English/Language Arts 9                                                                                Page  of

Units:

Unit 1 - Finding Common Ground

Unit 2 - The Struggle for Freedom

Unit 3 - Sweet Sorrow

Unit 4 - Heroes & Quests



Unit Title

Unit 1 - Finding Common Ground

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

“We may have different religions, different languages, different colored skin, but we all belong to one human race.” – Kofi Annan

In this unit, students will be examining topics such as society, culture, community, tolerance, and acceptance by closely analyzing narrative, informational, documentaries, and seminal texts. Students will use informational texts, literary selections for the unit, and literature circle books to create both personal and world inquiry-based questions. The inquiry-based essay as well as argumentative writing will be the focused writing for this unit.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How does an individual struggle to be part of a society?
  • What is an individual’s role in society?
  • How does a nation unite for a common cause?
  • How can people learn to live together?
  • How can symbols/images convey ideas about the individual’s role in society?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • How and why we interact in certain ways with other people-family, enemies, neighbors, strangers, and those with whom we disagree.
  • It is important to recognize the influence of others on our identity.
  • The individual and society- from the individual’s struggle to be a party of a society to a nation’s struggle to unite for a common cause.  

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • How to evaluate an argument
  • Various text structures
  • How to make inferences
  • How to cite textual evidence to support analysis
  • Story elements and complex characters, theme, tone, structure, character motivation, and word choice
  • How to analyze media
  • Vocabulary in context
  • How to analyze historical documents & speeches
  • Steps involved in creating an inquiry based essay and implementation of these steps into an essay
  • How to recognize author’s purpose
  • Rhetorical devices and their impact on a text
  • Elements of an inquiry based/ argumentative essay, such as a claim, reasons, evidence

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Analyze and evaluate an author’s claim and delineate and evaluate an argument
  • Analyze author’s choices concerning text structure
  • Determine and support inferences about theme
  • Cite text evidence to support analysis of text
  • Determine a central idea and analyze its development over the course of a text
  • Analyze an author’s purpose and use of rhetorical devices in a Seminal U.S. document
  • Analyze the representation of a subject in two different mediums
  • Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
  • Engage effectively in collaborative discussions
  • Write an argumentative essay

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Quizzes
  • Reader Response Journals
  • Extend the Ending Writing Prompt/Original Fairytale
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, Let’sRecap, etc.
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Exit Tickets
  • Literature Circle Log

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Short Story Assessment
  • Inquiry-based Argumentative Essay
  • Inquiry-based Synthesis Project for Literature Circles
  • Benchmark Assessment 1

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of project or essay topics and/or presentation methods

Learning Activities

Short Stories:

  • View and discuss Disney’s short film “Feast” to build background for POV and/or Listen to and annotate “Calvary” by Mandolin Orange song to build background on speaker (establishing POV)  -Add 2 more song options for student choice
  • Supplemental Resource: -Flocabulary POV (Youtube)
  • Read short stories and/or listen to audio of text
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8  (Model and practice collection features such as highlighting, notes, etc.)
  • Graphic organizer: Making Inferences (use Google App, Mindmapping, or Padlet) CRP11 (use for unit opener)
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12  (Students assume a variety of roles/tasks and have accountability with teacher designed or group-authored rubrics) & Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity, Learning Stations) CRP12/ Differentiated group work
    Example:
    http://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/4-strategies-implementing-learning-stations-classroom/

  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Quizlet, Visuwords, Google Slides (students illustrate and exemplify word meanings), Word Splash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed
  • Writing Activity: Passage Link & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.12.A.2, CRP2
  • Example: Close Reading “Night Calls”
    https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1trRcetidEnudfLw0566mIJMP417wkXLTIvvJgxhTEJ8/edit?usp=sharing

  • Close reading screencasts & modeled discussions (Student creation of these through written script or audio [Audacity: Create audio files to share online or Vocaroo and Screencastify.) Recap.com is another resource.  8.1.12.A.1, CRP11, CRP4
  • Google Forms comprehension checks (use to analyze and share student data and reflect on/redirect instruction)
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need (used mainly in Supplemental English/differentiation)
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening

Informational:

  • Intro Placemat Activity: “Four Facets of The American Story”
    https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1TPN9zgKmRpcVAS5SQ2SstZapg5jZlzaEOEexCw_azNM/edit?usp=sharing
  • Sample Activities: One Sentence Summaries per paragraph, discussion questions, Poll Everywhere, Padlet, Exit tickets
  • Read informational texts/ listen to audio of text
  • Annotate and complete argumentative skeleton
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, self-assessments, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Graphic Organizer: Claim, Support or Evidence (use Google App, Mindmapping, or Padlet) CRP11
  • Writing Activity (practice/support grade): Argument  8.1.12.A.2, CRP2, CRP4
  • (On-Demand Assignment to Assess Student Strengths/Weaknesses in Argument Writing)
  • Using what you have learned about how to develop an argument, write and support a claim about a positive aspect of your school or community using Google Docs.
  • Think about something you feel is an important, positive feature of your school or community.  Write a claim about it.
  • Make notes about the reasons that support your claim.  Then collect evidence that supports your reasons.  Consider an opposing claim and list valid counterarguments.
  • Write the draft of your argument.  Work carefully to present your reasons and evidence in a logical order.
  • Revise your draft to eliminate unrelated or illogical evidence.  Check your work to make sure you have used to conventions of standard English.

