responsibility for the individual program must still rest with the STUDENT and PARENT. Therefore, students are encouraged to consider both graduation and post-high school education entrance requirements.

Students must choose their classes carefully. Starting the 21-22 year, counselors will recommend students for their core content classes, including English, math and science based on their Map Assessment scores and current academic grades.  Students will select their electives, including two alternate elective choices.  In the event some electives are filled or canceled, students will be enrolled in their alternate choice(s) in the order listed. Prior to fall registration, students will be scheduled into the classes selected during pre-registration unless the classes are filled or canceled. Parents and students should read course descriptions carefully before pre-registering.

Students should discuss their course selections with parents, teachers, and counselors before pre-registration, choosing courses that are challenging and that will prepare them for college and/or a career technical program. Most career technical programs require postsecondary education; therefore, it is prudent to keep student options open by choosing classes that will serve as stepping stones to further education. All students will enroll in courses to fill the required class load. There may be exceptions to this depending upon credit requirements. Student schedules will be created through a computerized scheduling program based upon the courses chosen during pre-registration.

THE LAST DAY TO REQUEST A SCHEDULE CHANGE WILL BE AUGUST 01, 2021 AND STUDENTS MUST EMAIL THEIR REQUESTS TO THEIR COUNSELOR.

CLASS CHANGE REQUEST POLICY (After the deadline of August 01, 2020)

Schedule change requests, which stem from lack of effort on the student’s part or poor student discipline or attendance, are not granted.  These problems should be resolved through counseling, discipline referrals, and conferences. Due to the Nevada State Department of Education regulations, no student schedules will be changed after the first three weeks of the current semester.  Students who feel they are misplaced in a class should contact their counselor immediately. Class changes will NOT be granted to accommodate a change in a student’s lunch period or to change from/to a specific instructor.

Requests for a schedule change are only considered during the first three weeks of the school year and for the following reasons:

  1. The student needs another class for remediation.
  2. The student has already received credit for the class.
  3. Another class is more appropriate for career or college preparation.
  4. Counselor error in student placement.

In conformance to accreditation guidelines, the administration may, due to increased/decreased enrollment and staff changes, balance course sections by transferring students from one class and/or teacher to another section. Every effort will be made to ensure a smooth transition for students.

SCHEDULE CHANGES/DROPPING A CLASS

Since advanced planning and guidance are provided for each student prior to registration, schedule changes will not be made after registration. Those changes made after classes start must be based on a specific educational reason (misplacement, graduation requirement needed, etc.). After eighteen (18) days into the semester, no student may change or withdraw from a class due to the required number of hours to earn credit.  Students who drop a class after the eighteen (18) day limit will receive an “F” on the semester transcript. Year-long classes are scheduled as such; therefore, students are expected to remain in the class for the duration of the academic year unless one of the exceptions noted above is met. The Administration may, due to increased/decreased enrollment and staff changes, balance course sections by transferring students from one class and/or teacher to another section. Every effort will be made to ensure a smooth transition for students.

DUPLICATE COURSE WORK - REPEATING COURSES

A student may repeat a course. A student shall not receive additional credit for the repeated course. The higher grade shall be recorded on the permanent record and the lower grade replaced with a repeated course notation. A student may repeat a failed course one time to improve a grade. Regardless of the number of times a course is repeated, a grade of an “F” will only be removed once. If applicable, all other “F’s” will remain on a transcript. Other rules apply; please see the official CCSD Repeat Course Authorization Form for further details. These may be obtained from the school counselor.

POSTSECONDARY OPTIONS

NEVADA UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS

The Nevada Board of Regents sets the requirements for admission to Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) institutions. To see all Nevada options, please visit the NSHE website: https://nshe.nevada.edu/nshe-institutions/. The four-year NSHE admission criteria are as follows:

FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY

PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PRIVATE JUNIOR COLLEGE

CONTINUING EDUCATION CLASSES

LIFE SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAMS

APPRENTICESHIPS

CAREER, VOCATIONAL, OR TECHNICAL EDUCATION

JOB CORPS

CITY YEAR AND AMERICORPS

MILITARY

SOURCE: https://www.heath.gwu.edu/awareness-postsecondary-options 

NEVADA SCHOLARSHIPS

MILLENNIUM SCHOLARSHIP

The State of Nevada's Governor Guinn Millennium Scholarship Program provides financial support to Nevada's high school graduates who attend an eligible Nevada community college, state college, or university. You may receive up to a maximum award of $10,000 for undergraduate coursework during the six years following your high school graduation. There is no application form to complete. If you meet all Millennium Scholarship requirements upon high school graduation, the District will submit your name to the Office of the State Treasurer. You will receive an award notification in early August. A fact sheet on policy guidelines and requirements for eligibility can be obtained by calling 888-477-2667 or http://www.nevadatreasurer.gov/GGMS/GGMS_Home/. Please note that this information is subject to any changes in state law, policies adopted by the NSHE Board of Regents, availability of funding, and any related matters hereto.

PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION

The Public Education Foundation offers a variety of scholarships to help students pursue higher educational goals. In many cases, the scholarships make the college and university experience accessible to students who might not otherwise dream of a college education. The Public Education Foundation offers more than 260 different scholarship opportunities for Southern Nevada’s high school seniors to attend both in-state and out-of-state schools.

Scholarship donors are corporations, associations, organizations, foundations and individuals who want to create a brighter future by encouraging education. Each donor has the opportunity to determine the criteria of their scholarship and plays an active role in selecting the scholarship recipients. The Foundation provides professional assistance in establishing the scholarship funds at no cost, including advertising and promotion, clerical support, and an awards recognition luncheon in May. The luncheon gives the donors and scholarship recipients the opportunity to meet if they haven’t already done so during the selection process.

To date, the Foundation has awarded more than 6,100 scholarships totaling nearly $12 million. For more details, please visit https://thepef.org/scholarships/. 

NEVADA PROMISE SCHOLARSHIP

The Nevada Promise Scholarship aims to make a college education more accessible and affordable by providing last‐dollar financial aid to Nevada students attending one of the state’s four community colleges: College of Southern Nevada, Great Basin College, Truckee Meadows Community College, or Western Nevada College. The scholarship helps eligible students pay for up to three years of tuition and mandatory fees. Please contact your school counselor with additional questions, or visit www.csn.edu/promise.

NEVADA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CODE OF HONOR

There is a clear expectation that all students will perform academic tasks with honor and integrity, with the support of parents, staff, faculty, administration, and the community. The learning process requires students to think, process, organize, and create their own ideas. Throughout this process, students gain knowledge, self-respect, and ownership in the work that they do. These qualities provide a solid foundation for life skills, impacting people positively throughout their lives. Cheating and plagiarism violate the fundamental learning process and compromise personal integrity and one’s honor. Students demonstrate academic honesty and integrity by not cheating, plagiarizing, or using information unethically in any way.

