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guide to fx(hash)
Updated automatically every 5 minutes

 FX(HASH) + GENART + FOMO

This guide has moved to:

https://gitbook.fxhash-userguide.xyz/

Many thanks, @webbovich77 


Contents

Contents

Introduction

Dive in

Overview

Process of buying

Useful links

Minting

Schedule

Popularity

fx(hash) - minting

Safety

fx(hash)++ - minting

Mint page

Mint settings

Safety

NFTbiker - minting

Better Call Dev - better call dev

Safety

How to use

Secondary Market

fx(hash) - secondary

Collect token

See Generative Token

See Marketplace

fx(hash)++ - secondary

Functions

Viewing and Analysing

Tezos Blockchain Explorer

TzFlow

Functions

fx(hash) marketplace

fx(hash) collectors

fx(party)

fx(sales) bot

fxhashmonitor

fxfam

masterpiece

Tender

Wallets

Hot Wallets

Temple Wallet

General

Gas fee - change speed of transaction

Kukai Wallet

General

Gas fee - change speed of transaction

Cold Wallets

Ledger

Trezor

Tips |Tools |Tricks

Ecosystem analysis

Price charts

Newsletter/Blog/Podcast/Interviews

fx(hash) [waiting to be signed]

Fix Gentk

Finding an artists collection address

Rarity

Curation

Burn a token

Burn using Temple Wallet

Burn using Kukai Wallet

Burn using Objkt

Glossary


Introduction

Dive in

Skip the details and get your hands dirty?

Overview

FX(hash) is a generative art website, using the Tezos blockchain and its native token, tez (XTC), for purchases. It minted its first token - genesis token - on 11 November 2021.

Artists can mint their generative token (gentk), defining quantity, minting cost and specific features. Buyers can then mint a unique iteration of it, known as the primary market, until sold out. From there, the gentk can be listed for sale, known as the secondary market. There is no way to offer a price to an owner, nor auction a piece; you can only buy at listed price.

Process of buying

If this is your first foray into the Tezos blockchain, the process you will need to go through is listed below. I will update and flesh this section out soon. Please send me a direct message (dm) on twitter if you need help.

  1. Open an account on a Centralized Exchange (CEX) such as Coinbase, kraken, Kucoin or Binance.
  2. Send money from your bank, to the new CEX account. If you already have crypto in your CEX, eg. Ethereum or Bitcoin, you can swap it for tez, rather than buy (step 3).
  3. Buy tez (code is XTZ) in the new CEX account, using the dollars you just sent.
  4. Create a digital wallet (see section on wallets).
  5. Send your newly purchased tez from your CEX to your new digital wallet.
  6. Open fx(hash) and sync the website to your new digital wallet.
  7. Buy art.

Useful links

I’ve chosen not to simply make the names hyperlinks as I believe it is important you see the addresses and become savvy with them. Always make sure you are on the legitimate site.

Baking Bad - https://baking-bad.org/ 

Better Call Dev - https://better-call.dev/ 

Better Call Dev - Minting page https://better-call.dev/mainnet/KT1XCoGnfupWk7Sp8536EfrxcP73LmT68Nyr/interact?entrypoint=mint 

Everytimezone - https://everytimezone.com/ 

fxfam - https://fxfam.xyz/ (add the collection number at end to see it eg. fxfam.xyz/7889)

fx(hash) - https://www.fxhash.xyz/ 

fx(hash) collectors - https://fxcollectors.stroep.nl/ (see collectors of a specific collection)

fx(hash) discord - https://discord.com/invite/wzqxfdCKCC 

fx(hash) sales bot - https://twitter.com/FxhashSalesBot?s=20 (@FxhashSalesBot)

fx(hash) link shortener - https://fxha.sh/ (not affiliated to fxhash)

fxhashmonitor - https://fxhashmonitor.xyz/ 

fx(hash)++ - multiple tools:

fx(sales) - https://fxsales.glitch.me/ (show primary and secondary sales of a wallet)

