ALCOA HIGH SCHOOL

2018 - 2019

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Graduating Competitive Students

Building Relationships

Rigorous Expectations

Relevant Instruction

Dual Enrollment

Dual Enrollment

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per class

Requirements: 3.0 unweighted GPA / ACT Subscores: English – 18, Reading - 19, Math - 19 (or higher)

Students meeting the requirements for GPA and ACT scores may take Dual Enrollment (DE) courses at Maryville College or Pellissippi State Community College.  Dual Enrollment classes include, but are not limited to, English Composition 1010/1020, College Psychology, College Algebra, Elementary Probability & Statistics, College Calculus, etc.  Students’ responsibilities include applying for the Dual Enrollment Grant, applying to the college of choice, requesting transcript and ACT scores be sent to college of choice, providing their own transportation, and submitting final grades to their School Counselor.  See your School Counselor if you have questions. DE courses qualify for additional grade weighting.

The following classes are general DE class choices that seniors can select during registration in order to indicate an interest in adding Dual Enrollment as a course request:

  1. DE English Composition I (4039)
  2. DE Math (4011)
  3. DE Science (4000)
  4. DE Social Studies (4024)
  5. DE Foreign Language (4045)

**Note: Finalized DE schedules must be provided to the student’s School Counselor in order for the student to be scheduled in the specific DE class at AHS and for the student to receive high school credit. See DE Application for more details on scheduling requirements.**

English/Language Arts

English I Reading/English I (2901I/3001I) YEARLONG

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per semester

Prerequisite:  Recommended Placement by 8th Grade Reading Teacher

This class will focus on TN English Language Arts standards with special attention to the state mandated assessment. The course is a combination of CP English I and Reading Reinforcement.  Students enrolled in this course may focus on preparation for future studies in a four-year college or a role in the working world. Students will review parts of speech, grammar and usage, spelling, vocabulary, sentence structure, and paragraph development. Reading skills will be strengthened by selections taken from various genres including short stories, novels, and poetry. Literary elements in the various genres of literature will be studied and applied.  Students will focus on non-fiction, poetry, drama, novels, communication skills, logic, and media techniques. The students will be able to use classic plays and other forms of entertainment as a vehicle to analyze drama techniques and will also be able to display communication skills and employ various techniques to improve logical thinking through presentations and activities. Students will develop writing skills progressing toward five paragraph compositions and research papers. In addition, students will be responsible for displaying proper communication skills by way of oral presentations and group discussions. There is a moderate amount of work outside of class. One research project is required. Students will also be able to analyze varying media strategies during this course as well. Reading Reinforcement assignments will be interspersed throughout the term and will be directed toward reinforcing the reading skills and expanding students understanding of what they read. Several research-based assignments, including individual and group writing assignments and group projects, will be completed for both courses during the term.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

English I (3001B)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  Recommended Placement by 8th Grade Reading Teacher

This class will focus on TN English Language Arts standards with special attention to the state mandated assessment. Students enrolled in this course may focus on preparation for future studies in a four-year college or a role in the working world. Students will review parts of speech, grammar and usage, spelling, vocabulary, sentence structure, and paragraph development. Reading skills will be strengthened by selections taken from various genres including short stories, novels, and poetry. Literary elements in the various genres of literature will be studied and applied.  Students will focus on non-fiction, poetry, drama, novels, communication skills, logic, and media techniques. The students will be able to use classic plays and other forms of entertainment as a vehicle to analyze drama techniques and will also be able to display communication skills and employ various techniques to improve logical thinking through presentations and activities. Students will develop writing skills progressing toward five paragraph compositions and research papers. In addition, students will be responsible for displaying proper communication skills by way of oral presentations and group discussions. There is a moderate amount of work outside of class. One research project is required. Students will also be able to analyze varying media strategies during this course as well. Several research-based assignments, including individual and group writing assignments and group projects, will be completed during the term.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

English I CP (3001)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  Recommended Placement by 8th Grade Reading Teacher

This class will focus on TN English Language Arts Standards with special attention to state mandated assessment. Students enrolled in this course may focus on preparation for future studies in a four-year college or a role in the working world. Students will review parts of speech, grammar and usage, spelling, vocabulary, sentence structure, and paragraph development. Reading skills will be strengthened by selections taken from various genres including short stories, novels, and poetry. Literary elements in the various genres of literature will be studied and applied.  Students will develop writing skills progressing to five paragraph compositions and a research paper. In addition, students will be responsible for displaying proper communication skills by way of oral presentations and group discussions. There is a moderate amount of work outside of class. One research project is required. This course will continue the sequence of language arts in the ninth grade.  Students will focus on nonfiction, poetry, drama, novels, communication skills, logic, and media techniques. The students will be able to use classic plays and other forms of entertainment as a vehicle to analyze drama techniques and will also be able to display communication skills and employ various techniques to improve logical thinking through presentations and activities. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of the final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

English I ACP (3001H)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  Placement Test

This class will focus on TN English Language Arts Standards with special attention to state mandated assessment. Students enrolled in this course may focus on preparation for future studies in a four-year college or a role in the working world. Students will review parts of speech, grammar and usage, spelling, vocabulary, sentence structure, and paragraph development. Reading skills will be strengthened by selections taken from various genres including short stories, novels, and poetry. Literary elements in the various genres of literature will be studied and applied.  Students will develop writing skills progressing to paragraph compositions and a research paper. In addition, students will be responsible for displaying proper communication skills by way of oral presentations and group discussions. There is a significant amount of work outside of class. One research project is required. This course will continue the sequence of language arts in the ninth grade.  Students will focus on nonfiction, poetry, drama, novels, communication skills, logic, and media techniques. The students will be able to use classic plays and other forms of entertainment as a vehicle to analyze drama techniques and will also be able to display communication skills and employ various techniques to improve logical thinking through presentations and activities. They will also be able to analyze varying media strategies during this course as well. Finally, the students will be able to ensure they are meeting writing and grammar competencies through formal and informal writing opportunities. Assessment opportunities will include daily assignments, reading quizzes, tests, compositions, and presentations.  Students who take this course will receive academic weighting.  A summer reading assignment is required for this course. Note:  Students must take a placement test in order to be considered for this course. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of the final grade in the 2018-19 school year. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

English II (3002I)

Grade Level: 10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in English I

This course is designed to provide a continuation of the study of grammar and application of language skills as well as the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will study short stories, plays, essays, poetry, biographies, and novels.  Reference skills will be refined, and students will continue to develop patterns of writing that are used in both college and the working world:  letters, reports, articles, and essays.  Assessment will include vocabulary tests, class discussions, oral presentations, quizzes, objective tests, and compositions.  A minimum of one major research project will be required.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of the final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

English II CP (3002)

Grade Level: 10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in English I

This course is designed to provide a continuation of the study of grammar and application of language skills as well as the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will study short stories, plays, essays, poetry, biographies, and novels.  Reference skills will be refined, and students will continue to develop patterns of writing that are used in both college and the working world:  letters, reports, articles, and essays.  Assessment will include vocabulary tests, class discussions, oral presentations, quizzes, objective tests, and compositions.  A minimum of one major research project will be required.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of the final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

English II ACP (3002H)

Grade Level: 10     Semester / 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in English I ACP and/or recommended placement by English I teacher

This course continues the accelerated sequence in language arts at Alcoa High School and is strongly recommended for students who wish to attend a competitive four-year college. The application of grammatical knowledge and language skills is required for both reading and writing assignments. Students will read a variety of short stories and essays. They are expected to analyze, compare, and evaluate examples of world literature, which comprise the main body of work studied in this course. Students will continue to develop and refine research skills, and at least one major project will be required. Assessment for this course will include but not be limited to essay examinations, class discussion, oral presentations, objective tests, weekly vocabulary tests, and research projects. Summer outside reading and preparation for this class are required. Students who choose this course will receive academic weighting.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of the final grade in the 2018-19 school year. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

