O. Henry Middle School

2610 W. 10th Street

Austin TX 78703

Marlo Malott, Principal

Travis Brunner, Assistant Principal

Camie Fillpot, Assistant Principal

Karen Ciesla, Instructional Coach

Wanda Montemayor, 6th grade Counselor

Cristina Torres, 7th Grade Counselor

Amy Turner, 8th Grade/Lead Counselor

Delia Guerrero, Counseling Center Assistant

Amalia Sandel, Registrar

Patricia Mitzel, Special Education Department Chair

Casi Cook, 504 Coordinator

Angelica Tagle, Administrative Assistant

Tim Tierney, Attendance Specialist

Andrea Serra, Bookkeeper

Motto

In Pursuit of Excellence

Vision

O. Henry Middle School provides the opportunity and the resources to prepare students to be positive, successful, and constructive members of a global society.

Mission

The O. Henry community educates the whole child: academically, socially, emotionally, physically, and artistically.

Beliefs

We foster positive relationships with our faculty, staff, students, parents, and community. We ignite a lifelong love of learning while facilitating discovery and development of individual passions and interests. We provide a positive, safe, and nurturing environment. We incorporate 21st-century technology in the learning process to encourage student ownership of learning. We actively partner with parents and our community. We value and promote cultural diversity.


Scheduling Information

Course Selection & Availability

Courses are offered according to student need and teacher availability. It is very important that students and parents give careful consideration to selecting appropriate courses each spring in preparation for the following year.

The choices students make on the course selection sheets determine the master schedule of course offerings available. The master schedule determines teacher assignments. Though never perfect, it is designed to maximize student opportunities and minimize scheduling conflicts. Master schedule changes may be affected by insufficient course enrollment or instructor availability. Students should pay particular attention to the alternate electives they select during the course selection process. To avoid schedule conflicts, a student may be placed in one or more of his or her alternate selections.

Schedule Change Requests

The master scheduling process involves the course selection that you and your child complete in the spring of the year prior to the next grade level.  This choice sheet allows us to create the number of classes necessary to accommodate for the classes students are requesting.  Space in each class then becomes highly limited and often very difficult to change.

Schedule changes are possible only under very special circumstances.  The following process will be required of every student, should they need a schedule change.

  1. Print a schedule change form online or pick one up in the counseling center.
  2. Specify which class you’d like to drop and which you’d like to add.  Obtain signatures from the teacher you are dropping and the teacher whose class you wish to add.
  3. Write a 2 - 3 paragraphs, 3 - 5 sentences each stating why you think this schedule change should be considered.
  4. Obtain your parent’s signature and submit it to your grade level counselor.

Pre-AP & High School Credit Courses

Pre-AP courses are advanced courses designed to challenge students beyond grade-level academic work and to prepare students for advanced academic courses in high school. These courses include a special focus on the subject-specific activities a student are likely to encounter in a related high school advanced academic course. Pre-AP courses are available to students beginning in the 6th grade. It is recommended, but not required, that students wishing to take AP or other advanced courses in high school participate in Pre-AP courses offered in middle school and high school.

How Are Pre-AP Courses Different? Pre-AP courses include activities and strategies designed to engage students in active, high-level learning. Students will develop the skills, habit of mind, and concepts needed to succeed in college. Depth of material often requires students to read and write extensively in and out of class. To be successful in advanced courses, students are expected to have:

• The ability to go above and beyond what is asked; • Good time management skills;

• Strong reading and writing skills;

• High interest in subject matter;

• The willingness to accept critical feedback; and

• The ability to know when and how to ask for help.

How Many Pre-AP and/or High School Credit Courses Should a Student Take?

Consideration for the number of Pre-AP a student should take depends on the student’s motivation, self-discipline, and available time outside of class.

While O. Henry Middle School encourages all students to access advanced coursework, parents and students should carefully weigh this decision carefully. It is important to ensure that the student demonstrates the habits of mind that are likely to lead to success in academically rigorous classes. In order to ensure success in Pre-AP and high school courses, students who wish to enroll in Pre-AP and high school courses are expected to demonstrate the following characteristics:

 _____ Reads on or above grade level

 _____ Strong study skills and self-motivation

 _____ Proficient oral and written communication

 _____ Self-discipline to plan, organize, and carry out tasks to completion

_____ Interest and self-directedness in a particular subject

General Information

Curriculum at a Glance

O. Henry Middle School provides middle school students a well-balanced curriculum that meets the requirements of the Texas Education Agency (TEA). Our academic program offers all students the same basic course of study. Students in grades 6-8 are required to take core courses in English Language Arts and Reading, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Physical Education, and Fine Arts. These courses will be explained by subject area in this guide. All 6th grade students are placed in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Physical Education classes.

During the middle school years, students need to broaden their academic and career options and develop the foundation needed for success in high school.

A counselor can assist students and parents in choosing appropriate courses. Teachers may also make recommendations to parents to move students into advanced academic courses and will contact the parent to discuss this. If the parent wishes to move their child into advanced academic courses, the parent will need to conference with the current teacher and/or counselor.

Gifted and Talented Services

Identified gifted students are expected, but not required, to take a rigorous course of study to include Advanced Mathematics in middle school, Pre-AP courses in middle and high school and AP courses in high school. Differentiation: Identified gifted and talented (G/T) students are offered differentiated learning opportunities within the classroom in Mathematics, English Language Arts and Reading, Science, and Social Studies.

Differentiation is an instructional model guiding teachers in developing classrooms actively attentive to the needs of academically diverse skills student populations. The approach of differentiating instruction advocates active planning for student differences in the classroom. In a differentiated classroom, students have multiple options for taking in or accessing information (content), making sense of ideas (process), and expressing what they learn (product). In addition, flexible grouping and acceleration opportunities are prescribed by the classroom teacher.

G/T Cluster Grouping

Cluster grouping is a method O. Henry Middle School uses to meet the academic needs of G/T students. G/T students are clustered in core subject areas with a G/T trained classroom teacher. The G/T cluster teacher is responsible for teaching the core content academic curriculum as well as differentiating instruction for the G/T students.

Advanced Mathematics 

Students in Advanced Mathematics experience a compacted curriculum. Four years of math instruction are compacted into three years with students completing Algebra I in their eighth grade year. Additional Advanced Math experience compacts curriculum for 6-8 grade math in sixth grade, Algebra I in seventh grade and Geometry in 8th grade. Students will have to earn a Level III Advanced on 5th grade Math STAAR score (or equivalent) and have a teacher recommendation for the Advanced Mathematics sequence. The Geometry track will also require a summer bridge camp with mandatory attendance.