Kukai hot wallet - https://wallet.kukai.app/ 

Ledger cold wallet - https://shop.ledger.com/?r=60a19c641b93 (@zeneca_33 ref link)

NFTbiker - https://nftbiker.xyz/ 

Rarity check - https://raritycheck.xyz/ 

Temple hot wallet - https://templewallet.com/ 

Tender - https://fxtender.art/ (beautiful curation of fx(hash) collections)

Tezos Explorer Blockchain - https://tzkt.io/ 

Trezor cold wallet - https://trezor.io/ 

TzFlow: Tezos Mempool - https://tzflow.com/ 

Minting

You cannot batch mint, intentionally. It has been tried in the past and it simply makes duplicates of the work, which get flagged.

Schedule

Fx(hash) is open 24/7, 365, with one exception; releasing a new collection, also known as minting. The schedule refers to this exception.

As part of the beta period, the minting schedule is undergoing different timings to see what works best. As of Wed 12 Jan 22[1], the fx(hash) minting schedule is:

It is important to understand that an artist can only release a new collection (mint) within the open window period. Once a mint starts though, it can continue after the window closes, which was not the case early in the beta.

The current minting status (open/closed) and the time until it changes, is always shown in the top right corner of each page, in your local time zone.

A minting schedule is found under ‘community’ and defaults to your local time zone.

If you see a mint time published on social media and need to convert it, the best tool I have found is everytimezone.com. You simply slide the bar along to the time (and timezone) stated, and it will show your time, plus everyone else’s time on one page. The image below lines up with a 06:00UTC mint time. For me, it shows that it would be 5pm/17:00.

Popularity

Some mints are very popular and can sell out (mint out) in less than a minute. In these circumstances, using the fx(hash) website can be too slow. In these cases, using the fastest tool/s is paramount.

If the market believes the mint price is lower than what the secondary-market price will be, a mint can be very competitive and exhilarating. Warning - these aren’t always the feelings you have if you miss out!

fx(hash) - minting

The most common way to mint a piece of generative art from fx(hash) is to use its website. Generative art that is currently minting shows up on the front page and also in the explore section of the site. Only in some circumstances - popular mints - will you need to use a different site to mint.

Once you have found the collection you want to mint, you will see the mint icon. If it says it is locked, you may unlock it at your own discretion. See the safety section below, for more details. The process is shown in the images below.

If the top right corner of the site shows a green dot, your minting will work. If it is red, minting on the site is closed. If you try to mint, you will get a ‘Warning! Transaction is likely to fail’ alert in your wallet, like in the image above, highlighted with green ellipse.

Safety

During a mint, not everything is legitimate, with people pretending to be someone else. This can work when you see an artist’s name you want to collect and rush in, hoping to buy before they sell out, which is what the scammer preys upon.

If a generative token has just been uploaded to fx(hash), it will show a lock next to the minting button and last for one hour. You can click it to unlock - it doesn’t prevent you from minting. The idea is to warn you that the community hasn’t had time to review and, if needed, flag it. In a coming update, this will be permanently locked (for one hour) for accounts new to fx(hash) and not yet verified. This should significantly reduce scammers.

Community tools to reduce scamming focus on flagging. In the image below you can see where to flag, plus you can also see that it has been flagged and the associated warning. It is highly recommended to not buy in this case! If a gentk is flagged 10 times within an hour, it will be removed for verification by fx(hash).

fx(hash)++ - minting

Fx(hash)++ is a clean looking site that is normally fast and good for popular mints because it calls the contract directly. Like NFTbiker, it has a lot of useful functions, but as the name suggests, it is focussed on fx(hash).

