2018-2019

Program Of Studies

Colleyville Heritage High School

Collegiate Academy

Grapevine High School

Colleyville Middle School

Cross Timbers Middle School

Grapevine Middle School

Heritage Middle School

        

        

Main Table of Contents

GCISD Information

Campus Directories

Educational Programs

Foundation High School Program

GCISD Endorsements

Arts and Humanities Endorsements

CTE Endorsements

CTE Business and Industry

CTE Public Services

CTE STEM

STEM Endorsement

Performance Acknowledgements

Grapevine Colleyville ISD Local Graduation Requirements

GPA / Class Ranking

Pre-AP / AP / Gifted and Talented Placement

AP Capstone Certificate or Diploma

Career Planning Resources

Middle School Program of Studies

Sixth Grade Required Courses

Sixth Grade Elective Courses

Seventh Grade Required Courses

Seventh Grade Elective Courses

Eighth Grade Required Courses

Eighth Grade Elective Courses

All Foreign Language Courses

Special Education Course Offerings - Sixth Grade

Special Education Course Offerings - Seventh Grade

Special Education Course Offerings - Eighth Grade

High School Program of Studies

Career and Technical Education

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

Business, Administration, Marketing and Finance

Marketing

Finance

Family Consumer Sciences / Human Services

Hospitality and Tourism

Health Science

Information Technology / Media

Computer Science

Technology / Engineering Education

Transportation, Distribution and Logistics

English Language Arts

English Language Arts Electives

Journalism

Speech / Debate

Fine Arts

Visual Arts

Dance

Music

Choir

Theatre

Mathematics

Physical Education, Health and Athletics

Boys Athletics

Girls Athletics

Dance

Drill Team and Cheerleading

Science

Social Studies

Special Education Course Offerings

Modified Courses

Alternate Courses

Electives

Career Preparation Courses

World Languages

Local Credit Courses

Miscellaneous

Optional Opportunities for Credit

Credit By Exam Without Prior Instruction

Credit By Exam With Prior Instruction

Correspondence Courses

Summer Classes

College Readiness Electives

Available College Programs

GCISD Information

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD, a K-12 public school system in the heart of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, is making bold changes in the way we teach and the way students learn. The district is transforming its culture to provide the foundation that today’s students will need to be successful now and in life beyond high school.

 

GCISD’s strategic plan is called LEAD 2021, which stands for Leading Excellence-Action Driven. Through four core objectives – preparing students to be college and career ready, harnessing technology for learning, fostering citizenship and mutual respect, and building community involvement – the district is creating an innovative environment where students are inspired, encouraged, and supported.

One of the exciting new initiatives of LEAD 2021 is the expansion of the use of technology in the classroom. What began as six digital classrooms has now expanded to all of the elementary, middle, and high school campuses being 1:1, meaning every student has a device on which they may complete assignments.

 

GCISD maintains a long-standing commitment to educational excellence for all children. Building on its mission to be The BEST, the district continues increasing the level of rigor in classrooms to address expectations of the community and better prepare students for success in college and their future careers.

VISION

The Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District inspires, encourages, and empowers students to achieve their full potential in a global society.

MISSION

The mission of the Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District is to be THE BEST. We will promote good citizenship and prepare, motivate, and encourage each student to reach his or her full potential within a safe, caring, cooperative environment by providing an effective and enduring education.

The Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District develops the Program of Studies (POS) to assist in planning your student’s educational program. The catalogs for middle and high school have been combined in order to give a broad view of the secondary program. The information provided in this publication is designed to assist students and parents in planning and making appropriate choices for the student’s high school career. The GCISD graduation requirements, as well as, your own individual needs should be considered as you select your semester and yearly courses. Select your courses carefully since schedule changes may be limited. Note: Courses in this catalog may not be available on all campuses or may not be offered in a given year. The GCISD Board of Trustees, administrators, counselors, and instructors want your middle school and high school experience to be both fruitful and enjoyable. Occasionally, changes occur in course requirements due to action by the Texas Legislature and/or the Texas State Board of Education (SBOE). Your counselor will communicate any changes that are required. Otherwise, you will graduate with the course requirements in place when you enter your freshman year in high school.

COLLEGE CREDIT IN HIGH SCHOOL

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD offers numerous opportunities for students to earn college credit while enrolled in the district. These include College Board Advanced Placement, Dual Credit and Concurrent Enrollment courses, and articulated courses through Career and Technical programs. The AP and Career and Technical programs are open enrollment and participation is based on the prerequisites of the course. See the College section in the catalog regarding eligibility for these programs.

The Dual Credit program is in cooperation with Tarrant County Community College (TCC).  The district contact for Dual Credit offerings is Emberly Hill, 817-251-5415, emberly.hill@gcisd.net.

The Career and Technical articulation programs are in cooperation with TCC. The district contact for Career and Technical programs is Rick Bracy, 817-251-5737, rick.bracy@gcisd.net.

ASSURANCE OF NONDISCRIMINATION

No student shall be denied the right to participate in any school program, education service, or activity because of the student’s race, religion, sex, national origin or disability. The district has designated Anita Clayton to coordinate its efforts to comply with the nondiscrimination requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 as amended, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 dealing with rights of students with disabilities. All complaints shall be handled through established channels and procedures beginning with the building principal, followed by appeal to Anita Clayton, and finally the Board of Trustees. The Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District does not discriminate on the basis of a disability by denying access to the benefits of District services, programs, or activities. To request information about the applicability of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), interested persons should contact Gema Padgett at 817-251-5540.


Campus Directories

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www.gcisd-k12.org

Colleyville Middle School

1100 Bogart Drive

Colleyville, TX  76034-6098

PHONE (817) 305-4900

FAX (817) 498-9764

Cross Timbers Middle School

2301 Pool Road

Grapevine, TX  76051-2731

PHONE (817) 251-5320

FAX (817) 424-4296

Grapevine Middle School

301 Pony Parkway

Grapevine, TX  76051-5998

PHONE (817) 251-5660

FAX (817) 424-1626

Heritage Middle School

5300 Heritage Avenue

Colleyville, TX  76034-6098

PHONE (817) 305-4790

FAX (817) 267-9929

Grapevine High School

3223 Mustang Drive

Grapevine, TX  76051

PHONE (817) 251-5210

FAX (817) 481-5957

BRIDGES Advanced Learning Center                                                      

5800 Colleyville, Blvd.

Colleyville, TX  76034

PHONE (817) 521-5474

FAX (817) 581-4893

Colleyville Heritage High School

5401 Heritage Avenue

Colleyville, TX  76034

PHONE (817) 305-4700

FAX (817) 358-4765

GCISD Collegiate Academy

at Tarrant County College Northeast

828 W. Harwood Rd. (Building NMPC)

Hurst, TX 76054

817/515-6775

FAX: 817/515-6766

Educational Programs

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I.        REGULAR PROGRAM

Regular program courses are offered in language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and the elective areas.  These courses are designed to prepare students for college and career readiness.

II.        SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

Special education courses are provided to assist eligible students in both academic and nonacademic areas as determined by the student's Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) Committee.  Not every course will be considered appropriate for every student.  Rather, the ARD Committee will follow the student's Individual Education Plan (IEP) and the State graduation requirements as set forth in Texas State Board of Education Rule §89.1070 when determining course selection.  Student's IEP, placement, and services are reviewed annually by the ARD Committee.  Questions should be addressed to the campus counselor or educational diagnostician.

III.        ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESL) is a program offered for limited English speaking students in grades K-12.  It is a program of intensive instruction in English with teachers trained in recognizing and dealing with language differences.  Students enter and exit this program through the Language Proficiency Advisory Committee (LPAC).  All ESL students are monitored for two years after dismissal from the program.

IV.        CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Career and Technical Education courses include a wide range of options for students to experience various professional and career opportunities through course work, lab work, internships, and on-the-job training.  Students may enroll in individual courses or in a coherent sequence of courses.  Students enrolled in a career and technology program may have the opportunity to participate in a youth leadership training organization appropriate to the program in which he/she is enrolled.

V.        THE TEXAS SCHOLARS PROGRAM

The Texas Scholars Program requires that students be enrolled in courses that fulfill the requirements for the State Recommended Program or the Distinguished Achievement Program.  Students must complete two courses eligible for college credit.

VI.        EXTRACURRICULAR PROGRAMS

All students who participate in a GCISD extracurricular program must sign a drug and alcohol pledge.

VII.        FEES

GCISD schools charge fees in some classes.  Fees are authorized for materials used in any program in which the resultant product is in excess of minimum requirements and, at the student’s option, becomes the personal property of the student.  If you are unable to pay or would rather have your child participate in an alternative instructional activity, please notify your building principal.

VIII.        SCHEDULE CHANGES

Because student course requests determine master schedule construction and personnel allocation, all course change requests must be made during the schedule change windows of May 21-23 and August 1-3. Students may submit ONE request online per window to be considered for a change.  After that, student schedule changes that include extenuating circumstances will be considered on an individual basis with campus administrator approval and space availability.

Exemptions will be extended to high school students only and only in the courses listed in this regulation.  Exemptions will not be extended to middle school students.

Course Offerings

The Official Program of Studies is designed to give you the information that will help you and your parents make the appropriate selections as you plan a course of study from the wide variety of offerings in the Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District.  Each Course is described and specific prerequisites are listed so that you will know whether or not you have successfully completed the entry requirements.

High School courses are listed as standard, enrollment based, optional, or ARD committee recommended:

Foundation High School Program

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Students entering Grade 9 in the 2014-2015 school year and thereafter shall enroll in the courses necessary to complete the curriculum requirements for the Foundation High School Program and the curriculum requirements for at least one endorsement.

A student may graduate under the foundation high school program without earning an endorsement if, after the student’s sophomore year:

(1)  the student and the student’s parent or person standing in parental relation are advised by a school counselor of the specific benefits of graduating from high school with one or more endorsements; and

(2)  the student’s parent or person standing in parental relation files with a school counselor written permission, on a form adopted by the agency, allowing the student to graduate under the foundation high school program without earning an endorsement.

Coursework required for the Foundation High School Program

English Language Arts - Four credits

• English I • English II • English III • English IV or other advanced English course

Math - Three credits

• Algebra I • Geometry • Algebra II or other advanced math course

Science - Three credits

• Biology • IPC or Advanced Science Course • Advanced Science Course

Social Studies - Four credits

World Geography • World History • U.S. History • U.S. Government • Economics

Physical Education - One credit

Fine Arts Electives - One credit

Languages Other Than English - Two credits

Two credits in the same language

Speech – 1/2 credit

•Professional Communications

Health - 1/2 credit

Technology - One credit* (Classes of 2018, 2019, 2020, and 2021 only)

*The technology credit requirement will be removed for current 8th graders (class of 2022) and below. This option will provide students with more flexibility in their selection of courses and allow them to reach advanced level offerings in a wider variety of areas.

Electives - six credits

Credit Review Process 

In order to appropriately manage differing graduation requirements encountered by students entering GCISD high schools and in order to help all students meet GCISD’s graduation requirements/pathways, a Credit Review Process shall be followed. This process is designed to meet the rare, exceptional situations which arise when students transfer into GCISD and/or have unconventional course sequence needs. Counselors are available to assist students with this form and the necessary procedures.

GCISD Endorsements 

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(All Endorsement Pathways require English IV and Algebra II)

Requirements include a  4th math and 4th science inclusive of or in addition to all of the foundation plan requirements AND a requirement that four (4) of the required 26 credits must be in a coherent sequence and content specific to the Endorsement Area being pursued by the students.

An Endorsement may be earned by completing a GCISD CTE pathway within an Endorsement Area as long as it consists of a coherent sequence of three or more courses for four or more credits in CTE that must include two courses from the same CTE Cluster and one “Advanced CTE” course.

Courses used to satisfy an endorsement may also be used to satisfy foundation plan requirements, including core courses or elective courses.

Endorsement

Non-CTE

CTE

STEM

Students must take a coherent sequence of at least three courses for four or more credits in the correlated CTE clusters (of which two must be in the same cluster and of which one course must be an “advanced” course)

OR

Students must take two additional math classes AFTER successful completion of Geometry and Algebra II

OR

Students must take two additional science courses AFTER successful completion of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics

Math Pathway  

Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II AND two additional courses for which Algebra II is a prerequisite from the list provided in TAC 19 Ch. 74.13 (e) (2) or (e) (3)

Science Pathway –

Biology, Chemistry, Physics AND two additional courses from the list provided in TAC 19 Ch. 74.13 (e) (4)

Coherent Sequence in the following CTE Pathways:

  • Engineering Courses

Business & Industry

Students must take a coherent sequence of at least three courses for four or more credits in the correlated CTE clusters (of which two must be in the same cluster and of which one course must be an “advanced” course)

OR

Students must take four credits in ELAR elective courses to include at least three “levels” of:

  • Adv. Journalism or
  • Public Speaking or
  • Debate

Adv. Journalism Pathway:

Yearbook 1

Yearbook 2

Yearbook 3

Additional English Elective from Chapter 110

Public Speaking / Speech & Debate Pathway:

Debate 1 / Oral Interp.

Debate 2

Debate 3

Additional English Elective from Chapter 110 or Adv. Public Speaking

Coherent Sequence in the following CTE Pathways:

  • Ag. Sciences
  • Arts/AV & Communication
  • Business Administration
  • Finance
  • Hospitality & Tourism
  • Information Technology
  • Marketing
  • Sports Management
  • Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Endorsement

Non CTE

CTE

Public Services

Students must take a coherent sequence of at least three courses for four or more credits in the correlated CTE clusters (of which two must be in the same cluster and of which one course must be an “advanced” course)

None at this time in Grapevine Colleyville ISD

(Four courses in JROTC)

Coherent Sequence in the following CTE Pathways:

  • Health Sciences
  • Law Enforcement
  • Education

Arts & Humanities

Students must take a coherent sequence of at least four courses within several areas that include:

  • Social Studies
  • LOTE
  • ASL
  • Fine Arts
  • English

Social Studies Pathway  –

Five Social Studies Credits from Chapter 113 (Social Studies) &/or 118 (Economics) – Must include US History, Government, & Economics

English Pathway  –

3 elective English Credits in addition to the 4 required

LOTE Pathway –

Four levels of the same language in LOTE

OR

Two levels of the same language in LOTE AND Another two levels of an additional language in LOTE

ASL Pathway -  

Four levels of ASL

Fine Arts Pathway –

A coherent sequence of four credits of fine arts courses selected from chapter 117 (Band, Choir, Theatre Arts, Tech. Theater, Dance, Art)

OR

Students take two credits in one fine arts area and two more in another.

None

Multi-Disciplinary

Students must take a coherent sequence of at least four courses within several areas that include:

  • 4x4 Core Courses
  • Advanced Placement/Dual Credit
  • Workforce Development

4x4 Pathway –

Four credits in each of the core areas to include English IV, Chemistry and/or Physics

Advanced Placement Pathway -  Four credits in Advanced Placement, or dual credit selected from English, mathematics, science, social studies, economics, languages other than English, or fine arts.

Workforce Development –

Four advanced courses from within one endorsement area

OR

Among endorsement areas that are not in a coherent sequence;

Provided they prepare a student to successfully enter college or the workforce without remediation.

Arts and Humanities Endorsements

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Sample Personal Graduation Plan for Arts and Humanities Area of Study

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9th

Science

Math

English I,

Pre-AP Eng I,

GT Pre-AP Eng 1, ASPIRE Pre-AP Eng. I

World Geo, Pre-AP World Geo, AP Human Geo, GT AP Human Geo, ASPIRE AP Human Geo

LOTE*

Health*/ Prof Communication*

Fine Arts*

Endorsement/

Elective*

10th

Science

Math

English II,

Pre-AP Eng II,

GT Pre-AP Eng 1I

World Hist, Pre-AP World Hist, AP World Hist, GT AP World Hist

LOTE*

PE*

Technology Credit*

Endorsement/

Elective*

11th

Science

Math

English III,

Pre-AP Eng III, AP Lang & Comp,

GT AP Lang & Comp,

Dual Credit English

US Hist, Pre-AP US Hist, AP US Hist, GT AP US Hist

Endorse-ment/

Elective

Endorse- ment/

Elective*

Endorse-

ment/

Elective*

Endorsement/

Elective*

12th

Science

Math

English IV, AP Lang & Comp, AP Lit & Comp,

GT AP Lang & Comp, GT AP Lit & Comp,

Dual Credit English

Gov’t/Econ, AP Gov/AP Microeconomics

Endorse- ment/

Elective

Endorse- ment/

Elective*

Endorse-

ment/

Elective*

Endorsement/

Elective*

*  Designated courses may be completed at any grade level

Additional Courses Directly Related to the Humanities Area of Study

Social Studies Strand

Students will take 1 credit from the following list:

English Strand

Students will take 3 credits from the following list:

LOTE Strand

Students will take 4 foreign language credits in one of the following ways:

Fine Arts Strand

Students will take 4 credits in the same Fine Arts area

or

Students take two credits in different Fine Arts areas (two credits in each of two different fine arts areas for 4 credits.

AP European History (1 Credit)

Independent Study in English (1/2 to 3 credits)

4 credits in same language (Chinese, French, German, Latin, Spanish)

Band I-IV (Various Courses)

Band Guard/Dance Guard I-IV

AP Comparative Government and Politics (1/2 Credit)

Creative Writing 1 (1/2 credit)

2 credits in 2 of the offered languages (ASL, Chinese, French, German, Latin, Spanish) for a total of 4 credits

Choir I-IV (Various Courses)

Psychology (1/2 Credit)

Literary Genre: World Literature (1/2 credit)

Dance I-IV

Dance Team I-IV (Various Courses)

Band Guard/Dance Guard I-IV

AP Psychology (1 Credit)

Literary Genre: Shakespeare (1/2 credit)

Theater I-IV (Various Courses)

Sociology (1/2 Credit)

The Bible as Literature (1/2 credit)

Art I

Art Ceramics I-III

Art Drawing I-III

Art Painting I-III

Art Sculpture I-III

Art PAP 2D Studio

Art PAP 3D Studio

Art AP Drawing

Portfolio

Art AP 2D Portfolio

Art AP 3D Portfolio

Art Portfolio Independent Study

Art PAP History

Art AP History

Professional Communications (1/2 credit)

*Additional Recommended Music Courses:

Music Theory Pre-AP

Music Theory AP

Debate I, II, III (1 credit each)

CTE Endorsements

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In order for a student to receive a CTE endorsement, they must successfully complete a coherent sequence of 3 or more courses for 4 or more credits within that endorsement area while observing all prerequisites; the last course within the sequence must be an advanced course.  All advanced courses are notated with an asterisk.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9th

Science

Math

English

Social Studies

LOTE

Health/Prof Communication

Fine Arts

Endorsement/

Elective

10th

Science

Math

English

Social Studies

LOTE

PE

Technology Credit

Endorsement/

Elective

11th

Science

Math

English

Social Studies

Endorsement/Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

12th

Science

Math

English

Social Studies

Endorsement/Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Note:  Professional Communications and Touch Systems Data Entry combined can be embedded into any of the CTE endorsement areas for 1 credit

CTE Business and Industry

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Business Administration, Marketing, and Finance

Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance

Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology Mgt.