6th Grade Required Course Descriptions

6th Grade English Language Arts and Reading Course Numbers:

Academic 1006.R0000.Y

Pre-AP 1006.H0000.Y

Grade 6 English Language Arts and Reading concentrates on the following strands of skills: Reading, Writing, Research, Listening and Speaking and Oral and Written Conventions. The skills are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier skills as needed while they attend to skills for their grade. In sixth grade, students will read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts and compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail. Students will also be expected to conduct research where they will evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and findings. Students will read and write on a daily basis.

6th Grade Mathematics:

Course Numbers:

Academic 3006.R0000.Y

Pre-AP Algebra Track 3006.H0000.Y

Pre-AP Advanced Geometry Track  3016.H0000.Y

Throughout mathematics in grades 6-8 students build a foundation of basic understanding in numerical representations and probability, computations and algebraic relationships, geometry and measurement, and data analysis and personal financial literacy.  Students may begin by taking Academic or Pre-AP math or 6th grade advanced math which could lead to Algebra or Geometry depending on 6th grade STAAR scores.

6th Grade Social Studies-World Cultures

Course Numbers:

Academic 6006.R0000.Y

Pre-AP 6006.H0000.Y

Students learn about events, leaders, beliefs, and geography in economic and political systems and cultures. Grade 6 emphasizes modern life in world regions. Students in Pre-AP are assigned and engaged in appropriate content and discussion extensions.

6th Grade Science

Course Numbers:

Academic 4006.R0000.Y

Pre-AP 4006.H0000.Y

Students learn life, earth, and physical science concepts in an integrated way, with an emphasis on inquiry-based field and laboratory investigations. A unit on personal health and sexuality is included at each grade level.  

P.E. & Functional Fitness

Course Number: 7016.R0000.Y

The O. Henry Middle School Physical Education program is based upon acquiring knowledge and skills that are the foundation for engaging in physical activity. Our mission is for all students to leave the class with the ability to sustain regular, lifelong physical activity as a foundation for a healthy and fulfilling life.  

The O. Henry Middle School Physical Education curriculum is based on physical activities undertaken in an active, caring, supportive and non-threatening atmosphere in which every student is challenged and successful. We aim to provide every student with a wide variety of physical activities and challenges that will contribute to the development and maintenance of their physical, cognitive, and affective well being. Ultimately students will be provided with the foundation for making informed decisions that will empower them to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Functional Fitness will be taught in the spring semester. Students in Functional Fitness are exposed to a variety of health club and individual fitness activities that promote health-related fitness for a lifetime.  Expectations for this course are for the students to be active, learn wellness concepts, and design achievable personal fitness goals.

Dance I/Dance Wellness I:

Course Number: FA  5012.R0000.Y PE 7021.R0000.Y

(open to all grade levels) Year long course with a focus on the Elements of Dance, Jazz, Ballet, World, Hip Hop, and Contemporary/Modern dance. Students will learn skills and techniques to begin their dance education as well as dance history, vocabulary, and theory. Students will be given the opportunity to participate in a Fall and/or Spring performance.

*Can use class for either PE credit or Fine Arts credit in 7th and 8th grade

7th Grade Required Course Descriptions

7th Grade English Language Arts

Course Numbers:

Academic 1007.R000.Y

Pre-AP 1007.H000.Y

In this course, students learn writing, research, listening, and speaking skills from the English Language Arts and Reading TEKS. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year.  Students complete research projects, present their findings, and engage in discussions with their peers. They learn grammar usage, vocabulary, and other English language skills within the context of reading and writing.

7th Grade Mathematics

Course Number:

Academic 3007.R0000.Y

Pre-AP 3007.H0000.Y

Pre-AP Advanced Algebra Track 3017.H0000.X/3018.H0000.X

Pre-AP Algebra I 3313.HJ00.Y (Geometry Track)

Academic: Throughout mathematics in grades 6-8 students build a foundation of basic understanding in numerical representations and probability, computations and algebraic relationships, geometry and measurement, and data analysis and personal financial literacy.

Pre-AP Advanced Algebra Track : All 8th grade TEKS are taught, in addition to the 7th grade TEKS not covered in the 6th grade advanced course. Students enrolled in this course will take the 8th grade STAAR.

Pre-AP Algebra I : 7th grade students may take Algebra, which is a high school credit course. These course is dependent upon STAAR scores.  In Algebra, students deepen their understanding of relations and functions and expand their repertoire of familiar functions (linear, quadratic, and exponential).

7th Grade Social Studies-Texas History

Course Numbers:

Academic 6007.R0000.Y

Pre-AP  6007.H0000.Y

Students learn about events, leaders, beliefs, and geography in economic and political systems and cultures. Grade 7 studies Texas Geography and History.

7th Grade Science

Course Numbers:

Academic 4007.R0000.Y

Pre-AP 4007.H0000.Y

Students learn life, earth, and physical science concepts in an integrated way, with an emphasis on inquiry-based field and laboratory investigations. A unit on personal health and sexuality is included at each grade level.

8th Grade Required Course Descriptions

8th Grade English Language Arts

Course Number:

Academic 1008.R0000.Y

Pre-Ap 1008.H0000.Y

In this course, students learn writing, research, listening, and speaking skills from the English Language Arts and Reading TEKS. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year.  Students complete research projects, present their findings, and engage in discussions with their peers. They learn grammar usage, vocabulary, and other English language skills within the context of reading and writing.

8th Grade Mathematics

Course Numbers:

Academic 3008.R0000.Y

Algebra 3313.HJ00.Y

Geometry 3413.HJ000.Y

Academic:The primary focal areas in Grade 8 are proportionality; expressions, equations, relationships, and foundations of functions; and describe increasingly complex situations. Students use concepts of proportionality to explore, develop, and communicate mathematical relationships. Students use algebraic thinking to describe how a change in one quantity in a relationship results in a change in the other. Students connect verbal, numeric, graphic, and symbolic representations of relationships, including equations and inequalities. Students begin to develop an understanding of functional relationships. Students use geometric properties and relationships, as well as spatial reasoning, to model and analyze situations and solve problems. Students communicate information about geometric figures or situations by quantifying attributes, generalize procedures from measurement experiences, and use the procedures to solve problems. Students use appropriate statistics, representations of data, and reasoning to draw conclusions, evaluate arguments, and make recommendations.