Mint page

Mint individual pieces directly from a scrolling list, with the latest mint at the top. This is a common technique people utilise for minting during popular drops. Be careful; the page provides a hyperlink to the fx(hash) gentk and also to the twitter account (if one is linked). Check the links and if your spidey-senses are off, double check fx(hash) discord, or the gentk page. Users can flag the drop if there are concerns and this is a good time to take a breath. The link you require for the minting page is available in the official links section.

At times, it will struggle from high usage and show the mint slightly later than NFTbiker. Both are refreshing their feed every 30 seconds, which is how long a block takes on Tezos. At other times, fx(hash)++ will be the better option; we are still early and try them all, often.

Mint settings

You can:

Safety

As fx(hash)++ is a 3rd party site, caution must be taken. Do not assume what you see is correct; always check the link back to fx(hash). Hopefully they will have linked it to their twitter account and website. At the moment, artists are unable to authenticate their accounts, so a smart scammer will have the correct twitter and website linked.

Users have the ability to flag a collection on the minting page of the gentk, which shows up on the fx(hash)++ minting list as shown below.

NFTbiker - minting

This site is often intimidating at first glance, but holds a lot of power. Most of that power is focussed on Objkt and HEN, but still is useful for fx(hash).

At times, it will struggle from high usage and show the mint slightly later than fx(hash)++. Both are refreshing their feed every 30 seconds, which is how long a block takes on Tezos. At other times, NFTbike will be the faster option; we are still early and try them all, often.

To view the live feed for minting, you need to select ‘follow’ and then add the fx(hash) address into the ‘wallets to watch’ field; images below show where to select. The fx(hash) address is: KT1XCoGnfupWk7Sp8536EfrxcP73LmT68Nyr

Better Call Dev - better call dev

BCD is the most complicated of the minting sites, though with a few runs at it, the process becomes easier. For the additional steps, there have been cases of it being no better than fx(hash)++ and NFTbiker. Consider it a good tool to have in the kit.

Safety

Be careful. Make sure you have all the correct information and do not rush the process.

How to use

Issuer Address - This is the artist wallet address, which can be found above their name, on their fx(hash) profile page.

Issuer ID - This is the generative token number (GENTK#). The twentieth token to have been minted on fx(hash) will have an issue id of 20 (GENTK#20), and can be found above the name of the collection.

Source - This is your tezos wallet address

Amount - This is in mutez, which is: 1million to 1tez. So if you are buying a 3tez item, you would type in 3000000 (three million).

Secondary Market

At the moment, the two main places to conduct secondary sales are on fx(hash) and fx(hash)++.

fx(hash) - secondary

Select the marketplace option, then either choose the art on the main page - which defaults to listing the most recently listed art - or type in what you are searching for; artist name or collection name. It will take you to that gentk’s specific page, where details specific to it are listed, including royalties, transaction hash, art features.

Once a gentk is selected, it will give you the following options:

Collect token

Choosing this option will activate your connected wallet and ask you to confirm. It is very rare that you would need to change gas for this kind of purchase.

See Generative Token

Choosing this will take you to the collections main page, where you can see details about the entire collection. Choose this pathway if you want to see every piece from the collection; a great way to enjoy the art.

This feature allows you to see the collections broad details such as mint price, tags, and ipfs.

See Marketplace

Choosing this will take you to the collections marketplace, where only those gentk listed for sale are shown. The default view is ‘recently listed’. A popular action is to sort by price (low to high), which is shown in the bottom right corner of image below.

Information to note on this image: is how many items are for sale relative to how many were minted, how many sales (nb and tez) in the last 24hrs compared to overall, and the floor (cheapest price). Of course all information is useful, but these give a quick indication of where the art sits in the ecosystem. In the image below, you can see the last 24hrs account for only 4% of sales but 27% of tez after mint.

fx(hash)++ - secondary

The tools available on this site allow for more than buying a single item. From the main page, if you scroll down, the following functions are available to you. Direct links for each function are in the official links section.