Touch Systems Data Entry

Professional Communications

Professional Communications

Small Animal Management

Business Information Management I

Floral Design

Global Business

Livestock Production

Virtual Business

Equine Science

Entrepreneurship

Advanced Floral Design*

Banking and Financial Services

Veterinary Medical Applications*

Securities and Investments

Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies*

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

Agricultural Structures Design and Fabrication*

Fashion Marketing

Advanced Animal Science*

Financial Mathematics

Practicum in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources – Veterinary Medicine “Vet Tech”*

Accounting I*

Business Information Management II*

Accounting II*

Practicum in Business*

Practicum in Business Extended*

Practicum in Marketing*

Practicum in Marketing Extended*

Information Technology/Media

Hospitality and Tourism

Touch Systems Data Entry

Principles of Hospitality and Tourism

Professional Communication

Professional Communication

Principles of Arts, Audio, Video Technology, and Communications

Introduction to Culinary Arts

Digital Media

Culinary Arts I*

Video Game Design

Practicum In Culinary Arts*

Audio/Video Production I

Graphic Design and Illustration*

Animation*

        

Web Technologies*

Computer Maintenance*

Advanced Audio/Video Production*

Practicum in Computer Technician*

Advanced Video Game Design*

Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics

Principles of Transportation Systems

Professional Communication

Basic Collision Repair and Refinishing

Automotive Basics

Collision Repair*

Automotive Technology I:  Maintenance and Light Repair*

Paint and Refinishing*

Automotive Technology II: Automotive Service*

CTE Public Services

Law Public Safety and Corrections

Health Science

Principles of Law Public Safety and Corrections

Principles of Health Science

Professional Communication

Medical Terminology

Law Enforcement I

Professional Communications

Court Systems and Practices*

Medical Microbiology

Law Enforcement II*

Pathophysiology

Anatomy and Physiology

Human Services

Health Science Theory*

Health Science Theory/Clinical*

Principles of Human Services

Practicum in Health Science - EMT*

Professional Communication

Practicum in Health Science - CNA*

Child Development

Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness

Child Guidance*

Practicum in Human Services - Education*

Food Science (Bridges Only)*

CTE STEM

Engineering

Principles of Applied Engineering

Touch Systems Data Entry

Professional Communications

Engineering Presentation and Design I

Robotics I*

Engineering Presentation and Design II*

STEM Endorsement

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In order for a student to receive a STEM endorsement, they must successfully complete a coherent sequence of 3 or more courses for 4 or more credits within that endorsement area while observing all prerequisites; the last course within the sequence must be an advanced course.  

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9th

Biology or

Chemistry

Algebra I

or

Geometry or Algebra II

English I

Social Studies

LOTE

Health/Prof Communication

Fine Arts

Endorsement/

Elective

10th

Chemistry or Physics

Geometry

or Algebra II

English II

Social Studies

LOTE

PE

Technology Credit

Endorsement/

Elective

11th

Physics or

Adv. Sci

Algebra II or Geometry

or

Pre-Calculus

English III

Social Studies

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

12th

Physics or

Adv. Sci.

Pre-Calculus or

Adv. Math

English IV

Social Studies

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Endorsement/

Elective

Courses Directly Related to the STEM Area of Study

Advanced Math

Advanced Science

AP Calculus AB

AP Biology

AP Calculus BC

AP Chemistry

Pre-AP Statistics

AP Physics 1

AP Statistics

AP Physics 2

AP Computer Science A

AP Physics C

Independent Study in Mathematics: Multivariable Calculus

AP Environmental Science

Independent Study in Mathematics: Differential Equations

CTE

Engineering (*indicates Advanced Course)

Principles of Applied Engineering

Touch Systems Data Entry

Professional Communications

Engineering Presentation and Design I

Robotics I*

Advanced Engineering Presentation and Design II*

Performance Acknowledgements

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Advanced Coursework

OR

Bilingualism/Bi-literacy Coursework

AND

OR

OR

OR

OR

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS ONLY

In addition to above requirements, students must also

AND

Advanced Examination

A score of 3 or higher on a College Board AP Exam

AP Capstone Certificate or Diploma

College Readiness Examination

OR

OR

OR

Workforce Readiness

OR

Grapevine Colleyville ISD Local Graduation Requirements

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26 credits required for graduation

**The removal of the technology credit requirement will be in effect for current 8th graders (class of 2022) and below. This option will provide students with more flexibility in their selection of courses and allow them to reach advanced level offerings.

GPA / Class Ranking

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Academic Achievement - Class Ranking        

Policy EIC (LOCAL)

CLASS RANK

Class rank shall not be calculated or reported except for students in the top ten percent of a given class as required by state law. The District shall provide students ranked in the top ten percent a certification of class rank containing the student’s numerical rank in class.  The District shall not report class rank on the student’s academic transcript.

REPORTING PERIOD

Beginning at the end of the spring semester of the 2013-2014 school year, class rank shall be determined and reported to the top ten percent of students and then once a year thereafter.

After each calculation period, students in the top ten percent shall be notified of their exact class rank.  The lowest weighted grade point average (GPA) used to determine class rank earned by a student currently in the top ten percent of the class shall be communicated to all students in the class after each calculation period.

CALCULATION FOR

STUDENTS ENTERING

GRADE 9 IN THE

2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR

For the students who entered grade 9 in the 2013-2014 school year, the weighted GPA shall include semester grades earned in all high school credit courses taken in grades 9-12 only, except as excluded in this policy.

EXCLUSIONS

The calculation of weighted GPA shall exclude grades earned:

  1. In the summer school session between grades 8 and 9.
  2. In summer school for the purpose of credit recovery;
  3. Through credit by examination, with or without prior instruction; or
  4. Through a traditional correspondence course.  The District shall not exclude

distance-learning courses taken through the Texas Virtual School Network (TxVSN).

        

Students in the top ten percent, including the valedictorian and salutatorian, shall be determined using weighted semester grades earned in the five core areas of English, mathematics, science, social studies, and Languages Other Than English (LOTE) as well as any Advanced Placement (AP) courses not associated with these subjects. The eligible courses shall be listed in the Program of Studies.

WEIGHTED GRADE

POINT AVERAGE (GPA)

The District shall weight the grades in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), and Pre-AP courses, in accordance with provisions of this policy.  Effective in the 2014-2015 school year, all dual credit courses will receive a weight equivalent to Pre-AP.  Additionally, any course that requires an AP course as a prerequisite shall be calculated with the same weight as an AP course.

WEIGHTED GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)

FOR STUDENTS ENTERING GRADES 9 AND 10

IN THE 2014-2015 SCHOOL YEAR & BEYOND

The District shall convert semester grades to grade points and shall calculate a weighted GPA in accordance with the following chart.

Grade

AP

Pre-AP

Regular

97-100

6.0

5.0

4.0

94-96

5.8

4.8

3.8

90-93

5.6

4.6

3.6

87-89

5.4

4.4

3.4

84-86

5.2

4.2

3.2

80-83

5.0

4.0

3.0

77-79

4.8

3.8

2.8

74-76

4.6

3.6

2.6

71-73

4.4

3.4

2.4

70

4.2

3.2

2.2

TRANSFERRED GRADES

When a student transfers grades for properly documented courses, the District shall assign AP weight to AP and IB course grades; however, the District shall assign Pre-AP weight to transferred Pre-AP, Pre-IB, or honors course grades only if the same courses are offered to the same class of students in the District and if:

  1. The district in which the credit was earned has administered an AP or IB exam; or

  1. The course is intended to prepare students for a subsequent course in which an AP or IB exam would be administered.

LOCAL GRADUATION HONORS

For the purpose of determining honors to be conferred during graduation activities, the District shall calculate class rank at the end of the fifth six-week grading period of the senior year.  The average of the fourth and fifth six-week grades shall be used as the semester grade for this purpose.  For the purpose of applications to institutions of higher education, the District shall also calculate class ranking as required by state law.  The district’s eligibility criteria for local graduation honors shall apply only for local recognitions and shall not restrict class ranking for the purpose of automatic admission under state law.

[See EIC (LEGAL)

HIGHEST RANKING GRADUATE

The student meeting the local eligibility criteria for recognition, as the valedictorian shall also be considered the highest ranking graduate for purposes of receiving the scholarship certificate from the State of Texas.

VALEDICTORIAN AND SALUTATORIAN

The valedictorian and salutatorian shall be the eligible students with the highest and second highest ranking, respectively.  To be eligible for such recognition, a student must:

  1. Have been continuously enrolled in the same high school in the District for the three

semesters immediately preceding graduation; and

  1. Be graduating after four entire school years of enrollment in high school.

BREAKING TIES

In case of a tie, GPAs shall be calculated to the number of decimal places necessary to break the tie.  In the event that a tie is unable to be broken using this method, the following criteria shall be used sequentially to the extent necessary to break a tie.

STUDENT GRADUATING IN FEWER THAN FOUR YEARS

A student graduating in fewer than four entire school years of enrollment in high school shall not be eligible for recognition as the official valedictorian or salutatorian of a graduating class.  However, if a student graduating in fewer than four entire school years of enrollment in high school has a weighted GPA equal to or higher than that of the four year official valedictorian or salutatorian, the District shall recognize the student as the valedictorian or salutatorian of students graduating in one year, two years, or three years, as appropriate.

Courses that will be included in the Ranking GPA calculation:

English Language Arts

English I

Pre-AP English I

GT Pre-AP English I

ASPIRE Pre-AP English I

English I- For Speakers of Languages Other Than English

English II

Pre-AP English II

GT Pre-AP English II

English II – For Speakers of Languages Other Than English

English III

English III Dual Enrollment

Pre-AP English III

AP Language and Composition (counted toward either English III or English IV)

GT AP Language and Composition (counted toward either English III or English IV)

English IV

English IV Dual Enrollment

AP Literature and Composition (English IV)

GT AP Literature and Composition (English IV)

AP Seminar

AP Research

Math

Algebra I

Pre-AP Algebra I

Geometry

Pre-AP Geometry

GT Pre-AP Geometry

Mathematical Models with Applications

Algebra II

Pre-AP Algebra II

GT Pre-AP Algebra II

Advanced Algebra

PreCalculus

Pre-AP Precalculus

GT Pre-AP Precalculus

Pre-AP Calculus

AP Calculus AB

GT AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus BC

Pre-AP Statistics

AP Statistics

AP Computer Science A II

Independent Study in Computer Science

Independent Study in Mathematics/College Algebra Dual Enrollment

Multivariable Calculus

Differential Equations

Financial Mathematics

Science

Pre-AP Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC)

Biology

Pre-AP Biology

AP Biology

Advanced Topics in Biology

Chemistry

Pre-AP Chemistry

GT Pre-AP Chemistry

AP Chemistry

Physics

Food Science - only offered at Bridges Accelerated Learning Center

AP Physics C - Mechanics

AP Physics C - Electricity and Magnetism

AP Physics 1

AP Physics 2

Environmental Systems

AP Environmental Science

Anatomy and Physiology

Astronomy

Aquatic Science

Forensic Science

Advanced Animal Science

Medical Microbiology

Pathophysiology

Scientific Research and Design:  Advanced Studies in Physics

Social Studies

World Geography

Pre-AP World Geography

AP Human Geography

GT AP Human Geography

ASPIRE AP Human Geography

World History

Pre-AP World History

AP World History

GT AP World History

United States History

Pre-AP United States History

Dual Enrollment United States History

AP United States History

GT AP United States History

AP European History

United States Government

United States Government Dual Enrollment

AP United States Government

GT AP United States Government

AP Comparative Government and Politics

Economics

Principles of Microeconomics Dual Enrollment

AP Microeconomics

GT AP Microeconomics

AP Psychology

AP Seminar

AP Research

Languages Other Than English (LOTE)

American Sign Language I

American Sign Language II

American Sign Language III

American Sign Language IV (Independent Study)

Chinese I

Pre-AP Chinese II

Pre-AP Chinese III

AP Chinese IV

Chinese Cultural and Linguistic Topics (Independent Study)

French I

Pre-AP French II

Pre-AP French III

AP French IV

French Cultural and Linguistic Topics (Independent Study)

German I

Pre-AP German II

Pre-AP German III

AP German IV

German Cultural and Linguistic Topics (Independent Study)

Latin I

Pre-AP Latin II

Pre-AP Latin III

AP Latin IV

Latin Cultural and Linguistic Topics (Independent Study)

Spanish I

Spanish II

Pre-AP Spanish II

Pre-AP Spanish III

Pre-AP Spanish III For Spanish Speakers

Spanish Cultural and Linguistic Topics

AP Spanish IV Language and Culture

AP Spanish IV Language and Culture for Spanish Speakers

AP Spanish V Literature

Spanish Cultural and Linguistic Topics

Fine Arts

AP Two Dimensional Portfolio

AP Drawing Portfolio

AP Three Dimensional Portfolio

AP Art History

Art History Seminar

AP Music Theory

Computer Science

AP Computer Science A

Computer Science III

AP Computer Science Principles

Independent Study in Technology Applications

Pre-AP / AP / Gifted and Talented Placement

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Middle School Pre-Advanced Placement classes provide the foundation for entering the Pre-AP/AP program at the high school level.  In middle school, Pre-Advanced Placement courses in the four core areas will cover grade level curriculum with greater depth and complexity.  These courses will NOT be accelerated and will provide more flexibility in course selection and student scheduling.  A student profile that provides guidance criteria for Pre-AP classes is available in the counselor’s office.  Students who enroll in Pre-AP classes should be task committed and have good time management skills.

Pre-Advanced Placement classes are also offered at the high school level and provide strategies and skills recommended to enter the Advanced Placement program.  Advanced Placement classes are offered in the four core areas as well as computer science, the Arts, and foreign languages.  Students in Advanced Placement courses will be strongly encouraged to take an Advanced Placement examination in each course.  The fee per AP exam is approximately $94 and the fee per AP Seminar and AP Research are approximately $142.  Significant fee reductions are available for students qualifying for free and reduced lunch.  Check with your counselor to learn more about eligibility requirements for College Board fee reductions, state and district subsidies, and other support that may be available.  If students choose not to take the College Board exam, students will take the district version of an Advanced Placement test.  The district version of an AP test will be considered as the semester exam grade and be weighted accordingly.  Of course, the AP College Board exam should be the goal of every student enrolled in an Advanced Placement course.  Students enrolled in GT/Pre-AP/AP courses are encouraged to carefully consider the academic load in which they are registering.  Students who enroll in Advanced Placement classes should be task committed, have good time management skills, and be able to handle the rigor of a college level class.

Pre-AP and AP course instructors are required to receive gifted education professional learning in instructional strategies and the needs of the gifted. GT Pre-AP and GT AP courses include increased content depth and complexity.

 

Gifted students at the middle school level are served through GT Discoveries, integrated Pre-AP English Language Arts and Pre-AP Social Studies courses, and may also elect to enroll in Accelerated Math and Accelerated Science.  GT Independent Study is a middle school elective option.

 

Gifted high school students may enroll in GT Pre-AP English 1, GT Pre-AP English 2, GT AP Language and Composition (counted toward English III or English IV), and GT AP Literature and Composition (counted toward English IV).  GT AP Human Geography, GT AP World History, GT AP US History, GT AP Government, and GT AP Economics are also available to gifted high school students.  

ASPIRE Academy courses meet the needs of highly gifted students who require significant curricular modifications in the classroom environment. In addition to differentiation of the core curriculum, the ASPIRE Academy curriculum will be aligned to state and NAGC standards, incorporate and utilize resources that will add depth complexity and appropriate pacing through enrichment and extension.

AP Capstone Certificate or Diploma

College Board AP Capstone

Students typically take AP Seminar in the 10th or 11th grade, followed by AP Research. Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research and on four additional AP Exams of their choosing will receive the AP Capstone Diploma™. This signifies their outstanding academic achievement and attainment of college-level academic and research skills.

Alternatively, students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research will receive the AP Seminar and Research Certificate™ signifying their attainment of college-level academic and research skills.

        

Career Planning Resources 

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College Board

www.collegeboard.org        

The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the College Board is composed of more than 6,000 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,800 colleges through major programs and services in college readiness, college admission, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT® and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns.

Federal Student Aid

http://studentaid.ed.gov/sa

The Department of Education's Federal Student Aid programs are the largest source of student aid in America. If you're interested in financial aid for college or a career school, you've come to the right place. Visit the website to find out more and how to apply for this aid.

Reality Check

https://texasrealitycheck.com/

This site allows students to search for careers starting with the expenses they need to cover, the salaries they want to make, and their career choices.

Career Information
www.careeronestop.org

This is the place to search for career, training, and job search information.

Interlink

www.interlink-ntx.org

Solving the workforce puzzle by bridging the gap between business and education.

Middle School Program of Studies

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MS Table of Contents

Sixth Grade Required Courses

Sixth Grade Elective Courses

Seventh Grade Required Courses

Seventh Grade Elective Courses

Eighth Grade Required Courses

Eighth Grade Elective Courses

All Foreign Language Courses

Special Education Course Offerings - Sixth Grade

Special Education Course Offerings - Seventh Grade

Special Education Course Offerings - Eighth Grade

Sixth Grade Required Courses

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Pre-AP courses in the four core areas for students entering 6th grade will cover grade level curriculum with greater depth and complexity.  These courses will NOT be accelerated and will allow for more flexibility in course selection and student scheduling.   Gifted and Talented students will continue to be served through the Discoveries program (an integrated language arts and social studies class) as well as through Accelerated Math and Accelerated Science.  These two accelerated courses cover content from multiple grade levels with compacted curricula.  GT requirements appear at the front of this booklet.  One course in Fine Arts is required during 6th, 7th or 8th grade.

English Language Arts

Course No. M0609

Semesters:  2

Students in 6th grade language arts participate in a course of study which includes advanced oral and written language development. Critical reading skills are developed through a wide variety of diverse materials including classic and contemporary literature and informational texts. Students are expected to analyze information from multiple sources to form relationships among ideas. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization and punctuation.

Pre-Advanced Placement English Language Arts

Course No. M0610

English Language Arts / STEM

Course No. M0610S

Semesters:  2

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s Pre-AP and gifted and talented language arts students. Note taking, oral presentations, advanced study of word origins, critical reading and writing skills and multiple opportunities for research are major instructional targets. Readings include a study of classic literature, mythology, and fantasy. Students are expected to analyze information from multiple sources to form relationships among ideas.  Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation. Students must possess advanced language abilities and have a sincere interest in the areas of reading and language arts.

GT World Discoveries  

ELA Course No. M0611

History Course No. M0618

ASPIRE GT World Discoveries

ELA Course No. MA0611

History Course No. MA0618

Semesters:  2

Meet qualifications for ASPIRE placement

This course will be comprised of the objectives from language arts and social studies, as well as, gifted education practices to meet the needs of gifted learners. It provides an opportunity for identified gifted/talented students to see the relationship between reading, writing, and history. Included in the course will be the study of art, music, literature, architecture, geography, culture, government, and folklore of the cultures of the contemporary world. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.  World Discoveries also provides opportunities for extended learning, possible field trips to local historical sites, and hands-on experiences.  This course requires a high level of reading, comprehension, and writing skills.

Social Studies:  World Cultures

Course No. M0642

Semesters:  2

This course is a study of people and places of the contemporary world and their historical development.  The concepts of limited and unlimited government are introduced and the students describe the nature of citizenship in various societies.  Institutions common to all societies of government, economics, education, and religion are compared. Respect for cultural diversities of the world is highlighted as a citizenship skill.  Map and globe skills, chart and graph skills, reading, writing, and problem solving skills are stressed throughout the course.

Pre-AP Social Studies: World Cultures

Course No. M0644

Social Studies: World Cultures / STEM

Course No. M0644S

Semesters:  2

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s Pre-AP and gifted and talented social studies students. Students study the development of cultural areas of the contemporary world.  Focus is placed on the use of knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of historical inquiry, to describe patterns of change within and across the cultures of the world.  Writing to understand historical developments is emphasized as students learn to interpret primary documents and gain historical perspectives of today’s world.

This course will provide a greater degree of depth and complexity.