Pre-AP Algebra I: 8th grade students may take Algebra, which is a high school credit course. These course is dependent upon STAAR scores.  In Algebra, students deepen their understanding of relations and functions and expand their repertoire of familiar functions (linear, quadratic, and exponential). Principal permission is required to enroll in the Algebra I Pre-AP course if a student did not complete the Grade 7 Advanced Mathematics course. Students enrolled in Pre-AP Algebra 1 in will take the STAAR Algebra 1 EOC assessment.

Pre-AP Geometry: Students should develop facility with a broad range of ways of representing geometric ideas - including coordinates, networks, transformations - that allow multiple approaches to geometric problems and that connect geometric interpretations to other contexts. Students will expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences through the Geometry content strands of Geometric Structure, Patterns, Dimensionality, and Geometry of Location, Congruence and the Geometry of Size and Similarity and the Geometry of Shape.

8th Grade Science

Course Number

Academic 4008.R0000.Y

Pre-Ap 4008.H0000.Y

Year-long

Academic/Pre-AP: Students learn life, earth, and physical science concepts in an integrated way, with an emphasis on inquiry-based field and laboratory investigations. A unit on personal health and sexuality is included at each grade level.

8th Grade Social Studies, U.S. History

Course Number:

Academic 6008.R0000.Y

Pre-Ap 6008.HR0000.Y

Year-long

Students learn about events, leaders, beliefs and geography in economic and political systems and cultures. Grade 8 studies U.S. History from exploration to 1877.

Elective Course Descriptions

Physical Education, Athletics or PE Equivalent

P.E.

7th grade Course Number: 7017.R1000.X

8th grade Course Number: 7018.R10000.X

Semester-long

Semester-long

The O. Henry Middle School Physical Education program is based upon acquiring knowledge and skills that are the foundation for engaging in physical activity. Our mission is for all students to leave the class with the ability to sustain regular, lifelong physical activity as a foundation for a healthy and fulfilling life.  

The O. Henry Middle School Physical Education curriculum is based on physical activities undertaken in an active, caring, supportive and non-threatening atmosphere in which every student is challenged and successful. We aim to provide every student with a wide variety of physical activities and challenges that will contribute to the development and maintenance of their physical, cognitive, and affective well being. Ultimately students will be provided with the foundation for making informed decisions that will empower them to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Athletics

Course Number

7th grade Fall:  7037.R1000.X Spring: 7037.R2000.X

8th grade Fall:  7037.R1000.X Spring: 7037.R2000.X

Year long

The athletic program at O. Henry Middle School is an integral part of the educational process. Athletics offer a positive and meaningful experience that will enhance the growth and development of all students who participate. Athletics is a year long course.

The O. Henry Middle School Athletic program is made up of ten sports programs open to all seventh and eighth grade students. (Boys & girls cross country, football, volleyball, cheer, boys and girls basketball, tennis, boys and girls track.) Sixth graders are able to compete in cross country and tennis. Lacrosse is open to all girls in grades 6-8.  Those athletes that take part in the tryouts or programs at O. Henry must have a doctor's physical on file in the Athletic office. AISD offers free physicals in April of each school year. Physical form here

 

All athletes are also required to meet academic requirements throughout the sports season. If an athlete does not meet those academic requirements, the athlete may not participate in interscholastic competition.

Dance I/Dance Wellness I: Can count as a P.E. Credit, Fine Arts, or Combo

Course Number: FA  5012.R0000.Y PE 7021.R0000.Y

Dance II/Dance Wellness II

Course Number: FA 5022.R0000.Y PE 7022.R0000.Y

(open to all grade levels) Year long course with a focus on the Elements of Dance, Jazz, Ballet, World, Hip Hop, and Contemporary/Modern dance. Students will learn skills and techniques to begin their dance education as well as dance history, vocabulary, and theory. Students will be given the opportunity to participate in a Fall and/or Spring performance.

*Can use class for either PE credit or Fine Arts credit in 7th and 8th grade

Mustang Dance Company

Course Number: FA 5023.R0000.Y PE 7023.R0000.Y

(7th/8th grade only by audition) Year-long course with an emphasis on performance qualities. The curriculum will focus on Jazz, Ballet, Hip Hop, Contemporary/Modern, and Choreography/Dance Production. Mustang Dance Company will have various performances throughout the school year in addition to a Spring Concert.

*Can use class for either PE credit or Fine Arts credit

FINE ARTS

Band (6,7)

Year-long

Prerequisites: None

Being involved in instrumental music provides an enriching cultural, social, and educational experience. Beginner level band  includes the basic elements of music playing skills, & introduction to band literature. Most beginning band students are learning to play their first musical instrument. Students will perform at a football game, Winter Concert, Winter Recital, Spring Trip, & Spring Concert.

Band (7,8)

Year - long

Students focus on improving their fundamental skills and begin/continue instruction on full band  music in a large ensemble. All students are placed in one of our 3 performing ensembles which perform 2-4 times each semester.  All of these students have the opportunity to be in the Pep Band and attend the Spring Trip.

Jazz Band (7,8)

Chamber Winds/Percussion

Course Number

Year - long

Prerequisite: 1 year of band and audition

Jazz Ensemble is offered to students in grades 7 and 8 at this time. Standard instruments are preferred such as saxophone, trombone, trumpet, guitar, piano, bass and drum set. Other instruments may be part of the group with the director's approval. This class is a separate elective in addition to the student's core music class. Students may play various styles consistent with the jazz idiom such as swing style, ballads, rock, Latin, pop, be-bop, etc. Students will begin to learn the basics of improvisation as well as some of the history of Jazz. Music will be selected based on the strengths of the group. This group is not for beginning students.

Classical Guitar

Course Number: 5061.R0000.X, 5062.R0000.X, 5063.R0000.X

An instrumental music ensemble designed to promote classical guitar performance techniques. Students will perform in both solo and ensemble activities throughout the year. This class is for beginning classical style guitar instruction.

Students furnish classical guitars. Out of school rehearsal and performances required.

Choir Beginning Con Brio Girls (6)

Course Number: 5041.R0000.Y

Year-long

Prerequisites: None

Choir is performance oriented and teaches unison, and two part choral literature through a study of vocal techniques, sight-reading skills, and music listening. Three performances per year are required.