English III (3003I)

Grade Level: 11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in English II

As the third step in the College Prep English sequence, English III includes a survey of American literature and will focus on further developing analytical writing skills and reviewing TN English Language Art standards as students prepare for state-mandated assessments and college-level writing to come.   Units of study will cover a cross-section of American literature from the early Native-American and Colonial periods through the romantic, realist, and early modern movements.    Assigned readings will include both literary and informational texts (particularly those pertaining to United States history) with an emphasis on further enhancing students’ critical reading skills.  Assessment will include several formal essays, a research paper, projects, tests, quizzes, as well as daily classwork and homework.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of the final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

English III CP (3003)

Grade Level: 11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in English II

As the third step in the College Prep English sequence, English III includes a survey of American literature and will focus on further developing analytical writing skills and reviewing TN English Language Art standards as students prepare for state-mandated assessments and college-level writing to come.   Units of study will cover a cross-section of American literature from the early Native-American and Colonial periods through the romantic, realist, and early modern movements.    Assigned readings will include both literary and informational texts (particularly those pertaining to United States history) with an emphasis on further enhancing students’ critical reading skills.  Assessment will include several formal essays, a research paper, projects, tests, quizzes, as well as daily classwork and homework.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of the final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

AP Language and Composition [AP English III] (3013)

Grade Level: 11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Recommended placement by English II teacher and one full credit in English II

This course continues the accelerated sequence in language arts at Alcoa High School and is recommended for students who wish to attend a competitive four-year college. The application of grammatical knowledge and language skills is required for both reading and writing assignments. This course emphasizes the importance of non-fiction and informational texts and will survey philosophical trends through literature, focusing on rhetorical devices and their impact.  In addition to analytical reading of literature and social studies, communication skills in writing and speaking will be stressed. Examples of rhetorical arguments will be analyzed, compared, and evaluated. Students will continue to develop and refine research skills, and at least one research paper is required. Students are required to sit for the College Board AP Language and Composition exam in May for an opportunity to receive college credit.  Other assessments may include tests, essays, portfolios, and vocabulary. Summer outside reading and preparation for this class are required. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting if the student sits for the exam.

English IV (3005I)

Grade Level: 12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in English III

As the fourth step in the College Prep English sequence, English IV  includes a survey of British literature and a focus on writing in preparation for college-level writing. This course is designed to develop critical and analytical skills in speaking, writing, reading, listening, and thinking. A survey of British literature through the Old English Period through the Renaissance Period and the basic philosophical and historical events of the respective periods will be studied. Library and reference skills will be reinforced and one major research project is required. Students enrolled in this course may focus on preparation for future studies in a four-year college or a role in the working world. Assessment will include projects, quizzes, tests, essays, book reviews, research papers, and vocabulary.  

English IV CP  (3005)

Grade Level: 12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in English III

As the fourth step in the College Prep English sequence, English IV  includes a survey of British literature and a focus on writing in preparation for college-level writing. This course is designed to develop critical and analytical skills in speaking, writing, reading, listening, and thinking. A survey of British literature through the Old English Period through the Renaissance Period and the basic philosophical and historical events of the respective periods will be studied. Library and reference skills will be reinforced and one major research project is required. Students enrolled in this course may focus on preparation for future studies in a four-year college or a role in the working world. Assessment will include projects, quizzes, tests, essays, book reviews, research papers, and vocabulary.  

ACT Prep/Writing (6193)

Grade Level: 11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

The focus of this class is to prepare students for standardized college entrance exams and to be a complementary part of a comprehensive educational program. The student will become more familiar with the format and concepts tested on the ACT and SAT tests, hone in on skills that will make the student more successful beyond high school, become more intellectually disciplined, learn time management needed for timed tests, become aware of the needed vocabulary skills, develop listening and speaking skills through group and class discussions and presentations, recognize different learning styles and types of intelligence, identify and employ study habits to cater to specific areas of need, refresh content-specific skills where needed, identify: course of study, necessary skills, test scores, and financial means needed to enter colleges/universities of interest, help the student become more fiscally responsible, take a critical look at possible career choices through research, identify areas of personal stress and employ stress management techniques.  Students may opt-out of this required class their junior year if they score 29 or higher on the ACT prior to the first day of the scheduled semester.

Math

Algebra I A Special Education (31025F/31025S) YEARLONG

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per semester

This course is designed for students who need individualized instruction in Algebra. Topics of this course include the language of Algebra, real numbers, solving and analyzing linear equations, and graphing relations and functions. Successful completion of this course will prepare students for Algebra I B.

Algebra I B Special Education (31026F/31026S) YEARLONG

Grade Level: 10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per semester

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Algebra I A

This course is designed for students who need individualized instruction in Algebra. Students will cover topics such as radical expressions and triangles, non-linear functions, data analysis, and probability. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Geometry A Special Education (31085)

Grade Level: 11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Algebra I B

This course is designed for students who need individualized instruction in Geometry. Students will cover topics such as the properties of angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, and other regular figures. Students will also go into depth regarding properties of graphing on the coordinate plane. This course includes topics suggested by the State Guide and the new State Standards.

Geometry B Special Education (31086)

Grade Level: 12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Geometry A

This course is designed for students who need individualized instruction in Geometry. Students will cover topics such as the properties of angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, and other regular figures. Students will also go into depth regarding properties of graphing on the coordinate plane. This course includes topics suggested by the State Guide and the new State Standards. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Algebra I A/Algebra I B (31023/31024) YEARLONG

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per semester

This course is designed for all students starting their Algebra I experience. The course will mainly utilize direct instruction, discovery learning, a flipped classroom concept, and integration of technology. Topics of interest in this course include the language of Algebra, real numbers, solving inequalities, solving and analyzing linear equations, and graphing relations and functions. Successful completion of this course will give the student necessary algebraic skills needed for the next level of mathematics course. Assessment will typically come from homework, quizzes, and test results.  Successful completion of Algebra I A will award the student an elective credit.  Successful completion of Algebra I B will result in a completed math credit.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Algebra I CP (3102)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

This course is designed for all students starting their Algebra I experience. The course will mainly utilize direct instruction, discovery learning, a flipped classroom concept, and integration of technology.  Topics of interest in this course include the language of Algebra, real numbers, solving inequalities, solving and analyzing linear, quadratic, root, and rational equations, and graphing relations and functions. Successful completion of this course will give the student necessary algebraic skills needed for the next level of mathematics courses as well as a completed math credit. Assessment will typically come from homework, quizzes, and test results.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Algebra I ACP (3102H)

Grade Level: 9  SEMESTER/1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Placement based on teacher recommendation, placement test, and TCAP results.