Math

Course No. M0622

Semesters:  2

Focal points in mathematics at grade 6 are using operations with integers and positive rational numbers to solve problems, understanding and applying ratios and rates and using equivalent ratios to represent proportional relationships, using expressions and equations to represent relationships in a variety of contexts, understanding data representation, and financial literacy.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

Pre-Advanced Placement Math

Course No. M0624

Semesters:  2

This course is designed to provide students with opportunity for entry into Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the high school level.  Sixth grade TEKS will be taught with an introduction to Pre-AP strategies incorporated throughout the course.  Students will engage in learning of sixth grade curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

Accelerated Math

Course No. M0626

Accelerated Math / STEM

Course No. M0626S

Accelerated Math / ASPIRE

Course No. MA0626

Semesters:  2

Prerequisite:  Meet qualifications for GT or accelerated placement in mathematics

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Pre-AP/AP courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s accelerated or gifted and talented mathematics students. All of sixth and part of seventh grade TEKS objectives are compacted to prepare the student for Accelerated Math in seventh grade.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course. Students must possess advanced facility with numbers and have a sincere interest in mathematics

Science

Course No. M0632

Semesters:  2

Grade 6 science is interdisciplinary in nature. Enduring understandings in Science transcend disciplinary boundaries and include change and constancy, patterns, cycles, systems, models, and scale.   As students engage in inquiry-based scientific investigations and reasoning they will learn science in the following conceptual strands:   Matter and Energy; Force, Motion and Energy; Earth and Space Science; and Organisms and Environments.  

Pre-Advanced Placement Science

Course No. M0634

Semesters:  2

This course is designed to provide students with opportunity for entry into Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the high school level.  This science course is interdisciplinary in nature. Enduring understandings in Science transcend disciplinary boundaries and include change and patterns, cycles, systems, models, and scale.

As students engage in inquiry-based scientific investigations and reasoning they will learn science in the following conceptual strands:   Matter and Energy; Force, Motion and Energy; Earth and Space Science; and Organisms and Environments. Curriculum will be taught with an introduction to Pre-AP strategies incorporated throughout the course.  Students will engage in learning activities with increased depth and complexity.

Accelerated Science

Course No. M0636

Accelerated Science /STEM

Course No. M0636S

Accelerated Science /ASPIRE

Course No. MA0636

Semesters:  2

Prerequisite:  Meet qualifications for GT or accelerated placement in Science

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the school level and meet the needs of the district’s advanced and gifted/talented students. This science course is interdisciplinary in nature.  Enduring understandings in Science transcend disciplinary boundaries and include change and constancy, patterns, cycles, systems, models, and scale.   As students engage in inquiry-based scientific investigations and reasoning they will learn science in the following conceptual strands:   Matter and Energy; Force, Motion and Energy; Earth and Space Science; and Organisms and Environments.  Students will receive compacted instruction including standards from sixth, seventh and eighth grades.  Students will engage in learning activities with increased depth and complexity.

Physical Education / Health

Course No. M0650

The emphasis in the sixth grade PE program is on understanding, measuring, monitoring, and improving the relationship of physical activity and health as a lifetime skill.  Students acquire physical skills through instruction, demonstration, practice, and assessment.  These various skills will be used in drills and/or lead-up games for a variety of individual and team sports.  Through the use of technology, students will learn to measure their own performance more accurately and develop plans for improvement.  Students are required to suit out in proper uniform.

In health education an emphasis is placed on acquiring knowledge and skills regarding healthy behaviors, understanding puberty and the reproductive process.  Abstinence-based programs such as Choosing the Best, Aim for Success, and Life Skills Training are major components in providing this health information.  Play It Safe, a TEKS-based program, addresses a variety of contemporary topics such as sexual harassment, sexual abuse, and other pertinent issues in an age-appropriate manner. Parent previews will precede presentation of all materials related to human sexuality.

Sixth Grade Elective Courses

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In addition to the core ELA course selection, students are required to select from one of the following ELA electives. (Due to the nature of the curriculum, students are expected to enroll in 2 ELA courses in each school year for 6th and 7th grade.)

The school reserves the right to cancel any course if there is insufficient enrollment or if certified staff is unavailable to teach the course.  

There may be additional material costs associated with these courses for which the student will be responsible.

STEM Causes and Effects (GMS ONLY)

Course No. M6101S

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: Participation in STEM Program

Students will explore, discover, and tap into their understanding of the world around them through the engineering design process. The Engineering Design Process, in conjunction with ELA curriculum objectives related to listening, speaking, research, and technical writing will drive the tasks. Students will come to a greater understanding of the design process through the use of current event articles.  Students will explore engineering careers. This course will conclude with a culminating project applying learned concepts.

AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination )

Course No. M0429

Semesters 2

Prerequisite: Application, interview, Instructor Approval

AVID is designed as a college-readiness course to support students in building skills around organization, academic behaviors, critical thinking, probing questioning, critical reading, and analytical writing. Students will be exposed to reading strategies that will assist in vocabulary building and understanding a variety of texts, and will also focus on prewriting techniques, summary writing, and structural components of note-taking. The AVID curriculum is driven by the WICOR method, which stands for writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization and reading. The tools used in this course will help students to be more successful readers, writers, and thinkers in the more rigorous courses in which they will also be expected to enroll (i.e. Pre-AP and Accelerated middle school offerings).

GT Independent Study

Course No. M06436

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: GT Identification

In this open-ended course offering, students will be allowed to design a project or course of learning according to their interests. The required components of this course will be research, reading, and writing. The work will culminate with a presentation of their work to an audience of peers, teachers, and middle school administrators.

Literacy Achievement

Course No. M06442

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite: Documented weakness in reading (i.e. STAAR failure, etc…)

This course is designed to strengthen students’ reading and writing skills to ensure grade-level proficiency with academic tasks and expectations. Students enrolling in this course will have demonstrated a need for intervention on STAAR or other assessment or coursework. Through a wide variety of targeted experiences in reading and writing with authentic texts, students will build skills that will transfer to success on assessments.

Considerations:  This course is designed to support and accelerate students who have demonstrated needs in reading and/or writing.

Project Language Arts (PLA)
Course No. M1644

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite:  none

Students will develop their 21st century skill-set inspired by the GCISD’s Portrait of a Graduate lens and the new Texas ELA standards. Students will develop a love and passion for reading and writing while demonstrating their learning through creative performance-based assessments. Through this course, students will become effective communicators in an increasingly digital world.

English Acquisition

Course No. M06443

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite:  ELL status

In this course, students new to the English language will have the opportunity to build vocabulary and strengthen their English speaking, reading, and writing abilities. The design of this course will be to support ELL students in both social/conversational language acquisition and development of English skills to support content learning in other middle school coursework.

Considerations:  This course is designed to support students who are newly acquiring the English language.

Careers in Engineering and Coding

Course No. M0660                                    

This course is recommended for students in Grade 6.

The goal of this course is to create a culture of high expectation and continuous improvement that provides middle school students with a foundation for success in high school, future studies, and careers. Students explore college and career planning within specific career cluster(s). The students research labor market information, learn job-seeking skills, and create documents required for employment. Students use self-knowledge to explore and set realistic goals. Districts have the flexibility of offering career exploration knowledge and skills in a variety of instructional arrangements.


Math Investigations 6
Course No. M06250

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite: Documented need in mathematics

This course is recommended for students in Grade 6.

This course is designed to strengthen students’ mathematics skills to ensure grade-level proficiency with academic tasks and expectations. Students enrolling in this course will have demonstrated a need for intervention on STAAR or other assessment or coursework. Through a wide variety of targeted experiences in mathematics, students will build skills that will transfer to success on assessments.
Considerations:  This course is designed to support and accelerate students who have demonstrated needs in mathematics.

Art I

Course No. M06706

Art is designed for students with strong interests in exploring many art disciplines and media.  Each area of study focuses on critical thinking and problem solving as students develop their artistic skills.  There is an emphasis on art history, multi-cultural events, and customs through varied art projects.  Areas of study are drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, fibers, papermaking, paper mache, and computer technology.  There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.

THEATRE ARTS 

Theatre I

Course No. M08766

Theatre I at the 6th grade level is a beginning Creative Dramatics class. It introduces young performers to blocking, stage movement, and projection through ensemble collaboration. Performers gain self-confidence, and develop speaking, presentation and problem solving skills. Creative dramatics leads students into self-expression and communication in a dramatic form. Units covered may include acting, improvisation, mime and movement, puppetry, storytelling, ensemble, and team building.

MUSIC

This course provides students with a general overview into the realm of music. Emphasis is placed on basic music reading and performance etiquette.

Choir - Beginning Men

Course No. M06576

Semesters: 2

This is the beginning choir and requires no audition.

The program strives to allow students to gain musical Knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. Emphasis is placed on proper singing techniques, music reading skills, and performance etiquette.  These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity to engage in field trips, choir competitions and other extra activities. Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances. Required Materials/Fees for choir vary per campus to cover the needed performance uniform.

Choir - Beginning Women

Course No. M06566 

Semesters: 2

This is the beginning choir and requires no audition.

The program strives to allow students to gain musical Knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. Emphasis is placed on proper singing techniques, music reading skills, and performance etiquette.  These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity to engage in field trips, choir competitions and other extra activities. Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances.

Required Materials/Fees for choir vary per campus to cover the needed performance uniform.

BAND

Various Course Numbers

Semesters: 2

The Beginning Band program introduces the student to his/her musical instrument and spends the first year in small instrument-specific classes teaching basic fundamentals of playing instruments. The beginning band performs at the annual Winter Concert, Solo & Ensemble Concert, Spring Concert, and Spring Music competition. Discipline, teamwork, and positive self-esteem are stressed. Parents of students selected for beginning band will be contacted by the band director to set up an appointment to decide which instrument is best for the child. Instrument choice is determined by physical characteristics, desire of the student, and needs of the band program. Most parents obtain instruments through a rental program, designated instruments are available through the school for a fee of $50 per semester.

Pre-Athletic P.E.

Course No. M0846B - Boys

Course No. M0846G - Girls

Semesters: 2

Sixth grade physical education designed to relate terminology, skills, movements, and techniques of team sports relative to current team sports offered in the district.

Seventh Grade Required Courses

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Pre-AP courses in the four core areas for students entering 7th grade will cover grade level curriculum with greater depth and complexity.  These courses will NOT be accelerated and will allow for more flexibility in course selection and student scheduling. Gifted and Talented students will continue to be served through the Discoveries program (an integrated language arts and social studies class) as well as through Accelerated Math and Accelerated Science.  These two accelerated courses cover content from multiple grade levels with compacted curricula.  GT requirements appear at the front of this booklet.

English Language Arts

Course No. M07602

Semesters:  2

In grade seven, students refine and apply oral and written communication skills. Critical reading skills are developed through a wide variety of diverse materials including classical and contemporary literature and informational texts. Students are expected to analyze information from multiple sources to form relationships among ideas. Students apply literary and expository writing skills, research skills, the use of technology, and the analysis of visual literacy in a variety of genres. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation

Pre-Advanced Placement English Language Arts

Course No. M07607

Pre-Advanced Placement English Language Arts / STEM

Course No. M7607S

Semesters:  2

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s Pre-AP and gifted and talented language arts students. Students refine and apply advanced oral and written communication skills such as note taking, oral presentations, and advanced study of word origins through both guided and independent studies. Students are expected to read advanced selections with greater depth and attention to the relationship of how literary elements work to enhance the story plot. Students write for a variety of audiences and purposes to communicate research findings and explore different genres. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization and punctuation. Students must possess advanced language abilities and have a sincere interest in the areas of reading and language arts.

 

GT Texas Discoveries

ELA Course No. M0708

History Course No. M0718

Prerequisite:  Meet qualifications for GT placement

ASPIRE Texas Discoveries

ELA Course No. MA0708

History Course No. MA0718

Prerequisite:  Meet qualifications for ASPIRE placement

This course replaces Language Arts (reading, English) and Texas history for 7th grade GT students.  The Texas Discoveries at the seventh grade level will provide the opportunity for identified gifted/talented students to see the relationship between geography, culture, government, and folklore based on gifted education practices to meet the needs of gifted learners. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation. Texas Discoveries also provides opportunities for extended learning, possible field trips to local historical sites, and hands-on experiences. This course requires a high level of reading, comprehension, and writing skills as well as the Parallel Curriculum Model to meet the needs of gifted learners.

             Social Studies

Texas History

Course No. M0742

This course is a study of Texas geography, history, government, economics, and people from the prehistoric period to the present.  Emphasis is placed on the diversity of the land, the diversity of cultures and the rich heritage created by the people of many different cultures in developing the land that is Texas.  The course promotes skills such as critical thinking, comprehension, drawing conclusions, cooperative learning, research, geographic navigation, map reading, editing, writing, vocabulary usage, and study skills.

Pre-Advanced Placement

Social Studies:Texas History

Course No. M0744

Pre-Advanced Placement

Social Studies: Texas History/STEM

Course No. M0744S

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s Pre-AP and gifted and talented history students.  This course challenges students by extending social studies skills and broadening their knowledge base of Texas History.  Activities include the study and analysis of primary documents, the examination and design of political cartoons both past and present, and experiential exercises which bring the history of Texas to life.  Students investigate and interpret/analyze multiple historical/contemporary viewpoints across the cultures of Texas to recognize the many facets of the state’s history.  This course will provide a greater degree of depth and complexity.

Math

Course No. M0722

Prerequisite:    Successful completion of Math grade 6 or equivalent

Focal points in mathematics at grade 7 are developing fluency with rational numbers and operations to solve problems in a variety of contexts; representing and applying proportional relationships; using expressions and equations to describe relationships in a variety of contexts, including geometric problems; comparing sets of data; and financial literacy.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

Pre-Advanced Placement Math

Course No. M0724

Prerequisite:    Successful completion of Math grade 6 or Pre-Advanced Placement Math grade 6 or its equivalent

This course is designed to provide students with opportunity for entry into Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the high school level.    Seventh grade TEKS will be taught with the development of Pre-AP strategies incorporated throughout the course.  Students will engage in learning of seventh grade curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

Accelerated Math

Course No. M0726

Accelerated Math / STEM

Course No. M0726S

Accelerated Math / ASPIRE

Course No. MA0726S

Prerequisite:    Successful completion of Accelerated Math grade 6 or its equivalent

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Pre-AP/AP courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s accelerated or gifted and talented mathematics students.  All of eighth and part of seventh grade TEKS objectives are compacted to prepare the student for eighth grade Pre-AP Algebra I.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.  Students must possess advanced facility with numbers and have a sincere interest in mathematics.

Science

Course No. M0732

Grade 7 science is interdisciplinary in nature. Enduring understandings in Science transcend disciplinary boundaries and include change and constancy, patterns, cycles, systems, models, and scale.   As students engage in inquiry-based scientific investigations and reasoning they will learn science in the following conceptual strands:   Matter and Energy; Force, Motion and Energy; Earth and Space Science; and Organisms and Environments.

Pre-Advanced Placement Science

Course No. M0734

This course is designed to provide students with opportunity for entry into Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the high school level.  This science course is interdisciplinary in nature. Enduring understandings in Science transcend disciplinary boundaries and include change and constancy, patterns, cycles, systems, models, and scale.   As students engage in inquiry-based scientific investigations and reasoning they will learn science in the following conceptual strands:   Matter and Energy; Force, Motion and Energy; Earth and Space Science; and Organisms and Environments.  Curriculum will be taught with Pre-AP strategies incorporated throughout the course.  Students will engage in learning activities with increased depth and complexity.

Accelerated Science

Course No. M0736

Accelerated Science / STEM

Course No. M0736S

Accelerated Science / ASPIRE

Course No. MA0736

Prerequisite:  Meet qualifications for GT or accelerated placement

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the school level and meet the needs of the district’s advanced and gifted/talented students.  This science course is interdisciplinary in nature. Enduring understandings in Science transcend disciplinary boundaries and include change and constancy, patterns, cycles, systems, models, and scale.   As students engage in inquiry-based scientific investigations and reasoning they will learn science in the following conceptual strands:   Matter and Energy; Force, Motion and Energy; Earth and Space Science; and Organisms and Environments.  Students will receive compacted instruction including standards from sixth, seventh and eighth grades.  Students will engage in learning activities with increased depth and complexity.

Physical Education / Health

Course No. M0750

Emphasis in this seventh grade PE program is placed on continued social development through physical activity.  Believing every student can become physically fit, fitness exercises are included daily.  Students acquire physical skills through practice and apply these skills in a variety of sports including volleyball, basketball, badminton, and others.  Technology is used to measure and monitor improvement in fitness.  Students are required to suit out in proper uniform.

In health education an emphasis is placed on acquiring knowledge and skills regarding healthy behaviors, understanding puberty, and the reproductive process.  Abstinence-based programs, such as Choosing the Best, are major components in providing this health information. Play It Safe, a TEKS-based program, addresses a variety of contemporary topics such as sexual harassment, sexual abuse, and other pertinent issues in an age-appropriate manner. Parent previews will precede presentation of all materials related to human sexuality.

ATHLETICS AND HEALTH

BOYS:        Football, basketball, track,

cross country, tennis

Course No. M0745

GIRLS:        Volleyball, basketball, track,

cross country, tennis

Course No. M0755

Athletics is open to seventh grade students interested in an extracurricular activity through competitive sports.  Basic fundamentals of each sport are taught.  Students are expected to participate in at least one sport per semester.

Tryouts are held for each sport when necessary.  Participants MUST HAVE a physical examination, insurance, and parent permission.  Practice will be held before or after school.  The game schedule for next year has not been determined.  Those athletes whose sport is not in season still participate in an off-season conditioning program. In health education an emphasis is placed on acquiring knowledge and skills regarding healthy behaviors, understanding puberty, and the reproductive process.  Abstinence-based programs, such as Choosing the Best, are major components in providing this health information.  Play It Safe, a TEKS-based program, addresses a variety of contemporary topics such as sexual harassment, sexual abuse, and other pertinent issues in an age-appropriate manner.  

This is a FULL YEAR course.  For more information refer to the Athletics policy in the back of this booklet.  Parent previews will precede presentation of all materials related to human sexuality.

Seventh Grade Elective Courses

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In addition to the core ELA course selection, students are required to select from one of the following ELA electives. (Due to the nature of the curriculum, students are expected to enroll in 2 ELA courses in each school year for 6th and 7th grade.)

The school reserves the right to cancel any course if there is insufficient enrollment or if certified staff is unavailable to teach the course.  

There may be additional material costs associated with these courses for which the student will be responsible.

Please See Page 94 For All Middle School Foreign Language Course Offerings.

STEM Causes and Effects (GMS ONLY)

Course No. M7141S

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: Participation in STEM Program

Students will explore, discover, and tap into their understanding of the world around them through the engineering design process. The Engineering Design Process, in conjunction with ELA curriculum objectives related to listening, speaking, research, and technical writing will drive the tasks. Students will come to a greater understanding of the design process through the use of current event articles.  Students will explore engineering careers. This course will conclude with a culminating project applying learned concepts.

AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)

Course No. M0432

Semesters 2

Prerequisite: Application, interview, Instructor Approval

AVID is designed as a college-readiness course to support students in building skills around organization, academic behaviors, critical thinking, probing questioning, critical reading, and analytical writing. Students will be exposed to reading strategies that will assist in vocabulary building and understanding a variety of texts, and will also focus on prewriting techniques, summary writing and structural components of note-taking. The AVID curriculum is driven by the WICOR method, which stands for writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization and reading. The tools used in this course will help students to be more successful readers, writers, and thinkers in the more rigorous courses in which they will also be expected to enroll (i.e. Pre-AP and Accelerated middle school offerings).

GT Independent Study

Course No. M07436

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: GT Identification

In this open-ended course offering, students will be allowed to design a project or course of learning according to their interests. The required components of this course will be research, reading, and writing. The work will culminate with a presentation of their work to an audience of peers, teachers, and middle school administrators.

Literacy Achievement

Course No. M07442

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite: Documented weakness in reading (i.e. STAAR failure, etc…)

This course is designed to strengthen students’ reading and writing skills to ensure grade-level proficiency with academic tasks and expectations. Students enrolling in this course will have demonstrated a need for intervention on STAAR or other assessment or coursework. Through a wide variety of targeted experiences in reading and writing with authentic texts, students will build skills that will transfer to success on assessments.