  • Collaborative discussions CRP12  (One sentence summary groups) & Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity (see near “Quilt”), Learning Stations) CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Quizlet, Visuwords, Google Slides (students illustrate and exemplify word meanings), Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need

Speeches:

  • Read informational texts/view accompanying videos/listen to audio of text
  • Video HISTORY Channel: The Gettysburg Address: A New Declaration of Independence
  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, self-assessments, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Student created graphic organizers: Author’s purpose, Rhetoric, Central Idea/Details (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) CRP11
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12 & Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity, Learning Stations) CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, Quizlet, Visuwords, Google Slides with word illustrations/audio, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • Speaking Activity:Discussion (for “Rituals of Memory”) CRP4
  • In her essay, Blaeser lists a few mementoes that are linked to memorable events in her life.  What connections can you make between objects and memories?  Share your reflections in a group discussion.
    1.  Collect two keepsakes or souvenirs that represent meaningful events from your life, events that you are willing to discuss.  Make notes on how these objects serve as reminders and why the events are important to you.  Using your notes and the mementoes (if possible), share your objects, describe your events, and explain their significance.
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking

Photo Essay & Poem:

  • Close Reading of Poem CRP8
  • Analyzing Text & Media Questions CRP8
  • Video HISTORY Channel: Remembering Fallen Friends
  • Media Activity: Reflection
  • Choose between two mediums (A or B) to express ideas about the value of war memorials. CRP4, CRP11
  • Think about the ideas expressed in the poem and the photo essay.  Draw a picture or create digital art to express similar ideas.  Then, write a short description of the difference between what a drawing can express as compared to a photograph or poem.
  • Work with a partner to produce a short video interviewing classmates and teachers about the memorial.  Include a final scene in which you and your partner discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using film to capture emotions about the memorial.

Literature Circle:

  • Reflection Log
  • Resource: Literature Circles: Voice and Choice in Book Clubs & Reading Groups by Harvey Daniels, Mini-Lessons for Literature Circles by Daniels & Steinke
  • Reading Conferences

Argument Writing:

  • Read and analyze mentor texts (Step 1 in Performance Assessment Book)
  • Read and analyze sources
  • Discuss with partner
  • Mini-lessons on creating an argument & citations, using parenthetical citations, purpose of a Works Cited Page, and evaluating sources CRP7
  • Prewriting & organization charts (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) CRP11
  • Conferencing with teacher
  • Peer reviews on Google Classroom CRP12, 8.1.12.A.3
  • Mini-lessons on argument writing process and skills and conventions of standard English (see Purdue Owl Writing Lab Online and my.hrw.com)

Inquiry:

(Can be group project via Lit Circle groups)

  • Create an inquiry-based question inspired by pieces read, discussions, and themes addressed throughout the marking period – OR- Create a synthesis project that uses texts from the unit to address the unit theme
  • Conduct research to answer and support created inquiry. CRP7
  • Create a document that answers and provides evidence and reasoning for inquiry complete with a MLA works cited page. 8.1.12.D.1, CRP7
  • Create a video, Google slide, or other presentation mode of student choosing to present to the class introducing inquiry, providing evidence, and explaining reasoning behind stance on the inquiry, explanation of POV, and the relation to marking period connection. 8.1.12.A.1,2 CRP7
  • Peer review using Google Classroom 8.1.12.A.3

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Argument by Anna Quindlen, “A Quilt of a Country”

Blog by Eboo Patel, “Making the Future Better Together”

Short Story by Nadine Gordimer, “Once Upon a Time” (recommended for advanced readers due to high Lexile level; modifications needed)

Short Story by Lisa Fugard, “Night Calls”

Essay by Kimberly M. Blaeser, “Rituals of Memory”  (recommended for advanced readers due to high Lexile level; modifications needed)

Speech by Abraham Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address (Video HISTORY Channel: The Gettysburg Address: A New Declaration of Independence)

Newsela.com: Speech by Abraham Lincoln, Second Inaugural Address: https://newsela.com/articles/speeches-lincoln-second-inaugral/id/18205/

Speech by Bill Clinton, Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address

Optional:

Photo Essay, “Views of the Wall” (Video HISTORY Channel: Remembering Fallen Friends), Poem by Alberto Rios, “The Vietnam Wall”

Literature Circle Novels:

Finding Miracles by Julia Alvarez

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Honors) by Betty Smith

Saving Red by Sonya Sones

All We Have Left by Wendy Mills

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazine, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180468-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-9

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. 

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

RI.9-10.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view or purpose.

RL.9-10.6:

  • Recognize and understand a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text from outside the United States
  • Read multiple texts from world literature
  • Analyze how a particular point of view or cultural experience is reflected in a text
  • Analyze how culture impacts a particular point of view

RI.9-10.6:

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance the purpose
  • Identify rhetorical devices and text structures that advance the purpose of the piece

RI.9-10.7. Analyze various perspectives as presented in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.

  • Evaluate the similarities and differences between various accounts of a subject are told in multiple different mediums
  • Critically examine how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message

RI.9-10.8. Describe and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning an author uses is logical/ legitimate and if the evidence that is used is relevant to the argument or provides enough proof
  • Pinpoint any statements that are false and judge if any of the author’s reasoning is misleading.
  • Understand what a reliable source is and what makes one questionable

RI.9-10.9. Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) documents of historical and literary significance, (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, etc.), including how they relate in terms of themes and significant concepts.

  • Study and evaluate influential U.S. documents
  • Evaluate the theme and significant concepts as these are relevant to the historical context and background knowledge

W.9-10.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.9-10.1.A. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

W.9-10.1.B. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims avoiding common logical fallacies, propaganda devices, and using sound reasoning, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

W.9-10.1.C. Use transitions (e.g. words, phrases, clauses) to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

W.9-10.1.D. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.9-10.1.E. Provide a concluding paragraph or section that supports the argument presented.

