ENGL 101 – Heartland Community College

Critical Reading and Writing

Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

Meeting Times

Section 037

MW 3:30PM – 4:45PM

ICB 2801

Instructor: Ryan Edel, Ph.D.

Office Hours

MW 1:00PM – 2:00PM

and By Appointment

Heartland Campus Library

Contact the Instructor

E-mail me via Heartland: ryan.edel

E-mail me via 12Writing

ENGL 101 Quick Links

Schedule

Week 1 – First Quarter

Week 4 – Second Quarter

Week 8 – Third Quarter

Week 12 – Fourth Quarter

Project Information

Project 0

Project 1

Project 2

Project 3

Policies

Attendance

Deadlines

Course Focus

Respect

CREDIT HOURS:  3        CONTACT HOURS:  3        LECTURE HOURS:  3   LABORATORY HOURS: 0

In English 101, students will improve their writing by learning about the integrated relationship between critical reading and writing skills. Students will explore how genres of communication shape the acts of reading and writing, and in the process, will learn how to become responsible and ethical readers, writers, and designers of various kinds of texts. Students gain exposure to a wide range of tools and skills available and necessary to 21st century readers and writers, including collaboration techniques, visual design principles, and how to effectively control surface features of their writing.

Textbooks

The majority of assigned texts will be hyperlinked from the online syllabus, and these readings may be supplemented with handouts.  Additionally, the following online textbooks will be regularly referenced:

RELATIONSHIP TO ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS AND TRANSFERABILITY:

ENGL 101 fulfills 3 of the 9 semester hours of credit in Communication required for the A.A. or A.S. degree.  This course should transfer as part of the General Education Core Curriculum described in the Illinois Articulation Initiative to other Illinois colleges and universities participating in the IAI. However, students should consult an academic advisor for transfer information regarding particular institutions. Refer to www.iTransfer.org for information.

Learning Outcomes

Course Outcomes

Essential Competencies and Program Outcomes

Range of Assessment Methods

Identify & describe multiple modes of information

PO1

Projects such as an essay, blog post, feature article, persuasive editorial, etc.

Process Assignments, which may include but are not limited to, invention exercises (e.g., listing, concept mapping, claim structure outlining, etc.), topic proposals, annotated bibliographies, drafting, peer review, documentation practice, revision, editing,  in-class assignments (individual and collaborative), class discussion of writing or readings, attendance, and quizzes.

 

Articulate the role of conventions in shaping & designing rhetorical situations

CT 1

PO1

Articulate how genres shape reading & writing

 

PO2

Identify & define rhetorical concepts

 

PO2

Contribute, through writing, their own ideas & opinions about a topic to an ongoing conversation in ways that are appropriate to the academic discipline or other context

CT 2

PO3

Practice efficient research methods by locating & organizing research materials

 

PO4

Read critically through comprehension, analysis & critique of a variety of texts

 

PO4

Write about texts for multiple purposes including (but not limited to) interpretation, synthesis, response, summary, critique & analysis

CO 3

PO4

Recognize and navigate the ethical responsibilities required by complex environments

CO 5

PO5

Recognize the importance of collaboration in textual production

CO 4

DI 1

PO6

Control the appropriate surface features of a text, including (but not limited to) syntax, grammar, punctuation, spelling,  & documentation

 

PO7

Essential Competencies:

DI 1 (Diversity Outcome 1): Domain Level—Valuing; “Students reflect upon the formation of their own perspectives, beliefs, opinions, attitudes, ideals, and values.”

CO 3 (Communications Outcome 3):”Students listen in order to comprehend information, critique and evaluate a message, show empathy for the feelings expressed by others, and/or appreciate a performance.”

CO 4 (Communications Outcome 4): “Students are self-reflective of the communications process.”

CO 5 (Communications Outcome 5): “Students communicate ethically through monitoring their behavior and interactions with others.”

CT 1 (Critical Thinking Outcome 1): “Students gather knowledge, apply it to a new situation, and draw reasonable conclusions in ways that demonstrate comprehension.”