What is cheating?

Cheating or academic dishonesty can take many forms, but always involves the improper taking of information from and/or giving of information to another student, individual, or other source. Examples of cheating can include, but are not limited to:

What is plagiarism?

Plagiarism is a common form of cheating or academic dishonesty in the school setting. It is representing another person’s works or ideas as your own without giving credit to the proper source and submitting it for any purpose. Examples of plagiarism can include, but are not limited to:

All stakeholders have a responsibility in maintaining academic honesty. Educators must provide the tools and teach the concepts that afford students the knowledge to understand the characteristics of cheating and plagiarism. Parents must support their students in making good decisions relative to completing coursework assignments and taking exams. Students must produce work that is theirs alone, recognizing the importance of thinking for themselves and learning independently, when that is the nature of the assignment. Adhering to the Code of Honor for the purposes of academic honesty promotes an essential skill that goes beyond the school environment. Honesty and integrity are useful and valuable traits impacting one’s life.

Questions or concerns regarding the consequences associated with a violation of the Code of Honor may be directed towards your child’s school administration and/or the school district.

NON-DISCRIMINATION AND ACCESSIBILITY NOTICE

CCSD does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, creed/religion, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, disability, marital status or age, in admission or access to, treatment or employment, or participation in its programs and activities, and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts of America and other designated youth groups, pursuant to federal and state laws including, but not limited to, Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA), and the Boy Scouts of America Equal Access Act.

TRANSCRIPT INTERPRETATION GUIDE

COURSE OF STUDIES

Our course of study is in accordance with the Clark County School District Secondary Course Guide. The following academic courses meet the required course selection for the Standard High School Diploma.  Additional academic courses are detailed in the listing of elective courses, which follows this section.

Prerequisites are listed in this Course Catalog to help students and parents make the best educational decisions possible. Students must meet these prerequisites to enroll in a course or request permission to challenge the course. Both semesters of a prerequisite course must be successfully completed.

ENGLISH

FUNDAMENTALS OF READING AND WRITING 9

This one-year intervention class is designed for students who need additional instruction and support to master grade-level reading and writing skills and concepts. This course provides additional instructional support (Response to Instruction (RTI) - Tier II or Tier III) to students enrolled in the English 9 course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

ENGLISH 9

This one-year course (Foundations in Composition and the Elements of Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designed to build on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier grades but in more sophisticated ways such as mastering the language, structure, and rhetoric of text; completing more complex writing assignments; reading and analyzing a range of literary and informational discourse, both classic and contemporary; delivering more extensive oral presentations; and participating in a variety of conversations and collaborations with peers. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Grades:  9

Prerequisite: None

Credits:  1

ENGLISH 9

HONORS

This one-year course (Foundations in Composition, Language, and the Elements of Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. This course is designed to build on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier grades but in more sophisticated ways such as mastering the language, grammar, structure, and rhetoric of text; completing more complex writing assignments; reading and analyzing a range of literary and informational discourse, both classic and contemporary; delivering more extensive oral presentations; and participating in a variety of conversations and collaborations with peers. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

FUNDAMENTALS OF READING AND WRITING 10

This one-year intervention class is designed for students who need additional instruction and support to master grade-level reading and writing skills and concepts. This course provides additional instructional support (Response to Instruction (RTI) - Tier II or Tier III) to students enrolled in the English 10 course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades:10

Prerequisite: English 9

Credits: 1

ENGLISH 10

This one-year course (Composition and Themes in Global Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course focuses on traditional (e.g., argument, persuasive, expository), technical, and creative modes of composition. Through the study of themes found universally in global text, both literary and informational, instruction emphasizes not only critical analysis of text, but also writers’ historical, philosophical, cultural, and ethical perspectives. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10

Prerequisite: English 9

Credits: 1

ENGLISH 10

HONORS

This one-year course (Composition and Themes in Global Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designated as honors level  by  the  accelerated instructional pacing  and  depth  of content. This course focuses on traditional (e.g., argument, persuasion, expository), technical, and creative modes of composition. Through the study of themes found universally in global text, both literary and informational, instruction emphasizes the critical analysis of text and writers’ historical, philosophical, cultural, and ethical perspectives. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10

Prerequisite: English 9

Credits: 1

ENGLISH 11

This one-year course (Composition and Themes in American Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course requires expository, analytical, and argumentative writing assignments that are based on readings representing a wide variety of prose styles and genres. The course is also structured around multicultural themes and perspectives found in literary, nonfiction, and expository texts by authors to encourage students to think conceptually about the past, present, and future as well as ethnic and cultural diversity. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11

Prerequisite: English 10

Credits: 1

ENGLISH 11

HONORS

This one-year course (Composition and Themes in American Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated pacing and depth of content. This course requires expository, analytical, and argumentative writing assignments that are based on readings representing a wide variety of prose styles and genres. The course is structured around multicultural themes and perspectives found in literary, nonfiction, and expository texts by authors to encourage students to think conceptually about the past, present, and future as well as ethnic and cultural diversity.  Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11

Prerequisite: English 10 Honors

Credits: 1

AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP English Language and Composition examination. This college-level curriculum engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to the effectiveness of writing. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11

Prerequisite: English 10 Honors Credits: 1

ENGLISH 12

This one-year course (Post-Secondary Composition and Universal Themes in Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Instruction focuses on refining the skills required for post-secondary success. The writing focus in this course includes analysis, synthesis, and argumentation as they relate to workplace and real-world situations. A framework structured around universal themes that connect people across cultures and time anchors texts to real-life reading, writing, and speaking and listening opportunities likely to be experienced beyond high school. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 12

Prerequisite: English 11

Credits: 1

DUAL CREDIT (NSC): COLLEGE

ENGLISH 101 & 102 / ENGLISH 12 HONORS

This is a one-year dual credit course through Nevada State College. Students enrolled in this course must enroll in Nevada State College, and meet the prerequisite requirements. This course is designated as a college level course by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The writing focus in this course includes analysis, synthesis, and argumentation as they relate to post-secondary education and/or careers. Instruction focuses on refining the skills required for post-secondary success. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation. Students who complete this course with a “C” or higher will also be awarded up to six credit hours from Nevada State College.

