Mount Hutt College/Lauriston School Board of Trustees

Charter 2019

for

MOUNT HUTT COLLEGE

Introduction

The Board has the responsibility to develop strategic educational direction from Year 1-13 across two schools, Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School, which places it in a unique position.  We acknowledge the Board of Trustees governs two individual schools and that the management reflects each school’s requirements.  The legal responsibility of Boards of Trustees around governance and management is determined by Section 75 and 76 of the Education Act 1989.

Governance

The Board emphasises strategic leadership rather than administrative detail, has a clear distinction of Board and staff roles, concentrates on the future rather than the past or present, and is proactive rather than reactive.

Management

The Board delegates all authority and accountability for the day-to-day operational organisation of the respective schools to the Principal, or Acting Principal.

Combined Board Composition

Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School combined their boards in March 2004.  Initially to ensure both schools thrived, which has happened.  It took a lot of consultation with both school communities and required Ministry of Education approval.

Recognising New Zealand’s Cultural Diversity          NAG 1(e)

Both schools, as appropriate to their communities, will develop procedures and practices that reflect New Zealand’s cultural diversity and the unique position of Māori culture.  In recognition of this we will take reasonable steps to provide instruction in tikanga (Māori culture) and te reo (Māori language).

To achieve this, the schools will:

Commitment to Māori        NAG1(e)

Both schools recognise that Māori students face barriers to achievement additional to those faced by other students.  The reasons for this are complex, and are both historical and current.

We believe that the additional barriers faced by Māori students can only be addressed effectively in partnership between the school and its Māori community.  That partnership must work to make the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi a reality at both schools and give Māori students the same benefits of participation in education as other students.

The schools also recognise that Māori language and culture has an intrinsic importance to New Zealand society, which is over and above the contribution made by other cultures.  The schools are determined to reflect that importance.

The Board is committed to building, and playing an active part in, the partnership with our Māori community, and to resourcing decisions made in partnership.

National Education Goals and Priorities

Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School endorse the National Education Goals and the National Education Priorities and recognise the legislative requirements of the National Standards for achievement.


The College and its Community

Mount Hutt College

Mount Hutt College is a state rural, coeducational Year 7-13 College of 480 students.  It is set in attractive grounds in Methven, not far from Mt Hutt ski field, and serves a predominantly rural community.

A District Bus Scheme provides transport for about half of the school’s population, and due to rapid growth in 2007 an Enrolment Scheme was implemented at the direction of the Ministry of Education.  Since then the roll has stabilised at just under 500 students

A full range of curricular and extracurricular activities occur in the school, which has a tradition of performing well in all areas of its operation – academic, cultural, sporting and social – strong community links support all school activities.

The College continues to look at ways to meet the needs of its students and develop their aspirations. It uses technology in the form of NZnet to allow distance education. It has strong GATEWAY, STAR and Vocational Pathways programmes.  In 2015 an Agricultural Academy was started and we work closely with the Primary ITO to deliver this programme.

It is a BYOD (bring your own device) school. These devices are used when appropriate.

There is a range of contributing schools from all around Mid-Canterbury.

Location

Methven (updated  March 2019)

Decile Rating

9

Teaching Staff        Roll generated

                            Number of teachers

34.9

38

Number of foreign fee paying students

11

Ethnic composition

Pakeha  71%

Maori  10%

Other European  9%

South East Asian  7%    

Other Asian 1%

Pacifica  1%

Other 1%

Gender Composition

Female  222

Male   241


Vision

Following consultation with students, staff and the broader community during 2014 the joint board of Mount Hutt College and Lauriston developed a compelling vision of a Thriving Learning Community to express the desired future state of our schools. Our vision statement encompasses four domains that provide context and focus for the development of our strategic goals and define the criteria against which we measure success:

Note our vision will sometimes be abbreviated to “TLC” and the acronym “CELL” will often be used when referencing our four domains.

Opuke Kāhui Ako

Mt Hutt College is an active member of the Opuke Kāhui Ako. The Opuke Community of Learning consists of nine schools based around the foothills of Opuke (Mt Hutt) and along the plains bordered by the Rakaia River. There is one secondary school (Mt Hutt College), five full primary schools (Mayfield, Mt Somers-Springburn, Our Lady of the Snows, Rakaia and Dorie), and three contributing primary schools (Methven, Lauriston and Chertsey). In all, the schools cater for 1,362 students, 91 teaching staff, and eight proactive and dedicated Boards of Trustees. The schools are extremely well supported by their parent and wider communities who value education for their tamariki. Schools within our Opuke Community hold strongly to the belief that the learner is at the heart of the matter. Our kaupapa is focused on embracing the strengths within our communities. These include our whānau, boards, staff, and wider community. These connections will enable us to grow capacity and accelerate achievement. Our constant focus is “what impact will this have for our learners?”

Charter & Reporting

The board expects this charter document will become increasingly relevant and integrated into day-to-day operations and decision making at both schools.

This charter presents medium-term (i.e. 3-5 year) strategic goals which have been developed to achieve our aspirational vision of a Thriving Learning Community. We have intentionally rationalised our strategic goals to just two or three goals at each school to provide focus and clarity for our principals and their respective teams. Strategic goals will normally address elements across multiple domains – the view here being that the more domains a goal addresses the more quickly we advance towards our vision. Strategic goals will be reviewed annually by the board (with student, staff and community consultation where necessary) to ensure they remain relevant. Where a shift in focus is required following either self-review or externally imposed changes our strategic goals will be amended accordingly.

Strategic goals are further broken down into annual goals to provide a framework for the principal’s reporting during an academic year. For annual goals, the principal will define deliverables, measures, targets and associated review dates, and assign responsibilities.

Our vision of a Thriving Learning Community is very effectively complimented by the long-standing mottos that have presided over each school for many years: ‘Striving for Excellence’ and ‘Ready for Success’ at Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School respectively. Furthermore, the established school values embodied by the acronyms of PRIDE (at Mount Hutt College) and READY (at Lauriston School) define behaviours and attributes that are essential to the realisation of our collective vision.


Mount Hutt College

P

Passion

Be enthusiastic and committed to learning, Be proud of our school.

Look after each other and the environment.

R

Respect

Respect the rights of all to learn in every class.

Be polite and respectful to all.

Respect tidiness of all learning environments, Respect yourself.

I

Integrity

Be honest, Follow the school systems.

Take pride in doing your best.  Act responsibly when something is wrong.