  • Understand how much evidence is needed to satisfactorily support a point
  • Learn how to introduce argument(s) clearly and accurately with regard to counterclaims
  • Structure arguments so that there is an association and correlation between the claim(s), counterclaim(s), reasons, and evidence
  • Treat claims and counterclaims equitably taking into account what their audience knows as well as what concerns they might have
  • Develop unity and consistency in the essay  with words and structure, paying attention to the relationships created between the claims, counterclaims, evidence, and reason
  • Maintain an appropriate style and tone for the task – omitting personal bias
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding statement that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Determine how many facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information are needed        
  • Use text evidence to develop analysis and enhance content of argument

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.7. (Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally), evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

  • Listen to and evaluate multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media
  • Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source

SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any false reasoning or distorted evidence.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Identify false statements or evidence, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Move from passive listener to active participant

SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically. The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

  • Formulate a clear and concise perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.9-10.5.  Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.9-10.6.  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

  • Adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose
  • Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English as necessary

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

L.9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media:  Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme through various artistic mediums, including a photo essay.

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers, such as The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln and the Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address.

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel



Unit Title

Unit 2 - The Struggle for Freedom

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

 “If there is no struggle, there is no progress.” – Frederick Douglass

In this collection, students will explore themes revolving around “The Struggle for Freedom.” The unit will include literary and informational texts about historical and modern figures who sacrificed their lives to help create a better world, a world that consists of freedom for all people. Students will also read To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Should freedom be given or must it be demanded?
  • Can we value freedom if we haven’t fought for it?
  • How have people from around the world acheived social justice and won freedom from oppression?
  • What is the essence of freedom and why is it valuable?

To Kill a Mockingbird

  • What factors influence our moral growth? What kinds of experiences help us learn how to judge right from wrong?
  • What are the consequences of prejudice and injustice, and how does an individual’s response to them reveal his/her true character?
  • What are stereotypes, and how do they affect how we see ourselves and how others see us?
  • How does knowing more about the period in history in which a novel is set help you understand the characters and the choices they make?
  • What is justice? What roles do laws and individuals play in creating a just society?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The universal desire for freedom around the world.
  • What constitutes true freedom.
  • Throughout history, people have won their freedom from oppression around the world.

To Kill a Mockingbird

  • The relationship between the individual and society greatly influences one’s identity. Individuals seek to define their identities both within and in opposition to their society’s moral universe.
  • Prejudice, injustice, and stereotypes are harmful to the individual and society as a whole.
  • Examining the changes in the characters and setting of a work of fiction help us better understand the relationship between human behavior and social change in our society.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • How to analyze a seminal U.S. document
  • Rhetorical devices and their impact on a text
  • How to compare/contrast events and accounts in different mediums
  • Word choice & tone and their influence on a text
  • How to determine an author’s point of view
  • How to analyze why an author makes certain choices about style and structure of a text
  • The purpose of informational/explanatory essay
  • How to write an informational/explanatory essay

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Analyze a seminal U.S. document and the impact of its rhetoric
  • Analyze connections between ideas and events and analyze accounts in different mediums
  • Analyze how an author unfolds events in a diary and analyze the impact of word choice on tone
  • Determine author’s point of view and analyze accounts in different mediums
  • Analyze an author’s point of view and cultural background
  • Analyze an author’s choices about style and structure
  • Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
  • Engage effectively in collaborative discussions
  • Write an informational/explanatory essay

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Placemat activity
  • Graphic organizers
  • Analyzing text questions
  • Journal writing/Diary entry writing
  • Graphic frame visual representation
  • Blogging
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, Let’sRecap, etc.
  • Exit Tickets
  • Quizzes

Summative/ Benchmark

  • I Have a Dream/ “Nobody Turn Me Around” Assessment
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Assessment
  • Informational/Explanatory Essay or Project
  • Benchmark Assessment 2

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of essay topics or project presentation

Learning Activities

Speeches by Martin Luther King, Jr. & Robert Kennedy/History Writing:

  • Graphic Organizer Ideas: Rhetorical Devices (Repetition, Parallelism, Extended Metaphor) (use Google App, Mindmapping, or Padlet) CRP11
  • On-Demand Writing Activity: Analysis (I Have a Dream)
  • In unit 1, you read another seminal US speech, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address.  Compare the ideas in Lincoln’s speech to “I Have a Dream.”  Using Google Docs, write a one- to two—page analysis in which you compare how Lincoln and King address the theme of freedom.
  • Identify each speaker’s purpose.
  • Evaluate how the idea of freedom is articulated in each speech.
  • Give examples of how each speaker uses rhetorical devices to achieve his purpose.
  • Use the conventions of standard English. 8.1.12.A.2, CRP4, CRP8

  • On-Demand Writing Activity: Account
  • Imagine that you were in the audience for King’s speech, and using Google Docs write a one-page first-person account of your experience.
  • Gather information and impressions about the event from both the history text and the video.
  • Consider how you would respond in that situation, and write a one-page letter or diary entry.
  • Be sure to include specific details that convey the atmosphere in the Mall.
  • Use the conventions of standard written English. 8.1.12.A.2, CRP4, CRP6

  • Read and/or listen to audio of text
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12 & Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity, Learning Stations) CRP12/ Differentiated group work

Example: http://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/4-strategies-implementing-learning-stations-classroom/

  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • “I Dream Too” Mad-Lib type speech using sections of MLK’s speech  (What is your dream for your school, America, or the world?)
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, Quizlet, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed
  • Close reading screencasts & modeled discussions (Student creation of these through written script or audio [Audacity: Create audio files to share online.) 8.1.12.A.1, CRP11, CRP4
  • Example: Paired Screencast MLK https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1uUJVM1YTvewPvxH2BYSL3qxzW1UsxmCxj9_Gg192xTY/edit?usp=sharing

  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking

Diary

  • Read diary and/or listen to audio of text
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Example: Active Reading Strategies for Cairo: https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1BGIA3ykcDNot1naTMWQZvPx3ePYIlEfsYQM4v3702uo/edit?usp=sharing