Considerations:  This course is designed to support and accelerate students who have demonstrated needs in reading and/or writing.


Project Language Arts (PLA)
Course No. M1744

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: none

Students will develop their 21st century skill-set inspired by the GCISD’s Portrait of a Graduate lens and the new Texas ELA standards. Students will develop a love and passion for reading and writing while demonstrating their learning through creative performance-based assessments. Through this course, students will become effective communicators in an increasingly digital world.

English Acquisition

Course No. M07443

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite:  ELL status

In this course, students new to the English language will have the opportunity to build vocabulary and strengthen their English speaking, reading, and writing abilities. The design of this course will be to support ELL students in both social/conversational language acquisition and development of English skills to support content learning in other middle school coursework.

Considerations:  This course is designed to support students who are newly acquiring the English language.

Math Investigations 7
Course No. M07230

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite: Documented need in mathematics

This course is recommended for students in Grade 7.

This course is designed to strengthen students’ mathematics skills to ensure grade-level proficiency with academic tasks and expectations. Students enrolling in this course will have demonstrated a need for intervention on STAAR or other assessment or coursework. Through a wide variety of targeted experiences in mathematics, students will build skills that will transfer to success on assessments.
Considerations:  This course is designed to support and accelerate students who have demonstrated needs in mathematics.

BAND:

Each middle school has multi-level bands with varying names. Students are placed following an audition process. Most parents obtain instruments through a rental program, designated instruments are available through the school for a fee of $50 per semester.

Beginning Band

Various Course Numbers

Semesters:2

The Beginning Band program introduces the student to his/her musical instrument and spends the first year in small classes (percussion, brass, woodwinds, etc.) teaching basic fundamentals of playing instruments. The beginning band performs at the annual Winter Concert, Solo & Ensemble Concert, Spring Concert, and Spring Music competition. Discipline, teamwork, and positive self-esteem are stressed. Parents of students selected for beginning band will be contacted by the band director to set up an appointment to decide which instrument is best for the child. Instrument choice is determined by physical characteristics, desire of the student, and needs of the band program.  Students are placed in ability based bands following an audition process. Levels include: Concert Band, Symphonic Band, and Honors Band. Instrument usage fee: $50 per semester.

Concert Band

Course No. M08907

Semesters:2

This is an intermediate level band for seventh and eighth grade students. Proficiency in the basic fundamentals (tone, rhythm, fingering, etc.) is stressed. Concert Band performances occur in fall and spring.

Symphonic Band

Course No. M08917

Semesters:2

This is an advanced band for seventh and eighth grade students. These students are challenged with more difficult musical literature and required sight-reading skills. Symphonic Band participates in many activities throughout the year including various concerts, solo & ensemble contests, auditions, and UIL competition at the director’s discretion.

Honors Band

Course No. M08927

Semesters:2

This is for more advanced seventh and eighth grade band students. This group is challenged with a higher level of musical literature and sight-reading. Honors Band participates in many activities throughout the year including various concerts, solo & ensemble contests, auditions and UIL competition.

Art I

Course No. M06707

Art is designed for students with strong interests in exploring many art disciplines and media.  Each area of study focuses on critical thinking and problem solving as students develop their artistic skills.  There is an emphasis on art history, multi-cultural events, and customs through varied art projects.  Areas of study are drawing,

painting, sculpture, printmaking, fibers, papermaking, paper mache, and computer technology.  There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.

Art II

Course No. M07707

This is an intermediate level art course in various media and methods in two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.  It includes drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, fibers, and art history as applied to specific projects.  There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.

Advanced Art

Course No. M08707

Prerequisites: Teacher approval

This course is recommended for students who are considering pursuit of advanced art classes in 8th grade and high school. The students are required to develop and maintain a portfolio of work which demonstrates their talent and level of art skills. There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible. 

Choral Program

Students are placed following an audition process that emphasizes music sight reading capability.  Required Materials/Fees for choir vary per campus to cover the needed performance uniform.

Choir - Beginning Men

Course No. M07577

This is the beginning choir and requires no audition.

The program strives to allow students to gain musical Knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. Emphasis is placed on proper singing techniques, music reading skills, and performance etiquette.  These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity to engage in field trips, choir competitions and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances.

Choir - Beginning Women

Course No. M07567

This is the beginning choir and requires no audition.

The program strives to allow students to gain musical Knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. Emphasis is placed on proper singing techniques, music reading skills, and performance etiquette.  These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity to engage in field trips, choir competitions and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances.

Choir - Select Men  (Intermediate)

Course No. M07947

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students and requires an audition or director approval. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. Emphasis is placed on proper singing techniques, music reading and independent sight reading skill development and performance etiquette.  Students perform various types of choral literature and study progressive sight reading materials. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities. Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances.

Choir - Select Women (Intermediate)

Course No. M07937

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students and requires an audition or director approval. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. Emphasis is placed on proper singing techniques, music reading and independent sight reading skill development and performance etiquette.  Students perform various types of choral literature and study progressive sight reading materials. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities. Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances.

Choir - Advanced Men

Course No. M07957

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students by audition only. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. This choir stresses the development of excellent vocal quality and technique, advanced independent sight reading ability, and the development of performance excellence.  Students perform various types of advanced choral literature and study an intensive sight reading program. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances and contests.

Choir - Advanced Women

Course No. M07967

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students by audition only. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. This choir stresses the development of excellent vocal quality and technique, advanced independent sight reading ability, and the development of performance excellence.  Students perform various types of advanced choral literature and study an intensive sight reading program. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances and contests.

Choir - Advanced Mixed  (HMS Only)

Course No. M07977

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students by audition only. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. This choir stresses the development of excellent vocal quality and technique, advanced independent sight reading ability, and the development of performance excellence.  Students perform various types of advanced choral literature and study an intensive sight reading program. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances and contests.

Choir - Vocal Ensemble* (HMS Only)

Course No. M07997

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students by audition only. This choir stresses the development of excellent vocal quality and technique, advanced independent sight reading ability, and the development of performance excellence, emphasizing individual performance techniques. Various types of choral literature are used and some music is performed with choreography. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances and contests.

*Students are required to be concurrently enrolled in one of the program choirs.

THEATRE ARTS:

Theatre I

Course No. M08767

Theatre I at the 7th grade level is designed to introduce the student to the many performing and technical aspects of theatre. Students will learn basic acting techniques (stage movement, developing voice, memorizing lines, etc.), improvisation, mime techniques, character development, basic scene study (group and individual monologues), script analysis and performance critiquing. In small ensembles, duets and individually, students will prepare and perform scenes in class demonstrating these skills.

Theatre II

Course No. M08787

Prerequisite: Theatre I

Theatre II at the 7th grade level builds upon the skills learned in Theatre I. Students will continue to strengthen their acting skills in a variety of theatrical experiences, including reading and writing plays, as well as memorized and improvisational

performance.

Theatre Playbill 7

Course No. M08797

Prerequisites: Audition & Teacher Approval

This year long course gives students the opportunity to prepare and rehearse for events used in competitive speech/theatre tournaments. Participation in tournament competition or a class program is required. Students will develop the ability to work independently in the classroom. Students will also explore on a developmental level, aspects of theatre production as they prepare for performances. Students will experience the entire process of mounting a theatrical production both on and offstage. This class is designed for those students developing an interest in pursuing acting and production in 8th grade and high school.

OTHER ELECTIVES:

Principles of Business Marketing & Finance

Course No. M7729

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  None

Grade Level:  7-8

Students will gain knowledge/skills in economics and private enterprise systems, the impact of global business, marketing goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles.

Middle School Engineering and Robotics

Course No. M0712

Semesters: 2

This course is recommended for students in Grade 7.

The Engineering brings math and science to life for middle school students.  This innovative curriculum keeps students engaged and excited as they apply key concepts to the fundamentals behind electrical, mechanical, civil, environmental and biomedical engineering.  Activities are centered on thirteen 3-week modules covering the various disciplines of engineering.

College and Career Readiness

Course No. M0875

Semesters:  1

This course is recommended for students in Grades 7-8.

The career development process is unique to every person and evolves throughout one's life. Students will use decision-making and problem-solving skills for college and career planning. Students will explore valid, reliable educational and career information to learn more about themselves and their interests and abilities. Students integrate skills from academic subjects, information technology, and interpersonal communication to make informed decisions. This course is designed to guide students through the process of investigation and in the development of a college and career readiness achievement plan. Students will use interest inventory software or other tools available to explore college and career areas of personal interest. Students will use this information to explore educational requirements for various colleges and a variety of chosen career paths.

Yearbook

Course No. M0888

Prerequisite:  Teacher Approval – Spring Application

The primary objective of this course is to produce the school yearbook.  Students should exhibit a high degree of responsibility and maturity.  Occasionally, students will be required to attend and cover after-school events.  Meeting deadlines is a top priority for students in this class.  A strong background in English and/or art will be helpful.  Basic journalistic and printing terms, layout design, and copy preparation will be developed.

Touch Systems Data Entry

Course No. M07217

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½  HS Credit

In Touch System Data Entry, students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. Students will need to apply touch system data entry for production of business documents.

This course is a prerequisite for Business Information Management. Upon successful completion of this course, one-half high school elective credit will be awarded.  Fulfills 1/2 of Technical Credit required to graduate from high school. Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in middle school.

Principles of Art, Audio Video Technology and Communications

Course No. M07265

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  None

Grade Level:   7-8

Careers in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster require a creative aptitude, a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong academic foundation, and a proficiency in oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in this cluster and the knowledge, skills, and educational requirements for those opportunities.

Speech

Course No. M0777

Students are introduced to the elements of basic speech and communication while they study and participate in activities covering interpersonal and group communication, public speaking and the performing art of acting.  Students in this class may have the opportunity to compete in a speech tournament with fees not to exceed $30.

Teen Leadership

Course No. M0898

Semesters:  1

Teen Leadership is a program in which students develop leadership, personal, and business skills.  They learn to develop a healthy self-concept, healthy relationships, and learn to understand the concept of personal responsibility.  They will develop an understanding of Emotional Intelligence and the skills it measures, which include self-awareness, self-control, self-motivation, and social skills.  Students will develop skills in public speaking and communication and an understanding of personal image.  They will develop an understanding of the concept of principle-based decision-making and develop their own personal mission statement.  They will practice and develop skills for conflict resolution.  They will acquire an understanding of the effects of peer pressure and will develop skills to counteract those effects.  They will develop an understanding of the principles of parenting, enabling them to become better family members and citizens.  They will also develop an understanding of the need for vision in goal-setting, personally and professionally. There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.


Technology Applications: Introduction to Coding
Course No. M1801

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: none

This course is an introductory coding course that focuses on critical thinking and problem solving. Students will develop skills to identify relevant problems, develop solutions, design computer programs, and complete projects. They will use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore solutions and learn new relevant technologies.  Keyboarding skills are integrated into this course.

Eighth Grade Required Courses

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English Language Arts

Course No. M0804

In eighth grade language arts, students participate in an integrated course of study designed to prepare the student for high school English class.  Students read widely and identify characteristics of various literary forms.  Advanced reading strategies allow students to analyze information from multiple sources to form relationships among ideas supported with textual evidence.  Students apply literary and expository writing skills, research skills, the use of technology, and the analysis of visual literacy in a variety of genres.  Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.  Students present oral and written reports using research from print and visual sources.

Pre-Advanced Placement English Language Arts

Course No. M0814

Pre-Advanced Placement English Language Arts/STEM

Course No. M0814S

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s Pre-AP and gifted and talented language arts students.  Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.  Historical fiction, short stories, and classical literature are read and used to identify literary elements.  Students study analogies and use analogous logic to explain ideas and events in literature.  Writings will address specific audiences, and students refine the use of a variety of strategies to fully develop ideas.  Control of language, sentence structure and organization are expected.  Students present oral and written reports from independent research studies using primary sources and varied sources of visual media.  Students must possess advanced language abilities and have a sincere interest in the areas of reading and language arts. There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.  This course will provide a greater degree of depth and complexity.

GT American Discoveries

ELA Course No. M0817

U.S. History Course No. M0818

Prerequisite:  Meet qualifications for GT placement

ASPIRE American Discoveries

ELA Course No. MA0817

U.S. History Course No. MA0818

Prerequisite:  Meet qualifications for ASPIRE placement

This course replaces Language Arts (English) and U.S. History for 8th grade GT students.  The American Discoveries class at the eighth grade level will provide the opportunity for identified gifted/talented students to see the relationship between reading, writing, and history based on gifted education practices to meet the needs of gifted learners.   Included in the course will be the study of art, music, literature, architecture, geography, culture, government, and folklore. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively by maintaining focus and coherence, developing ideas fully, expressing their unique voice or perspective, supporting their ideas with textual evidence, and increasing proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.  This course requires a high level of reading, comprehension, and writing skills.

Social Studies

United States History

Course No. M0842

This course focuses on significant persons, issues, and events in U.S. History.  The time frame begins with

the Vikings’ European Exploration and proceeds through the Colonial Period, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.  This course includes elements of United States geography essential for full understanding of historical events and issues.  The multicultural, pluralistic nature of American society is incorporated throughout the course.  All racial and ethnic groups that make up the American cultural mosaic are studied.

Pre-Advanced Placement United States History

Course No. M0844

Pre-Advanced Placement United States History/STEM

Course No. M0844S

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s Pre-AP and gifted and talented history students.  Students enhance their ability to interpret history through the analysis of primary documents, investigation of multiple perspectives of significant historical figures, and engagement in activities which foster critical thinking and problem solving skills.  Students will be called upon to write essays based on historical evidence and use the process of historical inquiry to investigate important events, recurring

dilemmas, and persistent issues in the history of our nation.

This course will provide a greater degree of depth and complexity.

Math

Course No. M0822

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Math grade 7 or its equivalent

Focal points in mathematics at grade 8 are representing, applying, and analyzing proportional relationships; using expressions and equations to describe relationships, including the Pythagorean Theorem; making inferences from data; and financial literacy.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

Pre-Advanced Placement Math

Course No.  M0212

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Math grade 7 or Pre Adv. Placement Math grade 7 or its equivalent

This course is designed to provide students with opportunity for entry into Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the high school level.    Eighth grade TEKS will be taught with the development of Pre-AP strategies incorporated throughout the course.  Students will engage in learning of eighth grade curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

Accelerated Pre-Advanced Placement Algebra I

Course No. M0203

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Accelerated Math grade 7 or its equivalent

Accelerated Pre-Advanced Placement Algebra I/STEM

Course No. M0203S

ASPIRE Accelerated Pre-Advanced Placement Algebra I

Course No. MA0203

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s accelerated and gifted and talented students.  Students study linear functions, equations, and inequalities; quadratic functions and equations; exponential functions and equations; as well as number and algebraic methods.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.  Students must possess advanced facility with numbers and have a sincere interest in mathematics.  This course is the same course offered in the high school as Pre-AP Algebra I.  The purpose for offering the course in eighth grade is to allow students to have additional opportunities to take advanced math courses such as AP Calculus AB/BC and AP Statistics.  Students successfully completing Algebra I in eighth grade are strongly encouraged to complete four additional years of math in grades 9 – 12.  Each semester is graded independently.  Upon successful completion of each semester, one-half high school math credit will be awarded.  Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in eighth grade.

Accelerated Pre-Advanced Placement Geometry

Course No. M0206 A/B

Prerequisite:    Successful completion of Accelerated Pre-AP Algebra I. Meet qualifications for GT or Accelerated Placement

ASPIRE Accelerated Pre-Advanced Placement Geometry

Course No. MA0206 A/B

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses at the high school level and meet the needs of the district’s accelerated and gifted and talented students.  Students study coordinate and transformational geometry; logical argument and constructions; proof and congruence; similarity, proof, and trigonometry; two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures; circles; and probability.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.  Students must possess advanced facility with numbers and have a sincere interest in mathematics.  This course is the same course offered in the high school as Pre-AP Geometry.  The purpose for offering the course in eighth grade is to allow students to have additional opportunities to take advanced math courses such as AP Calculus AB/BC and AP Statistics.  Students successfully completing Geometry in eighth grade are strongly encouraged to complete four additional years of math in grades 9 – 12.  Each semester is graded independently.  Upon successful completion of each semester, one-half high school math credit will be awarded.  Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in eighth grade.  Due to the limited number of students qualifying for Pre-AP Geometry at the eighth grade level, students may not have the opportunity to take this course at their home campus.

Science

Course No. M0832

 

Grade 8 science is interdisciplinary in nature. Enduring understandings in Science transcend disciplinary boundaries and include change and constancy, patterns, cycles, systems, models, and scale.   As students engage in inquiry-based scientific investigations and reasoning they will learn science in the following conceptual strands:   Matter and Energy; Force, Motion and Energy; Earth and Space Science; and Organisms and Environments.

Pre-Advanced Placement Science

Course No. M0834

This course is designed to provide students with opportunity for entry into Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the high school level.  This science course is interdisciplinary in nature.

Enduring understandings in Science transcend disciplinary boundaries and include change and constancy, patterns, cycles, systems, models, and scale. As students engage in inquiry-based scientific investigations and reasoning they will learn science in the following conceptual strands:   Matter and Energy; Force, Motion and Energy; Earth and Space Science; and Organisms and Environments.  Eighth grade curriculum will be taught with Pre-AP strategies incorporated throughout the course.  Students will engage in learning activities with increased depth and complexity.  

Accelerated Science -  Pre-AP Biology

Course No. M0303 A/B

Accelerated Science -  Pre-AP Biology/STEM

Course No. M302S

Accelerated Science -  Pre-AP Biology/ASPIRE

Course No. MA302

Credit: 1 H.S. Credit

In Biology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving.

Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; and ecosystems and the environment.  Students will engage in learning activities with increased depth and complexity.  

Eighth Grade Elective Courses

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The school reserves the right to cancel any course if there is insufficient enrollment or if certified staff is unavailable to teach the course.  

There may be additional material costs associated with these courses for which the student will be responsible.

Please See Page 94 For All Middle School Foreign Language Course Offerings.

AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)

Course No. M0433

Semesters 2

Prerequisite: Application and Instructor Approval

AVID is a structured, college preparatory system for students who want to take on challenges and advanced courses. Each week, students in the AVID elective class engage in a rigorous college preparatory curriculum, college-age tutor-facilitated study groups, collaborative activities and academic success skills. In AVID, students participate in activities that incorporate strategies focused on writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization, and reading to support their success in advanced courses. Each year, the AVID Elective class reviews and then builds upon skills learned in prior years of AVID.  Potential students will need to apply and interview before being accepted into the elective.

GT Independent Study

Course No. M08436

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: GT Identification

In this open-ended course offering, students will be allowed to design a project or course of learning according to their interests. The required components of this course will be

research, reading, and writing. The work will culminate with a presentation of their work to an audience of peers, teachers, and middle school administrators.

STEM Causes and Effects (GMS ONLY)

Course No. M8141S

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: Participation in STEM Program

Students will explore, discover, and tap into their understanding of the world around them through the engineering design process. The Engineering Design Process, in conjunction with ELA curriculum objectives related to listening, speaking, research, and technical writing will drive the tasks. Students will come to a greater understanding of the design process through the use of current event articles.  Students will explore engineering careers. This course will conclude with a culminating project applying learned concepts.


Advanced Project Based STEM Elective

Course No. M0815

Semesters: 2

Prerequisite: none

This course incorporates the math and science needed to accomplish a multitude of engineering and technology based projects. Students in the course will be required to research and produce technical documents each nine weeks for their project of study. The possibilities of topics include, but is not limited to, electrical energy sources, fluids and life sciences, geometry and building structures, space science, building serial and parallel circuits, environmental issues, and bioengineering.   The course will incorporate one project every nine weeks and will provide students with the opportunity to showcase work to audiences that can examine the work and how it applies to real world situations.