Grades: 12

Prerequisite: (1) English 11; (2) 3.0 unweighted GPAT English Score

Credits: 1

MATHEMATICS

ALGEBRA I

This one-year course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills for further studies in mathematics. It is intended to increase mathematical fluency in problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of number, algebra, functions, and statistics. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the Algebra I requirement and one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: 8th grade mathematics with a minimum grade of “C” for both semesters

Credits:  1

GEOMETRY

This one-year course is a logical development of the inductive and deductive systems of reasoning. Emphasis is on developing visualization abilities, analytical skills, and logical reasoning. Continual development and review of algebraic skills are an integral part of this course. Various instructional techniques are utilized through activity-based methods. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of manipulatives, mathematical tools, and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Grades:  9-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I with minimum grade of “C” in both semesters

Credits: 1

GEOMETRY HONORS

This one-year course provides students with a rigorous study of Euclidean geometry including advanced topics. It incorporates problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of transformational geometry, trigonometry, measurement, and probability. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Algebra I with a minimum

grade of “B” for both

semesters

Credits: 1

ALGEBRA II

This one-year course provides students with a study of functions and statistics, including advanced topics. It incorporates problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication skills through the study of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; the design of statistical studies; and statistical inference. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry with a minimum grade of “C” for both semesters

Credits: 1

ALGEBRA II HONORS

This one-year course provides students with a rigorous study of functions and statistics, including advanced topics. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. It incorporates problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication skills through the study of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; the design of statistical studies; and statistical inference. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Algebra I Honors and Geometry with a minimum grade of “B” for both semesters

Credits: 1

COLLEGE

PREPARATORY MATHEMATICS

This rigorous one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Algebra II. In preparation for college-level mathematics, the focus of this course is the study of advanced mathematical topics and their applications. Emphasis is on refining problem solving skills through modeling and project-based learning. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of technology, including calculators or computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Grades:  11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II

Credits: 1

MATH OF PERSONAL FINANCE

This one-year semester course will be the study of personal finance for senior-level students. Students develop a deeper understanding of the mathematics of finance to include: money management, risk management, and financial planning related to consumer and family studies, career and technical education, and personal finance. The course emphasizes refining problem-solving skills using project-based learning activities and academic integration within the context of financial applications. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The use of technology, including calculators and computers, is an integral part of this course. While this course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation, it does not meet the core requirements for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Grades: 12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: .5

(Pairs with Math 120 Dual Credit)

PRE-CALCULUS AB HONORS

This rigorous one-year course is designed for the motivated student with a strong background in advanced algebra and will prepare the student for AP Calculus AB. In addition to reviewing topics from trigonometry, this course includes problem-solving techniques using analytic geometry, vectors, matrices, relations and functions and their graphs, probability and statistics, and the introductory concepts of calculus. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation. It is strongly recommended that students own a graphing calculator.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Math 126/127

Credits: 1

DUAL CREDIT (NSC):MATH 120 FUNDAMENTALS OF COLLEGE MATHEMATICS

This is a one-year dual credit course through Nevada State College. Students enrolled in this course must enroll in Nevada State College, and meet the prerequisite requirements. This course is designated as a college level course by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The course includes and reviews sets, logic; probability, statistics; consumer mathematics; variation; geometry and trigonometry for measurement; linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Emphasis on problem solving and applications. Satisfies Mathematics Core Curriculum. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation. Students who complete this course with a “C” or higher will also be awarded up to three credit hours from Nevada State College.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite:(1) Algebra I, Geometry, & Algebra II with “A/B” average

Credits: .5

(pairs with Math and Personal Finance)

DUAL CREDIT (NSC):MATH 126 & 127 /PRE-CALCULUS AB HONORS

This is a one-year dual credit course through Nevada State College. Students enrolled in this course must enroll in Nevada State College, and meet the prerequisite requirements. This course is designated as a college level course by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. This rigorous one-year course is designed for the motivated student with a strong background in advanced algebra and will prepare the student for AP Calculus AB. In addition to reviewing topics from trigonometry, this course includes problem-solving techniques using analytic geometry, vectors, matrices, relations and functions and their graphs, probability and statistics, and the introductory concepts of calculus. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation. Students who complete this course with a “C” or higher will also be awarded up to six credit hours from Nevada State College.

It is strongly recommended that students own a graphing calculator.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite:(1) Algebra I, Geometry, & Algebra II with “A/B” average Credits: 1

AP CALCULUS AB w/ MATH LAB

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Calculus AB examination. This college-level curriculum is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. Before studying calculus, all students should complete four years of secondary mathematics designed for college-bound students: courses in which they study algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry and elementary functions. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of technology, including graphing calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.  It is strongly recommended that students own a graphing calculator.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “B” for both

semesters in Precalculus

Credits: 1 for AP CALCULUS AB and 1 for MATH LAB

AP CALCULUS BC

This one-year Advanced Placement course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of high school mathematics. Students should have a strong background in functions, coordinate and analytical geometry, trigonometry, and advanced topics in algebra. This course includes a review of these topics, the study of limits, the differentiation and integration of functions of a single variable, and sequences and series. The use of technology, including graphing calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. Students completing this course will be prepared and encouraged to participate in the Advanced Placement Calculus BC examination. This course will fulfill one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “B” for both

semesters in AP Calculus AB

Credits: 1 for AP CALCULUS BC

SCIENCE

BIOLOGY

This one-year course is designed to integrate science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas related to biology. The topics covered in Biology include Structures and Function, Matter and Energy in Organisms and Ecosystems, Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems, Inheritance and Variation of Traits, Natural Selection and Evolution, and Engineering Design. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are essential to this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits required for high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Grades: 9

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

BIOLOGY HONORS

This one-year course is designed to integrate science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas related to biology. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The topics covered in Biology Honors include Structures and Function, Matter and Energy in Organisms and Ecosystems, Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems, Inheritance and Variation of Traits, Natural Selection and Evolution, and Engineering Design. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are essential to this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits required for high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Grades: 9

Prerequisite: B or above in 8th grade science

Credits: 1

CHEMISTRY

This course is designed for those students who have successfully completed Algebra I and exhibit an interest in science, especially chemistry.  Topics included are mathematics of chemistry, safety, laboratory procedures, properties of matter, atomic theory and structure, mole concept, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical equations, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular theory, states of matter, acids-bases-salts, equilibrium, thermochemistry, polymer chemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of the environment, and career opportunities. Science, Technology and Society (STS) issues will be an integral part of this course. Additional topics may include history of chemistry, biochemistry, qualitative chemistry, and research projects. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one science credit toward high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Biology, Pass both semesters of Alg I or Geometry Credits: 1