Choir MS 2 Cantante Girls (7,8)

Course Numbers

Girls: 5072.R0000.Y

Year - long

Choir classes are offered at three levels for a sequential, continuing study of choral music. This course is a performance oriented course and teaches unison, two and three part choral literature. Musicianship is developed through the study of vocal techniques, sight-reading skills, and music listening. Three performances per year are required.

Choir MS 3 Bel Canto Girls (7,8)

Course Numbers

Year – long

Prerequisites: Director Approval

Choir classes are offered at three levels for a sequential, continuing study of choral music. This course is a performance oriented course and teaches unison, two, and three part choral literature. Musicianship is developed through the study of vocal techniques, sight-reading skills, and music listening. UIL competition and three performances per year are required.

Choir MS Men’s Choir (6,7,8)

Course Numbers: 5042.R1000.Y

Year - long

Choir classes are offered at three levels for a sequential, continuing study of choral music. This course is a performance oriented course and teaches unison, two, and three part choral literature. Musicianship is developed through the study of vocal techniques, sight-reading skills, and music listening. UIL competition and three performances per year are required.

Piano (7,8)

Course Number: 015716.R0000.X

Semester - long

This is a performance-oriented course where students learn how to play the piano or practice the skills they are learning outside the classroom. All levels of ability may take this course. Reading music, piano technique, and music listening develops musicianship.

Orchestra 1 - Students in Grades 6-8

Prerequisite: None

Year- Long

The beginning orchestra class is for students who wish to learn how to play one of the following instruments: violin, viola, cello, and bass. No previous experience is necessary. The focus of this class will be to harvest technical growth on a specific stringed instrument through playing and listening. During the school year, the beginning orchestra will participate in different performances and social activities in and out of the school that will help strengthen their skills. Some of the activities that the beginning orchestra attends are the Zilker Park String Festival, the Monster Concert at Austin High, the Sixth Grade Social and the End of Year Field Trip.

 

Orchestra 2 - Students in Grades 7 or 8

Prerequisite: Orchestra 1

Year-Long

These classes are open to all students who have at least one year of experience playing the violin, viola, cello, or bass. In these classes, the student will continue to develop more advanced skills in playing these instruments and will play more challenging orchestra music. During the school year, the 7th and 8th Orchestra classes will participate in different performances and social activities in and out of the school that will help strengthen their skills. Some of the activities that the students attend are the AISD Solo and Ensemble, the UIL Orchestra and Sight-reading Contest, the Monster Concert at Austin High, the Orchestra Sponsor Valentine’s Dance and an overnight End of the Year Field Trip.

 

Orchestra 3 - Students in Grade 8

Prerequisite: Orchestra 2

Year-Long

This course is open to all advanced students who have at least one year's experience playing the violin, viola, cello, or bass. Students should be able to read music well. You will continue to develop more advanced skills in playing these instruments and will play more challenging orchestra music. Some of the activities that the students attend are the AISD Solo and Ensemble, the UIL Orchestra and Sight-reading Contest, the Monster Concert at Austin High, the Orchestra Sponsor Valentine’s Dance and an overnight End of the Year Field Trip. This is an elective for you to take if you enjoy music and enjoy being a part of a special group.

 

Mariachi Ensemble - Students Grades 7-8        

Prerequisite: None

Year-Long

This one-year course is designed for students with no previous guitar, vihuela or guitarron experience. Students will receive guidance and direction in solving problems related to playing these instruments on a beginning level. This course focuses on the traditional music of the mariachi as it developed in post-Revolutionary urban Mexico. Genres include the son jalisciense, canción ranchera, corrido, huapango, bolero, polka, joropo, pasodoble, and Mexican vals. Class sessions are primarily devoted to ensemble rehearsal, but may also include some guided listening and viewing of videos.

Art 2 (6, 7,8)

Course Number: 5001.R0000.X

Semester-long

Prerequisites: None

Students will work with a variety of processes and materials such as painting, drawing, sculpture, and digital media. Students rely on their perceptions of the environment, developed through increasing visual awareness and sensitivity to surroundings, memory, imagination, and life experiences, as a source for creating artworks. Art courses include the study of works of art and cultures and evaluation of student work and the works of other artists.

Art 2 (7,8)

Course Number

Year-long

Prerequisites: Art I

Through this course, students will experience using a variety of mediums such as painting, drawing, sculpture,

ceramics, printmaking, mixed media and crafts. In addition to gaining confidence and proficiency in creating works of art and interpreting and discussing works of art, students will study important periods, artists, and styles in art history along with contemporary art and artists. The students will apply creative problem solving skills as they produce artwork that shows their individuality, ideas, and creativity.

Art 3/Advanced Art (8th grade)

Course Number

Year-long

Prerequisites Art 2

Students in Advanced Art will explore a variety of art processes and materials such as painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, mixed media and crafts. They will use their imagination, personal experiences, and the foundation gained in Art 2 to create original artwork. Advanced students will develop a portfolio by creating a series of works. Of these works at least one will be an independent artwork of choice. Advanced students will be encouraged to participate in Jr. VASE at the end of the year, the regional art show where students must be able to express the meaning and content of their art and justify artistic decisions to a judge. Students will continue to study important periods, artists, and styles in art history along with contemporary art and artists.

Theater Arts 1 (6)

Course Number: 5011.R0000.Y

Semester-long

Prerequisites: None

In this fun introductory theatre class students will have the opportunity to explore theatre as an art, business, and tool that can grow personal and social awareness through games, exercises, and performances. There will be a specific focus on ensemble work, audience etiquette, voice and diction, body awareness and movement, character development, pantomime, puppetry performance, scene performance and intro to technical theatre.

Theatre Arts 1 - (7th and 8th grade)

Course Number: 5011.R0000.Y

Semester-long

Prerequisites: None

In this fun introductory theatre class students will have the opportunity to explore theatre as an art, business, and tool that can grow personal and social awareness through games, exercises, and performances. There will be a specific focus on ensemble work, audience etiquette, voice and diction, body awareness and movement, character development, pantomime, puppetry performance, scene performance and intro to technical theatre.

Intermediate Theater (7,8)

Course Number: 9635.R0000.X

Semester - long

Prerequisite: Beginning Theater

An intermediate Theatre arts course with a focus on acting and directing skills, as well as character development. Students will continue warm ups and improvisational activities as well as reinforce prior knowledge, while emphasizing performance as well as historical and cultural heritage.  

skills and begin/continue instruction on full band

music in a large ensemble.