  • Graphic organizer: Word Choice/Tone (use Google App, Mindmapping, or Padlet) CRP11
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Example: Diary Writing Assignment (secondary) https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1k5YGPjgH1BA00LSL-xttl3d6LwglP4PH2uHJFC7xshM/edit?usp=sharing

Short Stories/Memoir/Graphic Novel

  • Media Activity: Graphic Novel
  • Imagine that Nafisi had written her memoir in the form of a graphic novel.  How would she have integrated graphics and rhetoric?
  • Using a computer or poster board and pencil, create a series of graphic novel panels that follow Sanaz as she leaves the author’s home. Technology ideas: Storyboardthat.com, BitStrips.com, and similar websites
  • Add captions and speech and thought bubbles, including details from the memoir that you think advance the story.
  • In a small group, compare your graphic representations of Nafisi’s memoir.  Discuss whether you were able to convey the same ideas and point of view through graphics as Nafisi was able to convey in her memoir.  Was your use of rhetoric in your graphic representation as effective as Nafisi’s in her memoir?  CRP6, CRP11
  • Sample Assignment (Secondary 3): https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1JQYwoDDYXfESP09D7fBNPZ7uUUaePYwf4T6zxrlXBZs/edit?usp=sharing

  • Collaborative discussions CRP12 & Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity, Learning Stations) CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking
  • Graphic Organizers: Author’s Choices (pacing, foreshadowing, irony)
  • Analysis Questions Censors: https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1bMhvz8lw95o3nD7toFzZBw_vKos6Lsck5UH0G51vKqA/edit?usp=sharing
  • On-Demand Writing Activity: Letter (“The Censors”)
  • Juan’s letter to Mariana is central to this story’s plot.  Explore that letter through two brief writing tasks.  In both pieces of writing, include evidence from the text and use the conventions of standard English. CRP4, CRP6

  • “The Censors” Activity
  • Short research project and small group discussion/debate:
  • Compare and contrast policies on filtering and censorship both locally and globally.
  • Sample Activity: Censorship on the Internet may differ in other states and/or countries. Read and research How Internet Censorship Actually Works in China. Compare and contrast policies and their impacts on cultures and values. Write an argument that supports your perspective or engage in a class debate on this issue using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. W.9-10.1&7, SL.9-10.3, 8.1.12.D.3, CRP7

  • The Prisoner Assignments:

Writing Activity: Informational/Explanatory Essay

  • Mini-Lessons & Use of Mentor Texts (Resource: *Kelly Gallagher’s Write Like This)
  • Summarize informational texts, highlighting main claim and organizing evidence
  • Conduct research of a topic of addressing revolution, human rights violation, or seeking political or social freedom  8.1.12.D.1, 8.1.12.E.1, CRP7, CRP11
  • Synthesize various works by common goals and themes
  • (Honors) Complete informational essay skeleton, outline, notecards, and rough and final drafts utilizing Google docs to conduct peer editing and teacher-led editing sessions
  • *Other Levels can choose to turn this into a digital project with student choice of presentation mode or complete an essay as well

  • Mini-lessons on writing a informative/explanatory essay & citations (bibme.org, easybib.org, etc)
  • Prewriting & organization charts (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) CRP11
  • Conferencing with teacher
  • Peer reviews 8.1.12.A.3, CRP12
  • Mini-lessons on writing process and skills and conventions of standard English (see Purdue Owl Writing Lab Online and my.hrw.com)
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Writing/Language
  • Example (This is in a format that models the process of a Research Simulation Task): https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1FI7EOD0vDR87zJ7gscILWJT6xq6X1ubJBj6Ml0h_XA8/edit?usp=sharing

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

  • Resource: https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/publications/Teaching_Mockingbird.pdf
  • Novel: To Kill a Mockingbird, Newsela.com Text Set: https://newsela.com/text-sets/7674/books--to-kill,
  • Resource from the New York Times with Informational Texts: http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/27/50-years-of-to-kill-a-mockingbird/
  • Using Informational Text to Teach To Kill a Mockingbird, by Audrey Fisch and Susan Chenelle (found in IS Office)

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Speech by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., “I Have a Dream”

●        Songs: by Old Crow Medicine Show, “Motel in Memphis”,

Speech by Robert F. Kennedy, “A Eulogy for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.”

●        Video HISTORY Channel: Class of the 20th Century: 1963-1968

History Writing by Charles Euchner, from Nobody Turn Me Around: A People’s History of the 1963 March on Washington

●        Video HISTORY Channel: AMERICA: The Story of Us: March on Washington

Diary by Ahdaf Soueif, from Cairo: My City, Our Revolution

Memoir by Azar Nafisi, from Reading Lolita in Tehran

Graphic Novel by Marjane Satrapi, from Persepolis 2

Short Story by Luisa Valenzuela, “The Censors”

Short Story by Bessie Head, “The Prisoner Who Wore Glasses”

Novel: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazines, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180468-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-9

Resource: https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/publications/Teaching_Mockingbird.pdf

Newsela.com Text Set: https://newsela.com/text-sets/7674/books--to-kill

Resource from the New York Times with Informational Texts: http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/27/50-years-of-to-kill-a-mockingbird/

Using Informational Text to Teach To Kill a Mockingbird, by Audrey Fisch and Susan Chenelle (found in IS Office)

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RI.9-10.3:                                                         

  • Understand the relationship between a series of ideas or events that are connected
  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of how a series of ideas or events are connected and contribute to meaning
  • Analyze how the author presents the ideas or events and how the ideas are introduced, sequenced, and developed to contribute to the overall purpose of the text
  • Identify and analyze word choice  that comprise a series of events or ideas and how these key words advance the tension or events

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

RI.9-10.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view or purpose.