CHEMISTRY HONORS

This course is designed for those students who have successfully completed Algebra I and exhibit an interest in science, especially chemistry. Topics include: mathematics of chemistry, safety, laboratory procedures, elements - compounds - mixtures, atomic theory and structure, structure and organization of the periodic table, mole concept, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical equations, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular theory, phases of matter, solutions, acid bases theory, equilibrium, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of the environment, and career opportunities. Science, Technology, and Society (STS) issues will be an integral on-going part of this course. Additional topics may include history of chemistry, biochemistry, qualitative chemistry, and research projects. This course is distinguished from Chemistry I by the instructional pacing and the delivery of advanced content. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one science credit towards high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Biology H, Algebra I or Geometry with minimum “B” average

Credits: 1

PHYSICAL

SCIENCE

This one-year course increases scientific literacy through the use of science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts and core ideas related to physical science and earth and space science. This course is designed to provide a foundation for success in high school physical science and earth and space science courses. The topics covered include nature of matter and interactions, forces and motion, earth systems and sustainability, and space science. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are mandatory for this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits required for high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance. Approved May 2018.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

PHYSICS

This one-year course is designed for those students who have successfully completed Algebra I and who exhibit an interest in science. Topics included are the following: laboratory procedures, mathematics applications, laboratory safety, waves, optics, relativity, kinematics, dynamics, energy, heat, electricity and magnetism, and atomic structure. Physics is a course that informs students about the interconnectedness among different types of forces and energy transformations. Demonstrations and/or lab experiences are an integral part of this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits toward high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Pass Algebra I and Biology

Credits:1

PHYSICS H

This one-year course is designed to integrate scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas related to physics. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The topics covered in Physics Honors include Forces and Interactions; Energy; Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation; and Engineering Design. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are mandatory for this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits required for high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Pass Algebra I and Biology with a minimum “B”

Credits:1

AP PHYSICS C

MECHANICS

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Physics C: Mechanics examination. This college-level calculus-based curriculum provides students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of physics. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits required for high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, Algebra, Geometry

Credits: 1

AP BIOLOGY

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Biology examination. This college-level curriculum provides students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one credit of the Nevada high school graduation requirement for science and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry

Credits: 1

AP CHEMISTRY

This one-year course is designed to provide a comprehensive background for those students desiring an in-depth study of chemical concepts. This course will focus on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement Chemistry exam. Instructors should refer to the current Advanced Placement course description for examination specifics. Topics included are atomic theory and structure; chemical bonding; nuclear chemistry; gases, liquids and solids; solutions; reaction types; acids and bases; stoichiometry; equilibrium; kinetics; thermodynamics; electrochemistry; oxidation-reduction; descriptive chemistry; and an introduction to carbon chemistry. Laboratory work of quantitative and qualitative nature is used to develop manipulative skills and reinforce topic areas. It is recommended that students successfully complete a first year biology and a first year chemistry course before enrolling in AP Chemistry. This course will fulfill one of the two science credits required for high school graduation and college entrance requirements for laboratory science.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry

Credits: 1

SOCIAL STUDIES

WORLD HISTORY

This one-year course examines societal development from the Renaissance to the present with an emphasis on emerging ideologies, expansion of empires, growth of nations, and an  increase of  global interdependence. Students develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographical, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course.  This course fulfills the World History/Geography and the Arts/Humanities credits required for high school graduation.

Grade: 10

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

WORLD HISTORY HONORS

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement human World History examination. This college- level curriculum highlights the nature of changes in global frameworks and the causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies from historical, geographical, political, economic, and cultural contexts. This course covers the scope of human history from 8,000 BCE to the present. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the World History/Geography and the Arts/Humanities credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

AP WORLD HISTORY

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement Human World History examination. This college- level curriculum highlights the nature of changes in global frameworks and the causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies from historical, geographical, political, economic, and cultural contexts. This course covers the scope of human history from 8,000 BCE to the present. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the World History/Geography and the Arts/Humanities credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10

Prerequisite: English teacher recommendation

Credits: 1

US HISTORY

This one-year course is a study of American history with an emphasis on the Modern World from 1900 to the present day. Students explore and evaluate the significant historical events and the consequences. This course provides an examination of historical themes to analyze how new events continue to shape our nation and society today. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the US History credit required for high school graduation.

Grade: 11

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

DUAL CREDIT (NSC): COLLEGE

HISTORY 101 & 102 / US HISTORY  HONORS

This is a one-year dual credit course through Nevada State College. Students enrolled in this course must enroll in Nevada State College, and meet the prerequisite requirements. This course is designated as a college level course by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. U.S. political, social, economic, diplomatic, and cultural development from colonial times to the present will be examined. This course fulfills the US History credit required for high school graduation. Students who complete this course with a “C” or higher will also be awarded up to six credit hours from the Nevada State College.

Grades: 11

Prerequisite: (1) World History; (2) 3.0 unweighted GPA.

Credits: 1

US GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMICS

This one-year course is a study of United States federal, state, local, and tribal governments as well an overview of Economics. Students apply constitutional principles to assess the growth and development of the United States government and political system. Students will evaluate financial decision making, investigate how market systems work, and examine globalization. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. Effective instruction in social studies incorporates both the disciplinary skills and the content themes and requires historical thinking, robust academic discussions and engaging writing instruction. This course fulfills the U.S. Government credit required for high school graduation. Approved November 2018.

Grade: 12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

US GOVERNMENT HONORS AND ECONOMICS

This one-year course is a study of United States federal, state, local, and tribal governments as well an overview of Economics. Students apply constitutional principles to assess the growth and development of the United States government and political system. Students will evaluate financial decision making, investigate how market systems work, and examine globalization. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. Effective instruction in social studies incorporates both the disciplinary skills and the content themes and requires historical thinking, robust academic discussions and engaging writing instruction. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. This course fulfills the U.S. Government credit required for high school graduation. Approved November 2018.

Grades: 12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

AP US GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement United States Government and  Politics examination. This college level curriculum provides students with an analytical perspective of government and politics in the United States. It includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific examples. Students increase their knowledge of the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States politics. This course fulfills one US Government credit required for high school graduation.