This is an accelerated honors level Algebra I class designed to move at a faster pace and dive deeper into concepts.  The course will involve both direct instruction as well as discovery learning.  Topics of interest in this course include the language of Algebra, real numbers, solving inequalities, solving and analyzing linear, quadratic, root, and rational equations, and graphing relations and functions. Successful completion of this course will give the student necessary algebraic skills needed for the next level of mathematics courses as well as a completed math credit. Assessment will typically come from homework, quizzes, and test results.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

Geometry (3108B)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Algebra I and Algebra II

This is a course that will include all the topics suggested by the State Standards.  Assignments and discussion will center on the problems and ideas of the basic terms and concepts of triangles, analyzing of incomplete deductive proofs, rigid motion, circles, and areas/volumes. This course is heavily based online and will require frequent use of technology outside the classroom. This course includes daily skills practice, homework, quizzes, tests and group work. Time required outside of class is necessary, but not overwhelming. This is a semester long course. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Geometry CP (3108)

Grade Level:  10-11 SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Algebra I

This is a college preparatory course that will include all the topics suggested by the State Standards.  Assignments and discussion will center on the problems and ideas of the basic terms and concepts of triangles, analyzing of incomplete deductive proofs, rigid motion, circles, and areas/volumes. This course is heavily based online and will require frequent use of technology outside the classroom. This course includes homework, quizzes, tests and projects/frequent group work. Time required outside of class is necessary, but not overwhelming. This is a semester long course. The workload for the class is moderate. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Geometry ACP (3108H)

Grade Level: 9-11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Algebra I ACP and teacher recommendation. If Algebra I was taken in the 8th grade year, students must have earned an A or a B in the class and scored Mastered on the Algebra I placement test in order to take this class; 8th grade Algebra I students who meet this criteria may not take Geometry CP. If EOC scores are back, student scores will be considered for placement, also.

This is an accelerated college preparatory course that will include all the topics suggested by the State Standards.  Assignments and discussion will center on the problems and ideas of the basic terms and concepts of triangles, analyzing of incomplete deductive proofs, rigid motion, circles, and areas/volumes. This course is heavily based online and will require frequent use of technology outside the classroom. This course includes homework, quizzes, tests and projects/frequent group work. Time required outside of class is necessary, but not overwhelming. This is a semester long course. The workload for this class is maximum. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

Algebra II (3103B)

Grade Level: 10-11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Algebra I and teacher recommendation

This course covers the entire spectrum of state standards provided by the state of Tennessee.  Entrance into this course requires completion of Algebra I and teacher recommendation.  This course is heavily based online and will require frequent use of technology outside the classroom. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Algebra II CP (3103)

Grade Level: 10-11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Algebra I and teacher recommendation

This course covers the entire spectrum of state standards provided by the state of Tennessee.  Entrance into this course requires completion of Algebra I and teacher recommendation.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Algebra II ACP (3103H)

Grade Level: 9-10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Algebra I ACP and teacher recommendation.

This course is an advanced Algebra II course and will proceed at a faster pace and go deeper into concepts than Algebra II CP.  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

Pre-Calculus SDC (3126SD)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in ACP Algebra II, one full credit in ACP Geometry, or teacher recommendation.

This course is a dual credit college level course, and it involves a detailed study of advanced mathematical topics, including but not limited to equations, inequalities, functions, in-depth Trigonometry, models, and Analytical Geometry. Students will take the SDC challenge exam for college credit. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

Bridge Math (3181)

Grade Level: 12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Seniors are recommended for this course based on their ACT math score.  Students who score below 19 on the math portion of the ACT must register for this course as their senior math course.  A review of previously learned math skills will be taught in order to prepare students for college level mathematics courses.  Applications of these skills should play a principal role in the learning and assessment process.  Technology will be used to strategically enhance the student's understanding of core concepts via the use of multiple problem-solving strategies.

Applied Mathematical Concepts (3183)

Grade Level: 12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

This course replaces the Finite Math course previously taken in senior year. Concepts covered in this class include financial mathematics, linear programming, Algebra, problem solving, logic, data, reasoning, probability distribution, and confidence intervals.

Statistics SDC (3136SD)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  CP or ACP Algebra II

This course is a dual credit college level course, and it involves a detailed study of advanced mathematical topics, including, but not limited to the following:

1. Appropriate types of samples and sampling methods

2. Appropriate representation of data

3. Measure of Center and Variation

4. Probability and Statistics

5. Discrete Probability Distribution Objectives

6. Normal Probability Distribution

7. Sampling Distributions and the Central Limit Theorem

8. Estimates and Sample Sizes (Confidence Intervals)

9. Estimating a Population Mean: σ Known and Not Known

10. Hypothesis testing Objectives

11. Linear Regression and Correlation

Students will take the SDC challenge exam for college credit. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

AP Statistics (3129)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  Pre-Calculus ACP

AP Statistics is a senior level math class.  Students who successfully complete the course and examination may receive credit and/or advanced placement for a one-semester introductory college statistics course.  The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  The course will be a one-semester course. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting for students who sit for the exam. Note: Course offering depends on teacher availability.

Science

Biology I A (32103)

Grade Level: 10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Biology I A & B are courses that introduce students to the world of living things. The students explore the following topics in Biology I A: ecological organization,  population dynamics, flow of energy, and the diversity and evolution of species.  Biology I A & B are taken together.  Biology I A is taken in the spring semester.  Biology I B is taken the following fall semester.

Biology I B (32104)

Grade Level: 11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Biology I A & B are courses that introduce students to the world of living things. Biology I B is the second part of the course which focuses on the following: chemistry of the four major biomolecules, cells, cellular transport, cell reproduction, cell division, and genetics.  Biology I A is taken in the spring semester.  Biology I B is taken the following fall semester. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Biology I CP (3210)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Biology I is a laboratory science course that investigates the relationship between structure and function from molecules to organisms and systems, the interdependence and interactions of biotic and abiotic components of the environment, and mechanisms that maintain continuity and lead to changes in populations over time. Embedded standards for Inquiry, Technology & Engineering, and Mathematics are taught in the context of the following content: Ecology, Cells, Energy, Mitosis, Meiosis, and Genetics. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Biology I ACP (3210H)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Note:  This class requires summer work.

Prerequisite: Placement Test

We will start with a review of ecological relationships and energy flow. We will then proceed to study the cell structure and function of living organisms, photosynthesis, respiration and introductory genetics. Students will learn different note taking skills and have a wide variety of "hands on" experiences beyond the scope of the regular Biology I class. Cooperative group work and laboratory sessions make up about 20% of class time. Assessments include daily homework, lab reports, science notebook checks, chapter exams, and short research projects. Students who choose this course will receive academic weighting. Enrolled students will have some summer work to complete on an Introduction to Biology (Ch. 1), two chapters in Ecology (Ch. 2 & 3), and an Introduction to Classification (Ch. 17.1).  An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

Physical World Concepts (3237I)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Students will investigate through experimentation and laboratory activities the 5 major divisions of the physical world: (1) Mechanics; (2) Thermodynamics; (3) Waves and Optics; (4) Electricity and Magnetism; (5) Nuclear Science. Throughout the course of Physical World Concepts students will refine their problem solving skills, apply the engineering and legacy cycles, design experiments, conduct experiments, complete formal lab reports, practice using excel to create graphs and interpret data, as well as build and test prototypes.

Physical World Concepts (3237)

Grade Level: 10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Students will investigate through experimentation and laboratory activities the 5 major divisions of the physical world: (1) Mechanics; (2) Thermodynamics; (3) Waves and Optics; (4) Electricity and Magnetism; (5) Nuclear Science. Throughout the course of Physical World Concepts students will refine their problem solving skills, apply the engineering and legacy cycles, design experiments, conduct experiments, complete formal lab reports, practice using excel to create graphs and interpret data, as well as build and test prototypes.

Physical World Concepts (3237J)

Grade Level: 11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

In this course students will gain fundamental skills relating to identifying problems, reviewing literature, experimental design, prototype design, prototype testing, data collection methods, statistical analysis, and scientific writing. Students will be introduced to scientific literature and the writing process. We will formulate hypotheses, develop individualized experiments, collect data, use excel to run statistical tests, and create tables and graphs to be used in scientific papers. Also, each student will research, design and test a prototype. This course is focused around technology, engineering, ethics, critical thinking, investigations, the analysis of data, and the correct method for communication of those finding.