RL.9-10.6:

  • Recognize and understand a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text from outside the United States
  • Read multiple texts from world literature
  • Analyze how a particular point of view or cultural experience is reflected in a text
  • Analyze how culture impacts a particular point of view

RI.9-10.6:

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance the purpose
  • Identify rhetorical devices and text structures that advance the purpose of the piece

RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each work (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

RI.9-10.7. Analyze various perspectives as presented in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.

  • Evaluate the similarities and differences between various accounts of a subject are told in multiple different mediums
  • Critically examine how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message

RI.9-10.9. Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) documents of historical and literary significance, (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, etc.), including how they relate in terms of themes and significant concepts.

•        Study and evaluate influential U.S. documents

•        Evaluate the theme and significant concepts as these are relevant to the historical context and background knowledge

W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2.B. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2.C. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

W.9-10.2.E. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • Develop a strong formal style appropriate for the task
  • Maintain a tone that is free of bias
  • Integrate multimedia when appropriate and effective
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding paragraph or section that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone                        
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Incorporate facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information as needed

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally), evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

•        Listen to and evaluate multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media

•        Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source

SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically. The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

  • Formulate a clear and concise perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.9-10.5.  Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

L.9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media:  Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme through various mediums, such as video and graphic novels.

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech, videos and informational texts on the March on Washington, and personal accounts from around the world.

Current Events:  Students will connect the unit theme with various informational texts and current events.

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

8.1.12.D.3  Compare and contrast policies on filtering and censorship both locally and globally

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel



Unit Title

Unit 3 - Sweet Sorrow

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

“Love is the greatest intangible.” – Diane Ackerman

In this unit, students will interact with a variety of literary and informational texts on the unit theme, “Sweet Sorrow,” including William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Romeo & Juliet. Students will work on narrative writing and literary analysis.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What are the attributes and characteristics of love?
  • How does age shape our perception of love?
  • Is it necessary to maintain a balance between emotion and reason?
  • How do relationships shape values, actions, and lives?
  • Should loyalty to family take precedence over all other aspects of life?
  • What role does fate play in our lives?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The nature of love and the conflicts surrounding it
  • How age shapes our perception of love and how family and relationships shape our values and actions

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • How a modern artist draws on source material
  • Character motivations and parallel plots
  • Author’s point of view and effects of point of view on a text
  • How to determine author’s purpose
  • How to write narratives
  • How to write literary analysis essay
  • Effective research techniques and citation methods

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Analyze ideas presented in an essay and determine word meanings
  • Analyze how a modern artist draws on and transforms source material for a new artistic expression
  • Analyze character motivations and parallel plots
  • Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material and how an author’s choice of point of view creates desired effects
  • Determine a central idea and analyze its development over the course of a text
  • Analyze an author’s purpose
  • Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
  • Engage effectively in collaborative discussions
  • Write narratives
  • Write informative/explanatory essay (literary analysis)
  • Create an inquiry project

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Placemat activity
  • Graphic organizers
  • Analyzing text questions
  • Informal writing
  • Graphic frame visual representation
  • Blogging
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, Let’sRecap, etc.
  • Exit Tickets
  • Quizzes

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Narrative Essay (Storybird or Write the World)
  • Romeo and Juliet Assessment
  • Literary Analysis Essay
  • Benchmark Assessment 3

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of writing topics

Learning Activities

  • “Love’s Vocabulary” Speaking Activity: Discussion CRP4, CRP8
  • Does Ackerman provide convincing evidence that, as a nation, “we are embarrassed by love”?
  • Form groups of four students and discuss these questions:  Why does Ackerman say we are embarrassed by love or inhibited about it?  What evidence does she cite?  Does Ackerman herself find love embarrassing?  Cite examples from the text.
  • As a group, write a one-page summary of your discussion.

Romeo & Juliet

  • With a partner, students engage in short research on a question they have relating to issues/themes in the play. (examples: parent relationships, fueds, love, etc.)
  • Students develop questions, explore, research, and write/create a project that addresses their questions.
  • Projects can be shared on class blog or slides/ presented/ debated if students take opposing sides of an issue.
  • For more information about steps in inquiry projects:  See the following text available in IS office: Comprehension & Collaboration
  • 8.1.12.A.1,2,3, 8.1.12.D.1, 8.1.8.E.1, F.1 CRP4, CRP7, CRP8, CRP11, CRP12

  • Informational Text Summaries
  • Act I Speaking Activity: Discussion
  • In Romeo and Juliet, characters are motivated by passion and strong emotions.
  • Notice that throughout Act I, Shakespeare contrasts themes of love and hate through characters’ words and actions.
  • Work with a partner to identify passages that express love or hate.  Read the passages aloud with your partner and read with feeling to express the emotions that underlie the words.
  • Discuss what dramatic effect Shakespeare creates by pairing these two emotions in the first act of the play.
  • Write a summary that outlines the main points of your discussion. CRP4, CRP8
  • Example: 60 Second Shakespeare III, i: https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1TOYMElZFNv7NSlKJTmSeDDcEFIpc1rQIhOR4o1pWbp8/edit?usp=sharing

  • Act II Speaking Activity: Debate
  • Both Friar Laurence and Mercutio have personal attributes that put them at odds with Romeo’s passion.  Analyze their differences and hold a debate in which each character presents his point of view.
  • Working with two other students, discuss the characteristics and motivations of Friar Laurence, Mercutio, and Romeo.  What differences do these three demonstrate in Act II?
  • With each person in your group taking the point of view of one of these characters, debate Romeo’s plan to marry Juliet.
  • Write a summary of your debate. CRP4, CRP8

  • Act III Writing Activity: Journal Entries CRP4, CRP6
  • Use two brief writing tasks to explore the parallel feelings of despair Romeo and Juliet feel in Act III.  Base both pieces on evidence from the text.
  •  Write a one page journal entry from the point of view of Juliet when she learns of the death of Tybalt.
  • Write a one page journal entry from the point of view of Romeo when he is at the Friar’s cell awaiting exile.