Grades: 12

Prerequisite: US History Honors or AP

Credits: 1

PE / HEALTH

PHYSICAL EDUCATION I

This one-year course focuses on students becoming independent decision makers capable of planning for lifetime fitness and physical activity, while achieving current personal fitness and activity goals. Students are provided with experiences in psychomotor skills, movement, goal-setting, and health-related fitness knowledge. Students participate in movement experiences, team sports, individual and dual sports, dance/rhythms, and lifetime recreational activities. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. This course fulfills one of the two physical education credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II

This one-year course, required in the tenth grade, focuses on the physical, mental, social, and emotional development of the individual in cooperative and competitive settings. The student is provided with experiences in psychomotor skills, movement, and lifetime health-related fitness knowledge, skills, and values. The goals of this course are accomplished through participation in movement experiences and application of movement principles found in team sports, individual/dual sports, fitness and wellness activities, dance/rhythms, and lifetime recreational activities. Rules, strategies,  and  safety  are  emphasized  in  relation  to  active  participation  and development of knowledgeable spectators. Self-esteem is incorporated into all areas of the curriculum as is the exploration of career opportunities in related fields. This course will fulfill one of the two physical education credits required for graduation.

Grades: 10

Prerequisite: PE I

Credits: 1

HEALTH EDUCATION

This one-semester course is designed to introduce  students to  the   intricate relationships between the structural and physiological functions required for the mental, social, and physical wellness of the individual. The course includes health awareness, body functions, human development, use of community health resources, first-aid techniques,  and  the  relationships  of  these  to  the  total  health  and  fitness  of  the individual. Human sexuality and sexually transmitted infectious disease education, within established guidelines, will be an integral part of the course. Instructional practices will incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. This course will fulfill the one-half health credit required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9

Prerequisite: None

Credits: ½

CROSSFIT (FUNCTIONAL FITNESS)

This one-year course is designed to further promote a positive approach toward personal health. It builds upon the skills learned in Personal Fitness and Wellness I and reinforces total health and fitness concepts and practices. This course targets physical, mental, and social health, as well as the pursuit of lifetime fitness. Students develop an understanding of the principles of wellness including fitness and proper nutrition. Emphasis is placed on health, weight training, and lifetime fitness by engaging students in moderate to vigorous activity for a minimum of 50% of the instructional time.This course will fulfill one of the two physical education credits required for high school graduation, and may be repeated for elective credit.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

ADVANCED CROSSFIT (FUNCTIONAL FITNESS II)

This one-year course is designed to further promote a positive approach toward personal health. It builds upon the skills learned in Personal Fitness and Wellness I and reinforces total health and fitness concepts and practices. This course targets physical, mental, and social health, as well as the pursuit of lifetime fitness. Students develop an understanding of the principles of wellness including fitness and proper nutrition. Emphasis is placed on health, weight training, and lifetime fitness by engaging students in moderate to vigorous activity for a minimum of 50% of the instructional time.This course will fulfill one of the two physical education credits required for high school graduation, and may be repeated for elective credit.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Functional Fitness I

Credits: 1

ELECTIVES

ADVANCED ART

This one-year course is for students who have successfully completed beginning and intermediate art and will apply advanced skills in visual art techniques through an expanded variety of media and subject matter. Diverse styles, artists and historical periods will be analyzed and incorporated into production. Students will implement creativity, originality and innovation through problem solving and art making. Students will demonstrate an extended knowledge of aesthetics and will effectively critique their own work and the artwork of others. Through collaboration and production, connections will be made between visual art and their academic studies, lives, and the world around them. Instructional practices will incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contribution to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one elective credit.

Grades:11-12

Prerequisite: Painting II or Teacher Portfolio Approval
Credits: 1

AP CAPSTONE

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Seminar examination. This college-level curriculum engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10-11

Teacher recommendation, parent permission, application, interview, and essay required for consideration

Credits: 1

AP/DUAL CREDIT STUDY LAB

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Enrolled in at least two dual credit or AP classes

Credits:

APPLIED OFFICE PRACTICE

This course provides on-the-job training experiences in the offices of the school. Two credits may be earned in this program with a maximum of one credit earned in any specific office area.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Counselor and staff approval

Credits: 1

ART I

This one-year foundation course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the elements and principles of art as emphasized through the production of art, the study of art history, aesthetics, and art criticism. This course will fulfill either the one arts/humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation. Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

BUSINESS AND MARKETING (Principles of)

This one-year course introduces students to business and marketing concepts in the areas of business management, entrepreneurship, and marketing. Students gain an understanding of principles related to business law, communications, customer relations, economics, information management, and operations. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND TECH CONCEPTS

This one-year course is an introduction to various aspects of computer technology. Students receive instruction in proper keyboarding techniques, word processing, spreadsheet, database, multimedia, and desktop publishing. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. Students completing this full-year course earn either one-half computer credit and one-half elective credit or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: ½ -1

COLLEGE SURVIVAL

AND CAREERS

(NON-MAJOR)

This one-year course is designed to help students prepare for life after high school. Emphasis will be on planning for continued education in an apprenticeship, a two-year college, or four-year college or university Students will examine challenges of a new and independent life setting. Topics include exploring values, interests, aptitudes, and abilities that serve as a foundation for establishing a career path. This course fulfills one year of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Grades 11 and 12 Only

Credits: 1

COOPERATIVE OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION WORK EXPERIENCE

The Cooperative Occupational Education Program is a work-based learning opportunity, which integrates the classroom with paid, planned, and supervised part-time work in business, labor, or government jobs that relate to  students’ occupational classroom experiences. This course is offered to increase the knowledge and skills necessary for employment and advancement. A minimum of 15 work hours a week are needed to meet the requirements of 270 hours of training per semester. One-half elective credit can be earned per semester for a maximum of two elective credits. The work site must be approved by the Cooperative Occupational Education Coordinator.

Grades: 11- 12

Prerequisite: 11th or 12th grade students enrolled concurrently in

a career and technical

class related to the workplace

Credits: ½ - 2

COMPUTER SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY CONCEPTS

This one-semester course provides students with skills in computer education and technology. Areas of emphasis include computer science, computational thinking, productivity applications, and digital citizenship. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. This course fulfills the one-half computer credit or one half of one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Take with 1 semester of Business software applications.

Credits: 1/2

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles examination. This college-level curriculum emphasizes essential ideas of computer science with a focus on how computing can impact the world. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

CRIME AND JUSTICE

This one-year course is a study of crime and justice with special attention on local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies as they affect individuals within the legal system. Students analyze the historical development of law, theories of deviance, definitions of crime, as well as the criminal justice system and its processes. A special emphasis is placed on contemporary issues and dilemmas facing the current system. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one elective credit required for high school graduation.