English Acquisition

Course No. M08443

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite:  ELL status

In this course, students new to the English language will have the opportunity to build vocabulary and strengthen their English speaking, reading, and writing abilities. The design of this course will be to support ELL students in both social/conversational language acquisition and development of English skills to support content learning in other middle school coursework.

Considerations:  This course is designed to support students who are newly acquiring the English language.

Literacy Achievement

Course No. M08442

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite: Documented weakness in reading (i.e. STAAR failure, etc…)

This course is designed to strengthen students’ reading and writing skills to ensure grade-level proficiency with academic tasks and expectations. Students enrolling in this course will have demonstrated a need for intervention on STAAR or other assessment or coursework. Through a wide variety of targeted experiences in reading and writing with authentic texts, students will build skills that will transfer to success on assessments.

Considerations:  This course is designed to support and accelerate students who have demonstrated needs in reading and/or writing.

Math Investigations 8
Course No. M08210

Semesters: 1

Prerequisite: Documented need in mathematics

This course is recommended for students in Grade 8.

This course is designed to strengthen students’ mathematics skills to ensure grade-level proficiency with academic tasks and expectations. Students enrolling in this course will have demonstrated a need for intervention on STAAR or other assessment or coursework. Through a wide variety of targeted experiences in mathematics, students will build skills that will transfer to success on assessments.
Considerations:  This course is designed to support and accelerate students who have demonstrated needs in mathematics.

Art I

Course No. M06708

Art is designed for students with strong interests in exploring many art disciplines and media.  Each area of study focuses on critical thinking and problem solving as students develop their artistic skills.  There is an emphasis on art history, multi-cultural events, and customs through varied art projects.  Areas of study are drawing,

painting, sculpture, printmaking, fibers, papermaking, paper mache, and computer technology.  There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.

Art II

Course No. M07708

This is an intermediate level art course in various media and methods in two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.  It includes drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, fibers, and art history as applied to specific projects.  There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.

Art III

Course No. M08708

Semesters:  2

This course is a study of various art media and methods.  It includes drawing, printing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, fibers, and graphic design.  It also includes art history, the cultural influence of art, and career opportunities in art.  There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.

Advanced Art

Course No. M08718

Semesters:  2

Prerequisite:  Teacher Approval required

This course is recommended for students who plan to pursue advanced art classes in high school. The students are required to keep a portfolio of work which demonstrates their talents and levels of art skills. There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.

ATHLETICS:

Semesters:  1-2

BOYS:        Football, basketball, track,

cross country, tennis

Course No. M0845

GIRLS:        Volleyball, basketball, track,

cross country, tennis

Course No. M0855

Athletics is open to eighth grade students interested in an extracurricular activity through competitive sports.  Basic fundamentals of each sport are taught.  Students are expected to participate in at least one sport per semester.  Tryouts are held for each sport when necessary.  Participants MUST HAVE a physical examination, insurance, and parent permission.  Practice will be held before or after school.  The game schedule for next year has not been determined.  Those athletes whose sport is not in season still participate in an off-season conditioning program.  For more information refer to the Athletics policy at the back of this booklet.

Physical Education / Health

Course No. M0850

Semesters:  1-2

Emphasis on continued social development through physical activity is the focus of this PE program.  Believing every student can become physically fit, fitness exercises are included daily.  Students acquire physical skills through practice and apply these skills in a variety of sports including volleyball, basketball, badminton and others.  Technology is used to measure and monitor improvement in fitness.  Students are required to suit out in proper uniform.  In health education an emphasis is placed on acquiring knowledge and skills regarding healthy behaviors, understanding puberty, and the reproductive process.  Abstinence-based programs, such as Aim for Success, are major components in providing this health information.  Play It Safe, a TEKS-based program, addresses a variety of contemporary topics such as sexual harassment, sexual abuse, and other pertinent issues in an age-appropriate manner. Parent previews will precede presentation of all materials related to human sexuality.

BAND:

Students are placed in ability based bands following an audition process. Levels include: Concert Band, Symphonic Band, and Honors Band. Many parents obtain instruments through a rental program, designated instruments are available through the school for a fee of $50 per semester.

Concert Band

Course No. M08908

Semesters:2

This is an intermediate level band for seventh and eighth grade students. Proficiency in the basic fundamentals (tone, rhythm, fingering, etc.) is stressed. Concert Band performances occur in fall and spring.

Symphonic Band

Course No. M08918

Semesters:2

This is an advanced band for seventh and eighth grade students. These students are challenged with more difficult musical literature and required sight-reading skills. Symphonic Band participates in many activities throughout the year including various concerts, solo & ensemble contests, auditions, and UIL competition at the director’s discretion.

Honors Band

Course No. M08928

Semesters:2

This is for more advanced seventh and eighth grade band students. This group is challenged with a higher level of musical literature and sight-reading. Honors Band participates in many activities throughout the year including various concerts, solo & ensemble contests, auditions and UIL competition.

CHORAL PROGRAM

Students are placed following an audition process that emphasizes music sight reading capability.  Required Materials/Fees for choir vary per campus to cover the needed performance uniform.

Choir - Select Men  (Intermediate)

Course No. M08578

Prerequisite: Audition & Teacher Approval

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students and requires an audition or director approval. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. Emphasis is placed on proper singing techniques, music reading and independent sight reading skill development and performance etiquette.  Students perform various types of choral literature and study progressive sight reading materials. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities. Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances

Choir- Select Women  (Intermediate)

Course No. M08568

Prerequisite: Audition & Teacher Approval

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students and requires an audition or director approval. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. Emphasis is placed on proper singing techniques, music reading and independent sight reading skill development and performance etiquette.  Students perform various types of choral literature and study progressive sight reading materials. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities. Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances

Choir - Advanced Men  (Advanced)

Course No. M08958

Prerequisite: Audition & Teacher Approval

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students by audition only. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. This choir stresses the development of excellent vocal quality and technique, advanced independent sight reading ability, and the development of performance excellence.  Students perform various types of advanced choral literature and study an intensive sight reading program. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances and contests.

Choir -  Advanced Women (Advanced)

Course No. M08968

Prerequisite: Audition & Teacher Approval

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students by audition only. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. This choir stresses the development of excellent vocal quality and technique, advanced independent sight reading ability, and the development of performance excellence.  Students perform various types of advanced choral literature and study an intensive sight reading program. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances and contests.

Choir - Advanced Mixed  (HMS Only)

Course No. M08978

Prerequisite: Audition & Teacher Approval

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students by audition only. The program strives to allow students to gain musical knowledge in a supportive and creative environment. This choir stresses the development of excellent vocal quality and technique, advanced independent sight reading ability, and the development of performance excellence.  Students perform various types of advanced choral literature and study an intensive sight reading program. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances and contests.

Choir- Vocal Ensemble* (HMS Only)

Course No. M08998

Prerequisite: Audition & Teacher Approval

This choir is open to seventh and eighth grade students by audition only. This choir stresses the development of excellent vocal quality and technique, advanced independent sight reading ability, and the development of performance excellence, emphasizing individual performance techniques. Various types of choral literature are used and some music is performed with choreography. These students participate in curriculum-based school-sponsored concerts on a regular basis and have the opportunity for field trips, UIL Choir competitions, and other extra activities.  Rehearsals may be required outside of class time prior to some performances and contests.

*Students are required to be concurrently enrolled in one of the program choirs.

THEATRE ARTS:

Theatre I

Course No. M08768

Theatre I at the 8th grade level is designed to introduce the student to the many performing and technical aspects of theatre. Students will learn basic acting techniques (stage movement, developing voice, memorizing lines, etc.), improvisation, mime techniques, character development, basic scene study (group and individual monologues), script analysis and performance critiquing. In small ensembles, duets and individually, students will prepare and perform scenes in class demonstrating these skills.

Theatre II

Course No. M08788

Prerequisite: Theatre I

Theatre II at the 8th grade level builds upon the skills learned in Theatre I. Students will continue to strengthen their acting skills in a variety of theatrical experiences, including reading and writing plays, as well as memorized and improvisational performance.

Theatre III

Course No. M08798

Prerequisite: Theatre I & Theatre II

Theatre III at the 8th grade level builds upon the skills learned in Theatre I and Theatre II. Students will continue to strengthen their acting skills in a variety of theatrical experiences

Theatre Playbill 8

Course No. M08778

Prerequisite: Audition & Teacher Approval

This year long course gives students the opportunity to prepare and rehearse for the type of events used in competitive speech/theatre tournaments. Participation in tournament competition or a class program is required. Students must be able to work independently in the classroom. Students will also explore aspects of theatre production as they prepare for performances. Students will experience the entire process of mounting a theatrical production both on and offstage. This class is designed especially for those students seriously interested in pursuing acting and production in high school.

OTHER ELECTIVES:

Speech

Course No. M0777

Semesters:  2

Students are introduced to the elements of basic speech and communication while they study and participate in activities covering interpersonal and group communication, public speaking and the performing art of acting.  Students in this class may have the opportunity to compete in a speech tournament with fees not to exceed $30.

PALS

Course No. M0894

Semesters:  1-2

Prerequisite:  Application and Teacher Approval required

PALS is a peer assistance, leadership, and service course for selected eighth grade students.  These students are trained for six weeks in interpersonal relations, self-awareness, group dynamics, conflict resolution, and mediation.  Upon completion of this training, students work with peers and elementary students as positive role models dealing with today’s issues.

Teen Leadership
Course No. M0898

Semesters:  1

Teen Leadership is a program in which students develop leadership, personal, and business skills.  They learn to develop a healthy self-concept, healthy relationships, and learn to understand the concept of personal responsibility.  They will develop an understanding of Emotional Intelligence and the skills it measures, which include self-awareness, self-control, self-motivation, and social skills. Students will develop skills in public speaking and communication and an understanding of personal image.  They will develop an understanding of the concept of principle-based decision-making and develop their own personal mission statement.  They will practice and develop skills for conflict resolution.  They will acquire an understanding of the effects of peer pressure and will develop skills to counteract those effects.  They will develop an understanding of the principles of parenting, enabling them to become better family members and citizens.  They will also develop an understanding of the need for vision in goal-setting, personally and professionally. There may be additional material costs associated with this course for which the student will be responsible.

Principles of Human Services

Course No. M0874

Semesters:  2; Credit:  1 HS Credit

Principles of Human Services is a laboratory course that will enable students to investigate careers in the Human Services Career Cluster, including counseling and mental health, early childhood development, family and community, personal care, and consumer services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand human services careers.

Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high  school GPA for completion of this course in middle school.

Reading I

Course No. M0124

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1 HS Credit

Reading I is an elective designed for the student interested in improving reading skills.  The instructional emphasis targets individual improvement in reading comprehension, vocabulary, critical thinking, reading rate, and study skills.  Skills are practiced through the use of relevant materials and computer software.  This course is recommended for all students and is individualized to target specific reading skills assessed through the STAAR.  Ample time for silent reading is provided.  Each semester is graded independently.  Upon successful completion of each semester, one-half Reading I high school credit will be awarded.  Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in eighth grade.

Advanced Reading I

Course No. M0803

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1 HS Credit

This course is designed for the fluent reader and global thinker.  Critical thinking and literary analysis skills will be developed through use of technology, class discussions, self-selected novel studies, short stories, and informational reading.  Each semester is graded independently.

Upon successful completion of each semester, one-half Reading I high school credit will be awarded. Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in eighth grade.

Yearbook

Course No. M0888

Semesters:  2

Prerequisite:  Teacher Approval – Spring Application

The primary objective of this course is to produce the school yearbook.  Students should exhibit a high degree of responsibility and maturity.  Occasionally, students will be required to attend and cover after school events.  Meeting deadlines is a top priority for students in this class.

A strong background in English and/or Art will be helpful.  Basic journalistic and printing terms, layout design, and copy preparation are required.

Touch Systems Data Entry

Course No. M07218

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½ HS Credit

 In Touch System Data Entry, students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. Students will need to apply touch system data entry for production of business documents.

This course is a prerequisite for Business Information Management. Upon successful completion of this course, one-half high school elective credit will be awarded.  Fulfills 1/2 of Technical Credit required to graduate from high school. Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in middle school.

Fundamentals of Computer Science & Coding

Course No.  M0873 

Semesters:  2 Credits:  1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  None

Grade Level:   8

Fundamentals of Computer Science is an introductory coding course that empowers students to create authentic products and engage with computer science as a medium for creativity, communication, collaboration, and problem solving. Students will foster their creativity and innovation through opportunities to design, implement, and present solutions to real-world problems. 

Upon successful completion of this course, one high school elective credit will be awarded.  It fulfills one Technical Credit required to graduate from high school.  Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in middle school

Principles of Arts, Audio Video Technology, and Communications

Course No. M8265

Semesters:  2 Credits:  1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  None

Grade Level:   7-8

Careers in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster require a creative aptitude, a strong It background in computer and technology applications, a strong academic foundation, and a proficiency in oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in this cluster and the knowledge, skills, and educational requirements for those opportunities.

College and Career Readiness

Course No. M0875

Semesters:  1

This course is recommended for students in Grades 7-8.

The career development process is unique to every person and evolves throughout one's life. Students will use decision-making and problem-solving skills for college and career planning. Students will explore valid, reliable educational and career information to learn more about themselves and their interests and abilities. Students integrate skills from academic subjects, information technology, and interpersonal communication to make informed decisions. This course is designed to guide students through the process of investigation and in the development of a college and career readiness achievement plan. Students will use interest inventory software or other tools available to explore college and career areas of personal interest. Students will use this information to explore educational requirements for various colleges and a variety of chosen career paths.

Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance

Course No. M8729

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  None

Grade Level:  7-8

In Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance, students gain knowledge and skills in economies and private enterprise systems, the impact of global business, the marketing of goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings in business, marketing, and finance.

Library Aide

Course No. M0908

Semesters:  1-2

Prerequisite:  Application and Librarian Approval Required

Students learn such skills as checking books in and out, assisting students in locating books and research materials, and shelving returned books properly.  To qualify to be a library aide, the student must be passing all subjects, have satisfactory conduct in all classes, and meet other screening criteria.

Principles of Applied Engineering

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. M0800

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  None

Principles of Applied Engineering provides an overview of the various fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and their interrelationships. Students will develop engineering communication skills, which include computer graphics, modeling, and presentations, by using a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Upon completing this course, students will have an understanding of the various fields of engineering and will be able to make informed career decisions. Further, students will have worked on a design team to develop a product or system. Students will use multiple software applications to prepare and present course assignments.

Fulfills f Technical Credit required to graduate from high school.  Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in middle school.

Teacher/Counselor Office Aide

Teacher Aide Course No. M0905

Counselor Aide Course No. M0906

Office Aide Course No. M0907

Semesters:  1-2

Prerequisite:  Application and Administrator Approval Required

Students collect attendance cards, take messages, assemble packets, assist the teacher/counselor/secretary, file cards, and perform other related duties.  To qualify to be an aide, the student must be passing all subjects, have satisfactory conduct in all classes, and meet other screening criteria.

All Foreign Language Courses

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Spanish is offered during the day at each middle school campus.  Other foreign languages are available as zero hour courses, requiring that the student have independent transportation to the offering high school campus. Students are provided with district transportation to return to their home campuses in time for the beginning of their second period course.

Grade points are not factored into the high school GPA.

Spanish I

(Standard)

Course No. M0150

Semesters:  2, Credits:  1 HS Credit

Spanish I is a course that serves as an introduction to beginning Spanish. The class focuses on sound production, stress patterns, and language intonation, and highlights introductory level geographical facts, social customs, and cultural celebrations. At the conclusion of the course, students will perform at the novice proficiency level in the following language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing.

Pre-AP Spanish II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.  M0151

Semesters: 2, Credits: 1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  Completion of Elementary Dual Language Program

Spanish II is a high school level course offered to students who have participated in the Two-Way Dual Language Program in Elementary School.  

Pre-AP Spanish II will continue to develop proficiency in all four language domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing at a more  rigorous level. Students can expect to have more time spent on practice of using the language, with high expectations of proficiency. The course is literacy based and builds on long term Spanish learning from an early age. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to communicate orally as a world citizen. Students will participate in dialogues about familiar situations, using more complex sentences and grammatical patterns. Familiar materials will be read and short, directed compositions will be written.

Upon successful completion of each semester, one-half high school foreign language credit will be awarded.

Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in sixth grade.

This course will be offered at designated middle schools based on feeder patterns of Dual Language Elementary programs and course enrollment.

Pre-AP Spanish III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. M0154

Semesters: 2, Credits: 1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  Completion of Elementary Dual Language Program and Pre-AP Spanish II

Pre-AP Spanish III is a high school level course offered to students who have participated in the Two-Way Dual Language Program in Elementary School and Pre-AP Spanish II.

This course will be accelerated and expanded to include an extensive study of grammar and advanced vocabulary so that students will reach an intermediate level of proficiency. The course is literacy based and builds on long term Spanish learning from an early age. It is designed for those students planning to continue their Spanish language study and/or prepare for the Advanced Placement Exam. Students will continue to develop proficiency in the following language skills:  reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and showing. There will be an emphasis on Advanced Placement strategies and skills.

Upon successful completion of each semester, one-half high school foreign language credit will be awarded.

Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in seventh grade.

This course will be offered at designated middle schools based on feeder patterns of Dual Language Elementary programs and course enrollment.

AP Spanish IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. M0196

Semesters: 2, Credits: 1 HS Credit

Prerequisite:  Completion of Elementary Dual Language Program and Pre-AP Spanish III

AP Spanish IV is a high school level course offered to students who have participated in the Two-Way Dual Language Program in Elementary School and Pre-AP Spanish III.

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a rigorous course taught exclusively in Spanish that requires students to improve their proficiency across the three modes of communication: interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive. The course focuses on the integration of authentic resources including online print, audio, and audiovisual resources; as well as traditional print resources that include literature, essays, and magazine and newspaper articles; and also a combination of visual/print resources such as charts, tables, and graphs; all with the goal of providing a diverse learning experience. Students communicate using rich, advanced vocabulary and linguistic structures as they build proficiency in all modes of communication toward the advanced level. This course is designed to refine the communication skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and showing, focusing exclusively on Advanced Placement strategies and skills.

Grade points are not awarded nor entered into the high school GPA for completion of this course in seventh grade.

This course will be offered at designated middle schools based on feeder patterns of Dual Language Elementary programs and course enrollment.

French I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. M0162

Semesters:  2, Credits:  1 HS Credit

Students will learn to understand and produce the sounds, stress patterns, and intonation of the language. The content of this course will include an introduction to all five language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural literacy) with emphasis on the ability to communicate orally from the core of this course of study. Students will take part in everyday simple conversations using basic grammatical structures and learn to read and write simple questions and answers as they develop as world citizens. Students will also study basic facts about the geography, customs, and culture of the country.

Chinese I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. M0183

Semesters: 2 Credits: 1 HS Credit

Chinese I is a high school level course. It is an introductory course intended for students with little or no knowledge of the language. Its aim is to present essential vocabulary and grammar, and to develop the pronunciation, listening, reading and writing skills necessary for basic communication and comprehension. An emphasis will be on producing the sounds, stress patterns, and intonation of the language. Basic Chinese radicals (components of the characters) and structure of the characters will be stressed for future character building. Customs and cultural insights are also presented.

German I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. M0168

Semesters:  2, Credits:  1 HS Credit

Students will learn to understand and produce the sounds, stress patterns, and intonation of the language. An introduction to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) with emphasis on the ability to communicate orally forms the core of this course of study. Students will take part in everyday simple conversations using basic grammatical structures and learn to read and write simple questions and answers.  Students will also study basic facts about the geography, customs, and culture of German

Latin I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. M0158

Semesters:  2, Credits:  1 HS Credit

Latin I is a high school level course. Latin I is the study of the language, the culture, and the attitude of the Roman Empire. Students study basic grammar and learn the essential elements of Latin pronunciation, as well as build a comprehensive and practical vocabulary through the use of Latin roots, terms, prefixes, suffixes, and phrases. Points of grammar and syntax are developed through the study of literary passages on topics such as the mythology, history, government, geography, and culture of the Romans. Upon successful completion of each semester, one-half high school foreign language credit will be awarded.