CT 2 (Critical Thinking Outcome 2): “Students determine value of multiple sources or strategies and select those most appropriate in a given context.”

Program Outcomes:

1. Teach students to recognize and critique the constructed nature of information

2. Teach students how to employ appropriate multi-modal strategies

3. Identify and demonstrate to students how to transfer learning and understanding between genres via metacognition

4. Model and foster intellectual curiosity by exploring and building upon new ideas, questions, and topics

5. Teach students to locate and synthesize a wide range of ideas and perspectives

6. Introduce and engage in collaboration

7. Teach students appropriate writing features and processes

COURSE/LAB OUTLINE:

·         Elements of the writing process

·         Principles of organization and development

·            Principles of design

·         Identifying purpose and audience

·         Use of Sources and Ethical behavior

·         Revision strategies

·            Researching for different environments

·         Writing for different genres

·         Uses of technology in writing, sharing, and publication

Attendance

Daily Attendance

Daily attendance is a major requirement for success in this course.  I will take attendance each day.  Each student is permitted two “sick day” absences – you are however still responsible for completing any missed assignments, and I will mark zeros on assignments missed due to absence.  For each absence after two, I will subtract 5% from your final grade.

Exceptions to this policy include illness, family emergency, and Heartland-sanctioned student activities (e.g. marching band, athletics.)  In these cases, please contact me as soon as possible to let me know, and then we will discuss appropriate make-up work.  In the event that you do have excused absences, the excused absences will automatically count toward your “sick day” absences.

Please note that employment hours will not count as excused absences.  Please notify your employer of your class schedule.  If your supervisor schedules you for class time, please let me know.  You may also feel free to provide your supervisor with my cell phone number.  If I don’t hear from them, I’ll be happy to call them myself.

Midterm Withdrawal Policy

if a student is failing this class at midterm and any of the following situations apply, the student will be automatically withdrawn by the end of week 8:

•        was absent for any 2 consecutive weeks without appropriate notice

•        has more than 5 unexcused absences

•        Did not complete at least 60% of assignments

Assignment Deadlines

Project deadlines

The syllabus lists milestones and due dates for the major projects, typically on a Friday.  For these projects, the deadline is midnight of that day.  If you require additional time, please request an extension via e-mail by the day before (Thursday).  If no work is submitted and no extension is requested, I may subtract up to 10% from project work for each day late.  The lost points will ONLY apply to the section of your project due that particular day, not the entire project.  In cases of emergency (such as illness or family emergency) I will not impose a grade penalty – instead, we will work out a new deadline based on circumstances.

Regular Assignments

For the readings and “regular” assignments, those are to be read or completed before class time on the date listed.  In general, I don’t accept late assignments unless there’s an extenuating circumstances (such as illness or a family emergency.)  Most days, we will have classroom activities directly tied to the reading assignments – if you don’t complete the reading in time for these activities, then you will have missed an opportunity that makeup work cannot replace.

Digital Accounts

This course will rely heavily upon online tools and resources, and I will set aside class time to ensure everyone can access key online resources.  At a minimum, you will be required to have a Google Drive account, and you will need access to several Kindle Samples from Amazon.  To keep textbook costs down, you will not be required to purchase any texts through Amazon – you are, however, expected to make arrangements to read the assigned samples.  Google Drive and Kindle Samples can both be accessed on campus library computers with internet.

About the Course

English 101 centers upon our habits of writing, the genres we use for expression, and our audiences.  To remember this, think “Author, Artifact, Audience.”  I know, artifact seems a strange term to describe writing, but the written part of your writing is just that – an artifact.  Words on a page, video on a screen – language that has been carved into stone.  It’s the solid evidence of how authors communicate with audiences.

But communication, by its very nature, is messy.  You say one thing, but people read it another way.  Or your friends know what you mean before you even say it.  Artifacts alone cannot tell the whole story.  But sometimes, artifacts are all we have.  A resume, a cover letter – a future employer might see nothing else about you.  Unless they check your Facebook profile.  And then decide that the one picture you took on that one day is the one picture that sums up your entire life.  (Hopefully it was a good one?)