D

Diversity

Recognise and understand differences; talents, culture and religion.

Celebrate successes of others in all areas of school life.

E

Excellence for all

Aim for the very best in all that you do, Be the best you can be.

Always exhibit our school values of PRIDE.



STRATEGIC/ANNUAL

SECTION

Mount Hutt College


Strategic Goals for 2019 to 2020

While the Strategic Goals are set in a three-year phase, the educational review that is currently occurring will have its first directions at the beginning of 2019 and a review of our Strategic Goals could occur during 2019.  Our Goals are in line with our Opuke Kāhui Ako.

  1. Strategic Goal 1: ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori

  1. Strategic Goal 2: Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

The College’s strategic plan is reviewed annually by the Board of Trustees

Strategic Plan for 2019 – 2020 

(Note normally this would be a three-year plan but with new guidelines in 2020 better to not extend past 2020)


1. Strategic Plan 2019 - 2020:  Strategic Goal 1:

ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori

Background

Develop an implementation strategy for ESMM, firstly using Ka Hikitia “Effectiveness in the sector indicators and incorporating ideas drawn from consultation with our Māori community and recommendations from best practice models”.

2.1  Culturally responsive effective teaching of Māori learners.

2.2  Effective educational leadership; culturally responsive learning context and systems.

2.3  Effective provision of te reo Māori in and through education.

2.4  Effective engagement with iwi, hapu and Māori Communities.

2.5  Effective parent, family and whanau engagement (informed, demanding, determining).

2.6  Effective Māori learner support, information and advice (pathways).

2.7  Effective and relevant service provision for Māori learners.

The areas in bold are the focus areas for 2019 this is a continuation of the three areas of 2018.


Strategic Goal 1 ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori

Strategic Priority

Purpose

Outcomes

2.1 Culturally responsive effective teaching of Māori learners

To improve learning outcomes for Māori students and all learners.

“What is good for Māori learners is good for all learners”.

Ako Culture counts; Knowing, respecting and valuing who students are, where they come from and building on what they bring with them.

  • Teachers have a better understanding of Tikanga.
  • Teachers have a better understanding of Te Reo.
  • Maori students are more engaged in their learning.
  • Productive partnerships; Maori students, whānau, hapu, iwi and educators sharing knowledge and expertise with each other to produce better mutual outcomes.

Annual Targets 2019:

Operational actions in support of our annual targets

Key responsibilities

Timeframe

Staff Professional Development  to develop a good understanding of Ka Hikitia and Tataiako

  • More staff enrol with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa in the He Papa Tikanga.

  • Staff complete the He Papa Tikanga course.
  • Sessions at staff meetings.

Jenna: to encourage

Jenna (Jill Biddle) Te Wānanga tutor

Jenna, Rana

July 2019

July 2019

T1, T2, T3 T4


Strategic Goal 1 ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori

Strategic Priority

Purpose

Outcomes

2.2 Effective educational leadership; culturally responsive learning context and systems

Core Concept:  To what extent have leadership and management been successful in creating and maintaining a welcoming and inclusive learning culture and systems that support Māori learners enjoying and achieving education success as Māori?

  • Improve BOT and school leaders understanding of leadership for Māori learning as Māori.
  • College Leadership proactive and respond to improving the understanding of Tikanga.
  • Improve students understanding of our Tikanga.

  • More use of Te Reo and Tikanga by the BOT.

  • More use of Te Reo and Tikanga at the College.

  • More students know and can perform the College Haka.

Annual Targets 2019

Operational actions in support of our annual targets

Key responsibilities

Timeframe

Senior Leadership continue to grow the use of Te Reo in the College

  • Continue to improve our Mihi whakatau at the beginning of the year and with visiting Groups.
  • Use Te Reo to describe role within the School.

SLT, Rana, Jenna

Rana, Jenna

Jan T1, T2, T3, T4

Jan, Feb

More Students know the College Haka

  • Have senior boy’s students teach the Haka to more students.
  • Develop the Girls actions and have Girls also learn the Haka.

Senior students

T1, T2


Strategic Goal 1 ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori

Strategic Priority

Purpose

Outcomes

2.4 Effective engagement with iwi, hapu and Māori Communities

Whanaungatanga Relationships (students, school wide, community) with high expectations.

Make Mount Hutt College a welcoming place for all.

Continue to develop the use of our Waiata and Haka.

Māori students develop their Te Reo and Tikanga at school.

  • Build on the 2018 consultation with Maori community.
  •  Build links with Arowhenua and Hakatere Marae.
  • Improve MHC engagement with whānau.
  • Write our vision in a Maori context?
  • Develop student voice.
  • More students to have a Marae experience.
  • Māori students learn as Māori.

Annual Targets 2019:

Operational actions in support of our annual targets

Key responsibilities

Timeframe

Have a second Māori Consultation evening

  • Invited all members of the Mount Hutt College communities to a second Māori consultation evening and share the information gathered from the last years Hui.

Principal, Heni, Juanita

T1 or T2

Develop student voice

  • Use the COL student Hui to obtain student voice to develop our Māori perspective.

Rana, Jenna , Principal

T2

Marae Experience

  • Take our Junior Māori classes to a Marae

Jenna

T3 or T4

Support Students who wish to take NCEA Māori

  • Have students take Māori via distance and support them at school too.

Jenna

Beginning of year and ongoing


2.        Strategic Plan 2019 - 2020:  Strategic Goal 2:

Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

  1. Annual Target 2019: Teaching as Inquiry.

Teaching staff will engage purposefully with the inquiry cycle in order to improve outcomes for students.

Actions:

  1. Continue to support teachers’ inquiry record keeping and reflective practice through subscription to Arinui.
  2. Encourage opportunities for collaborative inquiry for teachers of some junior class and/or shared target students.
  3. Support the quality of inquiry through development of Practice Analysis Conversations.

Outcomes:

Background

Staff have started to make significant shifts in thinking about their teaching as a result of focused inquiry practice. In particular, the selection of target students to focus upon has caused staff to re-examine their courses and teaching and to consider what changes can be made so that those particular students can meet the set goals. Furthermore, this focus is based on evidence and supported by more teacher learning, discussion, exploration and reflection.  

The comments teachers have made in the faculty summary overviews shows the range of depth of thinking and engagement that exists in 2018 with a school focus on writing. With a less prescriptive focus in 2019, teachers have a broader opportunity to interpret the question “what are my key learners’ needs and what data tells me this?”  However, selecting a school-wide focus (i.e. the Learning Progressions Framework for writing) has concentrated attention and intensified the impact upon students.  