Chemistry Com (3221I)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Biology I

Chemistry for the Community is a study in the fundamentals of Chemistry. Chemistry I will cover the following topics: Measurement, Periodic Trends, Matter and Change, Atomic Theory, Electron Arrangement, Ionic Bonding and Nomenclature, Chemical Reactions and Product Prediction, and Mole Concept. Each student will be participating in several lab activities. Moderate homework and some memorization will be required. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year.

Chemistry I CP (3221)

Grade Level: 10-11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Biology I

Chemistry will cover the following topics: Measurement, Periodic Trends, Matter and Change, Atomic Theory, Electron Arrangement, Ionic Bonding and Nomenclature, Chemical Reactions and Product Prediction, and Mole Concept. Each student will be participating in several lab activities. Moderate homework and some memorization will be required. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2017-18 school year.

Chemistry I ACP (3221H)

Grade Level: 10-11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  A grade of "B" or better in Algebra I

Chemistry ACP will cover the following topics: Measurement, Periodic Trends, Matter and Change, Atomic Theory, Electron Arrangement, Ionic Bonding and Nomenclature, Mole Concept, Chemical Reactions and Product Prediction, Mole Concept and Stoichiometry. Each student will be participating in several lab activities. This honors course will require much more memorization and higher-level problem solving than Chemistry I CP. There will be a small amount of summer work. An End of Course Test will be given at the end of the course, which will count at least 15% of their final grade in the 2018-19 school year. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

Physics ACP (3231H)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Physics is an analytical science that requires strong problem solving skills. Physics is becoming more and more relevant in thousands of vocations. As the technology of our world grows exponentially, an understanding of basic Physics concepts can prepare students for the demands of these technologies as well as any course out there. Physics A will be a study of kinematics (motion) with a strong dose of the following topics: Measurement, Graphing and Charts, Velocity, Acceleration, Displacement, Time, Force, Two Dimensional Motion, Gravitation, and Momentum. This course will demand two six-week out of class projects. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

Human Anatomy & Physiology (3251)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Biology I

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory science course that includes an in-depth study of the body systems that maintain homeostasis from anatomical, physiological, and histological perspectives. Students explore anatomical and physiological concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry and Technology & Engineering are taught in the context of the content standards for Anatomical Orientation, Protection, Support, and Movement, Integration and Regulation, Transportation, Absorption and Excretion, and Reproduction, Growth, and Development. Assessments include: daily homework, lab work, unit quizzes and exams, and various projects. A final will be administered at the end of each of the terms that will comprise 20% of the final average.

Social Studies

World History & Geography (3415I) 

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Students will study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. They will examine the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth century political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the Russian and Chinese Revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political, ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world. Relevant Tennessee connections will be part of the curriculum, as well as appropriate primary source documents. Students will explore geographic influences on history, with attention given to political boundaries that developed with the evolution of nations from 1750 to the present and the subsequent human geographic issues that dominate the global community. Additionally, students will study aspects of technical geography such as GPS and GIS, and how these innovations continuously impact geopolitics in the contemporary world.

World History & Geography CP (3415)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Students will study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. They will examine the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth century political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the Russian and Chinese Revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political, ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world. Relevant Tennessee connections will be part of the curriculum, as well as appropriate primary source documents. Students will explore geographic influences on history, with attention given to political boundaries that developed with the evolution of nations from 1750 to the present and the subsequent human geographic issues that dominate the global community. Additionally, students will study aspects of technical geography such as GPS and GIS, and how these innovations continuously impact geopolitics in the contemporary world.

AP Human Geography (3450)

Grade Level: 9-10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Placement Test

This Advanced Placement course is a College Board accredited course.  The  AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface.  Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.  Assessments in this course will include tests, quizzes, essays, textual analysis, and class participation.  Students will take the College Board Advanced Placement Human Geography exam in May.  There is an advanced level of reading and writing required for this course. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting for students who sit for the exam.

U.S. Government & Civics (3417I)

Grade Level: 10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit

U.S. Government will focus on the historical foundations of the United States system of government, including an in-depth study of the Constitution (specifically the three branches of the federal government and the amendments.) Content area reading assignments will be interspersed throughout the term and will be directed toward reinforcing the units of study in U.S. Government and expanding student understanding of important world and national issues. Several research-based assignments, including individual and group writing assignments and group projects, will be complete for both courses during the term. Additional assessments will include tests, quizzes, essays, textual analysis assignments, and class participation in debates and daily discussions.

U.S. Government & Civics CP (3417)

Grade Level: 10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit

U.S. Government will focus on the historical foundations of the United States system of government, including an in-depth study of the Constitution (specifically the three branches of the federal government and the amendments.) Content area reading assignments will be interspersed throughout the term and will be directed toward reinforcing the units of study in U.S. Government and expanding student understanding of important world and national issues.  Several research-based assignments, including individual and group writing assignments and group projects, will be complete for both courses during the term. Additional assessments will include tests, quizzes, essays, textual analysis assignments, and class participation in debates and daily discussions.

AP U.S. Government & Politics (3445)

Grade Level: 10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Signature of previous social studies teacher.

This is an accredited AP College Board course that introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the U.S. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, causes and consequences of political events, and interprets data to develop evidence-based arguments. Assessment in this course will include exams, quizzes, essays, research projects, papers, notebook checks, classwork, and homework. Students will take the College Board AP US History examination in May.  This course qualifies for additional grade weighting for students who sit for the exam.

American History SDC (3416SD)

Grade Level: 11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

American History Statewide Dual Credit is an academically challenging one credit course aligned with postsecondary (college/university) standards. Students will be taught using a curriculum created by a State of TN faculty working group consisting of college and high school faculty from across the state. The curriculum begins with the New South and Westward Expansion at the end of the 19th Century and continues through to America in the Post 9/11 and the events under the Obama presidency. Students can earn postsecondary credit for any TN public postsecondary institution if they meet or exceed 80% on a challenge exam at the end of the course. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

AP U.S. History (3440)

Grade Level: 11    SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Signature of previous social studies teacher.

The AP US History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present.  The course has students investigate the content of US history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past.  The course also provides seven themes (American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America and the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places.  Students will take the College Board AP US History examination in May. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting for students who sit for the exam.

Economics CP (3431)

Grade Level: 12     NINE WEEKS/ 0.5 credit(s)

Economics includes an examination of the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies and by people as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Students will examine the key economic philosophies and economists who have influenced the economies around the world in the past and present. Informational text and primary sources will play an instrumental part of the study of economics where it is appropriate. Two projects are completed during this course. Assessments are done in social studies classes by using a variety of methods including tests, quizzes, essays, research, required projects, class participation, etc.

Economics ACP (3431H)

Grade Level: 12     NINE WEEKS/ 0.5 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Signature of previous social studies teacher.

The fields of both microeconomics and macroeconomics are included in this study of the economic decision making process. An examination of the allocation of scarce resources in the product market and factor market will highlight the interaction of the consumer, producer and government. Greater dependence on mathematical principles will further student understanding of economic ideas such as supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Students will examine the key economic philosophies and economists who have influenced the economies around the world in the past and present. Greater emphasis will be placed on informational texts and primary sources. Three projects are completed during this course. Students will receive academic weighting in this course. Assessments are done in social studies classes by using a variety of methods including tests, quizzes, essays, research, required projects, class participation, etc. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting.

Personal Finance (3496)

Grade Level: 12     NINE WEEKS / 0.500 credit(s)

Personal Finance is a course designed to help students understand the impact of individual choices on occupational goals and future earning potential. Real world topics covered will include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as savings and investing. Students will design personal and household budgets; simulate use of checking and saving accounts; demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt, and credit management; and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.