MIDDLE SCHOOL ATHLETICS REQUIREMENTS

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  1. STUDENTS must meet the following requirements:
  1. Parent permission to participate.
  2. Physical.
  3. Insurance or Waiver.
  4. Emergency medical information.
  5. Meet all basic T.E.A. and U.I.L. eligibility requirements.
  6. Students must sign the GCISD drug and alcohol pledge.
  7. Students are expected to participate in at least one sport per semester.

  1. PRACTICE ATTENDANCE

An athlete who misses more than two practices will not be eligible to participate in the following athletic contest.

  1. GAME ATTENDANCE
  1. Unless prior arrangements have been made with the coach, any athlete who misses an athletic contest in his or

her sport will not be eligible to participate in the following contest.

  1. Students must attend school for at least a half day on game day to participate in the days’ athletic competition.

  1. DISMISSAL FROM TEAM
  1. Repeated failure to attend practice.
  2. Attitude detrimental to the best interests of the team.
  3. Repeated failure to attend contest.
  4. Parents or guardian of any athlete who is dismissed from the team will be notified.

  1. DISMISSAL FROM ATHLETICS
  1. Attitude detrimental to the best interests of the program.
  2. Failure to meet all requirements necessary for participation.
  3. Student withdraws from a team and does not plan to participate in any other sports.
  4. Student will remain in off-season for the remainder of the semester.

  1. EXCUSES FROM PARENTS

Non-participation in athletics will be excused for a maximum of three practices, accompanied by parental notes.  Any extension of this rule will require a report from a physician explaining the illness or injury and the rehabilitation required.

  1. QUITTING

Any student who withdraws from a team will not be eligible to participate in that sport until the following

year.

  1. TEAM TRAVEL

Students who participate in school-sponsored trips shall be required to ride in transportation provided by the school to and from the event.  Exceptions may be made if the student’s parent or guardian presents a written request to the principal before the scheduled trip requesting that the student be allowed to ride with the parent, that the student be allowed to ride with another person designated by the parent, or that the student be allowed to drive him or herself to the event.  In those instances where the District does not provide transportation to an extracurricular school-related activity in a non-required course, students are responsible for obtaining their own transportation.  The District shall not be liable for any injuries that occur to students riding in vehicles that are not provided by the school.

  1. DISCIPLINE

All discipline of athletes will be in accordance with school board policy.

Special Education Course Offerings - Sixth Grade

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

Essential English

Course No. 16441

The focus is on oral and written language development. Students are expected to analyze information from diverse materials. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively and increase proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization and punctuation. Sixth grade students are required to complete one English course and one Language Arts elective.

ESSENTIALS OF READING AND CREATIVE WRITING – Modified

Course No.  16439

This is a *modified English Language Arts (ELA) elective that must be recommended by an ARD committee prior to a student’s enrollment in the course. The course is intended for students in need of a self-contained elective that are not able to progress in a general ELA elective without significant modifications to the TEKS and even with special education instruction and the provision of supplementary aids and services. The course will provide students with

opportunities to read and experience text linked to the grade level TEKS and to develop writing skills at their ability level based on the grade level styles of written work. Technology is embedded throughout the course along with access to a wide variety of literature genres. 

SOCIAL STUDIES

Essential World Cultures

Course No. 1642

The course is a study of people and places of the contemporary world and

institutions common to all societies of government, economics, education and Religion along with respect for cultural diversity.  Map, globe, chart and graph skills are stressed throughout the course.

MATH

Essential Math

Course No. 1622

Focal points in mathematics at grade 6 are using operations with integers and positive rational numbers to solve problems, understanding and applying ratios and rates and using equivalent ratios to represent proportional relationships, using expressions and equations to represent relationships in a variety of contexts, understanding data representation, and financial literacy. Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.

SCIENCE

Essential Science

Course No. 1632

This course is a study of force and motion using pulleys and inclined planes, the solar system, earth systems, the chemical properties of matter, the characteristics of

rocks and minerals and their formation, objects in space, characteristics of living things and how they are classified.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Adapted Physical Education

Course No. 1650

This course provides student with basic health concepts, lifetime sports and recreation skills.  Students will be given the opportunity to participate in leisure and lifetime activities based upon student need, interests, physical strength, vitality and endurance.

Study Skills

Course No. M0253

Semesters: 2

This course is designed to help students master the basic skills necessary to become competent learners.  The myriad number of topics will include all of the basic study skills, critical thinking with Bloom’s Taxonomy, learning styles, communication, goal setting and problem solving principles.  Emphasis is placed on academic skills, note taking, cursive writing, teamwork and leadership fundamentals.

Special Education Course Offerings - Seventh Grade

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

Essential English

Course No. 17441

The focus is on oral and written language development. Students are expected to analyze information from diverse materials. Students apply literary and expository writing skills, research skills, the use of technology, and the analysis of visual literacy in a variety of genres. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively and increase proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization and punctuation. Seventh grade students are required to complete one English course and one Language Arts elective based on ARD committee determinations of their individualized needs.

ESSENTIALS OF READING AND CREATIVE WRITING – Modified

Course No.  17439

This is a *modified English Language Arts (ELA) elective that must be recommended by an ARD committee prior to a student’s enrollment in the course. The course is intended for students in need of a self-contained elective that are not able to progress in a general ELA elective without significant modifications to the TEKS and even with special education instruction and the provision of supplementary aids and services. The course will provide students with

opportunities to read and experience text linked to the grade level TEKS and to develop writing skills at their ability level based on the grade level styles of written work. Technology is embedded throughout the course along with access to a wide variety of literature genres.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Essential Texas History

Course No. 1742

The course is a study of Texas geography, history, government, economics, and people from the prehistoric period to the present.  Emphasis is placed on the diversity of the land and cultures that make up Texas.

MATH

Essential Math

Course No. 1722

Focal points in mathematics at grade 7 are using ratios to describe proportional relationships, geometry, measurement, probability and adding/subtracting decimals, fractions and integers. Problem solving strategies, language communication, connections within and outside mathematics, and formal and informal reasoning are emphasized.

SCIENCE

Essential Science

Course No. 1732

Students will study inclined planes to understand the relationship between force and motion, the physical and chemical properties of matter and their interactions.   Students investigate the body systems and inherited characteristics of living organisms, as well as their adaptations to Texas ecosystems and the solar system.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Adapted Physical Education

Course No. 1750

This course provides student with basic health concepts, lifetime sports and recreation skills.  Students will be given the opportunity to participate in leisure and lifetime activities based upon student need, interests, physical strength, vitality and endurance.

Study Skills

Course No. M0253

Semesters: 2

This course is designed to help students master the basic skills necessary to become competent learners.  The myriad number of topics will include all of the basic study skills, critical thinking with Bloom’s Taxonomy, learning styles, communication, goal setting and problem solving principles.  Emphasis is placed on academic skills, note taking, cursive writing, teamwork and leadership fundamentals.

Special Education Course Offerings - Eighth Grade

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CTED: Principles of Human Services

Course No. 0812M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 8th

Prerequisite: None

(GMS only at this time)

This laboratory course will enable students to investigate careers in the human services career cluster, including counseling and mental health, early childhood development, family and community, and personal care services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand human services careers.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  This course is appropriate for students receiving modified or alternative curriculum based on grade level TEKS.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

Essential Language Arts

Course No. 18441

The focus is on oral and written language development. Students are expected to analyze information from diverse materials. Students apply literary and expository writing skills, research skills, the use of technology, and the analysis of visual literacy in a variety of genres. Students are expected to communicate written ideas effectively and increase proficiency of conventions such as spelling, capitalization and punctuation.  Eighth grade students are required to complete one Language Arts course.

ESSENTIALS OF READING AND CREATIVE WRITING – Modified

Course No.  18439

This is a *modified English Language Arts (ELA) elective that must be recommended by an ARD committee prior to a student’s enrollment in the course. The course is intended for students in need of a self-contained elective that are not able to progress in a general ELA elective without significant modifications to the TEKS and even with special education instruction and the provision of supplementary aids and services. The course will provide students with

opportunities to read and experience text linked to the grade level TEKS and to develop writing skills at their ability level based on the grade level styles of written work. Technology is embedded throughout the course along with access to a wide variety of literature genres.

MATH

Essential Math

Cours`e No. 1822

Focal points in mathematics at grade 8 are representing, applying, and analyzing proportional relationships; using expressions and equations to describe relationships, including the Pythagorean Theorem; making inferences from data; and financial literacy. Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Adapted Physical Education

Course No. 1650

This course provides student with basic health concepts, lifetime sports and recreation skills.  Students will be given the opportunity to participate in leisure and lifetime activities based upon student need, interests, physical strength, vitality and endurance.

SCIENCE

Essential Science

Course No. 1832

Students will study Newton’s Laws to understand the relationship between force and motion.  They investigate the structure of atoms and the Periodic Table. Students will explore characteristics of the universe.  Students will study ocean systems and the earth, moon and sun system.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Essential US History

Course No. 1842

This course focuses on significant persons, issues and events in U.S. History.  The time frame begins with the Vikings’ European Exploration and proceeds through the Colonial Period, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

Study Skills

Course No. M0253

Semesters: 2

This course is designed to help students master the basic skills necessary to become competent learners.  The myriad number of topics will include all of the basic study skills, critical thinking with Bloom’s Taxonomy, learning styles, communication, goal setting and problem solving principles.  Emphasis is placed on academic skills, note taking, cursive writing, teamwork and leadership fundamentals.

 

High School Program of Studies

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HS Table of Contents

Career and Technical Education

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

Business, Administration, Marketing and Finance

Marketing

Finance

Family Consumer Sciences / Human Services

Hospitality and Tourism

Health Science

Information Technology / Media

Computer Science

Technology / Engineering Education

Transportation, Distribution and Logistics

English Language Arts

English Language Arts Electives

Journalism

Speech / Debate

Fine Arts

Visual Arts

Dance

Music

Choir

Theatre

Mathematics

Physical Education, Health and Athletics

Boys Athletics

Girls Athletics

Dance

Drill Team and Cheerleading

Science

Social Studies

Special Education Course Offerings

Modified Courses

Alternate Courses

Electives

Career and Technical Education for the Disabled (CTED) Courses

World Languages

Local Credit Courses

Miscellaneous

Optional Opportunities for Credit

Credit By Exam Without Prior Instruction

Credit By Exam With Prior Instruction

Correspondence Courses

Summer Classes

College Readiness Electives

Available College Programs

Career and Technical Education

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There may be additional material costs associated with some career and technical education courses for which the student will be responsible.  Enrollment in some courses may be limited due to facilities and safety issues.  Some courses may require an application process.  This application is available in the counseling office.  The district will provide transportation for campus specific offerings.  The Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability or age in its CTE programs and activities.

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Coordinated group and individual instructional activities consisting of classroom and laboratory experiences, supervised agricultural experiences, and leadership activities are included in this comprehensive secondary program. The program is designed to develop competencies needed by high school students desiring to or preparing to enter agricultural, food, and natural resources occupations.

FFA activities are an integral part of the AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES Career Cluster. Opportunities for developing skills in leadership, cooperation, and citizenship are provided through extension of classroom / laboratory learning experiences by membership and participation in this student leadership organization.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS 
Agricultural Scientist, Agricultural Engineer, Technical Sales Rep, Cooperative Extension Service, Biological Scientist (Agricultural), Fish and Game Warden, Farmer/Farm Manager, Quality Control/Landscape Architect, Forester and Conservation Scientist, Technician-Food  Teacher, Career and Technical Education, Range Manager, Crop Protection/ Hazardous Material, Technical Coordinator, Veterinary Technician, Veterinarian

Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0801

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Grades: 9-10

Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources will allow students to develop knowledge and skills regarding career and educational opportunities, personal development, globalization, industry standards, details, practices, and expectations. To prepare for careers in agriculture, food, and natural resources, students must attain academic skills and knowledge in agriculture. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, experience, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology Management

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0805

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology Management examines the management of game and non-game wildlife species, fish, and aquacrops and their ecological needs as related to current agricultural practices. To prepare for careers in natural resource systems, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to natural resources, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

Small Animal Management

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0852

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  None

In Small Animal Management, students will acquire knowledge and skills related to small animals and the small animal management industry. Small Animal Management may address topics related to small mammals such as dogs and cats, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. To prepare for careers in the field of animal science, students must enhance academic knowledge and skills, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

Livestock Production

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0806

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades 10 - 12

In Livestock Production, students will acquire knowledge and skills related to livestock and the livestock production industry. Livestock Production may address topics related to beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and poultry. To prepare for careers in the field of animal science, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

Equine Science

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0807

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Grades: 10 - 12

In Equine Science, students will acquire knowledge and skills related to equine animal systems and the equine industry. Equine Science may address topics related to horses, donkeys, and mules. To prepare for careers in the field of animal science, students must enhance academic knowledge and skills, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0804

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies is designed to develop an understanding of agricultural mechanics as it relates to safety and skills in tool operation, electrical wiring, plumbing, carpentry, fencing, concrete, and metal working techniques. To prepare for careers in agricultural power, structural, and technical systems, students must attain academic skills and knowledge; acquire technical knowledge and skills related to power, structural, and technical agricultural systems and the industry; and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, industry certifications, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings.

Agriculture Structures Design and Fabrication        

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0856

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisites:  Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies

In Agricultural Structures Design and Fabrication, students will explore career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for careers in mechanized agriculture and technical systems, students must attain knowledge and skills related to agricultural structures design and fabrication. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and technical skills in a variety of settings.

Floral Design

(Enrollment Based)  TECC

Course No 0826

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

This course satisfies a Fine Art Credit for High School Graduation

Floral Design is designed to develop students' ability to identify and demonstrate the principles and techniques related to floral design as well as develop an understanding of the management of floral 50 enterprises. Through the analysis of artistic floral styles and historical periods, students will develop respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Students will respond to and analyze floral designs, thus contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and evaluations. To prepare for careers in floral design, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to horticultural systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings.

Advanced Floral Design

(Enrollment Based)  TECC

Course No. 0809

Semesters:  2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Floral Design

In this course, students build on the knowledge from Floral Design and are introduced to more advanced floral design concepts, with an emphasis on specialty designs and specific occasion planning. This course focuses on building skills in advanced floral design and providing students with a thorough understanding of the design elements and planning techniques used to produce unique specialty floral designs that support the goals and objectives of a specific occasion or event. Through the analysis and evaluation of various occasion and event types, students explore the design needs and expectations of clients and propose and evaluate appropriate creations. From conception to evaluation, students are challenged to create and design appropriate specialty floral designs that meet the needs of the client. Furthermore, an emphasis on budgetary adherence and entrepreneurship equips students with many of the necessary skills needed for success in floral enterprises.

Veterinary Medical Applications

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0853

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisites:  Equine Science, Small Animal Management, or Livestock Production

Veterinary Medical Applications covers topics relating to veterinary practices, including practices for large and small animal species. To prepare for careers in the field of animal science, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to animal systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings.

Advanced Animal Science

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0854

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Must have Biology and Chemistry or IPC; Algebra I and Geometry; and either Small Animal Mgt, Equine Science, or Livestock Production - Fulfills 1 high school Science graduation Requirement

Advanced Animal Science examines the interrelatedness of human, scientific, and technological dimensions of livestock production. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through field and laboratory experiences. To prepare for careers in the field of animal science, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry standards. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

Practicum in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources - Veterinary Medicine - “Vet Tech”

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No.  0847

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2

Prerequisites: Principles of AGFNR, Livestock Production or Small Animal Management, and Vet Med Applications

12th grade/16 years old minimum, provide own transportation to outside cooperating entity.

Students must actively seek and assist in placement with local veterinarians.

Practicum in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources is designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experiences such as employment, independent study, internships, assistantships, mentorships, or laboratories. To prepare for careers in agriculture, food and natural resources, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings.  Additional fees may be associated with this course for certification exams, scrubs, and equipment.

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

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Careers in planning, managing and providing legal, public safety, protective services and homeland security, including professional and technical support services

Students today are interested in careers in law enforcement, forensics, homeland security, law investigations, corrections and dispatching, to name just a few.  The Law, Public Safety, Correction and Security Cluster has all this and more!  According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the forecast for the homeland security industry is growth from $40 billion in 2004 to $180 billion in 2015.  Since many of the personnel for homeland security positions are recruited from existing cluster occupations, the result will be an increasing growth in jobs.  

CAREER PATHWAYS UNDER THE LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS AND SECURITY CLUSTER:

Legal Services, Law Enforcement Services, Security and Protective Services, Emergency and Fire Management Services, Correction Services

Principles of Law, Public Safety Corrections and Security

Course No. 0848 TECC

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade 9-10

Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security introduces students to professions in law enforcement, protective services, corrections, firefighting, and emergency management services. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of police, courts, corrections, private security, and protective agencies of fire and emergency services. The course provides students with an overview of the skills necessary for careers in law enforcement, fire service, protective services, and corrections.

Law Enforcement I

Course No.0849 TECC

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade 10-12

Prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security.

Law Enforcement I is an overview of the history, organization, and functions of local, state, and federal law enforcement. Students will understand the role of constitutional law at local, state, and federal levels; the U.S. legal system; criminal law; and law enforcement terminology and the classification and elements of crime.

Court Systems and Practices         

Course No. 0863 TECC

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade 10-12

Prerequisites: Law Enforcement I and Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security

Court Systems and Practices is an overview of the federal and state court systems. The course identifies the roles of judicial officers and the trial processes from pretrial to sentencing and examines the types and rules of evidence. Emphasis is placed on constitutional laws for criminal procedures such as search and seizure, stop and frisk, and interrogation.

Law Enforcement II

Course No. 0861 TECC

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade 11-12

Prerequisites: Law Enforcement I and Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security, and Court Systems and Practices.

Law Enforcement II provides the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for a career in law enforcement. Students will understand ethical and legal responsibilities, patrol procedures, first responder roles, telecommunications, emergency equipment operations, and courtroom testimony

Forensic Science

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0318

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry

Forensic Science is a course that introduces students to the application of science to connect a violation of law to a specific criminal, criminal act, or behavior and victim. Students will learn terminology and procedures related to the search and examination of physical evidence in criminal cases as they are performed in a typical crime laboratory. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence such as fingerprints, bodily fluids, hairs, fibers, paint, glass, and cartridge cases. Students will also learn the history and the legal aspects as they relate to each discipline of forensic science.

Business, Administration, Marketing and Finance

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This comprehensive program provides students with meaningful instruction both for business and about business, while being flexible and adaptable to the needs of industry and society. Students are provided broad, transferable concepts and competencies that allow them to enter the job market with the ability to function in new and emerging technological occupations as well as to reach maximum potential in higher education.

The student organization that provides extra-curricular involvement for those enrolled in Business Education is Business Professionals of America (BPA). BPA contributes to the advancement of leadership, citizenship, personal growth, academics, and technological skills. This organization serves as a cohesive agent in the worldwide networking of education, business, and industry. Competitive events enhance career/job preparation, workplace competencies, self-confidence, and the instructional program.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS

Accountant & Auditor, Computer Programmer, Medical Secretary, Bank Manager, Court Reporter, Management Consultant, Buyer, Wholesale & Retail, CPA (Certified Public Accountant), Real Estate Manager, City Manager, Educational Administrator, Stockbroker, Claims Adjuster, Entrepreneur, Telecommunications Specialist

Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0729

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Grades: 9-10

In Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance, students gain knowledge and skills in economies and private enterprise systems, the impact of global business, the marketing of goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings in business, marketing, and finance.


Practicum in Business Management
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 08410 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2

Prerequisite:  Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance plus one additional business credit

Grades: 11, 12

This course is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences occur in a paid or unpaid arrangement and a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and to make a successful transition to the workforce or postsecondary education.