Our next step for developing more effective teacher inquiry is the introduction of Practice Analysis Conversations.  These are designed to provide effective feedback to teachers on their practice.  This method is to help teachers recognise the gaps that might occur between their stated intentions and the actual learning that is occurring.  This approach is based on the research of Helen Timperley.  

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-NoReVUCZuueob-rCo17YeX3QIqnAX6gQ7Z3o0j6xKLrErE-YujmIBnH8MIeFz586kuAbGmTMLNdk_x4o01tkAJ2UG8TCL9F68cxIP2jj4JdHavsqseLpC3BnQRv6eHq0ri_0ek_


Some background for Teaching and inquiry and Practice Analysis Conversations.

(Taken form the Opuke Kāhui Ako PLD application for 2019)

The common PLD focus provides the opportunity to develop capacity across the Opuke Kāhui Ako in teaching and learning and inquiry practices. It provides the opportunity for teachers to reflect on their practice with respect to their teaching. Having a common focus fosters closer relationships between teachers across schools within the Kāhui Ako.  We want the PLD to help build on teaching and learning successes for all learners. The PLD we have had throughout 2018 has focused on effective teaching practices around literacy across the curriculum, as well as what the important aspects of literacy are, and how to design programmes that meet the needs of writers. We have designed teaching and learning inquiries focused on writing.  In order to embed effective teaching and learning practices, we want to strengthen Teaching as Inquiry at the classroom level. We are wanting to develop Practice Analysis Conversations (PAC, Helen Timperley) as the mechanism for focusing on what works for whom, and for guiding teacher inquiry.  We will build sustainable practices to Practice Analysis Conversations and inquiry by strengthening leadership capacity. We will be coaching in PAC so that we can continue leading learning after the PLD has ended. This will also include co-constructing some systems that support inquiry, with protocols for focus student meetings and refining of our Curriculum and Achievement Plans.  We are wanting to improve outcomes for all ākonga, by building teacher capability in: Learning-focused conversations (teacher-teacher, teacher-student, teacher-caregiver); Data driven & informed decision-making (make sense of, review, rationalise); leadership, Assessment for Learning (AFL); Learning Progression Framework (investigate to support the measure of progress).

During 2018 PLD, it has become clear that some schools are interested in critically evaluating the teaching and learning contexts in their curriculum. While the LPF has provided us with the framework of what to notice and recognise in literacy, some schools would like to go further in looking at what contexts and environments for learning would be most meaningful to their learners. Data:

  1. The Senior Leadership Teams from our schools have identified the need to establish a more robust system for observations and teacher inquiries.  This has been a subject raised at a number of steering group meetings.  Two schools in our Kāhui Ako have been involved with Practice Analysis Conversations (PAC) as part of their Inquiries in 2018 for Mount Hutt College and Methven Primary School.  This mahuri (seedling) group has given these teachers the motivation and drive to see PAC being rolled out to all staff, and in all our schools, due to the specific focus on best practice.  Teacher advocacy certainly promotes the development of this tool.  Some comments made by teachers involved in the trial group include:

"The PAC tool made me really focus on specifics of my teaching.  Having the pre-observation conversations really challenged me to be clear and explicit with my deliberate acts of practice. I would love PAC to be an ongoing tool that we could use across curriculum areas."  "We need consistency with our results and consistency only comes by having time to practice it."


Strategic Goal 2: Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

Strategic Priority

Purpose

Outcomes

2.1 Teaching as Inquiry

Teaching staff will engage purposefully with the inquiry cycle in order to improve outcomes for students

  • Teaching as Inquiry model in understood by all staff.
  • Teaching as inquiry model is used by all staff.
  • All inquiries are focused on improving professional practice, student engagement and student learning.
  • Target students make progress in their achievement.
  • Using Arinui Teachers’ inquiry records provide evidence towards annual appraisal.
  • Using Arinui Teachers record improvement in teacher practice.
  • Teachers share findings through collaborative.

Annual Targets 2019:

Operational actions in support of our annual targets

Key responsibilities

Timeframe

All staff use Teaching as Inquiry effectively

  • Arinui subscription bought for all teaching staff.
  • Staff with expertise in the use of Arinui share their learnings in workshops at TOD, COL TOA as meetings.

Principal

Carolyn and Kris

Jan, Feb 1

All year

Staff show progress in their inquiry

  • Meeting with their Appraiser to share at check point meetings.
  • Teacher invites peer observe focus area in lesson.

Appraiser

Peer

T1,T2,T3

T1, T2 T3

Teachers report on outcomes for students

  • Teachers share outcomes with the Appraiser.

Appraiser

T4

Inquiry summaries inform reporting

  • HOF use Appraisal information in their end of year report.
  • Principal’s report includes Inquiry outcomes.

HOF

Principal

T4, T1 2020

Next steps for school improvement identified

  • Review of the Reports discussed and 2020 priorities established and report to the BOT.

Principal, SLT, HOF, teachers

T4


Strategic Goal 2: Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

Strategic Priority

Purpose

Outcomes

2.2 Encourage opportunities for collaborative inquiry for teachers of same junior class and/or shared target students

To improve student learning and engagement by teachers working together across subjects

  • Professional conversations support and challenge teachers to think deeply about the effectiveness of their teaching actions.

Annual Targets 2019:

Operational actions in support of our annual targets

Key responsibilities

Timeframe

Teachers work together across curriculum areas to improve student learning and engagement

  • Teacher self-select to work together with a class.
  • Teacher choose the way they are going to collaborate.
  • Use Teaching as inquiry to develop their model.
  • Report progress to other staff.
  • Use the information gathers to inform possible changes to the Junior Timetable in 2020.
  • Recommend changes in Junior learning for 2020.

Kris, teachers involved

Teachers involved

Teachers involved

Teachers involved

Kris, HOFs

Kris, HOFs

Feb

Feb, Mar

T1, T2, T3

T2, T3

T3

End T3

Next steps for school improvement Identified

  • Review of the reports discussed and 2020 priorities established and report to the BOT.