  • Act IV Speaking & Writing Activity: Dramatic Reading & Letter CRP4, CRP6
  • Explore through reading and writing the plan devised by Friar Laurence to fool Juliet’s family.
  • In a small group, real aloud Scene 4 and Scene 5 (lines 1-21) of Act IV.
  • Listen for the excitement expressed by the characters in Scene 4.  Contrast this with their grief in Scene 5.
  • Think about what Juliet might say to her family to explain her actions.  Work together to write a letter from Juliet in which she explains why she felt she had no other options.

  • Act V Writing Activity: Eulogy CRP4, CRP6
  • Use your knowledge of Romeo and Juliet to write a eulogy, a tribute to someone who has died, for both of them. With a partner, brainstorm important details about their lives and relationship.  Think about their motivations, how they fell in love, the challenges they faced, and how they changed each other. Ground your ideas in details from the play.

“Pyramus & Thisbe”

  • Graphic Organizer: Comparison
  • On-Demand Writing Activity (Support) (“Pyramus and Thisbe”):
  • Write a comparison of “Pyramus and Thisbe” and Romeo and Juliet
  • Consider the fact that Romeo and Juliet is a play, while “Pyramus and Thisbe” is a narrative poem.
  • Compare and contrast the play and the narrative poem in terms of plot, conflict, and characters.
  • Consider how the genre of each text affects these elements.
  • Review your writing with a partner and revise for standard English grammar and usage. 8.1.12.A.2, CRP4, CRP8

  • Writing Activity: Journal Entries (“Duty”) CRP4, CRP6
  • Use characters from Romeo and Juliet, as presented in “Duty” to explore how point of view can be used to transform source material.  In both pieces, include evidence from the text and use the conventions of standard English.
  • In the character of Lady Capulet, create a journal entry in which she delivers her opinions on the responsibilities of children to their parents and their families.
  • In the character of Juliet’s nurse, create another journal entry in which the nurse delivers her opinion on how Lady Capulet raised her daughter, Juliet.

Honors: Romeo & Juliet/West Side Story Compare/Contrast Analysis Project

Activities (w/Integration of Technology):

  • Read and/or listen to audio of text.
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Character Analysis, Parallel Plots/Tension (Use Google Map, Mindmapping or Padlet CRP11
  • Collaborative Discussions CRP12 & Cooperative Group work (Placemats etc.)
  • Differentiated Group work: http://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/4-strategies-implementing-learning-stations-classroom/
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed.
  • Writing Activity: Passage Link & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.12.A.2 CRP2
  • Close reading screencasts and modeled discussions
  • Level Up Tutorials

Writing:

  • Mini-Lessons (Literary Analysis & Narrative: Dialogue construction, plot design, imagery, characterization, conflict, and figurative language) & Use of Mentor Texts
  • Conduct research of topic that presents an original and inspired creation or adaptation CRP7
  • Complete a narrative outline, and rough and final drafts utilizing Google docs to conduct peer editing and teacher-led editing sessions
  • Compose essay on topic of choice
  • Peer Review & Teacher Conferences (Utilize Google Classroom to view 3 peer narrative pieces. 8.1.12.A.3)
  • Resource: *Kelly Gallagher’s Write Like This
  • Narrative Planning Sheet: https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/1z7R_XRjwNwS_tHYeFQ_pKHJ84Gopr0qNnOsAqxRi1Tk/edit?usp=sharing
  • Narrative Writing Resources Doc: https://docs.google.com/a/gatewayhs.com/document/d/16XQ8WwZrxXk8w5PJvIjrSunaEydFOEbBoUCWgXXjaN0/edit?usp=sharing
  • Sp.Ed: Synthesis Project- Create a synthesis project (comic) that uses texts from the unit to address the unit theme (primary)

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Essay by Diane Ackerman, “Love’s Vocabulary” from A Natural History of Love

Instructional Text, “Shakespearean Drama”

Drama by William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet (Video BIO Channel: Biography: William Shakespeare)

Poem and Video by Kate Tempest, “My Shakespeare”

Myth Retold by Ovid, “Pyramus and Thisbe” from the Metamorphoses

Short Story by Pamela Rafael Berkman, “Duty”

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazines, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180468-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-9

Newsela.com Text Set: “Romeo and Juliet” by William Shakespeare
https://newsela.com/text-sets/9216/books--romeo-juliet

Supplementary Resources from Commonlit.org
https://www.commonlit.org/texts/excerpts-from-romeo-and-juliet/paired-texts
“Adolescence and the Teenage Crush”
“Teaching Shakespeare in a Maximum Security Prison”
“Sonnet 43” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Informational Text Resources from The New York Times:

“Anti-Love Drug May Be Ticket to Bliss”

“Room for Debate | When Do Kids Become Adults”

“The Brain on Love”

“Love and Pain Relief”

Learning Network Resources: Teaching Shakespeare with The New York Times

All You Need Is Love - Learning About Famous Couples Through History

More Resources

The Folger Shakespeare Library | Teaching Romeo and Juliet

Shaking Up Shakespeare: Reaching the Shakespeare-Averse With Adaptations

Frontline | Inside the Teenage Brain

Psychology Today | Taking Words Seriously – Romeo and Juliet Are Troubled Kids

NPR | The Teen Brain: It’s Just Not Grown Up Yet

Films

Romeo and Juliet, West Side Story

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RI.9-10.3:                                                         

  • Understand the relationship between a series of ideas or events that are connected
  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of how a series of ideas or events are connected and contribute to meaning
  • Analyze how the author presents the ideas or events and how the ideas are introduced, sequenced, and developed to contribute to the overall purpose of the text
  • Identify and analyze word choice  that comprise a series of events or ideas and how these key words advance the tension or events

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RI.9-10.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view or purpose.