Theater Production (7, 8)

Course Number: 5013.R0000.X

Year-long

This is a really exciting class that focuses on the behind the scenes work for a production.  Create, communicate, and collaborate. Students design and create the sets, costumes, makeup, and props for the current production.  You’ll also learn to use sound, lighting, and media to help enhance the theater experience.  We’ll work, we’ll play, we’ll glue, we’ll design, and most importantly we’ll have a blast!


WORLD LANGUAGES

Discovering Languages and Culture (6)

Course Number: 9930.R0000.x/9326.R0000.X

Semester Long

Prerequisites: None

This is a non-sequential elective course where students explore a variety of aspects of one or more languages and cultures and develop basic language learning and communicative skills through the use of age-level appropriate and culturally authentic resources. In such discovery courses, students will also develop effective language study skills. Although languages may vary by campus, more attention is given to those languages currently taught in AISD schools. In some cases, special discovery courses in Spanish may be offered for students to explore the multiple regions where Spanish is spoken.

NOTE: This is a new LOTE course intended to replace the former course titled Exploratory Languages.

French I (7,8)

Course Number

Year-long, High School Credit

Prerequisites: None

French I provides instruction in speaking, listening, reading, and writing French as well as in the study of French culture, history, and geography.  At the end of the year-long course of study, students earn a high school elective credit toward the two-year requirement for two levels of the same language for the Recommended High School Program and three levels for the Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP).

French II (7,8)

Course Number: 2023.R000.Y

Year-long, High School Credit

Prerequisites: French I

French II  continues sequential world language instruction of which the overarching goal is communication. Students will engage in conversations, present information to an audience, and interpret culturally authentic materials in the target language. Students will also use the language to connect with other content areas, to make comparisons with their own language and culture, and to participate in communities beyond the classroom. Students should perform at novice-high to intermediate-low proficiency by the end of the year. The course reviews and refines appropriate grammatical concepts while students increase their cultural knowledge and understanding of the products, practices and perspectives.

Spanish I (7,8)

Course Number: 2313.RJY00.Y

Year-long, High School Credit Course

Prerequisite: None

Spanish 1 is a course designed for students with little to no current working knowledge of Spanish. Students will be introduced to a basic working vocabulary and to basic working grammatical structures related to their immediate environment. Receptive and expressive skills are fostered through interactive Spanish lessons in the target language.  The course also includes information about Spanish-speaking cultures and celebrations around the world.

Spanish II (7,8)

Course Number 2323.H000.Y

Year-long, High School Credit

Prerequisites: Spanish I

Spanish II  continues sequential world language instruction of which the overarching goal is communication. Students will engage in conversations, present information to an audience, and interpret culturally authentic materials in the target language. Students will also use the language to connect with other content areas, to make comparisons with their own language and culture, and to participate in communities beyond the classroom. Students should perform at novice-high to intermediate-low proficiency by the end of the year. The course reviews and refines appropriate grammatical concepts while students increase their cultural knowledge and understanding of the products, practices and perspectives.

Spanish for Native Spanish Speakers I (6,7,8)

Course Number: 2313.RJY00.Y

Year-long, High School Credit Course

This class is intended for students with some knowledge of the language (intermediate). Spanish I for Spanish Speakers focuses on reading and writing in Spanish. Another important aspect of the study is on cultural studies (culture, history, and geography), which will help the students to understand their culture and the importance of bilingualism in the modern world.  Students whose first language is Spanish or who have attended school in a Spanish-speaking country are encouraged to take this course. Through the course, students earn a high school credit toward the two levels of the same language for the Recommended High School Program and three levels for the Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP).

Spanish for Native Spanish Speakers II (6,7,8)

Course Number: 2313.RJY00.Y

Year-long, High School Credit Course

This class is intended for students with some knowledge of the language (intermediate). Spanish I or II for Spanish Speakers focuses on reading and writing in Spanish. Another important aspect of the study is on cultural studies (culture, history, and geography), which will help the students to understand their culture and the importance of bilingualism in the modern world.  Students whose first language is Spanish and who have attended school in a Spanish-speaking country are encouraged to take this course. Through the course, students earn a high school credit toward the two levels of the same language for the Recommended High School Program and three levels for the Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP).

Spanish for Native Spanish Speakers IV(8)

Course Number: 2343.P000.Y

Year-long, High School Credit Course, AP College Credit at end of year with exam

Level IV of Languages Other Than English develops even higher level student proficiency via world language instruction of which the overarching goal is communication. Students will engage in conversations, present information to an audience, and interpret culturally authentic materials in the target language. Students will also use the language to connect with other content areas, to make comparisons with their own language and culture, and to participate in communities beyond the classroom. Whether weighted or AP, students should perform at intermediate-mid to intermediate-high proficiency by the end of the year, with the exception of other LOTE’s that follow different proficiency targets.  Exclusive use of the target language by both teacher and student is expected at this fourth stage of language learning. Students study more advanced grammatical concepts as appropriate and delve even deeper into the analysis of the products, practices and perspectives of the target culture(s). At this level, it is crucial that students are exposed to a wide array of authentic materials such as audio and video resources as well as written and literary texts. The curriculum is based on guidelines from the College Board which advocates for advanced placement best practices and strategies that will prepare students for college and career. In May, students may opt to take the College Board Advanced Placement examination in their target language. These exams provide a measure of a student's ability to communicate in the target language via tasks that allow them to demonstrate their skills in the interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication. The exam also assesses a student's familiarity with the target culture. An incentive for taking the exam is the potential for receiving a sufficient score that will grant college credit hours. In general, these exams are taken at the end of the level IV course, although some students may wait until the fifth year of language study to take the examination.

 STEM and TECHNOLOGY

Coding (Creative Computing/Computer Science Intro) (6,7,8)

Course Number

Year-long

Prerequisite: None

The Creative Computing course is a two semester, first year computer science course introducing the basics of programming with block coding, the basics of web page design, and an introduction to robotics and other coding languages. Students will learn to code using blocks to drag and drop, but they can switch between blocks and text as the course progresses. Students will create and present projects through a variety of online programming platforms and robotics kits in which to program.

With a unique focus on creativity, problem solving and project based learning, Creative Computing gives students the opportunity to explore several important topics of computing using their own ideas and creativity to develop an interest in computer science that will foster further endeavors in the field.