Introduction to Philosophy LDC (3435LD)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

An investigation of the fundamental questions pertaining to reality, truth, freedom, the nature of humankind, the existence of God and social/political theory. The class will seek to expand the student’s awareness and basic understanding of philosophy and its various branches, and develop the student’s ability to think critically about traditional philosophical questions and problems. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting for students who sit for the exam.

Introduction to Psychology SDC (3433SD)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

The Statewide Dual Credit Learning Objectives for the course entitled Introduction to General Psychology (PSYC 1030) are created to cover the following topics:  Introduction to Psychology, History and Approaches, Research, Brain Physiology and Function, Human Development, Sensation and Perception, Memory, Consciousness, Cognition and Intelligence, Sexuality, Psychological Disorders, Therapy/Treatment, Social Psychology, Motivation and Emotion, Health Psychology, Learning, and Personality. Assessments are done in social studies classes by using a variety of methods including tests, quizzes, essays, research, required projects, class participation, etc. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting for students who sit for the exam.

World Languages

Spanish I (3021)

Grade Level: 9-11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Spanish I is a basic introduction to the Spanish language and its culture. Students will be taught a variety of useful vocabulary with an emphasis on pronunciation and use. Basic grammar structures will also be introduced and practiced with supportive listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities. Cultural components will be compared and contrasted as well. Assessment will include both oral and written evaluation, including tests, quizzes, listening and reading comprehension, as well as classroom activities and projects. Some independent activities will require use of the Internet.

**Note:  Only freshmen who are enrolled in English I ACP will be allowed to register for a foreign language in 9th grade.**

Spanish II (3022)

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Spanish I

Spanish II continues the development of skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish. More complex vocabulary patterns and grammatical concepts will be introduced, and there will be more focus on reading supportive text and writing short compositions. Assessment will be both oral and written, including tests, quizzes, listening and reading comprehension, as well as classroom activities and projects. Some independent activities will require use of the Internet.

Spanish III (3023)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Spanish II

Spanish III will allow students who have enjoyed the beginning courses in Spanish to continue their studies.  After a review of material covered in the previous courses, students will be presented with more complex grammar structures.  This course is designed to help students who will be taking placement exams at the university level. Activities will encourage oral communication and grammatical complexity. Note: Course offering depends on teacher availability.

German I (3051)

Grade Level: 9-12    SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

German I is the basic beginning German course. This course is designed to introduce students to the skills necessary to speak, understand, read, and write through the use of videos and conversation. In many of the reading selections, and activities, cultural aspects are emphasized. Assessment will include both oral and written evaluations.

**Note:  Only freshmen who are enrolled in English I ACP will be allowed to register for a foreign language in 9th grade.**

German II (3052)

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in German I

The emphasis in German II is on further development of skills in speaking, understanding, reading and writing German. More complex vocabulary and grammatical concepts are introduced, and culture and civilization are stressed. Assessments will include both oral and written evaluations. Students will participate in the National German Examination. Students receiving a grade of "A" for a total of two semesters are eligible for membership in the National German Language Honor Society (Delta Epsilon Phi).

German III: Early Bird (3053)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in German II

This class will be offered before school. German III will allow students who have enjoyed the beginning courses in German to continue their studies.  After a review of material covered in the previous courses, students will be presented with more complex grammar structures.  This course is designed to help students who will be taking placement exams at the university level. Activities will encourage oral communication and grammatical complexity.  Students will participate in the National German Examination. Students receiving a grade of "A" for a total of two out of three semesters in German are eligible for membership in the National German Language Honor Society (Delta Epsilon Phi).  Note: Course offering depends on availability.

Russian I (3061)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

This course will introduce students to the Russian alphabet, basic vocabulary, and the fundamental structure of the Russian language in the present tense, including all six of the cases in the declension system. Basic listening and reading comprehension will be emphasized as students engage in conversations and write brief compositions using present tense and the various cases. Geographic, historical, literary and contemporary political, social and cultural issues will also be introduced and developed.

**Note:  Only freshmen who are enrolled in English I ACP will be allowed to register for a foreign language in 9th grade.**

Russian II (3062)

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Russian I

This course is a continuation of Russian I and will further expand students’ vocabulary and introduce more complex sentence structures including the past and future tenses, plural forms, and verbal aspect. Speaking, listening and reading comprehension skills will be further developed, and students will write brief compositions using past, present and future tenses and all six cases. Students will be expected to read excerpts from modern Russian sources (online newspapers and magazines) and participate in both oral and written discussions of significant historical, literary, and cultural issues.

Fine Arts

Visual Art I (3501)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

The focus of Art I is to develop the student as an artist, while incorporating the study of art creation, aesthetic appreciation, and art history. Major studio emphasis will be placed on learning to draw and a survey of art history from prehistoric art until medieval times. Assessment includes performance evaluation, notebook, and written tests.

Drawing and Painting (3502)

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Art I

Drawing and Painting is for the student who wants to continue studying studio art and art history.  Emphasis will be placed on different types of art media, art theory, and continuing to study art history beginning with the Early Renaissance to Modern Art.  Spiral sketchbooks and portfolios are required and assessed. Three-ring notebooks from Art I are required for class use.

Photography (3502P)

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Art I

Alternative approaches to photography will be explored by making homemade cameras and photographs without the use of a traditional camera. Traditional black and white photography will be explored.   Students will spend time learning about the history of photography, camera operations, and darkroom procedures.  Manual, single lens reflex, 35mm cameras will be used for taking photographs.  Students not owning cameras will have one camera available to share, but having one is strongly encouraged.  Three-ring binders will be required to store negatives and notes on darkroom procedures.  Time spent outside of school will be required of photography students.   After school, photo lab hours will be available for students needing more time to finish assignments.

Singers Fall/Singers Spring (0995SF/0995SS) YEARLONG

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per semester

Freshmen will be allowed in Singers on an as needed basis.

Prerequisite: Audition

Students will appreciate performing at different occasions outside of school and during regular school hours. This is an audition-only ensemble. In this ensemble, students will learn the foundations of proper singing, as well as elements of music theory, sight-reading, and history. An introduction to all types of music is emphasized. These students are required to participate in fundraising to cover expenses for music, travel, and uniforms. If students do not participate in fundraisers, parents are required to make donations to the choral department. Students are expected to attend all performances and rehearsals. They should expect many performances throughout the year and are required to attend all (concerts, festivals, competitions, etc.). Students will be evaluated through performances, attendance, conduct, sight-reading examinations, and class participation. This class may be repeated for credit.

**Note: Students who take this class are required to do so both semesters due to the difficult performance schedule.**

Music Appreciation (3517)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Music Appreciation is a non-performance course that explores the elements and history of music.  It encourages students to view music as an ingredient of the student’s own life, and of human life in all cultures.  It uses history as a resource for understanding of how music has fulfilled basic human purposes in other ages and present times.  Content is divided between music history and a study of musical elements through musical literature.

Music Theory (3514)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Students will learn how to read, write, analyze, and perform music in preparation for music theory courses after high school. Music theory is a class designed for the advanced musician to more thoroughly understand the components of music and music composition. This class will enable the student to successfully complete basic college theory classes. Students will also be able to compose music and understand the guidelines used in music composed by others. It is preferred that students can already read music and have been a member of one of our music ensembles before taking this course, but it is not required.  

Marching Band Fall (0996F)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

The marching band performs at all football games, selected festivals and other activities that may be scheduled. Students enrolled in this course are required to attend pre-school band camp in July, all after school rehearsals, and all performances. Students involved will perform music suited to their ability levels. Participation in all performances and rehearsals is considered an integral part of the course and is required.