We’ll use two models to address how texts fit within society.  The first, Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) identifies the processes of production, dissemination, and perception that affect our understandings of writing.  The second model is the Rhetorical Triangle of ethos, pathos, and logos (frequently referred to as “traditional rhetoric.”)  Through these models, you’ll come to understand why we use different styles of writing when we use different genres.

Focus: Rhetoric and the American Experience

For this section of English 101, we will draw many of our in-class examples from American political discourse, moving from 1776 to the present.  We’ll be considering how social forces and writing technologies have affected (and been affected by) texts from the Declaration of Independence to Twitter.  This will be a broad survey intended to indicate the varieties and complexity of rhetorical texts, and we will discuss the ways in which these texts have shaped our own individual American identities.  The goal is not to “define” America, but rather to go beyond our own preconceptions, to understand that every text can be interpreted in different ways, often depending upon who’s reading it and why.  From these lessons, you will learn ways to better compose your own texts, and I will provide each of you with individual feedback to help you become a more effective writer in the genres of your choice.

Respect Is Essential

During this course, we will be addressing some uncomfortable topics.  It is very likely that not everyone in the class will share the same beliefs, and that members of our class will hold a variety of perspectives regarding the topics we discuss.  In this, respect is crucial.  I will respect everyone’s right to hold an opinion, and I will not grade assignments based on whether or not I agree with your opinion.  Instead, I grade assignments based on how well you are able to articulate a perspective and then support your writing with evidence.  It is my job to (1) expose all of you to a variety of perspectives, (2) provide you with research tools to gather and evaluate evidence, and (3) provide guidance to help you better express your thoughts through writing.

As a member of this class, you will be expected to also treat your classmates with a high level of respect.  Disagreement is certainly okay – we don’t all need to think and feel the same things.  (In fact, that would be counterproductive – a key part of learning is understanding the differences in how individuals view the world.)  However, we cannot have behaviors that forces some students into silence.  Name-calling, abusive language, and threats of any kind will not be tolerated.  Also, we cannot have writing that is specifically designed to “hurt” someone.  I don’t mean that all writing should be “happy” – in fact, much of the readings I assign still leave me uncomfortable, and addressing this discomfort is a part of learning.  However, I will not allow writing that aims to denigrate another person’s humanity, that denies another student the right to an opinion, or that threatens harm to another person.  Violation of these standards may lead to removal from the course and/or a report to appropriate university officials.

Assignments

This course is divided into an introductory unit (“Project 0”) followed by a project about any topic you’d like to write about (Projects 1, 2, and 3.)  There are two components to our projects: the “process” components (researching, outlining, drafting) and the “product” components (the final paper).  The process components will account for 50% of your grade, and the product components will count for the other 50%.

Daily Assignments

Process: 10% (of final grade)

These are the regular assignments drawn from our assigned readings.  Quizzes, reading responses, and in-class activities are a key part of learning the course concepts.  These assignments are worth a full letter grade.

Project 0: Applying CHAT to Rhetoric

Process:        10%

Product:        10%

In this collaborative project, you and your group members will choose a single document or set of documents somehow related to American history.  Then, using CHAT and the Rhetorical Triangle, you’ll discuss how this document came to be written and its cultural impact.  Your goal is to gather quotes that define each of the CHAT terms, and then apply these terms appropriately to describe your selected document.  See More about Project 0 – P0 Grading Rubric

Project 1: Genre Research

Process:        20% (sources, quote cards, outline, rough draft)

Product:        20% (2,500 words)

In this individual project, you’ll choose a genre related to any topic you like.  I highly encourage genres that you yourself either enjoy or plan to use in a future career – Facebook, recruitment posters, websites, and texting are some of the many genres I’ve seen discussed.  You’ll research the conventions of this genre, make a list of 40 quotes from ten sources, and then outline strategies to weave your research into a cogent discussion.  Using your prepared materials, you’l then write 2,500 words (10pp) explaining your genre, providing appropriate source citations to support your points.  See More about Project 1