Grades:11-12

Prerequisite: Successful  Completion of World History

Credits: 1

DUAL CREDIT (NSC) COM 101 & COM 102

This is a one-year dual credit course through Nevada State College. Students enrolled in this course must enroll in Nevada State College, and meet the prerequisite requirements.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: 3.0 unweighted GPA

Credits: 2

CULINARY ELECTIVE

(NON-MAJOR)

This one-year NON-MAJOR course provides students with an introduction to the principles, chemistry, and techniques of food preparation. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Non-major students only

Credits: 1

DRAWING I

This one-year course provides students with a strong foundation for drawing through the study of basic techniques and the use of a variety of media and subject matter. Students participate in exercises in art appreciation and critique to learn to personally consider and judge art. Problem solving, creativity, and originality are cultivated through planning, art making, and reflection. The development and influence of drawing for communication and expression are integrated into learning. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation for all cultures and their important contribution to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.  Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

DRAWING II

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Drawing I to expand knowledge and skill through an in-depth study of tools, techniques, media and subject matter. Students extend the study of art appreciation and participate in self and group critiques while interpreting, defending, and evaluating art. Problem solving, creativity, and originality are expected in planning, art making, and reflection. Specific drawing styles and significant artists who have used drawing throughout history are emphasized. Through collaboration and production, connections will be expanded between drawing and their academic studies, lives, and the world around them. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one Arts/Humanities credit required for graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Drawing I

Credits: 1

AP DRAWING

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Drawing examination. Highly motivated students will create a college level portfolio of artwork demonstrating a mastery of drawing. Students engage a wide range of approaches and media to address various drawing issues through abstract, observational, and/or inventive works. By AP guidelines, digital images of fifteen works and written documentation are submitted to demonstrate an inquiry-guided investigation through practice, experimentation, and revision for the Sustained Investigation section. Five physical works or high-quality reproductions of physical works with written responses are submitted to demonstrate the skillful synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas for the Selected Works section. Students should expect to work an additional four to six hours or more outside of class each week. Exact requirements may change and are specified by the College Board at http://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses. Through collaboration and production, connections will be made between visual art and their academic studies, lives, and the world around them. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation for all cultures and their important contribution to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one Arts/Humanities/CTE credit required for graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Drawing II

Credits: 1

FILM STUDIES I

In this one-year course, students study the development of the American film as an art form and a social phenomenon. The course surveys century genres, eras, trends, directors, studios and moguls. Students will focus on the techniques of acting as they apply to the electronic and film media. Class work will focus on class discussion and criticism of various films. This course will fulfill either the on Arts/Humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

INTERNSHIP

This one-semester course provides work-based learning experiences for students focusing on a specific career cluster. Students will spend a portion of time in the classroom and a portion at the internship site. Internships can be paid or unpaid work experiences of at least 30 hours in length. In order to receive credit for this course, students must fulfill all classroom and internship worksite requirements. This course will fulfill one-half elective credit for high school graduation and may be repeated for three additional semesters for a total of two credits.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: ½ - 2

(ROBOTICS I)

AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY I

This one-year course introduces students to the fundamentals of automation technologies. Areas of emphasis include lab safety, the engineering design process, power systems, basic automation systems, and control devices. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Approved May 2019. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY II DUAL CREDIT WITH CSN

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Automation Technology I. Areas of study focus on the integration of mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and robotic systems. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Approved May 2019. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Automation Technology  I

Credits: 1

AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY lll

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Automation Technology II. Areas of emphasis include use of robotics, programmable logic controllers, and the principles of automation. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Approved May 2019

This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Automation Technology  Il

Credits: 1

HISTORY OF POP MUSIC

This one-year course is an extensive study of history s most successful recording artists and bands. Emphasis is placed on the study and appreciation of music, including student research on the sociological events of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. Students analyze video, music, and literature and evaluate the impact on Western culture. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one elective credit required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: None

IMAGINATIVE

WRITING

This one-year course develops and improves both formal and informal writing skills with emphasis placed upon self-expression, creativity, and clear communication. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: English 10 or English 11

Credits: 1

INTRODUCTION TO ETHNIC STUDIES

This course critically examines the major historical, theoretical and political questions concerning ethnic minorities in the United States. We will explore the unique experiences of Asian-Americans, Chicanos/as, Native Americans and African-Americans by examining the history of colonialism, slavery, genocide, capitalism and patriarchy in the U.S. This course will broaden one's understanding of the ways in which race and ethnicity intersect with gender, class, citizenship, and nation in order to demonstrate how power relations impact group

identity, language in society and culture, forms of resistance, social oppression, social justice and activism. We will also consider how one's particular worldviews can be determined by the limitations of one's ideologies and cultural orientation. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: None

LATIN AMERICAN MUSIC APPRECIATION

This one-year course is designed to promote a positive attitude toward music.  The ability to recognize specific forms, musical techniques, and historical styles is emphasized through listening. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or the Arts/Humanities/CTE credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

MARKETING I

This one-year course is designed for students who have completed Principles of Business and Marketing and have a career interest in marketing. Areas of emphasis include selling, advertising, pricing, promotion, and product planning. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Principles of Business and Marketing

Credits: 1

MARKETING II

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Marketing I. Areas of emphasis include: marketing, economics, management, merchandising, and business ownership. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Marketing I

Credits: 1

MYTH AND FOLKLORE

This one-year course is an introduction to mythology and folklore emphasizing its influence in literature. This course emphasizes the relationships among literature, culture, philosophy, and psychology. Literature, composition, discussion, and critical-thinking skills are taught concurrently. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: English 10 or English 11

Credits: 1

PAINTING

This one-year course is designed to give students a strong foundation for painting through the study of basic painting techniques and the use of a variety of media and subject matter. Students will participate in exercises in art appreciation and critique to learn to personally consider and evaluate art. Problem solving, creativity and originality will be cultivated through planning, art making and reflection. The development and influence of painting for communication and expression will be integrated into learning. Various styles and artists who have used painting throughout history are introduced. Through collaboration and production, connections will be made between painting and their academic studies, lives, and the world around them. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one Arts/Humanities credit required for graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: ART 1

Credits: 1

PAINTING II

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Painting I to expand knowledge and skill through an in-depth study of tools, techniques, media and subject matter. Students extend the study of art appreciation and participate in self and group critiques while interpreting, defending, and evaluating art. Problem solving, creativity, and originality are expected in planning, art making, and reflection. Specific painting styles and significant artists who have used painting throughout history are emphasized. Through collaboration and production, connections will be expanded between painting and their academic studies, lives, and the world around them. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one Arts/Humanities credit required for graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: PAINTING I

Credits: 1

PIANO (Beginning)

This one-year course is designed for students with no previous experience playing piano who wish to build their skills. This course will include sight-reading, basic fingering, scale techniques, exercises to build skills, repertoire for beginning students, and beginning harmonization. The importance of consistent practice techniques will be emphasized. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation and may be repeated for elective credit.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

PIANO (Intermediate)