Functions

Fx(hash)++ has the following very useful functions:

Viewing and Analysing

Tools to watch the Tezos blockchain live, set up minting alerts, view artwork in wallets, see how much your wallet is worth, and who owns what gentks, are just some of the things now available to us. As always, the best place to delve deeper with each platform is on twitter and discord.

Tools of value:

Tezos Blockchain Explorer

www

twitter

discord

donate

The Tezos Blockchain Explorer (TzKT) is a dapp created by the Baking Bad team. It is similar to other well known blockchain explorers: etherscan, snowtrace and ftmscan.

Use the explorer to view - in depth - transactions that you, and others, have made. You can easily see your sent, received and tokens transferred. It is here you can follow the life of a token, through it’s different owners.

TzFlow

www

twitter

discord

donate

With this tool, you can watch the stream of transactions on the Tezos blockchain. It is an app that displays the live Tezos mempool contents and its history as seen in a single representative node.[2]

Functions

Some useful functions are:

In the ‘entrypoint’ column, two useful terms to be aware of are:

fx(hash) marketplace

www

twitter

discord

donate

Where all the action happens and where a lot of the other tools draw their functions from. The main two ways to view on this site are:

  1. Offers - individually listed pieces of work, with most recently offered shown first (offer means the price being offered by the seller), and
  2. Collections - shows most recently minted collection first. A good way to quickly see the floor price.

Each approach can be further refined by searching via name of artist or name of collection. Individual offers, or entire collections, will show up in search, depending on which function you search within.

fx(hash) collectors

www

twitter

discord

donate

Want to see who owns the most pieces in a collection, or how many pieces of a collection are on sale? Then this site by the excellent artist Mark Knol is what you need.

fx(party)

www

twitter

discord

donate

A very clean and simple way to view all the art in your wallet. Each column is sortable, so you can sort via date purchased, price paid, floor price etc. The features currently available are:

fx(sales) bot

www

twitter

discord

donate

A twitter feed that posts any sales on fx(hash) of 500 or more tez. Well worth following.

fxhashmonitor

www

twitter

discord

donate

A site, currently in beta, to monitor data and statistics relating to the number of sales, mints, wallets, secondary sales etc on fx(hash).

The creator of the site has posted fascinating data about fx(hash) on twitter since it began. His twitter feed is worth exploring, as well.

fxfam

www

twitter

discord

donate

A rarity site, created by the excellent artist, Zancan. How to use it as a rarity tool is listed in the rarity section of this document. It is also an excellent way to very easily view an entire collection visually, and sort it as you wish: rarity, price paid, mint number etc.

masterpiece

www

twitter

discord

donate

A well known site for viewing NFTs across multiple blockchains. Fx(hash) art can be viewed here, with a clean interface, sorting functions and the ability to purchase from the site. It complements fx(party) very well.

Masterpiece has a traditional and familiar interface, especially for those familiar with a typical art gallery.

Tender

www

twitter

discord

donate

In their own words, they are showcasing carefully selected gen-art projects from fx(hash), as a service to both new and established collectors. The projects are curated for their excellence and originality.

FxTender provides two curations: mintable projects and icons. A beautiful looking site is paired with a well thought out collection of amazing art.

Wallets

Digital wallets, commonly referred to simply as a wallet, will hold your crypto money (crypto or token) and crypto art (NFT). It can easily be thought of as a bank account that can easily hold specific currencies and art. For buying and selling art on Tezos blockchain, you need to use a wallet that can use tez. The main two are Temple and Kukai, and are addressed in detail, in the Hot Wallets section, below.

Wallets are categorised as either cold or hot. A cold wallet is not connected to the internet, holding your assets in a piece of hardware. It is the safer option, but takes longer to use. A hot wallet is connected to the internet via software - usually an extension in your browser - and is much faster and easier to use, but trades off the risk of cyberattacks.