Web Design 1 & Computer Science Discoveries (7, 8)

Course Number: 8413.R0000.X

Year – long

Prerequisite: Creative Computing I and/or II

In today's world, web pages are the most common medium for sharing ideas and information. Learning to design websites is an incredibly useful skill for any career path.

The Web Design course is a project-based course that teaches students how to build their own web pages. Students will learn the languages HTML, CSS, and Java to create their own live homepages to serve as portfolios of their creations. By the end of this course, students will be able to explain how web pages are developed and viewed on the Internet, analyze and fix errors in existing websites, and create their very own multi page, interactive websites. The CodeHS introduction to computer science curriculum teaches the foundations of computer science and basic programming, with an emphasis on helping students develop logical thinking and problem solving skills.

Investigating STEM Careers I, II  (6,7,8)

Course Number: 8455.R0000.Y

Year - long

This course will increase the student’s understanding of STEM careers.  Students will investigate a how Science, Technology, Engineering and Math come together in the development of products and systems to solve real world problems.  This course introduces real world applications in the area of STEM and involves hands-on problem-solving activities. Students will also explore academic and professional skills, current labor market and future trends for various types of STEM careers. STEM II- This course will provide an advanced understanding of STEM careers.  Students will investigate a how Science, Technology, Engineering and Math come together in the development of products and systems to solve real world problems.  Students will be involved in advanced hands-on problem-solving activities, including the use of power tools and equipment.  This course also introduces the concept including art in order to understand STEAM applications. Students will explore academic and professional skills, current labor market and future trends for various types of STEM/STEAM careers.

Media and Animation  (7,8)

Course Number: 8464.R0000.Y

Year - long

Students will analyze and assess current and emerging technologies, while designing and creating multimedia/animation projects. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment.

Keyboarding (6,7,8)

Course Number: 8401.R0000.X 

Semester - long, High School Credit Course

Our scholars learn to type while developing

real-life skills in reading, writing, communication and problem solving. Students will type a minimum of 25 words per minute with 80% accuracy for high school credit. This skill will decrease homework time for students, assist with technology skills and will be used throughout their educational and professional careers.

Students also develop Microsoft Office skills to produce workplace documents. Students will learn the importance of time management while creating office documents. These lessons include Microsoft Office, PowerPoint and Excel. By the end of the semester, all students are expected to key a minimum of 20 wpm with 80% accuracy. Students who do not want to earn 0.5 high school credit may complete the course for no credit.

Principles of Business Marketing  and Finance

Course Numbers: 8318.RJC00.Y

Year-long, High School Credit Course

In Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance, students study economies and private enterprise systems, the impact of global business, marketing of goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems and settings in business, marketing, and finance.

PLTW Design and Modeling & Automation and Robotics (7,8)

Course Numbers: 8853.R0000.Y

Year-long, High School Credit Course

Design & Modeling (DM) looks at the steps of the design process and how it used in each day in multiple areas. Students learn sketching and dimensioning - perspective, isometric, and orthographic sketches. We use Autodesk Inventor to bring their designs to 3D...several things have the opportunity to be printed on the 3D printers.
Automation & Robotics (AR) investigates robot uses, types, and advantages. Students use the same programming language as in sixth grade, ROBOTC, and we expand on their knowledge. Students go through the design process to solve problems/challenges they are given.

Native Plants and Animals (7,8)

Course Number: 9131.R0000.Y

Semester-long

Prerequisites: None

Through outdoor activities, games, art, music and group projects students practice careful observation and the use of critical thinking skills to recognize relations between biotic and abiotic factors in ecosystems, analyze the sources and flow of energy, relate carrying capacities to population changes and calculate the impact of human activities on the environment. Animal and garden maintenance are a large component of this class.

Environmental Science

Course Number: 9150.R0000.X

Semester-long

This is an introductory course for students who wish to study topics relating to the environment, its resources, quality and ethical issues. Environmental science is the study of the natural sciences in an interdisciplinary context that always includes consideration of people and how they have influenced various systems around us. It includes many aspects of biology, earth and atmospheric sciences, fundamental principles of chemistry and physics, human population dynamics, and an appreciation for the Earth and its natural resources

Science Explorers (6*,7,8)-Independent Study

Course Number: 9145.R0000.Y

Semester-long

This class is designed to meet the needs of advanced academic students*. Emphasis on intellectual exploration and the development of critical thinking and problem solving. An enriched curriculum that integrates core content areas and explores the process of problem solving through both independent and group development based projects.  This class incorporates aspects of communication, character development, calibration, research, and effective use of technology and resources. Students will create advanced products in a variety of media to demonstrate their learning in their chosen area of interest.

(This is an independent study project based class!)

Journalism and Liberal Arts

Book Whisperers (6,7,8)

Course Number: 9031.R0000.X

Semester - long

This course seeks to foster a love of reading for all students. Students will examine a variety of genres, from memoirs to realistic fiction, graphic novels to fantasy. They’ll write about their reading, establish critical thinking skills through socratic seminars and analysis of stories, conduct project-based learning, recommend and review their favorite books, and visit with local authors and booksellers.

Intro to Journalism (6)

Course Number: 1077.R0000.X

Semester

Prerequisites: None

In this class students get to learn about the history of communication and journalism.  Students will write and publish about things around school, community and world. We have press conferences, do interviews with interesting people and learn the basics of great reporting and being a news reporter.

Creative Writing I (6,7,8)

Course Number: 011041.R0000.X

Semester - long

This course provides writing experience in several genres. Students engage in the writing process from prewriting to publication and will engage in peer review and self-reflection. Students examine important examples of literature in relevant genres as subjects for technical analysis.

Creative Writing II: O. Henry Writing Project (7,8)

Course Number: 011042.R0000.X

Semester - long

This course provides writing experience in several genres. Students engage in the writing process from prewriting to publication and will engage in peer review and self-reflection. Students examine important examples of literature in relevant genres as subjects for technical analysis.

Students will edit, design, write and publish a student literary magazine in both hard-copy and on-line formats. Students will take charge of all levels of magazine publishing: advertising, selling, selecting, editing and designing as they create O. Henry’s literary magazine.

Literary Society: Owls (7,8)

Course Number: 011439.R0000.X

Semester - long

Students will have the opportunity to read some great works of literature (past and present), to view films inspired by these wonderful works, and the discuss the literary and film-making craft that makes classics, well classic.  Other activities will include reading, viewing, and discussing contemporary works of film, television, and other media and creating responses to what we learn in a variety of modes.