Practicum in Business Management + Extended
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 08411 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2 + 1 = 3 total

Prerequisite:  Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance plus one additional business credit.  Taken concurrently with Practicum in Business Management

Grades: 11, 12

The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Business Management and Administration Career Cluster. PBME is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences occur in a paid or unpaid arrangement and a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and to make a successful transition to the workforce or postsecondary education.

Touch Systems Data Entry

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0721

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  None

In Touch System Data Entry, students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. Students will need to apply touch system data entry for production of business documents.

Business Information Management I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0723

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Touch System Data Entry

In Business Information Management I, students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce and postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create word-processing documents, develop a spreadsheet, formulate a database, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate software.

Business Information Management II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0724

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Touch Systems Data Entry,  Business Information Management I.

In Business Information Management II, students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce or postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create complex word-processing documents, develop sophisticated spreadsheets using charts and graphs, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate multimedia software.

Professional Communications

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0743

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½ (½ speech)

Prerequisite:  None

Professional Communications blends written, oral, and graphic communication in a career-based environment. Careers in the global economy require individuals to be creative and have a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong and solid academic foundation, and a proficiency in professional oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop and expand the ability to write, read, edit, speak, listen, apply software applications, manipulate computer graphics, and conduct Internet research.

Global Business

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.0748

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Grades: 10 - 12

Global Business is designed for students to analyze global trade theories, international monetary systems, trade policies, politics, and laws relating to global business as well as cultural issues, logistics, and international human resource management.

Virtual Business

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0747

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite: Touch System Data Entry

Virtual Business is designed for students to start a virtual business by creating a web presence, conducting online and off-line marketing, examining contracts appropriate for an online business, and demonstrating project-management skills. Students will also demonstrate bookkeeping skills for a virtual business, maintain business records, and understand legal issues associated with a virtual business.

Entrepreneurship

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0862

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance

In Entrepreneurship, students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to become an entrepreneur. Students will learn the principles necessary to begin and operate a business. The primary focus of the course is to help students understand the process of analyzing a business opportunity, preparing a business plan, determining feasibility of an idea using research, and developing a plan to organize and promote the business and its products and services. In addition, students will understand the capital required, the return on investment desired, and the potential for profit.

Marketing

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Marketing Education is a program designed to prepare students to conduct the critical business functions associated with directing the flow of products and services from the producer to the consumer. A fundamental understanding of the marketing concept and basic marketing skills are essential not only to students entering the field of marketing, but also everyone entering the workforce. Marketing Education courses provide students with knowledge and skills that are highly transferable.

Students also have opportunities to develop leadership, social, civic and career skills in marketing through their participation in DECA, the student organization for Marketing Education. DECA provides well-planned activities that can be integrated into the curriculum and projects that promote occupational competence for students. DECA is committed to building relationships between education and the business community that will enhance the career and educational development of students.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS

Advertising, Director, International Marketer, Buyer/Purchasing Agent, Hotel/Motel Manager, Marketing Instructor, Financial Manager, Travel Services, Marketing Dir., Fashion Marketer, Broker, Restaurant Manager, Store Manager, Display Designer, Fashion Consultant, Distribution Manager, Product Designer

Sports and Entertainment Marketing 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0858

Semesters:  1; Credits: ½

Sports and Entertainment Marketing will provide students with a thorough understanding of the marketing concepts and theories that apply to sports and entertainment. The areas this course will cover include basic marketing concepts, publicity, sponsorship, endorsements, licensing, branding, event marketing, promotions, and sports and entertainment marketing strategies.

Fashion Marketing

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0860

Semesters:  1; Credits: ½

Grades: 10 - 12

Fashion Marketing is designed to provide students with knowledge of the various business functions in the fashion industry. Students in Fashion Marketing will gain a working knowledge of promotion, textiles, merchandising, mathematics, selling, visual merchandising, and career opportunities.

Entrepreneurship

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0862

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance

In Entrepreneurship, students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to become an entrepreneur. Students will learn the principles necessary to begin and operate a business. The primary focus of the course is to help students understand the process of analyzing a business opportunity, preparing a business plan, determining feasibility of an idea using research, and developing a plan to organize and promote the business and its products and services. In addition, students will understand the capital required, the return on investment desired, and the potential for profit.

Practicum in Marketing (10 hour/week work requirement)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0841

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance

Recommended Prerequisite: One other course from the Marketing Cluster

Practicum in Marketing is a series of dynamic activities that focus on the customer to generate a profitable exchange. Students will gain knowledge and skills that help them to be proficient in one or more of the marketing functional areas associated with distribution, financing, marketing information management, pricing, product planning, promotion, purchasing, risk management, and selling skills. Students will integrate skills from academic subjects, information technology, interpersonal communication, and management training to make responsible decisions. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical courses in marketing.

Practicum in Marketing +  Extended Practicum in Marketing (15 hour/per week work requirement)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 08412

Semesters:  2; Credits: 3

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing

Recommended Prerequisite:  One other course from the Marketing Cluster

Extended Practicum in Marketing is a series of dynamic activities that focus on the customer to generate a profitable exchange. Students will gain knowledge and skills that help them to be proficient in one or more of the marketing functional areas associated with distribution, financing, marketing information management, pricing, product planning, promotion, purchasing, risk management, and selling skills. Students will integrate skills from academic subjects, information technology, interpersonal communication, and management training to make responsible decisions.

Finance

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The Finance Cluster prepares learners for careers in financial planning, insurance, banking, business and financial management. Career opportunities are available in every sector of the economy and require specific skills in organization, time management, customer service and communication.

Students may enjoy leadership and competition opportunities in the Business Professionals of America (BPA) student leadership organization.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS

Financial Planner, Tax Preparer, Brokerage Clerk, Sales, Securities and Commodities, Investment Advisor, Development Officer, Teacher, Accounting, Accountant Bookkeeper , Chief Financial Officer, Revenue Agent, Comptroller, Treasurer, Auditor, Economist

Banking and Financial Services 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0779

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite:  Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance

In Banking and Financial Services, students will develop knowledge and skills in the economic, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of banking to become competent employees and entrepreneurs. Students will incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the operations, sales, and management of banking institutions to gain a complete understanding of how banks function within society.

Securities and Investments

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0781

Semesters:  2; Credits: 1

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite:  Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance

In Securities and Investments, students will understand the laws and regulations to manage business operations and transactions in the securities industry.

Accounting I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0725

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance

In Accounting I, students will investigate the field of accounting, including how it is impacted by industry standards as well as economic, financial, technological, international, social, legal, and ethical factors. Students will reflect on this knowledge as they engage in the process of recording, classifying, summarizing, analyzing, and communicating accounting information. Students will formulate and interpret financial information for use in management decision making.

Accounting II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0778

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisite:  Accounting I

This course satisfies a mathematics graduation requirement

In Accounting II, students will continue the investigation of the field of accounting, including how it is impacted by industry standards as well as economic, financial, technological, international, social, legal, and ethical factors. Students will reflect on this knowledge as they engage in various managerial, financial, and operational accounting activities. Students will formulate, interpret, and communicate financial information for use in management decision making. Students will use equations, graphical representations, accounting tools, spreadsheet software, and accounting systems in real-world situations to maintain, monitor, control, and plan the use of financial resources.

Financial Mathematics
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0786

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Grades:  10 - 12

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course satisfies a high school mathematics graduation requirement.

Financial Mathematics is a course about personal money management.  Students will apply critical thinking skills to analyze personal financial decisions based on current and projected economic factors.

Entrepreneurship

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0862

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance

In Entrepreneurship, students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to become an entrepreneur. Students will learn the principles necessary to begin and operate a business. The primary focus of the course is to help students understand the process of analyzing a business opportunity, preparing a business plan, determining feasibility of an idea using research, and developing a plan to organize and promote the business and its products and services. In addition, students will understand the capital required, the return on investment desired, and the potential for profit.

Family Consumer Sciences / Human Services

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The Human Services curriculum empowers individuals and families across the lifespan to manage the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. The relationship between work and family is the unique focus of Human Services. The department offers courses designed to prepare students for the world of work and life. The Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) organization provides extracurricular involvement for students enrolled in Family and Consumer Sciences Education courses. Leadership skills, citizenship, personal growth and community service related opportunities are supported through membership. Competitive events enhance career preparation, curriculum competencies, self-confidence, and the instructional program.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS
Family School or Career Counselor, Child Psychologist, Merchandise Display Artist, Child Care Specialist, Hotel/Motel Manager, Public Relations Specialist, Dietitian, Home Furnishings Buyer, Manicurist, Family and Consumer Sciences, Teacher, Cosmetologist, Professional Educator, Fashion Designer, Marketing Research Analyst, Social Worker

Principles of Human Services

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0812

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Grades: 9-10

Principles of Human Services is a laboratory course that will enable students to investigate careers in the Human Services Career Cluster, including counseling and mental health, early childhood development, family and community, personal care, and consumer services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand human services careers.

Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0816

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Human Services

Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness is a laboratory course that allows students to use principles of lifetime wellness and nutrition to help them make informed choices that promote wellness as well as pursue careers related to hospitality and tourism, education and training, human services, and health sciences.

Child Development

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0813

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Human Services

Child Development is a technical laboratory course that addresses knowledge and skills related to child growth and development from prenatal through school-age children, equipping students with child development skills. Students use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children and investigate careers related to the care and education of children.

Child Guidance

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0827

Semesters 2; Credits:  2

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisites:  Principles of Human Services and Child Development

Child Guidance is a technical laboratory course that addresses the knowledge and skills related to child growth and guidance equipping students to develop positive relationships with children and effective caregiver skills. Students use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children, strengthen a culturally diverse society, and pursue careers related to the care, guidance, and education of children, including those with special needs. Instruction may be delivered through school-based laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, mentoring, and job shadowing.

Food Science

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.0315

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification, three units of science

4th year science credit only available at Bridges Accelerated Learning Center

In Food Science students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Food Science is the study of the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public.

Practicum in Human Service - Education

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0842

Semesters:  2; Credits: 2

Grade: 12

Prerequisite:  Principles of Human Services, Child Development, Child Guidance

Practicum in Human Services provides background knowledge and occupation-specific training that focuses on early childhood development and services.  Content for Practicum in Human Services is designed to meet the occupational preparation needs and interests of students and should be based upon the knowledge and skills selected from two or more courses in a coherent sequence in the human services cluster.  Instruction may be delivered through laboratory training or work-based delivery arrangements i.e. cooperative education, mentoring, and job shadowing.

Hospitality and Tourism

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Hospitality and Tourism is one of the fastest growing career fields in America. Tourism plays an important part in this increase. The Hospitality and Tourism focus area provides training in the related fields, with specific focus on job related preparation for employment in the Restaurant/Hotel Industry. Students learn the basics of the tourism industry and the culinary industry and then have the opportunity to practice these skills in the pre-employment laboratory situation. Leadership and competition opportunities are provided for students with the FCCLA club – Family, Career and Community Leaders of America.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS

Executive Chef, Travel Agent, Hotel Manager, Reservation Agent, Concierge, Food Service Worker, Sous Chef, Waitress/Waiter, Maitre ‘D, Flight Attendant, Cook/Short Order, Cook, Baker, Convention Services, Tour Guide, Food/Beverage Manager

Principles of Hospitality and Tourism 

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0829

Semesters: 2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Grades: 9-10

Principles of Hospitality and Tourism introduces students to an industry that encompasses lodging, travel and tourism, recreation, amusements, attractions, and food/beverage operations. Students learn knowledge and skills focusing on communication, time management, and customer service that meet industry standards. Students will explore the history of the hospitality and tourism industry and examine characteristics needed for success in that industry.


Travel and Tourism Management 
(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 08310 A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Principles of Hospitality and Tourism

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Travel and Tourism Management incorporates management principles and procedures of the travel and tourism industry as well as destination geography, airlines, international travel, cruising, travel by rail, lodging, recreation, amusements, attractions, and resorts. Employment qualifications and opportunities are also included in this course. TTM focuses on the management, marketing, and operations of restaurants and other food/beverage services, lodging, attractions, recreation events and travel-related services.

Introduction to Culinary Arts

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0825

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 10 - 12,

Prerequisite:  Principles of Hospitality and Tourism

Introduction to Culinary Arts will emphasize the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the management of a variety of food service operations. The course will provide insight into the operation of a well-run restaurant. Introduction to Culinary Arts will provide insight into food production skills, various levels of industry management, and hospitality skills. This is an entry level course for students interested in pursuing a career in the foodservice industry. This course is offered as a classroom and laboratory-based course.

Culinary Arts

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0817

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2

Grades:  11 - 12

Prerequisite:  Principles of Hospitality and Tourism, and Introduction to Culinary Arts

Culinary Arts begins with the fundamentals and principles of the art of cooking and the science of baking and includes management and production skills and techniques. Students can pursue a national sanitation certification, a Texas culinary specialist certification, or any other appropriate industry certification. This course may be offered as a laboratory-based or internship course.

Practicum in Culinary Arts

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0818

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2

Grades:  11 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Hospitality and Tourism, Introduction to Culinary Arts, and Culinary Arts

Practicum in Culinary Arts is a unique practicum that provides occupationally specific opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. Practicum in Culinary Arts integrates academic and career and technical education; provides more interdisciplinary instruction; and supports strong partnerships among schools, businesses, and community institutions with the goal of preparing students with a variety of skills in a fast-changing workplace.

Health Science

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Health Science is a comprehensive secondary education program for students who have an interest and desire to explore health careers. Students gain the knowledge and skills to make realistic health career choices. Students enhance their academic foundation through a strong science-based enrichment curriculum. Industry partnerships provide students with valuable observation-based experience so students can visualize their potential roles in safe, effective, efficient, quality health care. Emphasis is placed on safety and technology utilized in health care. Opportunities for leadership and citizenship development are available through membership and participation in Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA). This student professional organization provides opportunities for leadership development, knowledge and skill recognition through the competitive events program and community service projects. By networking with health care professionals, students receive guidance in selecting and pursuing a health career.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS Home Health Aides, Medical Scientist, Physician Assistants, Athletic trainers, Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienists, Veterinary Techs, Physical/Occupational Therapy Assistants, Medical Assistants, Veterinarians, Physical/Occupational Therapists, Radiation Therapists, Surgical Technologists

Principles of Health Science 

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0320

Semesters:  2;  Credit:  1

Grades: 9 - 10  

Prerequisite: None

The Principles of Health Science course is designed to provide an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems of the healthcare industry.

Medical Terminology

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No 0321

Semesters:  2 Credit:  1

Grades: 9 - 11

Prerequisite: None

The Medical Terminology course is designed to introduce students to the structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, word roots, singular and plural forms, and medical abbreviations. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to medical procedures, human anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology.

Health Science Theory

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No 0324

Semesters:  2 Credits: 1

Grades:  11-12

Prerequisite: Principles of Health Science, Medical Terminology Biology, 16 Years Old, Background Check

This course may be taken as a stand alone course, Health Science Theory and Clinical is an optional 2 credit course.

The Health Science Theory course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will employ hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development. Additional fees may be associated with this class.

Health Science Theory and Clinical

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0332

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisite:  Principles of Health Science, Medical Terminology Biology, 16 Years Old, Background Check

This course is a combination of Theory and Clinical

The Health Science Clinical course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will employ hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development.  This course may be taught by different methodologies such as clinical rotations and career preparation learning. Students are required to pay for scrubs, clinical shoes, CPR certification and obtain all medical facility requirements which may include vaccinations, TB test, drug screen, and a criminal background check.  Additional fees may be associated with this class.

Medical Microbiology

(Enrollment Based)@CHHS

Course No 0325

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 – This course satisfies a high school science graduation requirement

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry

Recommended Prerequisite:  One course from the Health Science Cluster

To receive credit in science, students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement identified in §74.3(b) (2) (C) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum).

The Medical Microbiology course is designed to explore the microbial world, studying topics such as pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms, laboratory procedures, identifying microorganisms, drug resistant organisms, and emerging diseases.

Pathophysiology

(Enrollment Based)@CHHS

Course No 0326

Semesters:  2 Credits: 1 – This course satisfies a high school science graduation requirement

Grades:  11-12

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry

Recommended Prerequisite:  One course from the Health Science Cluster

To receive credit in science, students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement identified in §74.3(b) (2) (C) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum).

The Pathophysiology course is designed for students to conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Pathophysiology will study disease processes and how humans are affected. Emphasis is placed on prevention and treatment of disease. Students will differentiate between normal and abnormal physiology.

Anatomy and Physiology 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0311

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 - This course satisfies a high school science graduation requirement

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry

Recommended Prerequisite:  One course from the health Science Cluster

The Anatomy and Physiology course is designed for students to conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Anatomy and Physiology will study a variety of topics, including the structure and function of the human body and the interaction of body systems for maintaining homeostasis.

Practicum in Health Science - Certified Nursing Assistant W/Certification

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0329

Semesters:  2; Credit:  2

Grade: 12

Prerequisites: Principles of Health Science, Medical Terminology, Health Science Theory, and Biology -  12th grade and provide own transportation to outside cooperating entity.

This class requires a double-block in the student’s schedule. The course is designed to provide development of multi-occupational knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers, particularly nursing. Students undergo a patient focused clinical experience in a skilled nursing facility for continued knowledge and skill development. Students are eligible to take the written certification exam for nurse aide (CNA) through the Department of Aging and Disability Services by the end of the course. This is a National Certification and allows the holder to work as a CNA anywhere in the nations. Students are required to pay for scrubs, clinical shoes, criminal background check,  current TB test, and certification fee. Clinical shoes, current TB test/vaccine records, original social security card and ID are required to take the certification exam.  Additional fees may be associated with this class.

Practicum in Health Science - Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) W/Certification

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 03301

Semesters:  2; Credit:  2

Prerequisites: Principles of Health Science, Medical Terminology and Health Science Theory and provide own transportation to outside cooperating entity.

Course Fee set by Tarrant County College

The Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Course is designed to prepare students to provide basic emergency medical care to sick, and injured patients. EMT’s perform skills such as patient assessment, bandaging, oxygen administration, splinting, spinal immobilization, and resuscitation. EMT’s provide medical care in a

variety of settings including hospitals, emergency departments, police, fire

departments, and security agencies. Students can sit for the nationally approved EMT certification exam at the end of the year as long as *clinical requirements through Tarrant County College have been completed. Students are required to pay for scrubs, clinical shoes, and current TB test, certification fee. Clinical shoes, current TB test/shot records, original social security card and ID are required to take the certification exam.  Additional fees may be associated with this class  *(the clinical portion is normally offered the summer immediately upon graduation)

Information Technology / Media

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Information Technology includes the entire world of computers – from learning how to use them to creating them to programming them to repairing them. As technology improves, the desire for faster and more powerful equipment grows. Computer technology is quickly changing every industry – from agriculture to entertainment. People with a scientific understanding of computer technology will play a major role in America’s future. Opportunities will be great for innovative specialists who keep up with the latest technology.

Students may join the BPA – Business Professionals of America student leadership club in order to participate in activities and competitions and develop leadership skills. The Technology Student Association (TSA) provides the same opportunities for students in the more hands-on activities such as networking and computer repair and upgrading.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS

Computer Systems, Hardware Analyst, Computer Security Specialist, Computer Programmer, Cisco Certified Networking Associate, Computer Repair Technician, Website Designer, Computer Scientist/Engineer, Cryptanalysis, Mathematician, Computer Security Specialist, Global Positioning Technician, Mapmaker, Secretary, Court Reporter, Computer Technician, Computer Education

Principles of Information Technology

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0263

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended Prerequisite:  Touch Systems Data Entry

Grades: 9-10

In Principles of Information Technology, students will develop computer literacy skills to adapt to emerging technologies used in the global marketplace. Students will implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. Students will enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the information technology environment.