Concert Band Spring (0996S)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

This course is open to students who have prior experience performing on a woodwind (flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, bassoon), brass (trumpet, horn, trombone, tuba), or percussion instrument, or by special arrangement with the instructor. This instrumental ensemble experience is designed to develop the basics of musicianship: Instrumental performance technique, intonation and tonal skills, rhythmic skills, and expressive/interpretive skills.  

Drama LDC (3520LD)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

This course is an introduction to the theatrical arts. Students will work together to read, analyze, and perform monologues, dialogues, short one-act plays, and longer full-length plays. Through hands-on learning, the students will work in all aspects of theater, including directing, acting, stage design, makeup, costumes, lighting, and sound. Various performance styles, such as pantomime and improvisation, will be explored. This course qualifies for additional grade weighting for students who sit for the exam.

Career and Technical Education (CTE)

Introduction to Mechatronics and Robotic Systems (5922)

Grade Level: 9-10         SEMESTER/1.00 credit(s)

Potential Industry Certifications  Available:  Potential Industry Certifications Available:  OSHA-10, NC3 Precision Measurement

This course includes principles relating to automation, robotics, electronics, and mechatronics and the various occupations within these industries.  Students will explore blueprint reading and schematics, electrical circuits, robotic functions, and entry-level standards relating to mechatronics.  Students will learn safety and precision measurement techniques.  Students will learn basic principles relating to electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatics systems and how to troubleshoot issues as they relate to an industry setting. Students will also identify and describe components of a typical mechatronics system.

Through this course, students can obtain OSHA-10 General Industry, Starrett Precision Measurement, and Snap-on Advanced Multimeter certifications.  This course also prepares students for entry into the dual enrollment mechatronics program with TCAT-Knoxville.  Students who successfully complete the Starrett Precision Measurement and OSHA-10 certifications, along with an overall 85 course average, can also receive local, dual credit with Pellissippi State Community College.

Robotics and Automated Systems (6143)

Grades 9-10                SEMESTER/1.00 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Introduction to Mechatronics and Robotic Systems

Potential Industry Certifications Available:  Potential Industry Certifications Available:  OSHA-10, NC3 Precision Measurement

Robotics & Automated Systems is an applied course for students who wish to explore how robots and automated systems are used in industry. Building on the content and critical thinking frameworks of Principles of Engineering and Digital Electronics, this course asks students to follow the engineering design process and apply basic programming skills to complete assignments and projects. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will have an understanding of the historical and current uses of robots and automated systems; programmable circuits, interfacing both inputs and outputs; ethical standards for engineering and technology professions; and testing and maintenance of robots and automated systems.

DE Mechatronics I (40631)

Grade Level: 11-12        FALL SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  None

Potential Industry Certifications Available:  OSHA-10, NC3 Precision Measurement, NC3 Advanced Multimeter

Mechatronics I is a new dual enrollment course  for students interested in learning more about careers such as a mechatronics technician, electromechanical technician, or engineer. This first of two courses covers basic electrical and mechanical components of mechatronics systems as well as their combined uses with instrument controls and embedded software designs. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to describe and explain basic functions of physical properties and electrical components within a mechatronic system. They can logically trace the flow of energy through a mechatronic system and can communicate this process to others. They know how to effectively use technical documentation such as data sheets, schematics, timing diagrams, and system specifications to troubleshoot basic problems with equipment. Finally, they develop strategies to identify, localize, and correct malfunctioning components and equipment.  This is a dual enrollment course with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology.  Students will use their dual enrollment grant or Pell grant funding to cover tuition costs.  Students must maintain an 81 average to remain in this course and maintain satisfactory attendance.  Students will have an opportunity to obtain multiple industry certifications, including OSHA-10, Snap-on Advanced Multimeter,  and Starrett Precision Measurement Instruments.  Students completing OSHA-10 and Starrett Precision Measurement, with an overall 85 course average, can also receive local, dual credit with Pellissippi State Community College.

DE Mechatronics II (40632)

Grade Level: 11-12         SPRING SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  Mechatronics I

Potential Industry Certifications Available:  OSHA-10, NC3 Precision Measurement, Siemens Level I, NC3 Advanced Multimeter

Mechatronics II is a new dual enrollment, advanced course for students interested in learning more about such careers as mechatronics technician, electromechanical technician, or engineer. Following the groundwork of mechanics and electronics laid in Mechatronics I, this course covers basics of pneumatic, electro pneumatic, and hydraulic control circuits in a complex mechatronic system. In addition, the course addresses basic digital logic and programmable logic controllers (PLCs) employed in the mechanical, electronic, and control systems in a mechatronics system. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to explain the interrelationships of components and modules within a complex mechatronic system. They understand the differences between hydraulic and pneumatic fluid power and can explain the scientific principles that apply. They also use technical documentation (such as datasheets, circuit diagrams, displacement step diagrams, timing diagrams, and function charts) to troubleshoot and resolve malfunctioning pneumatic and hydraulic components and circuits. They demonstrate understanding of the role of programmable logic controllers (PLC) in mechatronic systems and the ability to write, debug, and run basic ladder logic. This is a dual enrollment course with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology.  Students will use their dual enrollment grant or Pell grant funding to cover tuition costs.  Students must maintain an 81 average to remain in this course and maintain satisfactory attendance.  Students will have an opportunity to obtain multiple industry certifications, including OSHA-10, Snap-on Advanced Multimeter,  and Starrett Precision Measurement Instruments.  Students completing OSHA-10 and Starrett Precision Measurement, with an overall 85 course average, can also receive local, dual credit with Pellissippi State Community College.

DE Mechatronics III (40633)

Grade Level: 12                 SPRING SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  Mechatronics II

Mechatronics III is a dual enrollment class with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology-Knoxville. This course allows students to further advance their knowledge and skills in mechatronics, industrial maintenance, and advanced manufacturing.  In this class, there will be a greater focus on PLC (programming logic control) training.  Students will work with Allen Bradley and Siemens PLC’s and how this technology facilitates automation within an industry setting. Students will use their dual enrollment grant funding to cover tuition costs.  Students must maintain an 81 average to remain in this course and maintain satisfactory attendance.  Students completing OSHA-10 and Starrett Precision Measurement, with an overall 85 course average, can also receive local, dual credit with Pellissippi State Community College.

Potential Industry Certifications Available:  OSHA-10, NC3 Precision Measurement, Siemens Level I, NC3 Advanced Multimeter

DE Mechatronics IV (40634)

Grade Level: 11-12         SPRING SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  Mechatronics III

Mechatronics IV Dual Enrollment is a course provided by the Tennessee College of Applied Technology-Knoxville.  This course allows students to apply the knowledge and skills gained in previous Mechatronics I-III dual enrollment classes to in-class projects and also offers potential work-based learning opportunities. Students will use their dual enrollment grant funding to cover tuition costs.  Students must maintain an 81 average to remain in this course and maintain satisfactory attendance.  Students completing OSHA-10 and Starrett Precision Measurement, with an overall 85 course average, can also receive local, dual credit with Pellissippi State Community College.

Potential Industry Certifications Available:  OSHA-10, NC3 Precision Measurement, Siemens Level I, NC3 Advanced Multimeter

STEM Engineering I (5924)

Grade Level: 9-10     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

STEM Engineering I is a foundational course in the STEM cluster for students interested in learning more about careers in engineering and technology. This course covers basic skills required for engineering and technology fields of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to identify and explain the steps in the engineering design process. They can evaluate an existing engineering design, use fundamental sketching and engineering drawing techniques, complete simple design projects using the engineering design process, and effectively communicate design solutions to others.