Project 2: Multimodal Expression

Process:        5% (gathering necessary media images)

Product:        10% (genre example and multimodal how-to guide)

Following your research project, you’ll produce examples of the genre you’ve researched, and then produce a visual “how to” guide for audiences unfamiliar with your genre.  PowerPoint, YouTube, and Tumblr feeds are among the successful choices I’ve seen for this project.  Given that you’ve already conducted extensive research on this genre, we will have fewer process assignments.  See More about Project 2

Project 3: Curated Metacognition Portfolio

Process:        5% (gathering quotes, selecting 1,750 words to highlight your work)

Product:        10% (750 words, curated portfolio)

Our capstone to the course is a curated portfolio that illustrates what you have learned during the semester.  How has the course changed your thoughts on writing?  What surprised you about the genre you’ve researched?  This work will draw from your other materials, both regular assignments and your works from Projects 0, 1, and 2.  You are expected to provide at least 750 (3pp) words of discussion regarding your learning, and this should be interspersed with quotes and/or images taken from your prior works.  I encourage the use of margin comments to better highlight which parts of your texts taught you the most.  The entire portfolio should be 2,500 words (10pp).  See More about Project 3

Final Grades

Final grades will be determined according to the following scale:

90 to 100%  =  A

80 to 89%        =  B

70 to 79%        =  C

60 to 69%        =  D

Below 59%  =  F

Guide to the Schedule

Week

#

Writing Skills Focus

Discussion and Exploration

Monday’s

to

Friday’s Date

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

This is the homework due on Monday.  Any readings or assignments listed here need to be read before class time.  I’m generally lenient about assignment deadlines – if you haven’t done the work, I’d rather have you in class than absent.  However, earning an A or B in the course will require you to do your work on-time.

This is what we’ll talk about in-class on Monday.  To keep up, you’ll need to have already completed the homework in the box to the left.

Wednesday

This is Wednesday’s homework.  Same instructions as for Monday.

Same as above.  Just note that “pop” quizzes are somewhat more likely on a Wednesday, especially if it looks as if not enough students did the reading for Monday.

Friday

No Class on Fridays.  Assignments listed here are due to Google Drive.  Many of our major projects are due on Fridays.  In case you need an extension, please ask in-class on Wednesday.

First Quarter

Week

1

Introduction: Unit “Zero”

CHAT and Rhetoric

8/21/2017

to

8/25/2017

Representation of Texts

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

No Homework for today.  It’s only the first day.  The first readings are for Wednesday.

Syllabus

James Hamblin: The Eclipse Conspiracy

Accessing Amazon Kindle Samples

“Welcome to Rhetoric: Social Media Filter Bubbles”

Wednesday

Tyler Kostecki: Understanding Language and Culture with Cultural Historical Activity Theory

Backpacks vs. Briefcases: Steps Toward Rhetorical Analysis by Laura Bolin Carroll

What are your social media habits?  How do we study our habits?

Safety Video

Create Google Account

Submit Google Drive E-mail

Friday

Google Drive: read and comment on Workshop pieces.

Sydney Ybarra: “Transmedia Storytelling” (GWRJ 39)

Week

2

Social Contexts of Texts

Plagiarism

8/28/2017

to

9/1/2017

Ethos, Activity, Socialization

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Steven D. Krause: Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Avoiding Plagiarism

Klass: “My Words

Martin: “How Senator John Walsh Plagiarized

Rutenberg and Parker: “Senator Accused of Plagiarism Admits Errors

To what degree do texts represent their authors?

Project 0 – Consider Your Interests

Project 0 Guidelines

Wednesday

Composing the Anthology: An Exercise in Patchwriting by Christopher Leary

Video: Jefferson Writes the Declaration of Independence

Video: The Duality of Thomas Jefferson

U.S. Declaration of Independence

Project 0 Group Matchups

Question: Does plagiarism apply to the Declaration of Independence?  Or is it more like retweeting?  Or more like Leary’s “patchwriting”?