This one-year course is designed for students who have achieved beyond the beginning piano level. It includes guidance and direction in solving problems related to studying repertoire, from analysis, style, and composers of varying stylistic periods. The importance of sustained effort and practice is stressed for technical proficiency. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or the Arts/Humanities/CTE credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Piano (Beginning)

Credits: 1

PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES

This one-year course examines peace and conflict studies focusing on diversity among races, religions, and cultures. An interdisciplinary approach provides students with opportunities to analyze ethnic conflicts, including the Holocaust and other 20th century events, as well as their influence on art, literature, and music. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to translate what they have learned in the classroom into context within their own experiences and the community. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades:10-12

Prerequisite:None

Credits: 1

PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

This one-year course is designed for students with an interest in the environment, focusing on the basic concepts of ecology. Topics include overpopulation, pollution, conservation of natural resources, and the interdependent relationships in ecosystems. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are essential to this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

PRINCIPLES OF LEADERSHIP

This course is designed for students who are working in a leadership capacity in student activities and government. Students will study general principles required for becoming good leaders. Considerable time will be spent in lab work where they will have practical experience in leadership. Enrollment is required for students elected as Student Body or Class Officers and/or appointed as executives. There is also a section for Student Ambassadors who assist in the Admissions Office. This course can be repeated for elective credit.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Student Council, Student Body & Class Officers

Credits: 1

PRINCIPLES OF MARINE SCIENCE

This one-year course is a survey of the physical and biological marine environment. Topics covered include the history of ocean exploration, properties of seawater, interactions between atmospheric and oceanic systems, a survey of oceanic life forms, and human interactions with the marine environment. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are essential to this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Biology

Credits: 1

PSYCHOLOGY

This one-year course introduces basic concepts used by psychologists in understanding human behavior. Topics include psychology as a science, human development, biological bases of behavior, motivation and learning, thinking and intelligence, normal and abnormal behavior, therapies, testing, and the effects of group membership on behavior. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one elective credit required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

DUAL CREDIT (NSC): COLLEGE

PSYCHOLOGY 101 /AP PSYCHOLOGY

This is a one-year dual credit course through Nevada State College. Students enrolled in this course must enroll in Nevada State College, and meet the prerequisite requirements. This course is designated as a college level course by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. This college-level curriculum introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. This course fulfills one elective credit required for high school graduation. Students who complete this course with a “C” or higher will also be awarded three credit hours from the Nevada State College.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite:  3.0 unweighted GPA

Credits: 1

PUBLICATIONS (YEARBOOK)

This one-year course is designed for the study and practice of the foundational elements of publications with major emphasis in information gathering, writing, layout design, and photography. Students participate in the production of the yearbook. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. This course may be repeated for elective credit.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Photo Majors Only AND Instructor Approval

Credits: 1

SCIENCE INDEPENDENT STUDY

This one-semester course provides students the opportunity to pursue a study of their own interest through investigation and lab-based research. Students collaborate with the supervising teacher to design and implement the topic of study. Individual students or teams of students are expected to work independently and consult with their supervising teacher at least once each week. The supervising teacher provides direction, monitors progress, and evaluates students' work. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are essential to this course. Students are required to complete written assignments and a final presentation. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one half of one of the elective credits required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite:Chemistry AND Instructor Approval

Credits: 1

SENIOR RESEARCH PROJECT – ADVANCED MATHEMATICS

(MATH IN SPORTS AND ATHLETICS

This one-half to two-year course is designed to enable juniors and seniors to thoroughly investigate an approved mathematical topic of their choice under the sponsorship of a mentor and/or committee. The project must be designed and approved before the close of the student’s junior year. Students are expected to work independently and consult with their supervising mentor for guidance. Students are required to provide their mentor and/or committee of interested or qualified persons with a written report or oral presentation of their study. Credit will be given upon satisfactory completion of the project as commensurate with the hours spent on the project. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. This course will fulfill one-half to two of the mathematics credits required for graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite:

Credit: 1

STEM ROBOTICS ll

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Robotics I. Areas of emphasis include engineering and robotic technologies as influenced by manufacturing and society. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school

Grades: 10-11

Prerequisite: Robotics l or Automation l

Credits: 1

SPANISH I

This one-year course is designed to acquaint students with the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish within a limited scope. It provides practice and the correct use of basic language structures and also develops an appreciation of the customs and traditions of Spanish-speaking people. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Credits: 1

SPANISH II HONORS

This one-year course is designed to continue the Nevada Academic Content Standards development of proficiency in the four skills introduced in Spanish I: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Knowledge of basic structures and vocabulary will be expanded to allow the student to communicate in real-life situations. This course will promote further understanding and appreciation of Hispanic cultures and will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Minimum

“C” average in Spanish I

Credits: 1

SPANISH III HONORS

This one-credit course is designed to develop a greater degree of proficiency in the Spanish language. It will further the ability to communicate in authentic oral and written context, and increase the ease and  confidence  with  which  the  student  uses  the language. This course will fulfill either one Arts/Humanities credit or one elective credit required for graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Minimum “C” average in Spanish II Honors

Credits: 1

BEGINNING SPANISH LITERACY

This one-year course is designed to provide Spanish-speaking students with an entry-level course to their heritage language. Students will develop proficiency in the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish. The focus of the instruction will be on literacy (reading and writing in Spanish). This course will explore oral and written communication, incorporating an understanding of the varied Hispanic cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing English and Spanish, and participating in multicultural communities. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Fluency in

Spanish

Credits: 1

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH LITERACY H

This one-year course is designed to build on Spanish for Spanish Speakers I and provide Spanish speakers with further opportunities to develop proficiency in Spanish through the fundamental skills of speaking, reading, and writing. The program seeks to broaden skills that the students already have and develop others. This course will promote further understanding and appreciation of the varied Hispanic cultures. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Fluency in Spanish

Credits: 1

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Spanish Language and Culture examination. This college-level curriculum prepares students to use the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) in the Intermediate to pre-advanced range as described in the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Performance Guidelines for K–12 Learners. This course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or the Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Minimum “C”

average in Spanish Speakers III H or Intermediate Spanish Literacy Honors or Consent from  Instructor