STEM Engineering II (6139)

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in STEM Engineering I

STEM Engineering II is a fundamental course in the STEM cluster for students interested in developing their skills in preparation for careers in engineering and technology. The course covers essential knowledge, skills, and concepts required for postsecondary engineering and technology fields of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to describe various engineering disciplines, as well as admissions requirements for postsecondary engineering and engineering technology programs in Tennessee. They will also be able to identify simple and complex machines; calculate various ratios related to mechanisms; explain fundamental concepts related to energy; understand Ohm’s Law; follow the steps in the engineering design process to complete a team project; and effectively communicate design solutions to others.

STEM Engineering III (6146)

Grade Level: 11-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in STEM Engineering II

Upon successful completion of this course, students will take the Certified SolidWorks Associate Exam.

Industry Certification:  Certified SolidWorks Associate

STEM Engineering III is an applied course in the STEM career cluster for students interested in further developing their skills as future engineers. This course covers knowledge, skills, and concepts required for postsecondary engineering and technology fields of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to explain the differences between scientists and engineers, understand the importance of ethical practices in engineering and technology, identify components of control systems, describe differences between laws related to fluid power systems, explain why material and mechanical properties are important to design, create simple free body diagrams, use measurement devices employed in engineering, conduct basic engineering economic analysis, follow the steps in the engineering design process to complete a team project, and effectively communicate design solutions to others. Students in this course have the opportunity to take the SolidWorks (CSWA) certification exam.

STEM IV Practicum (6105OS): See Work Based Learning Off-Site

Grade Level: 11-12        SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in STEM III

STEM Practicum is a capstone course intended to provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous STEM Education courses within a professional, working environment. In addition to developing an understanding of the professional and ethical issues encountered by STEM professionals in the workplace, students learn to refine their skills in problem solving, research, communication, data analysis, teamwork, and project management. Instruction may be delivered through school laboratory training or through work-based learning arrangements such as internships, cooperative education, service learning, mentoring, and job shadowing. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for postsecondary study in a STEM field.  Note: Course offering depends on availability.

Marketing and Management I (5931) 

Grade Level: 9-10        SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) 

Intro to Marketing and Management I focuses on the study of marketing concepts and their practical applications. Students will examine the risks and challenges that marketers face to establish a competitive edge in the sale of products and services. Topics include foundational marketing functions such as promotion, distribution, and selling, as well as coverage of economical fundamentals, international marketing, and career development. Student will also have an introduction to the Marsh School store and develop skills that can be used to put on a resume. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will understand the economic principles, the marketing mix, and product development and selling strategies.

Marketing and Management II (5932)

Grade Level: 10-12        SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Marketing and Management I (5931)

Marketing and Management II is a study of marketing concepts and principles used in management. Students will examine the challenges, the responsibilities, and risks managers face in today’s workplace. Subject matter includes finance, business ownership, risk management, marketing information systems, purchasing, promotion, and human resource skills. Students will also be responsible for working in the Marsh School Store throughout this course. This will allow them hands on experience in a workplace. Students will also have the opportunity to job shadow with local business partners throughout this course.

Event Planning & Management (6168)

Grade Level: 11-12        SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: One full credit in Intro to Marketing and Hospitality

*Coordinating Work Based Learning is also available with this course*  

Event Planning & Management is designed to be a project-based, capstone experience in which students research, prepare, deliver, and reflect upon an original event for a community organization, business, or nonprofit. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will further refine leadership, teamwork, and management skills acquired in previous courses and apply them through application in a practicum setting. The course is highly customizable to meet local needs: partner organizations may be chosen at the discretion of student teams, with the approval of the instructor and appropriate school personnel. Organizations can include local non-profits, charities, shelters, agencies, businesses, sports teams, school-based enterprises, or other entities with a demonstrated need for assistance in staging an event or a commitment to providing students with work-based learning opportunities.

Work Based Learning: Career Practicum (6105)

Grade Level: 11-12        SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisites:  This course is open to students age 16 or older who have completed at least two courses in his or her elective focus and who meet application/eligibility requirements.

Note: Students have the option to take this course for honors credit.  Students will be accepted based on meeting eligibility requirements and teacher/work-based learning coordinator recommendation.  Students can receive a credit in any work-based learning experience during both the Fall and Spring semesters.

Work-Based Learning: Career Practicum is a capstone course intended to provide students with opportunities to apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous CTE and general education courses within a professional work environment. The course allows students to earn high school credit for select internships, which allow students to interact with industry professionals in order to extend and deepen classroom work and support the development of postsecondary and career readiness knowledge and skills.

 

Eligible students must be age 16 or older and must have completed two prior courses within their elective focus.  Participating students must exhibit a 90% attendance rate. Students must be on track to graduate and demonstrate work-readiness attitudes and skills demonstrated through recommendations from their classroom instructors.  Students participating in off-site internships must drive and have reliable transportation to and from the internship sites.  Internships may be paid or unpaid experiences. Paid experiences should be obtained by the student prior to the course start date.

Workload: Students will be required to complete a personalized learning plan and digital portfolio to demonstrate knowledge and skills gained through their respective internships.  Students will also participate in career-readiness skills such as developing resumes, completing job applications, and participating in mock interviews.

Any student interested in one of the following work-based learning opportunities should pick up an application from Mrs. Gornto upon registration.

Students interested in an internship should select one of the following:  

Work-Based Learning Off-Site (6105OS)

Work-Based Learning Marsh Store (6105MS)

Work-Based Learning Technology Support Team (6105TT)

Work-Based Learning Teacher Assistant at AES, AIS, and AMS (6105TA)

Work-Based Learning Library Assistant at Alcoa High School (6105LA)

Work-Based Learning Main Office Aide (6105MO)

Prerequisite 2.75 GPA

Work-Based Learning Student Affairs Office Aide (6105SO)

Prerequisite 2.75 GPA

Health Science Education (5998)
Grade Level: 9-11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)


This course is an introduction to broad standards that serve as a foundation for healthcare
occupations and functions across health services. The course will cover medical terminology,
career planning, healthcare systems, body function and structure (basic anatomy/physiology),
infection control, and foundational healthcare skills such as vital sign assessment, First Aid and
CPR. HOSA membership and participation is encouraged. This course will serve as a strong
foundation for all future health science courses

Medical Therapeutics (5999)

Grade Level: 10-11     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  One full credit in Health Science Education

Medical Therapeutics is an applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in therapeutic and nursing services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in therapeutics services; assess, monitor, evaluate, and report patient/client health status; and

identify the purpose and components of treatments. This course is required before a student can proceed to either of the medical certification courses (Nursing Education/C.N.A. or Emergency Medical Services/E.M.R.)

Nursing Education/ Clinical Internship (6000)

Grade Level: 12     SEMESTER/ 2.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite:  Health Science and Medical Therapeutics. Students must apply and be accepted to

this course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students may sit for the Certified Nursing Assisting (CNA) Licensure Exam.  

Industry Certification:  C.N.A-Certified Nursing Assistant

Nursing Education is the senior level course in the Health Science cluster.  This class is scheduled

for two consecutive blocks in the Fall term and includes a Certified Nursing Assistant

certification training program and a clinical internship component.  Students will complete

classroom training and participate in a clinical rotation with a long-term care facility during the

first few weeks of the course. This portion of the class will prepare them to take the state C.N.A.

licensure exam at the end of the course.  The clinical internship component is the hands-on

portion of the Nursing Education class.  Students will be in a clinical setting (hospital, nursing

home, physician office) once initial training is complete. Students will gain valuable clinical skills

including: assessment of vital signs, certification in Healthcare Provider CPR, personal care,

assisting with feeding, walking, assistive devices, and assessment skills. Students must also take

Anatomy and Physiology prior to graduation to complete this path of study.

Emergency Medical Services DE (4100)
Grade Level:     11-12 SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)
Prerequisite: One full credit in Medical Therapeutics. Students must be 17 years old before the
course concludes.