SLT, HOF, teachers

T4


Strategic Goal 2: Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

Strategic Priority

Purpose

Outcomes

2.3 Support the quality of inquiry through development of Practice Analysis Conversations

Improve teachers skills and improve teacher practise, and  identifying learners’ needs

  • A seedling group of teachers become proficient at PAC and are able to support a larger group of teachers in the future

Annual Targets 2019:

Operational actions in support of our annual targets

Key responsibilities

Timeframe

Support the quality of inquiry through development of Practice Analysis Conversations

  • Successful PLD application in connection with Opuke Kāhui Ako.
  • ‘Seedling group’ of six staff commence PAC with each other.
  • Group report on their work to other staff.
  • ‘Seedling group’ expand to commence PAC with other staff.

Kris, Carolyn

Jan, Feb

T1

T2, T3

T3

Next steps for school improvement identified

  • Review of the Reports discussed and 2020 priorities established and report to the BOT.

SLT, HOF, teachers

T4



     

Text box displaying document title and subtitle

Text box displaying document title and subtitle


Contents

  1. Introduction        2

  1. Annual Goals 2018        5

  1. Analysis of Variance        7

Strategic Goal 1:  Educational Success for Māori as Māori        7

Strategic Goal 2: Improving achievement for all students        12

  1. Literacy        12
  2. NCEA achievement        14

        

  1. Strategic Goals for 2018 to 2020 (Draft)        16


  1. Introduction

About Us

Mount Hutt College is a state rural, coeducational Year 7-13 College of 480 students.  It is set in attractive grounds in Methven, not far from Mt Hutt ski field, and serves a predominantly rural community.

A District Bus Scheme provides transport for about half of the school’s population, and due to rapid growth in 2007 an Enrolment Scheme was implemented at the direction of the Ministry of Education.  Since then the roll has stabilised at just under 500 students

A full range of curricular and extracurricular activities occur in the school, which has a tradition of performing well in all areas of its operation – academic, cultural, sporting and social – strong community links support all school activities.

The College continues to look at ways to meet the needs of its students and develop their aspirations. It uses technology in the form of NZnet to allow distance education. It has strong GATEWAY, STAR and Vocational Pathways programmes.  In 2015 an Agricultural Academy was started and we work closely with the Primary ITO to deliver this programme.

It is a BYOD (bring your own device) school. These devices are used when appropriate.

There is a range of contributing schools from all around Mid-Canterbury.

Location

Methven (updated  May 2018)

Decile Rating

9

Teaching Staff        Roll generated

                            Number of teachers

34.9

38

Number of foreign fee paying students

11

Ethnic composition

Pakeha  71%

Maori  10%

Other European  9%

South East Asian  7%    

Other Asian 1%

Pacifica  1%

Other 1%

Gender Composition

Female  222

Male   241

Opuke Kāhui Ako

Mt Hutt College is an active member of the Opuke Kāhui Ako. The Opuke Community of Learning consists of nine schools based around the foothills of Opuke (Mt Hutt) and along the plains bordered by the Rakaia River. There is one secondary school (Mt Hutt College), five full primary schools (Mayfield, Mt Somers-Springburn, Our Lady of the Snows, Rakaia and Dorie), and three contributing primary schools (Methven, Lauriston and Chertsey). In all, the schools cater for 1,362 students, 91 teaching staff, and eight proactive and dedicated Boards of Trustees. The schools are extremely well supported by their parent and wider communities who value education for their tamariki. Schools within our Opuke Community hold strongly to the belief that the learner is at the heart of the matter. Our kaupapa is focused on embracing the strengths within our communities. These include our whānau, boards, staff, and wider community. These connections will enable us to grow capacity and accelerate achievement. Our constant focus is “what impact will this have for our learners?”

Vision

Following consultation with students, staff and the broader community during 2014 the joint board of Mount Hutt College and Lauriston developed a compelling vision of a Thriving Learning Community to express the desired future state of our schools. Our vision statement encompasses four domains that provide context and focus for the development of our strategic goals and define the criteria against which we measure success:

Note our vision will sometimes be abbreviated to “TLC” and the acronym “CELL” will often be used when referencing our four domains.

Charter & Reporting

The board expects this charter document will become increasingly relevant and integrated into day-to-day operations and decision making at both schools.

This charter presents medium-term (i.e. 3-5 year) strategic goals which have been developed to achieve our aspirational vision of a Thriving Learning Community. We have intentionally rationalised our strategic goals to just two or three goals at each school to provide focus and clarity for our principals and their respective teams. Strategic goals will normally address elements across multiple domains – the view here being that the more domains a goal addresses the more quickly we advance towards our vision. Strategic goals will be reviewed annually by the board (with student, staff and community consultation where necessary) to ensure they remain relevant. Where a shift in focus is required following either self-review or externally imposed changes our strategic goals will be amended accordingly.

Strategic goals are further broken down into annual goals to provide a framework for the principal’s reporting during an academic year. For annual goals, the principal will define deliverables, measures, targets and associated review dates, and assign responsibilities.

Our vision of a Thriving Learning Community is very effectively complimented by the long-standing motto that have presided over each school for many years: ‘Striving for Excellence’. Furthermore, the established school values at Mount Hutt College embodied by the acronym of PRIDE define behaviours and attributes that are essential to the realisation of our collective vision.

Analysis of Variance

This analysis of variance is a statement in which the board provides an evaluation of progress Mt Hutt College has made in achieving the goals and targets set out in the charter. It shows parents, whānau and the community the actions that have been taken to achieve the goals and targets established for 2018 and how successful these actions have been for improving student achievement. The analysis of variance also provides the basis for plans for the coming year. Setting targets for the coming year, regularly reviewing progress and evaluating what's been achieved means the school will be better placed to ensure all students can achieve educational success.


2. Annual Goals for 2018

While the strategic Goals are set in a three-year phase the Educational Review that is currently occurring will have its first directions at the beginning of 2019 and a review of our strategic goals could occur during 2019. Our goals are aligned with our Opuke Kāhui Ako.

  1. Strategic Plan 2018 - 2020:  Strategic Goal 1: 

ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori

Develop an implementation strategy for ESMM, firstly using Ka Hikitia “Effectiveness in the sector indicators and incorporating ideas drawn from consultation with our Māori community and recommendations from best practice models.

2.1 Culturally responsive effective teaching of Māori learners.

2.2 Effective educational leadership; culturally responsive learning context and systems.

2.3 Effective provision of te reo Māori in and through education.

2.4 Effective engagement with iwi, hapu and Māori communities.

2.5 Effective parent, family and whānau engagement (informed, demanding, determining).

2.6 Effective Māori learner support, information and advice (pathways).

2.7 Effective and relevant service provision for Māori learners.

For 2018, three of the above have been selected to focus on as annual targets.