Use of wallets is as follows:

  1. NFTs and tokens (tez) that you do not plan to use in near term - store (protect) in a cold wallet.
  2. NFTs and tokens (tez) that you need to use - store in the hot wallet eg. listing an item for sale, or minting.

Hot Wallets

Temple Wallet

General

Temple is a browser-extension wallet, currently only available for use on a desktop; you cannot use it on mobile or tablet (they are working on a mobile version). It is very similar to MetaMask, so it is an easy transition for many. Some people prefer it to Kukai and some prefer Kukai. Both are very good, and are both susceptible to issues during popular mints. The jury is out on which one works better more of the time.

To download Temple, search for it in your browsers extensions. See the Temple website for how to set it up.

Temple has the ability to be kept unlocked, meaning you do not need to enter your password for every transaction. It is a useful function during a popular mint, when you need to approve transactions as fast as possible (to reduce the chance of missing out). Of course, good security dictates that you leave it locked at all other times!

Temple supports Ledger, but not Trezor, at time of writing.

Gas fee - change speed of transaction

Two main factors affect likelihood of a transaction being successful; gas price and speed of node. Both are addressed below.

Gas Price - If you want, or need, to improve the probability of a transaction being successful, you can edit the gas fee field. This is really only needed when the network is busy and you want to ensure the transaction is handled fast; like during a popular mint. In the image below, the original gas was 0.002388tz and has been edited to 0.022388tz; a 10x change. Simply select the 0 and replace with a 2, then click confirm. It doesn’t take long and can - arguably - help improve transaction success.

You cannot - currently - set a custom default gas fee on Temple, but you can set a custom gas fee if you use fxhash++ to mint or buy on secondary.

Speed of node - your wallet connects to a node (Temple refers to it as a network) to conduct its transaction, but unfortunately some nodes can become busy and slow your transaction down. To avoid the lucky-dip of what node your wallet selects, you can instead direct it to the one run by fx(hash).  This was created to bypass public node slow downs and was recently made available to the fx(hash) community. It should be faster when purchasing on fx(hash), with less slow downs. It can also be used when purchasing on objkt, versum and other tezos sites, although you may not see the speed benefits that you do when on fx(hash).

To redirect your Temple wallet to the fx(hash) node, follow the directions on the fx(hash) site. It is a simple process (unlike what it may sound like). This cannot be done on Kukai wallet at this time.

Kukai Wallet

General

Kukai is a browser wallet, which gives it the advantage of being usable on mobile devices, unlike Temple. Opening your Kukai wallet means you are opening a new tab on your browser.

It works on phones and tablets, as well as desktop. Some people prefer it to Temple and some prefer Temple. Both are very good, and are both susceptible to issues during popular mints. The jury is out on which one works better more of the time.

To open a Kukai Wallet, follow the directions for ‘create a new wallet’ on their website.

Kukai supports Ledger, but not Trezor, at time of writing.

Gas fee - change speed of transaction

If you want, or need, to improve the probability of a transaction being successful, you can edit the gas fee field. This is really only needed when the network is busy and you want to ensure the transaction is handled fast; like during a popular mint. In the image below, the original gas was 0.002527tz and has been edited to 0.022527tz; a 10x change. Simply select the 0 and replace with a 2, then click confirm. It doesn’t take long and can - arguably - help improve transaction success.

You cannot - currently - set a custom default gas fee on Kukai. You can set a custom gas fee if you use fxhash++ to mint or buy on secondary.

Cold Wallets

Ledger

Ledger is a very popular choice in the NFT space, offering the Ledger Nano S and the Nano X; the latter being the more expensive and better equipped (more storage space, bluetooth and usb-c connection). The Nano X is the recommended model.

Ledger is supported by Temple and Kukai; both still require you to plug the ledger into your computer. Neither uses bluetooth at the moment.

Please review the connection documents on the relevant wallets page, as help documents often change.

Trezor

Trezor is currently not supported by Temple or Kukai.