Upon successful completion of this course, students may sit for the National Registry Exam

Industry Certification: Emergency Medical Responder.


Emergency Medical Services is a capstone course designed to prepare students to pursue
careers in the field of emergency medicine. Upon completion of this course, proficient students
will be able to identify careers and features of the EMS system; define the importance of
workforce safety and wellness; maintain legal and ethical guidelines; correlate anatomy and
physiology concepts to the patient with a medical or traumatic injury; and perform EMS skills
with a high level of proficiency. Students who successfully complete this course as dual
enrollment taught by an EMT instructor will take the National Emergency Medical Responder
Certification exam at the end of the course.

Physical Education

Lifetime Wellness LDC (3303LD)

Grade Level: 9     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Lifetime Wellness is a holistic approach to health and lifetime physical activities in Tennessee high schools. This approach to total wellness encompasses the physical, mental, social, and emotional well-being of the individual. The content of the course includes Personal Fitness. This section is taught in the gymnasium, and/or a physical activity setting. Personal fitness and nutrition will be emphasized and integrated throughout the course. Students acquire knowledge and skills necessary to make decisions regarding their health and well-being throughout their lifetime. Students will be required to "dress out" in this course, and grading criteria includes class participation, effort, attitude, and the Presidential physical fitness test.

PE Fall/Spring (3301PF/3301PS)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per semester

This course will include units in individual and dual sports, team sports, fitness and conditioning, and rhythmic activities. Students are required to "dress out" in this course, and grading criteria includes class participation, effort, and attitude. This course may be taken for 1/2 or 1 credit. This course can be taken multiple times. Fall Semester: This section will cover most of the net sports: volleyball, ping-pong, pickleball, and badminton. Spring Semester: This section will cover several indoor sports: basketball, kickball, battle ball, and wiffle ball. Spring Semester: This section will cover several outdoor and indoor sports: softball, tennis, soccer, fishing, and walking. This class may be taken once per semester, if desired.

Men's Weight Training Fall/Spring (3302F/3302S)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per semester

Weight Training will consist of a variety of strength and power exercises that will enhance athletic performance while decreasing the chances for injury. The program will be based around the Squat, Bench Press, and various Olympic lifts. Students will lift heavy to develop absolute strength and light to develop dynamic power. Students will also perform lifts that will focus on strengthening the posterior-chain and shoulders to help athletes stay healthy and to maximize performance. A well designed strength program enhances the self-esteem and confidence level of students along with enhancing their physical well-being.  This class may be taken once per semester, if desired.

Women's Weight Training (3302W)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

The program will be designed to enhance health-related components of physical fitness for females, as well as the positive personal and social behaviors associated with exercise.  Students will be expected to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness in a safe, comfortable environment.  Students will participate in a developmentally appropriate resistance-training program that will encompass components of muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, and flexibility.   This is a cooperative learning environment that provides students the opportunity to accept diversity, become accountable for fitness, set and accomplish goals, and exhibit initiative.

Early Bird Weight Training Fall/Spring (3302EF/ES)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 0.500 credit(s)

This class is offered before school from 7:15 am-8:15 am on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays.  Students will earn a ½ credit, which will satisfy the state PE requirement.  The program will be designed to enhance health-related components of physical fitness for females, as well as the positive personal and social behaviors associated with exercise.  Students will be expected to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness in a safe, comfortable environment.  Students will participate in a developmentally appropriate resistance-training program that will encompass components of muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, and flexibility.   This is a cooperative learning environment that provides students the opportunity to accept diversity, become accountable for fitness, set and accomplish goals, and exhibit initiative.

Other Electives

Yearbook/Journalism ACP (3008) YEARLONG

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s) per semester

Prerequisite:  Acceptance through staff application process ONLY

Yearbook Advertising and Public Relations focuses on the concepts and strategies associated with promoting and designing a yearbook. This applied knowledge course addresses skills essential to the creative side of the yearbook industry and explores motivations for buying a yearbook. Students will demonstrate proficiency in fundamental advertising and public relations concepts by creating the Alcoa High School Yearbook as well as selling those yearbooks and business ads. Students learn basic photography, interviewing and writing skills, and how to design and edit yearbook pages using computer software. Throughout the school year, students will be given assignments and deadlines based on yearbook layout. You should be someone who is able to manage deadlines, work independently and be self-driven.

Workload is average, with some after school activities. Students will be asked to attend sporting events and other school sponsored activities for the purpose of taking photographs and will be admitted free of charge.  Students also have the opportunity to earn a free yearbook for taking this course based on their business ad sales total.

**Note:  This is a two semester commitment. Students will earn one credit per semester. **

Driver’s Education (3321)

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Must be at least 15 years of age when taking Driver's Education.

Driver's Education is offered to students in 10th-12th grade who are at least fifteen years of age or will be fifteen during the semester in which they are enrolling in Driver's Education. Course emphasis will be on perfecting driving skills and techniques. Proper driving procedures, good driver attitude, and a respect for traffic laws, defensive driving, and safety will be emphasized. Instruction will include classroom activities and behind-the-wheel instruction. Older students will be placed in first term driving classes when possible. Assessment includes driving average, chapter test average, notebook grade, and final exam grade.

Online Learning (3435OL)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Students may choose to take an online elective during one period during the school day.  Students taking Online Learning will inform the teacher of their class choice once enrolled. Students may choose between courses in the following:

1) African American Studies (3435AA)

2) Art History and Appreciation (3435AH)

3) Computer Applications and Technology (3435CA)

4) Native American Studies:  Historical Perspectives (3435NA)

5) Social Issues (3435SI)

Academic Success (3121)

Grade Level: 9-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Online intervention programs for remediation or enrichment.  Recommended for students based on teacher recommendation, test scores, etc., and placement is required. This class offers students an opportunity to improve skills in reading and/or math.

Peer Buddy (6193PB)

Grade Level: 10-12     SEMESTER/ 1.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Application Required

This course is designed for students who desire to give academic and social support to fellow students in the Comprehensive Developmental Classroom. Students may earn multiple credits by working in the CDC classroom at Alcoa High School.

Early Dismissal Fall & Spring (9305LA/9305ED)

Grade Level: 12     SEMESTER/ 0.000 credit(s)

Prerequisite: Must complete Early Dismissal Form & return to Student Affairs before class will be officially scheduled.  Student must be in good standing to graduate.

Seniors may choose to leave school early for 4th block only if all other graduation and attendance requirements have been met and with written parental permission.  Early Dismissal is a privilege and can be revoked at any point in the semester if academic and attendance requirements are not met. Students will not earn a credit for Early Dismissal because this request is not a class.  

Abbreviations Key

ACP = Advanced College Prep

AP = Advanced Placement

CP = College Prep

DE = Dual Enrollment

LDC = Local Dual Credit

SDC = Statewide Dual Credit

ADDED PERCENTAGE POINTS AND BONUS POINT WEIGHTING

HONORS

DE

SDC*

INDUSTRY CERTIFICATION*^

LDC*

AP*^

CI*^

CLEP*^

IB*^

ADDED PERCENTAGE POINTS TO SEMESTER AVERAGE, IF NUMERICAL AVAILABLE

3

4

4

4

4

5

ADDED QUALITY POINT WEIGHTING

0.5

1

0.75

0.5

0

1

*STUDENTS MUST SIT FOR THE CULMINATING EXAM TO RECEIVE PERCENTAGE POINTS ON THEIR AVERAGES. (ALL STUDENT ARE REQUIRED TO SIT FOR THE SDC EXAMS.)

^STUDENTS MUST SIT FOR THE CULMINATING EXAM TO RECEIVE ADDITIONAL QUALITY POINT WEIGHTING.