Annual Targets 2018:

2.1 Culturally responsive effective teaching of Māori learners

Ako Culture counts; Knowing, respecting and valuing who students are, where they come from and building on what they bring with them.

Productive partnerships; Maori students, whānau, hapu, iwi and educators sharing knowledge and expertise with each other to produce better mutual outcomes.

2.2 Effective educational leadership; culturally responsive learning context and systems

Core Concept:  To what extent have leadership and management been successful in creating and maintaining a welcoming and inclusive learning culture and systems that support Māori learners enjoying and achieving education success as Māori?

2.4 Effective engagement with iwi, hapu and Māori communities

Whanaungatanga Relationships (students, school wide, community) with high expectations.

  1. Strategic Plan 2018 - 2020:  Strategic Goal 2:

Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

 

Annual Targets 2018:

Teachers to work in inquiry groups focused on improved learning outcomes for a small group of students within their class. Using the premise that improved outcomes for the small group will result in improved outcomes for all. “What is good for Māori learners, is good for all”. With most inquiries the focus will be on Writing, which is the focused work stream (strand) for our Opuke Kāhui Ako.

The following groups have been identified.


3. Analysis of Variance 2018

This section focuses on the Analysis of the 2018 Goals and targets and recommended next steps.

Strategic Plan 2018 - 2020  

Strategic Goal 1: Educational Success for Māori as Māori

Annual Targets 2018:

2.1  Culturally responsive effective teaching of Māori learners

Ako Culture counts; Knowing, respecting and valuing who students are, where they come from and building on what they bring with them.

Productive partnerships; Māori students, whānau, hapu, iwi and educators sharing knowledge and expertise with each other to produce better mutual outcomes.

Analysis

There are a number of important strategies that the school has been undertaking to strengthen and affirm the self-identity and self-esteem of Māori students and to support the inclusive design for learning for all Māori students.

The school is making significant steps to ‘know their Māori learners’. The school is demonstrating care by getting to know their Māori learners and what's important to them. Teachers are making connections to their experiences and contexts to support learning and strengthen relationships. There are good examples of teachers applying tikanga Māori into their programmes of learning for students.

Teachers and leaders of the school are building relationships with Māori students by respecting and valuing who they are, where they come from and what they bring with them. The school has recognised the potential for developing this further and has made ongoing commitments through the charter goals to enhance and embed this practice.

Authentic relationships with students are at the heart of effective learning and it is vital students feel that they belong and valued for who they are. Student voice is becoming increasingly important to the school in asking students what will help. This is highlighted by hui for Māori students and a Year 12 female Māori student sharing the findings of the Māori community consultation with staff.

There has been a real active engagement by some staff to lead the building of a culturally responsive environment. The school believes that students are more likely to achieve when they see themselves and their culture reflected positively in subject matter, learning contexts and the environment around them. The carving in the hall is the cultural narrative for the school. Its dynamic meanings and stories are very powerful metaphors for the life of the school and the area. This area can be grown and expanded. It is important the school considers additional strategies rather than just the retelling of the full story to keep the messages relevant and interesting for everyone involved in the school.

All students in Year 7-9 learn Te Reo with an optional Te Reo class in Year 10. Many small engagement ideas have been developed to support staff in growing their skill and understanding with Te Reo Māori and Tikanga Māori such as Māori greetings, common sayings, correct pronunciation of Māori student names, and greetings for emails. All groups (visitors) are welcomed with a Mihi Whakatau which has grown in its protocols and diversity of skill over time. There is some bicultural signage such as on the windows of the Principal’s office and the translation and display of the school’s values in Māori. More could be done to integrate Māori language and symbols into establishing visible learning and a common language of learning throughout the school. The display of kīwaha in every classroom is a good example. The school has a waiata specifically written by and for it which is performed regularly by students and staff as part of the ‘regular’ life of the school. The school haka, derived from the cultural narrative, is undergoing a resurgence with the boys’ haka continuing to be shared with younger students and in 2019 the girls’ haka will be developed, shared and performed. Staff and student visits to Arowhenua Marae have been both engaging and empowering with all staff attending a COL teacher only day at Arowhenua Marae.

2.2 Effective educational leadership; culturally responsive learning context and systems

Core Concept:  To what extent have leadership and management been successful in creating and maintaining a welcoming and inclusive learning culture and systems that support Māori learners enjoying and achieving education success as Māori?

Analysis

The leadership and staff at My Hutt College is establishing and trying to grow reciprocal relationships with the Māori community. The inclusion of two Māori representatives (co-option and elected parent representative) on the Mt Hutt College Board of Trustees, encouraged and supported by the Principal, is a significant asset to the school.  The school is developing positive relationships with the community of people who know the students well. This concept is also developed in Years 7-10 with the identification of kaiārahi (student leaders)

Progress in understanding a need for a more Māori language was demonstrated at the beginning of 2019 with the establishment of vertical forms called manaaki led by kaiāwhina which is designed to support tuakana/teina relationships. Tuakana/teina refers to the relationship between an older (tuakana) person and a younger (teina) person and is specific to teaching and learning in the Māori context. Within teaching and learning contexts, this can take a variety of forms: peer to peer; younger to older; older to younger; able to less able. This is an exciting initiative and development for the school.

Some staff are undertaking a programme of professional development (He Papa Tikanga) through Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. To date, 7 staff have completed the programme, 7 staff are currently undertaking the programme, and another 7 will begin during 2019. He Papa Tikanga is giving staff insight into a Māori worldview where they learn about traditions, concepts, values and protocols and understand why Māori do things a certain way. They also learn how to apply some of these concepts in the home, workplace and community. The programme enables staff to challenge their thinking and reflect on their own beliefs and values and how they relate to those of other cultures. Staff are able to learn from home at their own pace with amazing resources and regular visits from a kaitiaki (support person). This is a very good professional development opportunity that is supporting and growing staff at Mt Hutt College.

Leadership capacity and capability has grown during 2018 and 2019 with a strong team leading Māori developments and initiatives. They continue to need both the school and BOT support and encouragement to collaboratively grow and develop the goal of ‘educational success for Māori as Māori’ and the NZ Curriculum Principle of inclusiveness. As an inclusive school, Mt Hutt College aspires to value every individual, respect diversity, provide equitable opportunities for all students and to recognise and meet the learning needs of all students. The school is actively engaged in this challenge. Students feel that they belong because they are welcomed and can participate in all aspects of school life.