Friday

Project 0: Secondary Sources

3 sources per person

Secondary sources give an overview of your genres and topics.

Week

3

Citation and Primary Sources

Legacies of Texts

9/4/2017

to

9/8/2017

Logos as Representation

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Labor Day: No Class

Wednesday

What is Academic Writing by L. Lennie Irvin

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott: The Declaration of Sentiments

James M. Lindsey: Remembering Ho Chi Minh’s 1945 Declaration of Vietnam’s Independence

Ho Chi Mihn: Declaration of Vietnam’s Independence

Friday

Project 0 Milestone

Find 3 Sources, describe how they’ll help (250 words total)

Directions

Save to 09-08 Folder

Second Quarter

Week

4

Research Writing

Argument and Process

9/11/2017

to

9/15/2017

Ethos, Pathos, Activity

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Rebecca Jones: Finding the Good Argument OR Why Bother with Logic?

Video: Jon Stewart on Crossfire

Schedule Group Meetings

[start the Jones article first – watch the Stewart video when Jones mentions it.]

Wednesday

Zemliansky: Chapter 2: Research Writing as a Process

Friday

Project 0 Milestone

Seven Sections, 4 (or 3) examples each

Week

5

Evaluating Secondary Sources

“Seeing” the Civil War

9/18/2017

to

9/22/2017

Reception and Representation

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Wikipedia Is Good for You!? by James P. Purdy

Wikipedia: Emancipation Proclamation (view all the images first, then read the article for context)

Representations of Composition:

Writing the Emancipation Proclamation

Reading the Emancipation Proclamation

Wednesday

Zemliansky: Chapter 3 – Research and Critical Reading (Introduction)

Finish as much of Project 0 as you can before class – we’ll be reviewing these materials and your last-minute questions.

Workshops: Project 0

Friday

Project 0 Due

Week

6

Scholarly Sources

Narrating Civil Rights

9/25/2017

to

9/29/2017

Activity, Ecology, Trajectory

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Zemliansky: Chapter 3 – Key Features of Critical Reading

Emancipation Proclamation:

Introducing Project 1

Question: Before this class, what did you think the Emancipation Proclamation said?  Where did you learn that?  What genres influenced this?

Wednesday

Readings Moved to Monday

Zemliansky: Chapter 3 – From Reading to Writing

Michael Coulter: MLK’s Dream and the Declaration of Independence

Dan Amira: 15 Things You Didn’t Know about “I Have a Dream”

WBEZ: Long lost speech helped inspire Dr. King’s Dream 

CHAT and Ecology: When You Don’t Have Infinite Time.

Question: Does plagiarism apply to “I Have a Dream”?  (Think back to the Declaration of Independence.)

Friday

P1 Milestone: 3 secondary Sources about your genre, 10 quotes

P0 Participation Survey

Week

7

Finding Sources

Helen Hunt Jackson

10/2/2017

to

10/6/2017

Pathos, Reception, Socialization

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Clarence B. Jones: “Remembering the First Draft of ‘I Have a Dream’”

Michael Coulter: MLK’s Dream and the Declaration of Independence

Dan Amira: 15 Things You Didn’t Know about “I Have a Dream”

WBEZ: Long lost speech helped inspire Dr. King’s Dream 

Zemliansky: Chapter 3 – Strategies for Connecting Reading and Writing

J. Weston Phippon: Kill Every Buffalo!

Wikipedia Activity: Project 1 Sources

Writing Activity: Project 1 Brainstorm

MLK Worksheet Activity: Cultural Impacts on Writing

Helen Hunt Jackson: Intro to Academic Articles

Wednesday

Biography of Helen Hunt Jackson

Helen Hunt Jackson: The Cheyenne (from A Century of Dishonor)

Valerie Sherer Mathes: Helen Hunt Jackson and the Campaign for Ponca Restitution, 1880-1881

Question: How did “social media” work in the days before computers?  How did Jackson use social connections to promote her activism?