Tips |Tools |Tricks

Ecosystem analysis

Price charts

Two regular price guides stand out in the space, focussing on recent and long term sales, floor prices and market values. Each author provides their own insightful analysis in a thread, as part of the update. They can be found on twitter at:

Newsletter/Blog/Podcast/Interviews

These fine folk throw a wide net over this exciting space, covering; gen-art, artists, tools, tricks and the latest news. Names and twitter profiles:

fx(hash) [waiting to be signed]

This is okay, do not panic.

Each newly minted token is generated just-in-time, tagged with the appropriate metadata, and uploaded to IPFS. During the beta phase, this process - signing - is done sequentially: Each new token enters a queue for signing and is produced one token at a time. During high activity on fx(hash), the queue can fill up and the server may not be able to keep up. In that case, you might need to wait for your NFTs to fully reveal and render.[3]

As fx(hash) matures and moves out of beta, the indexer will continue to improve and process gentk’s faster. As of 18 Dec 21, the indexer has been updated, and is performing far better.

For a far more detailed description of this process, see fx(hash)’s guide to minting a gentk.[4]

Fix Gentk

If you haven’t panicked, but waited for your gentk to be signed, as per above instructions and it still isn’t showing, then try this simple tool from fx(hash).

https://www.fxhash.xyz/fix-gentk

Finding an artists collection address

To use some of the tools listed in this document, you will need the artist's collection address. It is shown above their name, on their fx(hash) profile page, but when you click on it, it will take you to the Tezos Blockchain Explorer page. See image below for what button to select.

Rarity

An artist has the option to define features within a collection when minting, which can contribute to creating a scale of rarity. Sometimes the score can be meaningless due to the variety within the collection, and some artists intentionally avoid adding features to let the artwork define itself. Some individual pieces may have very rare chances, but be less pleasing to a collector. There is no silver-bullet approach to collecting; each collection will perform relevant to its own characteristics.

Rarity is applied by fxhash as follows (from their mint-guide):

Fxhash automatically computes the rarity of a particular feature by counting the number of occurrences among all the tokens of the collection. Two feature values are considered the same if a strict equality between those returns true.[5]

Zancan created a rarity tool for his beautiful Garden, Monoliths collection and kindly showed how to use it for other collections too. Simply replace XXXX with the gentk number (excluding #), which is found on the collections main page - see image below:

You can also see most viewed and last viewed collections at https://fxfam.xyz 

Curation

In its current beta status, fx(hash) does not do curation. The philosophy of fx(hash) is to let the collector determine what is good, bad and indifferent.  There are plans to bring a version of curation, through the use of communities, including a version of governance tokens. See official links - fx(hash) proposal for the most up-to-date information.

A principle of fx(hash) is that anyone can mint and the community will organically curate, which is already happening. There are complaints against this, which the previous paragraph seeks to allay. At the end of the day, buying art you like is the basic principle here. If you want to make money from it, slow down, engage with communities and consider how you would curate. With art starting as low as .5tez, there is space to practice and learn your strengths and weaknesses. If all else fails; invest deep, not wide.

Burn a token[6]

For whatever reason, you may no longer want a piece of art in your collection and you don’t want to sell it either; you just want to throw it away. That is easy to do and is called burning.

Burn using Temple Wallet

Open the Temple extension in your browser and follow the steps in the images below. The burn address in step 4 is: tz1burnburnburnburnburnburnburjAYjjX

There is no need to add an amount unless you have more than one. In which case, add the amount you want to burn. There is also no need to pay an additional fee.

Burn using Kukai Wallet

Open the Kukai Wallet in a tab and choose NFT/Collectibles. From there, follow the steps in the images below. There is one final screen after selecting preview on step 6; you just add your password on that screen and it is all done.

The burn address in step 5 is: tz1burnburnburnburnburnburnburjAYjjX

Burn using Objkt

To burn a token using Objkt, find the gentk you wish to dispose of, then choose actions. Select how many copies you want to burn, then burn, baby, burn!