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance the purpose
  • Identify rhetorical devices and text structures that advance the purpose of the piece

RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each work (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

  • Evaluate the similarities and differences between various accounts of a subject are told in multiple different mediums
  • Critically examine how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message

RL.9-10.9. Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

•        Recognize when an author draws on and then transforms source material (such as a theme or topic) from another text

•        Understand allusions

•        Identify allusions

•        Compare and contrast use of common ideas/topics between texts or allusions within texts

W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2.B. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2.C. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

W.9-10.2.E. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • Develop a strong formal style appropriate for the task
  • Maintain a tone that is free of bias
  • Integrate multimedia when appropriate and effective
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding paragraph or section that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone                        
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Incorporate facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information as needed

W.9-10.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.9-10.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.9-10.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.9-10.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent, complete, and comprehensive piece.

W.9-10.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.9-10.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

•        Convey experiences, real or imagined

•        Use time as the deep structure of the narrative

•        Form or structure based on a progression of events that build upon each other

•        Use effective details using precise language

•        Create clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation

•        Apply narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures

•        Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.7. (Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally), evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

  • Listen to and evaluate multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media
  • Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source

SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any false reasoning or distorted evidence.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Identify false statements or evidence, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Move from passive listener to active participant

SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically. The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

  • Formulate a clear and concise perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.9-10.5.  Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.9-10.6.  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

  • Adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose
  • Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English as necessary

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media:  Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme through various mediums.

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers, including William Shakespeare and ancient myth.

Current Events/Science:  Students will connect the unit theme with various informational texts and current events, including texts relating to psychology, adolescence, and the teenage brain

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel



Unit Title

Unit 4 - Heroes & Quests

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

“If a journey doesn’t have something to teach you about yourself, then what kind of journey is it?” – Kira Salak

In this unit, students will interact with a variety of literary and informational texts on the unit theme, “Heroes & Quests.” Students will complete an independent choice reading project and will focus on literary analysis.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What makes a hero?
  • What motivates people to take arduous journeys?
  • How could a positive personality trait become a tragic flaw?
  • What is the role of fate in our lives?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • That the hero’s journey takes many forms, from traveling through forbidding places to exploring the mind.
  • That the concepts of heroism and a heroic quest or journey, as originally laid out by Homer, are applicable to modern society
  • How fate (divine intervention) and free will are concepts that transcend time and religion.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • How to cite strong and thorough text evidence to support inferences about characters & theme
  • How to determine central idea
  • How to engage in collaborative discussions
  • How to effectively present information
  • How to identify style, tone, and mood and determine impact on text
  • Write an analytical essay

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Accurately cite strong and thorough text evidence to support inferences (specifically about characters/theme)
  • Analyze representations in different mediums
  • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed
  • Produce written reflections; practice writing in a myriad of situations
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
  • Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner
  • Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in a text
  • Use provided texts to identify and use various types of phrase and clauses
  • Use author’s style, tone, mood etc… to make connections between ideas and events
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage, standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  • Create a literary analysis essay

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Placemat activity
  • Graphic organizers
  • Analyzing text questions
  • Informal writing
  • Graphic frame visual representation
  • Blogging
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, Let’sRecap, etc.
  • Exit Tickets
  • Quizzes

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Odyssey Assessments
  • Independent Reading Project (via Learning Menu)
  • Benchmark Assessment 4

Alternative Assessments

  • Learning Menu with Student Choice

Learning Activities

Activities (w/Integration of Technology):

  • Read and/or listen to audio of text.
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Character Analysis, Theme Analysis (Use Google Map, Mindmapping or Padlet CRP11
  • Collaborative Discussions CRP12 & Cooperative Group work (Placemats etc..,)
  • Differentiated Group work: http://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/4-strategies-implementing-learning-stations-classroom/
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed.
  • Writing Activity: Passage Link & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.12.A.2 CRP2
  • Close reading screencasts and modeled discussions
  • View Video HISTORY Channel: Odysseus: Curse of the Sea – Collections, Excerpts from The History Channel presents The Odyssey – Clash of the Gods (https://www.schooltube.com/video/5853891486ab4a82a579/Clash%20of%20the%20Gods%20-%20The%20Odyssey%20Pt.%201), Excerpts from the Odyssey (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S_l12WM_KM)
  • Informational Text Written Summaries & Reflections
  • Level Up Tutorials
  • The point of view in the Odyssey rarely wavers from Odysseus’ perspective.  Nevertheless, other characters’ words and actions hint at what they are thinking.  Explore the epic from another point of view through this brief writing task.
  • Narrate an event from the Odyssey from the point of view one of the following characters: Polyphemus, Circe, Eurylochus, Tiresias, Scylla, Athena, Eumaeus, Telemachus, Eurymachus, or Penelope.
  • Engage and orient the reader using techniques such as dialogue and description to set up the situation and create a smooth progression of events.
  • Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the events.
  • Short Research Project Ideas: 8.1.12.D.1, E.1, F.1 CRP7
  • Greek mythology
  • When soldiers come home from war

  • On-Demand Writing Activity: Analysis (The Cruelest Journey) 8.1.12.A.2, CRP4, CRP8
  • At first glance, you might think this selection is about travel on the Niger River, an adventure in Mali, or a long journey.  What central idea gives meaning to all the details about Salak’s adventure?
  • Write a brief essay that analyzes the central idea of this selection.  State the central idea and then use quotations and paraphrases to support your analysis.
  • Remember to follow the conventions of standard English in your writing.
  • Exchange with a partner and give feedback.  Did you both use quotation marks to indicate the author’s words?  Are your paraphrases accurate?  Does your evidence support the central idea you identified?