Photojournalism I (7, 8)

Course Number: 8440.R0000.X

Semester - long OR Yearlong

Prerequisites: None

This course is designed as an introduction to digital photography and the careers available in the field of digital photography.  Students will gain hands-on experience, using Canon Rebel cameras. The class focuses on understanding the basic operations and functions of a DSLR camera and the manipulation of its settings to achieve specific results.

Photojournalism II (8)

Course Number: 8445.R0000.X

Semester - long OR Yearlong

Prerequisite: Photojournalism I

This course is a continuation of practicing and expanding upon skills acquired in Photo I as well as more creative assignments using Adobe Photoshop.

Graphic Design Careers (Yearbook) (8)

Course Number: 8419.R0000.Y

Year - long

Prerequisite: Photojournalism I + Submit Application the Spring before

The Hoofbeat Staff creates the yearbook for all OHMS students. This group of students will create the theme, design and layout making sure to include as many students as possible. Your photographs and interviews will fill the pages of this highly anticipated yearly book of memories. Students will also help market and sell the yearbook. Get up close with everything that makes our campus special: special events, sports, science experiments, concerts, and everything that we all want to remember and learn more about. You'll be there!

Speech(6, 7, 8)

Course Number:1525.RJ000.X

Semester - long

Prerequisite (none)

The focus of the course is to develop effective communication skills. The changing landscape of the social and work world requires students to send clear verbal messages, choose effective nonverbal behaviors, listen for desired results, and apply valid critical-thinking and problem-solving processes. In Speech, students are expected to identify, analyze, develop, and evaluate communication skills needed for professional and social success in a changing world. Types of course projects include: story telling, debate, formal interview, memorized speech and group presentations.

Mustang Online News and Podcast (6, 7, 8)

Course Number: 018849.R0000.Y

Year - long

Prerequisite (none)

In this course you will get report the breaking news around campus, community and world.  Sometimes, you are the very first student on campus to learn the inside scoop on new events and happenings around campus. You interview those in the know, pull together video footage with your team, edit it , and put online for the real world to experience. Exciting!

National History Day Program(6, 7,8)

Course Number: 014998.R0000.X

Year  - long

Prerequisite (none)

The National History Day (NHD) program is America’s premier year-long national competition for creative, highly motivated 6th, 7th and 8th graders who love historical research and the academic challenge of a lifetime.  O. Henry Middle School’s National History Day class teaches critical thinking, writing and research skills that boost student performance across ALL subjects.  Research shows that NHD prepares students for 21st century success in college, career and citizenship, inspiring them to accomplish more than they ever thought they could.  Since 2005, over 1,500 O. Henry Mustangs have reaped the benefits of NHD, as our school has developed one of the most successful programs in the nation.  Facilitated by certified NHD Coach Devereaux, former Texas NHD Teacher of the Year (2010) and the Texas State Historical Association’s History Educator of the Year (2017), students get to choose research on ANY topics of history that they want to become an expert on.  Students may choose to work alone or work with a partner or in a small group.  Students may choose to present their research as film documentaries, museum quality exhibits, interactive websites, live stage performances or as written thesis papers.  A trip to the national contest in Washington, D.C. in early June is the reward for those 6th, 7th and 8th graders who keep learning and pushing their research and presentation skills to the highest level.  For more information, please go to:  www.nhd.org  and click on the video button, “WHAT IS NHD?”.

America at War(6, 7,8)

Course Number: 9313.M0000.Y

Year  - long

Prerequisite (none)

The purpose of this course is to dive deeper into America’s involvement in both World Wars. Using different types of media, students will explore the social and political happenings in America, and other parts of the world at the time of the Great Wars. This class will be taking a field trip to the Admiral Nimitz National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg,TX.

Social Justice(7,8)

Course Number: 9313.M0000.Y

Year  - long

Prerequisite (none)

This course will engage students in exploring issues of oppression and privilege and will highlight the importance of an intersectional approach as we strive to effectively gain knowledge to counteract unjust systems and practices. By enhancing our own awareness of privilege based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation, national identity and ability, we will be better equipped to create integrated campaigns that empower the populations we seek to support. Students will learn about fairness in schools, law, public health, wealth and jobs for all people in society. This course will help students cultivate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes associated with effective and socially responsible leadership.

Teen Leadership(7,8)

Course Number: 9926.R0000.X

Semester  - long

Prerequisite (none)

Teen Leadership is a course in which students develop leadership, professional, and business skills. They learn to develop a healthy self-concept, healthy relationships, and learn to understand the concept of personal responsibility.

Additional ELECTIVES

AVID (6,7,8)

Course Number: 9217.R0000.Y

Year- long

Prerequisites: Application Required

AVID is a 4th - 12th grade program to prepare students to attend college. It has a proven track record in bringing out the best in students, and in closing the achievement gap. AVID stands for

Advancement via Individual Determination.

The AVID curriculum, based on rigorous standards and is driven by the WICOR method, which stands for writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization, and reading.Students sharpen and refine attitude, skills, and knowledge to successfully enter and complete a college-prep academic program in high school. Students learn and apply study skills and learning strategies to improve performance in the content areas. Note taking, outlining, writing, speaking, reading, test strategies, use of appropriate technology to improve performance, and self-awareness are stressed.

Mustang Foundations (6,7,8)

Course Number: 017617R

Semester - long

This class is designed to help students improve their learning effectiveness, attitudes, and motivation. The following are part of the curriculum: Time management, concentration, note taking skills, textbook study methods, test taking strategies, and critical thinking skills.

Health (8)

Course Number: 6931.R000.X

Semester - long

This course presents extensive coverage of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Health including: consumer health; diseases; environmental health and safety; growth and development; health and fitness for daily living; nutrition; use and abuse of tobacco, alcohol and drugs; and the human life cycle. Students are encouraged to choose responsible health behaviors now and in the future. This course is for mature middle school students. Students who complete this course will earn 0.5 high school credit toward their graduation requirements.

Cheer

Course Number:

Semester - long

Fall Semester- (7,8)

Spring Semester(6)

This class is for 8th and 7th  grade cheerleaders Students will learn the basics of cheerleading: stunting, jumps, tumbling, and choreography. This is a local credit only and does not count for PE credit. 6th grade students interested in cheer for their 7th grade year can take this course the spring of the 6th grade year.