Friday

P1 Milestone: 6 sources total, 20 quotes

Third Quarter

Week

8

Texts and Culture

Native Americans

10/9/2017

to

10/13/2017

Ecology and Distribution

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Reading Games: Strategies for Reading Scholarly Sources by Karen Rosenberg

Malea Powell: Survivance (Part 1)

Schedule Individual Meetings for Project 1

Wednesday

Malea Powell: Survivance (Part 2)

Question: How is Powell’s “survivance” a study of a genre.

Question: To what degree could Native American speakers be “authentic” in their stories?  What is the effect of poverty on narrative and genre?  Do we see similar effects in our own lives?

Friday

P1 Milestone: 10 sources and 30 quotes total, plus Basic Outline (e.g. bubble web)

Week

9

Texts and Belief

Blogging Feminism

10/16/2017

to

10/20/2017

Ethos and Representation

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Kyle D. Stedman: Annoying Ways People Use Sources

MLA/APA discussion with Purdue OWL

Wednesday

Emmy Rees: Review of Sara Ahmed

Sara Ahmed: A Complaint Biography

Question: What is the genre of the complaint?  What are its conventions?  What are the cultural implications of this genre?  And why is Ahmed using a blog to write about this?

Friday

P1 Milestone: Starter Draft (1,000 words).  Post to Workshop Group folders in Google Drive.

Week

10

Workshops

Project 1

10/23/2017

to

10/27/2017

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Read and comment on papers by group members.

Use the suggestions from workshop to help expand your projects.

Wednesday

Read and comment on papers by group members.

Grammar lessons based on most common issues.

Friday

P1 Milestone: Rough Draft (2,000 words) plus 40 quotes total

Week

11

Revisions

Proofreading

10/30/2017

to

11/3/2017

Activity

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

This American Life: Fear and Loathing in Homer and Rockville (1-hour radio program)

Research and Rhetoric: What’s at stake for American society?

Wednesday

Work on Project 1

Bring Your Questions

Friday

Project 1 Final Draft Due: 2,500 words

Fourth Quarter

Week

12

Multimedia Genres

Twitter, Trayvon Martin

11/6/2017

to

11/10/2017

Ecology and Distribution

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Lemieux: Justice for Trayvon

Hilton: Black Twitter

Daily Mail: How Twitter

Marissa Smith: How to Create a Sensible Social Media Strategy

Discussion: Can social uses of Twitter be boiled down into “sensible social media strategies”?

Schedule Meetings for Projects 2 and 3.

Wednesday

Project 2 Genre Draft

Friday

Project 2: Genre Example

Week

13

Multimodal Guides

Bloom’s Taxonomy

11/13/2017

to

11/17/2017

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Video: Bloom’s Taxonomy for Teacher’s (Revised)

Presentation Prep: A rough draft of your how-to, for feedback.

How do we teach someone “how” to do something?

Presentations: Talk us through your genre.

Wednesday

Presentation Prep

Presentations: Talk us through your genre.

Friday

Project 2: Genre Example plus Multimedia How-To

Week

14

Thanksgiving

11/20/2017

to

11/24/2017

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

“Catch-up” Day – TBA

Wednesday

Thanksgiving Break: No Class

Friday

Week

15

Metacognition: Proof of Learning

11/27/2017

to

12/3/2017

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

List of five new writing lessons you’ve learned this semester.

List of 5-10 examples from your writing this semester.

Arranging a learning narrative.

Wednesday

Rough Draft: What I’ve Learned (500 words)

Workshop: What I’ve Learned

Friday

Project 3: What I’ve Learned (750 words)

Week

16

Curating Evidence

Final Portfolio

12/4/2017

to

12/8/2017

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Collected quotes from all your work this semester, arranged to fit with your What I’ve Learned narrative.

Any extensions on Project 3 Portfolio must be requested by Wednesday.

Wednesday

Final Day of the Semester

Friday

Project 3 Due: 2,500 words

Week

17

12/11/2017

to

12/15/2017

Readings/Assignments

In-Class Activities

Monday

Finals Week

Wednesday