Writing:

  • Mini-Lessons & Use of Mentor Texts (Resource: *Kelly Gallagher’s Write Like This)
  • Prewriting & organization charts (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) CRP11
  • Conferencing with teacher
  • Peer reviews 8.1.12.A.3, CRP12
  • Mini-lessons on writing process and skills and conventions of standard English (see Purdue Owl Writing Lab Online and my.hrw.com)
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Writing/Language

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Epic Poem by Homer, from the Odyssey

●      Video HISTORY Channel: Odysseus: Curse of the Sea – Collections

●      Excerpts from The History Channel presents The Odyssey – Clash of the Gods (https://www.schooltube.com/video/5853891486ab4a82a579/Clash%20of%20the%20Gods%20-%20The%20Odyssey%20Pt.%201)

●      Excerpts from the Odyssey (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S_l12WM_KM)

 

Travel Writing by Kira Salak, from The Cruelest Journey: 600 Miles to Timbuktu

Nonfiction by David Finkel, from The Good Soldiers

 

Argument by Michael Griffin, “The Real Reasons We Explore Space”

 

Poem by Mary Oliver, “The Journey”

 

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazines, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180468-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-9

Newsela.com Informational Text Set: The Odyssey https://newsela.com/text-sets/9805/books--theodyssey-homer

https://newsela.com/text-sets/40346/el--myths-notlongago

Newela.com Informational Text Set: Heroes in History https://newsela.com/text-sets/17360/ss--heroes-history

Film:  Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?

 

Supplemental Resources from The New York Times

Related Times Articles

“Back From War, but Not Really Home”
Article about the sense of dislocation that has been shared by veterans returning from war since Homer conjured Odysseus’ inauspicious return some 2,800 years ago.

“Homecoming of Odysseus May Have Been in Eclipse”
Science article about a scientific theory that astronomical references in the epic correlate with real historical events.

“A Long, Strange Trip”
A British classics professor traces the lengthy shadow Homer’s “Odyssey” casts across Western culture.

“Across America, Deadly Echoes of Foreign Battles”
Article from the War Torn series that places “the troubles and exploits of the returning war veteran” into a larger context, including making a connection to Homer.

“The Zeus Trip”
Travel article on a family trip to Greece.

“Odysseus Unplugged”
Article on a radio play version of “The Odyssey” by a fiction writer.

“With Crews and Zoos, a B-Boy World”
Report from the Edinburgh Fringe Festival on a dance by South Korean break dancers based on “The Odyssey.”

Learning Network Lesson Plans

An Ancient Odyssey

Exploring Ancient Greek Mythology and History through Geography

It’s All Greek to Us

Examining How Ancient Greece Has Influenced the Modern World

How Civilized!

Creating Internet Scavenger Hunts About Ancient Civilizations

Conquering History

Exploring the Ancient Origins of Warfare

Fighting the War in Your Head

Examining Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Military Veterans

May the Force Be With(in) You

Creating 21st Century Heroes in the Language Arts Classroom

An Ancient Odyssey

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RI.9-10.3:                                                         

  • Understand the relationship between a series of ideas or events that are connected
  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of how a series of ideas or events are connected and contribute to meaning
  • Analyze how the author presents the ideas or events and how the ideas are introduced, sequenced, and developed to contribute to the overall purpose of the text
  • Identify and analyze word choice  that comprise a series of events or ideas and how these key words advance the tension or events

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

RI.9-10.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view or purpose.

RL.9-10.6:

  • Recognize and understand a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text from outside the United States
  • Read multiple texts from world literature to analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text
  • Analyze how a particular point of view or cultural experience is reflected in a text
  • Analyze how culture impacts a particular point of view

RI.9-10.6

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance the purpose
  • Identify rhetorical devices and text structures that advance the purpose of the piece

RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each work (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

  • Evaluate the similarities and differences between various accounts of a subject are told in multiple different mediums
  • Critically examine how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message

RI.9-10.8. Describe and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning an author uses is logical/ legitimate and if the evidence that is used is relevant to the argument or provides enough proof
  • Pinpoint any statements that are false and judge if any of the author’s reasoning is misleading.
  • Understand what a reliable source is and what makes one questionable

W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2.B. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2.C. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

W.9-10.2.E. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • Develop a strong formal style appropriate for the task
  • Maintain a tone that is free of bias
  • Integrate multimedia when appropriate and effective
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding paragraph or section that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone                        
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Incorporate facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information as needed

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.7. (Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.5.  Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media:  Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme through various mediums.

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers, including ancient Greek mythology and culture.

Current Events/Science:  Students will connect the unit theme with various informational texts and current events, including heroes and exploration in science.

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel

Suggested Open Educational Resources

Reading

 

Writing & Language

Speaking & Listening

Critical Thinking

●      Blogtopia. Blogging About Your Own Utopia

●      Teaching Channel Presents. Inquiry-Based Teaching

●      Inquiry Graphic Organizer

●      Review Redux. Introducing Literary Criticism Through Reception Moments

●      Assessing Cultural Relevance. Exploring Personal Connections to a Text

●      Developing Core Proficiencies from Engage New York

●      Lessons to Use with Popular Stories

●      Lessons to Use with Anthologies

●      English Language Arts Methods. Grades 9-12 Model Lessons

●      How to Encourage Higher Order Thinking

●      Bloom's Taxonomy & Depth of Knowledge

Technology Tools for Differentiation: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ihsTwYr1kFx9Jb08Z2w5i1MWoxYkRXZbTP4Gcbodp6I/htmlview?pli=1#gid=0

www.rewordify.com

Other Helpful Resources:

www.teachingchannel.org

www.theteachertoolkit.com