The work of the Community of Learning facilitators in the development of resources for the Opuke Kāhui Ako has been well received. A tikanga and te reo booklet for the COL has been produced that contains useful and wide-ranging resources such as; helpful language websites; technology creative free websites; Facebook groups; apps; and using Te Reo Māori. The learning facilitators are making a significant contribution to the leadership and understanding of Tikanga Māori and Te Reo Māori.

2.4 Effective engagement with iwi, hapu and Māori communities

Whanaungatanga Relationships (students, school wide, community) with high expectations.

Analysis

The school has undertaken a significant Māori consultation process to explore Māori perspectives on inclusion and identifying what Māori students need. The school is developing an understanding of the different perspectives and values held by Māori parents and whānau. The results of the Māori consultation have been shared with leadership and staff by a senior Māori student and a Māori representative from the Mt Hutt College Board of Trustees. The findings were well received. The challenge for the school is to build on these findings during 2019 and to re-engage the consultation with the Māori community.

The Māori whānau consultations used a Mihi Whakatau model developed by the Māori trustee and was used in our first consultation evening which was facilitated by the Kaitoko Mātauranga (educational advisor) from Arowhenua. 

Mt Hutt College has made a commitment through its leaders, teachers and whānau to co-construct ways of engagement based on their own critical questions, learning and self-review. It has led to more successful connections being forged and partnerships being explored and developed. Through consultation with the Māori community the school has identified that its work is more effectively becoming collaborative, mutually respectful (mana enhancing) and responsive to community needs. This work needs to continue to be developed and implemented.

At the heart of this goal is the concept of Whanaungatanga. Whanaungatanga refers to a sense of family connection. It’s a relationship through shared experiences and working together which provides people with a sense of belonging - about connecting to whānau – or family. This includes extended family and relationships at all levels. The school is undertaking some interesting work in this area. They have strengthened the tuakana / teina relationship through the manaaki and have increased the visibility of programmes and achievement in the school. Further work can be undertaken to grow family and community understanding of inquiry and collaborative learning. Strategies to encourage whanau into the school could be grown and maintained.

Mt Hutt College also has a commitment to a learner-centred teaching environment which is not possible without good relationships. This applies to teachers’ relationships with their learners as well as student and teacher relationships with each other. The staff are very effective in developing authentic relationships with students. This is very evident through the tone of conversations between staff and students and the willingness of staff to go that extra mile in supporting and caring for students. Mt Hutt College shows clear evidence of a learner-centred teaching environment where people feel connected and identify with the group. Their shared expectations mean that they celebrate diverse abilities and individual excellence at the school. Teachers need to continue to ask and explore those key questions: ‘What do you do to build relationships in your teaching context?’ and ‘Do you know what your learners’ aspirations and goals are?’ These are helpful questions for teachers learning inquiry. The ‘Next Steps’ need to be continuing the consultation, improve engagement with whānau and write our vision in a Māori context.


Strategic Plan 2018 - 2020  

Strategic Goal 2: Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

Annual Targets 2018:

Teachers to work in inquiry groups focused on improved learning outcomes for a small group of students within their class. Using the premise that improved outcomes for the small group will result in improved outcomes for all. “What is good for Māori learners, is good for all”. With most inquiries the focus will be on writing, which is the focused work stream (strand) for our Opuke Kāhui Ako.

The following groups have been identified.

Analysis

While the school has continued to work with students identified in 2017 due to their learning needs in literacy (Year 9 boys and Māori students who were either below literacy requirements or underperforming), a range of strategies have been used within each teacher’s learning inquiry to focus on a teacher identified students with learning needs with the aim of improving educational outcomes. This has made specific data collection relating to the target difficult to identify and collate in a meaningful way.

An analysis has been able to be undertaken using the school wide data of e-asTTle reading across Years 7-10 from 2016 – 2018 to look for trends and developments.

If we follow the Year 8 cohort of boys in 2016, the majority will be the Year 10 cohort in 2018. What we find is that 72% of students in 2016 were at or above the curriculum reading level and 28% below. By 2018 this performance distribution had changed to 39% at or above the curriculum reading level and 61% below. A similar trend occurs in 2016 Year 7 boys performance in reading when tracked through to Year 9 in 2018 although the change is not so dramatic but it could be by the time they reach Year 10.  The school should explore the reason(s) for this trend.

Literacy performance within NCEA by students in 2018 is very good. The school is above the national mean at Levels 1, 2 and 3 and above the decile 8-10 mean at Levels 2 and 3. Numeracy performance by students in 2018 is also very good. The school is above the national mean at Levels 1, 2 and 3 and above the decile 8-10 mean at Levels 2 and 3. This is a strong result for both literacy and for numeracy.

Note: There is an interesting set of data generated from 2018 when analysing the data from e-asTTle reading performance for boys across Years 7-10 and comparing the trends to NCEA literacy performance in Year 11-13. The e-asTTle data suggests that reading performance between cohorts is reasonably strong in Year 7 and 8 but deteriorates in Year 9 and further in Year 10. However, literacy data by the end of Year 11 is above the national and decile 8-10 mean. It is important for the school to understand why? Is this a maturation issue or perhaps a time lag between being exposed to improvement strategies and the actual improvement taking place? What is clear is that the school does not have readily accessible tools and models to collect this data school wide. Excellent examples of practice do exist that could be used school wide or generated for school wide use. One example is the junior tracking of Māori students by the HOF English.

The following Reading e-asTTle data illustrates the above point. This data is for a cohort when they were in Year 8 (end of) and Year 10 at the end of 2018. Note that a student may have progress but not at the expected rate. For example “below” in Year 10 is at a higher level than “below” in Year 8.

The data developed through the teacher’s learning inquires and presented in the Faculty Summary Reviews show progression and development of students with identified learning needs. Most of this data is qualitative in nature and while it demonstrates good evidence for how a learning need is being addressed it is not in a form that is helpful for the school to understand how broader issues are being improved. Encouragement could be given to the development of more agreed qualitative data so that trend analysis can be undertaken. The development and use of school wide data collecting tools would be advantageous.  