Glossary

Baking Bad - a team of developers responsible for BCD and TzKT, among others.

Batch mint - the process of minting multiple gentks in one transaction, much like a shopping cart on amazon, rather than one purchase at a time. It saves time.

BCD - Better Call Dev

Better Call Dev - BCD. A Smart contract meta-explorer for Tezos, created specifically for smart contract developers[7].

Cold wallet - a digital wallet that is not connected to the internet. Its strength being security, and weakness being slow payments.

Deterministic approach - the gentk should produce the same result on reload or redraw. If it doesn’t, it is in opposition to the spirit of fx(hash).[8]

fx(hash) address - the current address is KT1XCoGnfupWk7Sp8536EfrxcP73LmT68Nyr. Prior to 05 Jan 2021, the address was KT1AEVuykWeuuFX7QkEAMNtffzwhe1Z98hJS

Gas - transacting on the Tezos network requires users to pay gas in Tezos’ native token, tez. Wallets support the ability to offer to pay more gas on a transaction, which speeds it up.

Generative Art  - generative art refers to any art practice where the artist uses a system, such as a set of natural language rules, a computer program, a machine, or other procedural invention, which is set into motion with some degree of autonomy contributing to or resulting in a completed work of art.[9]

Generative Token - a program designed to produce a random output. In the case of fx(hash), there will often be >1 iteration of the generative token, each being unique.

Gentk - Generative Token

Hot wallet - a digital wallet that is connected to the internet. Its strength being quick payments and its weakness being lower security; it is more vulnerable to cyberattacks.

IPFS - InterPlanetary File System. A distributed system for storing and accessing files, websites, applications and data.[10] 

Mint - the process of activating code to output the gentk. A person who mints a gentk is the first owner and the output is unknown until it is signed; generated just-in-time, tagged with appropriate metadata and uploaded to IPFS.

Mutez - one millionth of a tez, represented as 0.000001 or 1/1000000. Useful for BCD, who needs you to add the cost in mutez, not tez. So, 5tez would be 5000000 mutez.

Primary - the initial market. No-one has owned the gentk previously, and the buyer will be it’s first owner.

Secondary - a market where the gentk has already been purchased and is now for sale by its owner.

Tez - the native cryptocurrency on the Tezos blockchain. Called tez, not Tez.

Tezos - a decentralised, open-source proof-of-stake blockchain network that can execute peer-to-peer transactions and serve as a platform for deploying smart contracts.[11] Spelt with an ‘s’ to annoy my friends of the Webster’s dictionary world. Use tez, not Tezos when describing purchases; that is only 5 tez.

Tezos Blockchain Explorer - TzKT. An advanced Tezos blockchain explorer based on its own open-source indexer with built-in performant API.[12]

TzKT - Tezos Blockchain Explorer

XTZ - the currency code for native cryptocurrency (tez) on the Tezos blockchain. Use tez unless needing to highlight the use case of XTZ.


[1] The previous schedule was 12hrs open, 11hrs closed, with a one hour earlier start each day.

[2] https://news.tezoscommons.org/tzflow-a-useful-tool-for-displaying-on-chain-data-608a2b5cdd39 

[3] From #faq-doc fx(hash) discord, 0906am, 14 Nov 2021

[4] https://www.fxhash.xyz/articles/guide-mint-generative-token 

[5] https://www.fxhash.xyz/articles/guide-mint-generative-token 

[6] No NFTs were harmed in the making of these screenshots, for obvious reasons!

[7] https://baking-bad.org/docs/ 

[8] https://www.fxhash.xyz/articles/code-of-conduct 

[9] https://www.philipgalanter.com/downloads/ga2003_paper.pdf 

[10] https://docs.ipfs.io/concepts/what-is-ipfs/ 

[11] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tezos 

[12] https://baking-bad.org/docs/