Off-Campus Physical Education Equivalent (7,8)

Course Number: 016033R/016035R

Semester - long

· The Off-Campus Physical Education Equivalent Program is an athletic/training program that students may participate in using a commercial or private agency approved by the District.

·  The Off-Campus Physical Education Equivalent Program packets may be obtained through the counselor’s office or on the AISD website (www.austinisd.org).

·  Students may only choose agencies that are listed on the “AISD Approved Agency” list on the AISD website.

·  Completed packets must be received by the P.E. Department at the Carruth Administration Center on or before the first day of each semester.

·   The Off-Campus Physical Education Equivalent Program course must be scheduled through your counselor and will be noted on the student’s report card.

·  Students must complete written assignments given by the Agency for verification of learned Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Physical Education. A numerical grade will be issued from the written assignments; it will then be factored into the students’ grade.

·  AISD is not responsible for providing transportation to the approved agencies.

Category 2 (only for Middle School Students based on a ruling from the State Board of Education, July 2006): A private or commercially-sponsored physical activity or training program. The student must participate in the substitute activity that is in congruence with the Physical Education TEKS (TAC) Chapter 74.

The student is required to participate at least 5 hours per week during the entire school semester.

Students certified to participate at this level will not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.


Standardized Testing

Standardized tests are administered periodically to all students to evaluate knowledge gained over a given period of time and to assess the effectiveness of the curriculum. The Texas Education Agency has established times at which tests are given and AISD provides guidelines for using the results. For all other students, the following state-mandated tests apply:

 

Grade 6:

STAAR (State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness), STAAR-Alternate 2: Math and Reading

TELPAS for LEP students

 

Grade 7:

STAAR (State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness), STAAR-Alternate 2: Math, Reading and Writing

TELPAS for LEP students

 

Grade 8:

STAAR (State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness), STAAR-Alternate 2: Math, Reading, Social Studies and Science

TELPAS for LEP students

 

Section 504 services

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, reauthorized in 2008, commonly referred to as “Section 504,” is a non-discrimination statute enacted by the United States Congress. The purpose of the Act is to prohibit discrimination and to ensure that students with disabilities have educational opportunities and benefits equal to those provided to other students. An eligible student under Section 504 is a student who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits them in a major life activity such as learning, self-care, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, reading, concentrating, breathing, working and performing manual tasks. See the school counselor or campus 504 Coordinator for more information about services for qualifying students.

 

Students with Dyslexia and Related Disorders

Students with dyslexia have difficulty with reading, writing and/or spelling. Each campus has a teacher (the dyslexia Designee) knowledgeable about dyslexia and Dyslexia intervention. This person is trained to reevaluate, instruct, and monitor eligible students. Schools serve students with dyslexia or related disorders in a variety of ways determined by a campus 504 committee. Services may include specialized instruction, classroom accommodations, and assistive technology. See the school counselor or campus 504 Coordinator for more information about services for qualifying students.

Special education services

Special education and related services are specifically designed instructional services developed to support students with disabilities within the general education curriculum. The intent of the support services is to enable all students with disabilities to make progress in the general education curriculum, to participate in extracurricular and nonacademic activities, and to be educated and participate with non-disabled peers in the public school system.

 

AISD is committed to meeting the needs of students who have cognitive, physical, emotional or learning differences. Each campus utilizes a child study team that meets to discuss and recommend intervention strategies through general education programming. Students who are referred for special education support and services must participate in an evaluation process with formal notice and consent of parents. If evaluation information shows eligibility for special education support and services, an Admission, Review and Dismissal (ARD) Committee develops an appropriate educational program for each student.

 

An ARD Committee includes:

·         The student and his/her parent;

·         District representative;

·         Evaluation representative;

·         At least one of the student’s general education teachers;

·         A special education teacher (The child’s disability may require a teacher certified in a specific area, such as Visual or Auditory impairment);

·         Related services provider, if required;

·         Language Proficiency Assessment Committee representative, if required;

·         Career and Technical Education Representative, if CTE is being considered for the student.

 

The program developed by the ARD Committee is referred to as an Individualized Education Program (IEP). The IEP is implemented in the least restrictive environment appropriate for the student.

The student and parents have legal rights under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that are outlined in the Procedural Safeguards. Parents also receive information from Texas Education Agency in the booklet, “A Guide to the Admission, Review and Dismissal Process.” Information about these rights are provided and explained to parents and/or adult students at least one time per year, and:

·         when a student is initially referred for evaluation

·         when requested by parent

·         at the initial filing of a due process hearing

English Language Learners(EL), Limited English Proficient(LEP), English as A Second Language Services (ESL)

The Middle School language arts curriculum provides English as a Second Language (ESL) for English language learners (ELLs), who are recent immigrants, (0-3 years in U.S. schools). Identified students in ESL classes develop their abilities to listen, speak, read, and write in English. An additional ESL Reading class is recommended for ELLs who need support in reading on grade level in English. Both classes are designed to develop the English language proficiency needed to succeed in all-English classes including language arts, math, science, and social studies.

 

The High School language arts curriculum provides English I and II for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL I and ESOL II) to recent immigrant students. A Reading class is recommended for English Language Learners who may not be reading on grade level to further develop comprehensive English skills. The English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher provides ESL instruction to meet the needs of students at the beginner and intermediate levels of proficiency. For recent Spanish-speaking immigrant students, Spanish for Spanish Speakers is recommended to strengthen the students’ primary language and reinforce the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills required to meet the standards on STAAR/EOC.

 

The state graduation plan provides an option for ELLs at beginner and intermediate proficiency levels, to take English for Speakers of Other Languages I and/or II (ESOL I and/or II) in lieu of English I and/or II.   English III and IV may be taught as sheltered courses with ELL strategies based on campus availability and learner needs.

 

For recent immigrant students who have been in a United States school for fewer than three years, sheltered courses in math, science, social studies, and language arts are recommended, when available. When possible, teachers provide native language support in the content.

 

English Language Learners Served by Special Education

ELLs who receive special education services have special education needs related to a disability as well as needs related to second language learning. It is important for ARD committees and LPACs to work together to ensure that instruction is tailored to meet each student’s linguistic and special education needs. Admission, Review, and Dismissal committees and Language Proficiency Assessment Committee should keep in mind that ELLs receiving special education services who participate in STAAR/STAAR-L administrations may also be eligible for other accommodations in addition to the linguistic accommodations that are determined to be appropriate.

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2019-2020 O. Henry Middle School Course Guide