NCEA Results

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Endorsement

Level

L1

L2

L3

L1

L2

L3

L1

L2

L3

L1

L2

L3

L1

L2

L3

Merit MHC

39%

21%

19%

32%

31%

26%

36%

16%

23%

29%

20%

23%

40%

10%

30%

Excellence MHC

13%

10%

8%

11%

8%

11%

14%

20%

5%

16%

13%

17%

32%

10%

8%

Overall MHC

52%

31%

27%

43%

39%

37%

50%

36%

28%

45%

33%

40%

72%

20%

38%

Decile 8-10

66%

53%

51%

68%

56%

52%

69%

57%

53%

69%

56%

57%

70%

56%

53%

Achievement MHC

74%

82%

82%

81%

80%

90%

92%

92%

83%

80%

93%

83%

81%

83%

75%

Decile 8-10

79%

79%

71%

82%

80%

75%

80%

82%

75%

79%

81%

76%

80%

83%

75%

BOYS (Level 2)

Achievement MHC

82%

69%

90%

91%

81%

Decile 8-10

63%

67%

67%

68%

79%

Endorsement MHC

37%

33%

22%

17%

20%

Decile 8-10

42%

44%

46%

46%

56%

UE

MHC

 

 

71%

 

 

65%

 

 

59%

54%

49%

Decile 8-10

 

 

61%

 

 

65%

 

 

65%

64%

63%

The overall performance results of NCEA student achievement is good although there are some specific challenges for the Board and senior leadership to monitor. Endorsements continue to perform strongly with Level 1 achievement showing a 20% improvement since 2014 at 72% for merit and excellence. This is 16% above the national mean and 2% above the decile 8-10 mean. Level 3 achievement of 38% has shown an 11% achievement since 2014 but still sits just below the national mean of 42.5% and well below the decile 8-10 mean of 53%. Level 2 achievement for endorsements has significantly reduced in 2018 to 20% which is 36% below the decile 8-10 mean. This could be due to a bimodal student population with different aspirations and pathway goals. The overall L1, L2 and L3 achievement data supports this view with all three levels at the decile 8-10 national mean. Overall the school has significantly improved the endorsement rates and has achieved the target set in the 2018 annual plan.

Boys NCEA achievement shows a strong performance across L1, L2 and L3. At Level 1, boys achieve at 78.6% which is 12.5% above the national mean and 4% above the decile 8-10 mean. At Level 2, boys achieve at 80.8% which is above the target of 80% set by the school in the 2018 annual plan. One of the factors contributing to this high achievement rate at Level 2 for boys are the alternative programs; STP, Star, Gateway and Primary Industry classes which all assist in boys achieving useful practical credits. This performance is also 8% above the national mean and 2% above the decile 8-10 mean. This is a strong result. NCEA Level 3 boy’s achievement is at 67.7% which is 7.4% above the NCEA Level 3 national mean.

Level 3 University Entrance is 49% however when focusing of those students who are aiming at University Entrance the figure is 89%. While this is important the target must still be all those wanting to go to University having the qualification to go. Those not wanting to go at the moment should also have this qualification, if they are thinking about doing further study later.  Last year the overall result of 62% and when focusing on those aiming for University, 85% achieved this goal.

Māori achievement NCEA results are difficult to analyse in relation to trends as the smaller numbers are significantly influenced by fluctuation in student numbers and the influence of cohort characteristics which makes comparison across years problematic. However, analysis of the results for 2018 show some strong performances and some challenges. Level 1 NCEA Māori achievement is at 71.4% which is significantly above the national mean (55.8%) and slightly above the decile 8-10 mean (71.1%). Level 2 NCEA Māori achievement is 16.8% below the national mean and even further below the decile 8-10 mean. The 2017 data would suggest this is due to a cohort variation. Level 3 NCEA Maori achievement is at 60% which is 8.5% above the national mean but 8.3% below the decile 8-10 mean. The Mt Hutt College Board of Trustees would gain more value and understanding about Māori achievement if they used leaver attainment data to measure NCEA performance. Leaver attainment data records the highest qualification a student leaves with and records every student. This ensures that student retention is factored in to the data analysis and helps overcome fluctuations in student cohort numbers.


Strategic Goals for 2019 to 2020

While the strategic goals are set in a three year phase, the educational review that is currently occurring will have its first directions at the beginning of 2019 and a review of our strategic goals could occur during 2019. Our goals are in line with our Opuke Kāhui Ako.

1. Strategic Plan 2019 - 2020: Strategic Goal 1:  Educational Success for Māori as Māori (ESMM)

Background

Develop an implementation strategy for ESMM, firstly using Ka Hikitia “Effectiveness in the sector indicators and incorporating ideas drawn from consultation with our Māori community and recommendations from best practice models.”

2.1        Culturally responsive effective teaching of Māori learners.

2.2        Effective educational leadership; culturally responsive learning context and systems.

2.3        Effective provision of te reo Māori in and through education.

2.4        Effective engagement with iwi, hapu and Māori communities.

2.5        Effective parent, family and whānau engagement (informed, demanding, determining).

2.6        Effective Māori learner support, information and advice (pathways).

2.7        Effective and relevant service provision for Māori learners.

Focus for 2019

2.1 Culturally responsive effective teaching of Māori learners

Ako Culture counts; Knowing, respecting and valuing who students are, where they come from and building on what they bring with them.

Productive partnerships; Māori students, whānau, hapu, iwi and educators sharing knowledge and expertise with each other to produce better mutual outcomes.

2.2 Effective educational leadership; culturally responsive learning context and systems

Core Concept:  To what extent have leadership and management been successful in creating and maintaining a welcoming and inclusive learning culture and systems that support Māori learners enjoying and achieving education success as Māori?

2.4 Effective engagement with iwi, hapu and Māori communities

Whanaungatanga Relationships (students, school wide, community) with high expectations.

2.  Strategic Plan 2019 - 2020:  Strategic Goal 2: Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students 

 

Annual Target 2019:

Teaching as Inquiry:  Teaching staff will engage purposefully with the inquiry cycle in order to improve outcomes for students.

Actions:

Outcomes:


Staff have started to make significant shifts in thinking about their teaching as a result of focused inquiry practice.  In particular, the selection of target students to focus upon has caused staff to reexamine their courses and teaching and to consider what changes can be made so that those particular students can meet the set goals.  Furthermore, this focus is based on evidence and supported by more teacher learning, discussion, exploration and reflection.  