Credits: 1

SPANISH V HONORS

This one-year course immerses students in authentic cultural contexts and language designed to develop and expand effective communication skills. It incorporates a variety of printed and electronic media in the Spanish language and culture. Emphasis is placed on refining the productive language skills of speaking and writing, with reading and listening skills serving as a context for communication. This course further reviews and refines increasingly complex and abstract grammatical and linguistic concepts in order to provide students with the ability to communicate at advanced levels within a contemporary framework. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or the Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Minimum “C”

average in AP Spanish Language and Culture

Credits: 1

SPANISH FILM STUDIES

In this one-year course, students study the development of the Spanish Language and film as an art form and a social phenomenon with a specific focus on Spanish titles. The course surveys century genres, eras, trends, directors, studios and moguls. Students will focus on the techniques of acting as they apply to the electronic and film media. Class work will focus on class discussion and criticism of various films. This course will fulfill either the on Arts/Humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion Intermediate Spanish Speaker or AP spanish

Credits: 1

SPEECH AND DEBATE I

This one-year course provides an opportunity to study speech techniques and to apply these techniques to formal debate and individual speaking situations. Students are encouraged to apply debate principles and speech techniques at the tournament level. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.  Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: English Teacher Recommendation

Credits: 1

SPEECH AND DEBATE II

This one-year course is a continuation of Speech and Debate I and provides an opportunity to study advanced speech techniques and to apply these techniques to formal debate and individual speaking situations. Students apply debate principles and speech techniques at the tournament level. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.  Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Speech & Debate I and Teacher Approval

Credits: 1

SPEECH AND DEBATE III

This one-year course is a continuation of Speech and Debate II and provides an opportunity to study advanced speech techniques and to apply these techniques to formal debate and individual speaking situations. Students apply debate principles and speech techniques at the tournament level. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.  Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Speech & Debate II and Teacher Approval

Credits: 1

SSSCU Member Services Work Experience

As a student Member Services Representative at Silver State Schools Credit Union (SSSCU) Roadrunner Branch, you will gain experience in cash handling, processing transactions, and communicating with members and the general public about SSSCU’s products and services through hands-on experience, one-on-one training, and mentoring by SSSCU staff. You will also learn valuable work force skills such as professionalism, customer service, teamwork, and job interviewing techniques. The program will provide you with the opportunity to learn about credit unions and the financial industry, and you will be better prepared to enter the job market after high school. The skills you learn here will benefit you now and in the future. In addition, successful completion of this course and graduation may lead to employment with SSSCU.

Grades 12

Prerequisite: Earned a “C” or higher in all previous Math courses

Credits: 1

STUDENT AIDE

This program allows students to assist teachers. Students gain experience by completing clerical tasks, assisting in laboratories, working with faculty members, and following  directions. A  maximum  of  one  credit  can  be  earned  in  the  student  aide program. A major portion of the final grade in this course is based on the student’s attendance.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: 2.5 cumulative GPA and teacher and/or counselor approval

Credits: 1

STUDENT TUTOR

This one-year course is designed to give students interested in  teaching or  social services professions an opportunity to help academically weak elementary or secondary school students. Student tutors may be assigned to English, reading, or mathematics laboratories in an elementary, junior, or senior high school to assist with individual student instruction. Student tutors are given direction and guidance by an assigned supervising teacher. Students applying for the program must have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and be knowledgeable in the academic area in which they are to assist. One-half credit per semester is earned upon the satisfactory completion of the program's requirements. STUDENTS ARE LIMITED TO ONE CREDIT. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: 3.0 cumulative GPA and teacher approval

Credits: 1

TOOLS FOR SUCCESS

This semester course is designed for ninth grade students to introduce skills for leadership   and   career   choices.   Effective   verbal   and   nonverbal   techniques   in interpersonal work relationships will guide students to make the needed transition from school  to  work  and  to  recognize  essential  business  and  industry  work  ethics. Instructional practices will incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one elective credit required for high school graduation.   Please see the Instructional Fee List in the appendix of this catalog

Grades: 9

Prerequisite: None (9th grade requirement)

Credits: .5

INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION

The goal of Southeast Career Technical Academy is to follow PL 94-142 and amendment “Individuals with Disabilities Act” (IDEA –101.149) by placing students in the “least restrictive environment.” An Individual Education Program committee, with parent involvement, works together to establish and maintain the most appropriate Individual Education Program (IEP) for each student. The student’s schedule is developed from the IEP.

At Southeast Career Technical Academy, the co-teaching and cooperative-consultative teaching models are used as an alternative approach to the delivery of special education services for mainstreamed students. The primary goal of the co-teaching and cooperative-consultative teaching models is to meet the needs of students who are eligible for special education and whose IEP includes placement in regular education courses. A special education teacher provides direct assistance with techniques and adaptations appropriate for the regular classroom. Co-teaching and cooperative-consultative teaching do not replace any of the program options that are presently available at Southeast Career Technical Academy. It is intended to fill the gap that exists between special education and regular education placement.

MATH APPLIED

These one-year courses emphasize competencies in the areas of basic number systems and career math. Due to the extreme range of individual student differences, students will be encouraged to develop skills appropriate to their ability levels in operations and measurements for personal and career/technical use. These courses also emphasize the understanding of mathematical concepts as they relate to the management of materials and money within the framework of our economic system. They apply this understanding to personal and career use necessary in everyday life.

Grades: 9-12

Credits: 1

ENGLISH I - IV APP

These one-year courses build upon the strategies emphasized in English Reading & Writing. They reinforce the application of the reading and writing processes and continue to develop students’ ability to apply appropriate strategies and resources in a wide variety of learning situations.  These courses fulfill one of the four English credits required for graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Credits: 1 credit each

PRINCIPLES OF ALGEBRA

This one-year course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills for further studies in mathematics. It is intended to increase mathematical fluency in problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of number, algebra, functions, and statistics. Students with Individual Education Programs (IEPs) have diverse needs and course accommodations and/or modifications may be required based upon IEP identified need. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the Algebra I requirement and one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Credits: 1 credit

PRINCIPLES OF GEOMETRY

This one-year course provides students with a rigorous study of Euclidean geometry including. It incorporates problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of transformational geometry, trigonometry, measurement, and probability. Students with Individual Education Programs (IEPs) have diverse needs and course accommodations and/or modifications may be required based upon IEP identified need. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the required mathematics credits for high school graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Algebra I or Principles of Algebra I

Credits: 1 credit

READING APPLIED

1535

This one-year course is designed to allow students to sequentially progress from one stage to another in the skills of reading. Emphasis will be placed on adapting instruction to meet the coping and survival skills necessary to function effectively in society. This course will provide individually determined sight vocabulary, a system to attack new words independently, and a successful sequence of experiences leading to the application of reading skills in both leisure time and functional situations. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Grades: 9-12

Credits: 1

STUDY SKILLS APPLIED

8250

This semester program will provide the student with proper study skills, test-taking strategies, and time management. Life skills will include budgeting money, banking, job preparation skills, and resources available to the students as an adult in the community.

Grades: 9-12

Credits: ½