The comments teachers have made in the faculty summary overviews shows the range of depth of thinking and engagement that exists in 2018 with a school focus on writing.  With a less prescriptive focus in 2019, teachers have a broader opportunity to interpret the question “what are my key learners’ needs and what data tells me this?”  However, selecting a school-wide focus (i.e. the Learning Progressions Framework for writing) has concentrated attention and intensified the impact upon students.  

Our next step for developing more effective teacher inquiry is the introduction of Practice Analysis Conversations.  These are designed to provide effective feedback to teachers on their practice.  This method is to help teachers recognise the gaps that might occur between their stated intentions and the actual learning that is occurring.  This approach is based on the research of Helen Timperley.  

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-NoReVUCZuueob-rCo17YeX3QIqnAX6gQ7Z3o0j6xKLrErE-YujmIBnH8MIeFz586kuAbGmTMLNdk_x4o01tkAJ2UG8TCL9F68cxIP2jj4JdHavsqseLpC3BnQRv6eHq0ri_0ek_

.


Some Background for Teaching and Inquiry and Practice Analysis Conversations.

(Taken from the Opuke Kāhui Ako PLD Application for 2019)

The common PLD focus provides the opportunity to develop capacity across the Opuke Kāhui Ako in teaching and learning and inquiry practices. It provides the opportunity for teachers to reflect on their practice with respect to their teaching. Having a common focus fosters closer relationships between teachers across schools within the Kāhui Ako. We want the PLD to help build on teaching and learning successes for all learners. The PLD we have had throughout 2018 has focused on effective teaching practices around literacy across the curriculum, as well as what the important aspects of literacy are, and how to design programmes that meet the needs of writers. We have designed teaching and learning inquiries focused on writing.  

In order to embed effective teaching and learning practices, we want to strengthen Teaching as Inquiry at the classroom level. We are wanting to develop Practice Analysis Conversations (PAC, Helen Timperley) as the mechanism for focusing on what works for whom, and for guiding teacher inquiry.  We will build sustainable practices to Practice Analysis Conversations and inquiry by strengthening leadership capacity. We will be coaching in PAC so that we can continue leading learning after the PLD has ended. This will also include co-constructing some systems that support inquiry, with protocols for focus student meetings and refining of our Curriculum and Achievement Plans.  We are wanting to improve outcomes for all ākonga, by building teacher capability in: Learning-focused conversations (teacher-teacher, teacher-student, teacher-caregiver); Data driven & informed decision-making (make sense of, review, rationalise); leadership, Assessment for Learning (AFL); Learning Progression Framework (investigate to support the measure of progress).

During 2018 PLD it has become clear that some schools are interested in critically evaluating the teaching and learning contexts in their curriculum. While the LPF has provided us with the framework of what to notice and recognise in literacy, some schools would like to go further in looking at what contexts and environments for learning would be most meaningful to their learners.  

Data:

  1. The Senior Leadership Teams from our schools have identified the need to establish a more robust system for observations and teacher inquiries.  This has been a subject raised at a number of steering group meetings.  Two schools in our Kāhui Ako have been involved with Practice Analysis Conversations (PAC) as part of their Inquiries in 2018 for Mt Hutt College and Methven Primary School.  This mahuri (seedling) group has given these teachers the motivation and drive to see PAC being rolled out to all staff, and in all our schools, due to the specific focus on best practice.  Teacher advocacy certainly promotes the development of this tool.  Some comments made by teachers involved in the trial group include:

"The PAC tool made me really focus on specifics of my teaching.  Having the pre-observation conversations really challenged me to be clear and explicit with my deliberate acts of practice. I would love PAC to be an ongoing tool that we could use across curriculum areas."  "We need consistency with our results and consistency only comes by having time to practice it."

  1. The Kāhui Ako achievement challenges are now being reviewed and key leadership roles are likely to change. Therefore it is important for the College and Kāhui Ako to position itself in ways to be adaptable: these include TaL, AtoL, PAC, learning-focused conversations, leadership and collaborative practice. Mt Hutt College is the pathway school for our Kāhui Ako Primary Schools. Year 9 is a critical transition point, therefore the Year 9 data is representative of student achievement throughout our Kāhui Ako.

Of a cohort of 63 Year 9 students,

Māori make up 19% of this cohort.



Triennial Review Programme/Board Annual Work Plan 2019 (DRAFT)

Year: 2019

Review

Area for Review

Board Meeting Dates

19th Feb

2nd April

14th May

25th June

6th August

17th Sept

29th Oct

3rd Dec

Strategic Review

Charter

 

Updated charter and strategic goals 2019

Confirmed Charter approved and sent to MoE

Review of strategic plan

Approve strategic  plan

Annual plan draft

Reporting on Annual Goals

Annual Goal

Annual Goal

Annual Goal



Regular

Review

Policies/Procedures Review

Schooldocs Term 1

G 2.1, G2.2

Schooldocs Term 2

G4, G8, G10, G11, G13, G16

G3, G15, 15.1

Schooldocs Term 3

G18, G18.1, G18.2, G18.3

O5, O12

G7, G14

Schooldocs Term 4

O10

G9, G19.2

O11

Learner Progress and Achievement

National Standards Report to BOT

NCEA Results

Analysis of Variance (national standards)

NCEA confirmed results and variance report

Principal Appraisal

Performance Agreement  / Goals Approved

Informal review

Informal review

Formal Review Report

MHC  - Curriculum  / HOF Progress Reports

Lauriston – Curriculum

Evaluation and Review Reports

Finance/Budget

2019 Approval

Accounts to Auditor

Monitor

Mid-year review

Monitor

Monitor

2020  Draft

2020  Draft

Board process

Requirements

Appoint chair

Succession planning

Compliance Checklist - Term 4

Roll return

1st  March

Trustee Election

Morning tea with staff

Compliance Checklist - Term 1

Annual Report approved and sent to MoE.

Roll Return

1st June

New Board

Select committees

Roll return

1st July

Compliance checklist

– Term 2 Report

Roll Return

1st September

 

Compliance checklist

– Term 3

Morning tea with staff

Board training

Meeting review NZSTA conference

Trustee Evaluation / Training goals

Self / effective governance reviews

Xmas party

Student Trustee

Report on Spirit of Adventure

Prepare elections and induction

Final feedback report

Year: 2019

Review

Area for Review

Board Meeting Dates

19th Feb

2nd April

14th May

25th June

6th August

17th Sept

29th Oct

3rd Dec

Emergent Review

New gov. initiatives

New local initiatives