Principles of Arts, Audio Video Technology, and Communications

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0265

Semesters:  2, Credits:  1

Grades: 9-10

Prerequisite: None

Careers in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster require, in addition to creative aptitude, a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong academic foundation, and a proficiency in oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in this cluster and the knowledge, skills, and educational requirements for those opportunities. 

Computer Maintenance

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0260

Grades: 10 - 12

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Principles of Information Technology

In Computer Maintenance, students will acquire knowledge of computer maintenance and creating appropriate documentation. Students will analyze the social responsibility of business and industry regarding the significant issues relating to the environment, ethics, health, safety, and diversity in society and in the workplace as related to computer maintenance. Students will apply technical skills to address the IT industry and emerging technologies.

Computer Technician Practicum

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0264

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2

Grades:  10 - 12

Prerequisite:  Principles of Information Technology and Computer Maintenance

In the Computer Technician Practicum, students will gain knowledge and skills in the area of computer technologies, including advanced knowledge of electrical and electronic theory, computer principles, and components related to the installation, diagnosis, service, and repair of computer based technology systems. Students will reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Proper use of analytical skills and application of IT concepts and standards are essential to prepare students for success in a technology-driven society. Critical thinking, IT experience, and product development may be conducted in a classroom setting with an instructor, with an industry mentor, or both.

Animation I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0819

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Grades:  10-12

Careers in animation span all aspects of motion graphics. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the history and techniques of the animation industry.

Digital Media

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0726

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 9 - 12

In Digital Media, students will analyze and assess current and emerging technologies, while designing and creating multimedia projects that address customer needs and resolve a problem. Students will implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students will enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the IT environment.

Audio/Video Production I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0811

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 9 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communication

Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production.

Audio/Video Production II with Lab

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0267

Semesters: 2, Credits: 2

Grades:  10-12

Prerequisite:  AV Production I

Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Building upon the concepts taught in Audio/Video Production, in addition to developing advanced knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production products. This course may be implemented in an audio format or a format with both audio and video.

Video Game Design

(Enrollment Based) CHHS

Course No. 0719

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Geometry

Students will be provided the opportunity to design, program, and create a functional video game. The course will introduce basic programming language and skills that are essential to developing a video game. Topics covered are math, physics, design, and computer programming.

Video Game Design II

(Enrollment Based) CHHS

Course No. 07192

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Grades:  10 - 12

Prerequisite:  Video Game Design I

Students will dive into the inner workings of a fully functional role-playing game (RPG) by customizing playable characters, items, maps, and chests and eventually applying customizations by altering and enhancing the core game code.

Web Technologies

Course No. 0712

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite:  Principles of Information Technology

In Web Technologies, students will learn to make informed decisions and apply the decisions to the field of IT. Students will implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students will enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the IT environment.

Graphic Design and Illustration

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0749

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 10-12

Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design.

Computer Science

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Pre-AP Computer Science I 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0251

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

This Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) course is designed to prepare

Students for success in Advanced Placement (AP) computer science

Courses and to meet the unique needs of the district's gifted and talented students in computer science.  This course is an introduction to computer science. An important emphasis will be placed on the complete development of algorithms which are independent of a particular language and which lend themselves to easy modification and maintenance.  The language used to implement the computer science skills in this course is JAVA. 

AP Computer Science Principles

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0252

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I

Computer science skills are in high demand and are valued by colleges and employers throughout the world. The AP Computer Science Principles (AP CSP) course introduces you to the essential ideas of computer science and shows how computing and technology can influence the world around you. You can pursue your interests in digital projects – like apps, films, games or music – that showcase your creativity, and use your creations to make a difference in your community.

AP Computer Science A  

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0253

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Pre-AP Computer Science I, Fulfills 4th year math credit

AP Computer Science A continues the emphasis on programming methodology and algorithm development from Computer Science I. The students will learn well-known algorithms and data structures. The importance of selecting the appropriate algorithm based on analysis of the algorithm efficiency will be stressed.  Data abstractions will be developed and implemented in student programs using objects and classes.   Case studies will be used to give the student practice in the management of complexity and to motivate the use of object-oriented programming.  The language used to implement the computer science skills in this course is JAVA.

Independent Study in Computer Science

(Enrollment Based) – Local Credit Only

Course No. 0254

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  AP Computer Science A and AP Computer Science Principles

(Local AP Weighted Credit) This course is intended for students who have taken two previous years of structured programming.  Students will design and implement computer-based solutions to problems in several application areas expanding the use of object oriented programming.  Students will learn how to develop and use data abstractions that include stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees.  There will be a continued emphasis on selecting the appropriate algorithms and data structures for the most efficient coding of a solution.

Independent Study in Technology Applications 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0261

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Students must have successfully completed two years of the following programming courses:  Pre-AP Computer Science I, AP Computer Science II, and Computer Science III

(AP Weighted Credit) The purpose of the Independent Study in Technology Applications course is to further student skills in programming through instruction advanced graphics programming in Java.  Course goals include: 1) developing skills to understand a partially-created project, completing the project in guided stages to meet predetermined specifications, and add enhancements to expand the application as it matures; 2) further develop debugging skills by applying them to an application created by another programmer; 3) learning reverse engineering skills by breaking a completed application down into logically appropriate stages, and 4) coding fluently in a well-designed, efficient fashion to create an application that meets a predefined set of expectations, rules and appearance.

Technology / Engineering Education

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A career in Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (S.T.E.M.) is challenging and ever-changing. Learners who pursue one of these career fields will be involved in planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and technical services (e.g., physical science, social science, engineering) including laboratory and testing services, and research and development services.

The Technology Student Association (TSA), the student organization for students enrolled in S.T.E.M, is an avenue by which leadership, citizenship, and technical skills are integrated into the instructional program. Leadership training is provided through curriculum activities in which students learn to conduct and participate constructively in organized meetings, speak effectively before groups, work cooperatively with others, solve problems, and compete as individuals. TSA assists students in the achievement of technologically related competencies in the areas of bio-related technology, communication, engineering, electronics, graphics, design, manufacturing, and research and development

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS

Aerospace Engineer, Air Traffic Controller, Architect, General Contractor, Civil Engineer, Computer Engineer, Product Designer, Manufacturing Supervisor, Landscape Architect, Laser Technician, Airplane Pilot, Mechanical Engineer, Robotics Technician, Welding Engineer, Supervisor, Construction Trades

Principles of Applied Engineering

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0800

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Grades: 9-10

Principles of Applied Engineering provides an overview of the various fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and their interrelationships. Students will develop engineering communication skills, which include computer graphics, modeling, and presentations, by using a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Upon completing this course, students will have an understanding of the various fields of engineering and will be able to make informed career decisions. Further, students will have worked on a design team to develop a product or system. Students will use multiple software applications to prepare and present course assignments.

Robotics I

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No.0828

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades:  9 - 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Applied Engineering

In Robotics I, students will transfer academic skills to component designs in a project-based environment through implementation of the design process. Students will build prototypes or use simulation software to test their designs. Additionally, students will explore career opportunities, employer expectations, and educational needs in the robotic and automation industry.

Engineering Design and Presentation I

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0851

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 9 - 12

Prerequisite:  Principles of Applied Engineering

Engineering Design and Presentation I is a continuation of knowledge and skills learned in Principles of Applied Engineering. Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and skills of the design process as it applies to engineering fields using multiple software applications and tools necessary to produce and present working drawings, solid model renderings, and prototypes. Students will use a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Through implementation of the design process, students will transfer advanced academic skills to component designs. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in engineering, technology, and drafting and what is required to gain and maintain employment in these areas.

Engineering Design and Presentation II

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0850

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2

Grades:  11 - 12

Prerequisite:  Engineering Design and Presentation I

Engineering Design and Presentation II is a continuation of knowledge and skills learned in Engineering Design and Presentation I. Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and skills of the design process as it applies to engineering fields using multiple software applications and tools necessary to produce and present working drawings, solid model renderings, 34 and prototypes. Students will use a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Through implementation of the design process, students will transfer advanced academic skills to component designs. Emphasis will be placed on using skills from ideation through prototyping.

Transportation, Distribution and Logistics

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The Transportation, Distribution and Logistics cluster includes the planning, management, and movement of people, materials, and goods by road, pipeline, air, rail and water and related professional and technical support services such as transportation infrastructure planning and management, logistics services, mobile equipment and facility maintenance. This area provides instruction that develops manipulative skills, safety, judgment, technical knowledge, and related occupational information. These skills prepare students for profitable employment in trade and industrial pursuits. It also trains students for a wide variety of occupations in industrial areas through contextual instruction in the layout, design, production, processing, assembling, testing, diagnosing, and maintaining of industrial, commercial, and residential goods and services.

Opportunities to develop and apply leadership, social, civic, and business-related skills are provided through the Skills USA, the student organization for young people enrolled in trade and industrial programs. As an integral part of the instructional program, club activities enhance and expand classroom instruction. Activities are directly related to the objectives of courses in Trade and Industrial Education.

FIFTEEN RELATED CAREERS

Aviation/Avionics, Aircraft Mechanic, Small Engine Mechanic, Diesel Engine Mechanic, Industrial Machine Technician, Heavy Equipment Mechanic, Numerical Control Machinist, Instrumentation & Electrical Specialist, Farm Equipment Mechanic, Automobile Collision Technician, Automobile Service Advisor, Heating & Cooling Mechanic, Telephone Installer, Die Cast Operator, Automobile Design Engineer

Principles of Transportation Systems

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0810

Semesters: 2;  Credits:  1

Grades: 9 - 10

In Principles of Transportation Systems, students will gain knowledge and skills in the safe application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. This knowledge includes the history, laws and regulations, and common practices used in the transportation industry. Students should apply knowledge and skills in the application, design, and production of technology as it relates to the transportation industries. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings.

Automotive Basics

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 08101

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 9 - 12

Automotive Basics includes knowledge of the basic automotive systems and the theory and principles of the components that make up each system and how to service these systems. Automotive Basics includes applicable safety and environmental rules and regulations. In Automotive Basics, students will gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and servicing of vehicle systems. This study allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach safety, tool identification, proper tool use, and employability.

Basic Collision Repair and Refinishing

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 08201

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades:  9 - 12

Basic Collision Repair and Refinishing includes knowledge of the processes, technologies, and materials used in the reconstruction [and alteration] of vehicles. This course is designed to teach the concepts and theory of systems related to automotive collision repair and refinishing.

Automotive Technology I:  Maintenance and Light Repair

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0822

Semesters:  2, Credits:  2

Grades:  10 - 12

Prerequisite:  Automotive Basics

Automotive Technology I : Maintenance and Light Repair includes knowledge of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. This course includes applicable safety and environmental rules and regulations. In Automotive Technology I : Maintenance and Light Repair, students will gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study will allow students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach safety, tool identification, proper tool use, and employability.

Collision Repair 

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0820

Semesters:  2, Credits:  2

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite:  Basic Collision Repair and Refinishing

Collision Repair includes knowledge of the processes, technologies, and materials used in the reconstruction of vehicles. This course is designed to teach the concepts and theory of systems related to automotive collision repair and refinishing.

Automotive Technology II:  Automotive Service

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0823

Semesters:  2, Credits:  2

Grades:  10 - 12

Prerequisite:  Automotive Basics, and Automotive Technology I:  Maintenance and Light Repair

Automotive Technology II : Automotive Service includes knowledge of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. Automotive Technology II : Automotive Service includes applicable safety and environmental rules and regulations. In this course, students will gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study will allow students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach safety, tool identification, proper tool use, and employability.

Paint and Refinishing

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0821

Semesters:  2, Credits:  2

Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisite:  Basic Collision Repair and Refinishing, and Collision Repair

Paint and Refinishing includes knowledge of the processes, technologies, and materials used in the reconstruction of vehicles. This course is designed to teach the concepts and theory of systems related to automotive paint and refinishing.

English Language Arts

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Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) courses are designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) Language Arts courses and to meet the unique needs of the district’s gifted and talented language arts students.  They are designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and issues in language arts.  Basic content is the same as the on level course, but instruction allows for greater depth and complexity in the curriculum.

Advanced Placement (AP) courses will challenge students with college-level material that enables them to successfully pass the Advanced Placement exam and receive college credit.  Reading requirements include the text written on the college level and additional outside reading.  AP courses may require summer assignments.

All language arts classes require outside reading during the school year and during the summer. Students are held accountable for their summer reading during the first six weeks of school.  Summer reading information can be accessed at www.gcisd-k12.org.  A dictionary and thesaurus are essential tools that students will use from year to year.  Although class sets of books are provided, many students choose to purchase their own copies of the assigned novels. Pre-AP, AP and GT students may be asked to acquire additional reading materials.

English I

English I - For Speakers of Languages Other Than English

Pre-AP English I

Pre-AP English I/STEM

GT Pre-AP English I

ASPIRE Pre-AP English I

English II

English II - For Speakers of Languages Other Than English

Pre-AP English II

Pre-AP English II/STEM

GT Pre-AP English II

English III

ESL English III

English III - Dual Enrollment (fee based) - See available college programs

Pre-AP English III

AP English III - Language and Composition

GT AP English III - Language and Composition

English IV

ESL English IV

English IV - Dual Enrollment - (fee-based) - See available college programs

AP English IV - Literature and Composition

GT AP English IV - Literature and Composition

English I

(Standard)

Course No. 0101

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

English I provides the opportunity for students to explore meaningful literature and apply a variety of effective writing techniques.  The course integrates the study of literature, writing, vocabulary, and grammar.  The purpose of this class is to develop lifelong language fluency, to develop an appreciation of literature, and to develop critical and applied reasoning skills.

English I - For Speakers of Languages Other Than English

(Standard)

Course No. 0970

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ESL Identification

English I for Speakers of Languages Other Than English is a full-year course of study which explores the essentials of the regular English curriculum with an emphasis on the development of basic interpersonal communication skills and cognitive academic language proficiency. The course of study integrates the study of literature, writing, vocabulary, and grammar necessary for academic English.  Readings and writings will parallel the selections in English I, but may reflect the different reading and interest levels of the student.

Pre-AP English I

(Standard)

Course No. 0102

Pre-AP English I/STEM

Course No. 0102S

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Freshman Classification

This Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) course is designed to prepare students for success in Advanced Placement (AP) English courses and offers a differentiated curriculum that includes a wider range and a greater depth of subject matter.  Its purpose is to increase the student's effectiveness as a reader, speaker, listener, and writer by emphasizing higher-level and critical-thinking skills and by providing opportunities for creative and productive thinking.  Emphasis is placed on quality literature, the exploration of literary themes through writing, and the methods of discourse.

GT Pre-AP English I*

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0102G

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Freshman Classification

*  Must meet qualification for GT placement

GT Pre-AP English I is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  This Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) course is designed to prepare students for success in Advanced Placement (AP) English courses and offers a differentiated curriculum that includes a wider range and a greater depth of subject matter.  Its purpose is to increase the student's effectiveness as a reader, speaker, listener, and writer by emphasizing higher-level and critical-thinking skills and by providing opportunities for creative and productive thinking.  Emphasis is placed on quality literature, the exploration of literary themes through writing, and the methods of discourse.


ASPIRE Pre-AP English I
(Enrolment Based)

Course No. 1100 A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: ASPIRE Qualification

Grades: 9

ASPIRE Pre-AP English I is designed specifically to serve ASPIRE students in order to provide a learning environment commensurate with the academic and affective needs of highly gifted students.   This Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) course is designed to prepare students for success in Advanced Placement (AP) English courses and offers a differentiated curriculum that includes a wider range and a greater depth of subject matter.  Its purpose is to increase the student's effectiveness as a reader, speaker, listener, and writer by emphasizing higher-level and critical-thinking skills and by providing opportunities for creative and productive thinking.  Emphasis is placed on quality literature, the exploration of literary themes through writing, and the methods of discourse.

English II

(Standard)

Course No. 0103

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  English I

English II extends the exploration of meaningful literature and effective writing techniques from English I.  It is the study of varied literary genres along with their characteristic elements.  The course integrates the study of literature, writing, vocabulary, and grammar with the goals of developing lifelong language fluency, appreciation of literature, and critical and applied reasoning skills.

English II  - For Speakers of Languages Other Than English

(Standard)

Course No. 0971

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ESL Identification, ESOLI

English II for Speakers of Languages Other Than English is a full-year course of study which explores the essentials of the regular English curriculum with an emphasis on the development of basic interpersonal communication skills and cognitive academic language proficiency. The course of study integrates the study of literature, writing, vocabulary, and grammar necessary for academic English.  Readings and writings will parallel the selections in the English II program.  ESL students will move directly into academic English III.

Pre-AP English II

(Standard)

Course No. 0104

Pre-AP English II/STEM

Course No. 0104S A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Sophomore Classification

This course is designed to prepare students for success in Advanced Placement (AP) English courses and integrates the areas of literature, religion, philosophy, political science, art, music, and history. Students extrapolate ideas through composition; review and refine skills in language, reading comprehension, critical/creative thinking skills, and develop skills in guided and independent research.  

GT Pre-AP English II*

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0104G

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Sophomore Classification

*  Must meet qualification for GT placement

GT Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) English II is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  This course is designed to prepare students for success in Advanced Placement (AP) English courses and integrates the areas of literature, religion, philosophy, political science, art, music, and history. Students extrapolate ideas through composition; review and refine skills in language, reading comprehension, critical/creative thinking skills, and develop skills in guided and independent research.  

English III

(Standard)

Course No. 0105

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  English II

English III is a study of the development of American literature, focusing on representative authors and their works and emphasizing expository writing and vocabulary enrichment within the framework of the literature. The purpose of this class is to increase the student's awareness of American cultural heritage and develop an appreciation of themes in American literature.  Strengthening student skills in composition, vocabulary, language, and reading comprehension is emphasized.

ESL English III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0105E; Section numbers for ESL section will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  English II. Participation in ESL programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

             The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

             served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

English III is a study of the development of American literature, focusing on representative authors and their works and emphasizing expository writing and vocabulary enrichment within the framework of the literature. The purpose of this class is to increase the student's awareness of American cultural heritage and develop an appreciation of themes in American literature.  Strengthening student skills in composition, vocabulary, language, and reading comprehension is emphasized.

English III - Dual Enrollment (fee based) - See available college programs

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0963

Semesters: 1-2, Credits: College and High School

Prerequisite: Junior standing and meet College Early Entrance Requirements

Pre-AP English III

(Standard)

Course No. 0106

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:   Junior Classification

This Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) course is designed to prepare students for success in Advanced Placement (AP) English courses. English III Pre-AP is a study of the development of American literature focusing on the historical perspective which provides opportunities for broad reading experiences with many representative authors and their works. Emphasis is placed on independent thought, critical analysis, and evaluation.  Its purposes are to allow interested and able students to deepen their understanding of American cultural heritage through literature and to strengthen the students' skills in composition and language.

AP - Language and Composition (may count as English III or English IV)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0107

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:   Junior or Senior Classification

The course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.  This course prepares students to take the AP Language and Composition exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. Advanced English courses in grades eight through ten will help prepare students for success in the Advanced Placement English course and on the Advanced Placement Exam.  Reading requirements include the ability to read text written on the college level, as well as critical review of literature journal articles.

GT AP Language and Composition* (may count as English III or English IV)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0107G

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:   Junior or Senior Classification

*  Must meet qualification for GT placement

GT AP Language and Composition is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners. The course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.  This course prepares students to take the AP Language and Composition exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. Advanced English courses in grades eight through ten will help prepare students for success in the Advanced Placement English course and on the Advanced Placement Exam.  Reading requirements include the ability to read text written on the college level, as well as critical review of literature journal articles.

English IV

(Standard)

Course No. 0110

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  English III

English IV is a study of writing and research skills integrated with the study of a variety of literary genre, both  fiction and nonfiction, including novels, plays, essays, and poems which center around the immortality of ideas found in every generation of English literature.  Students become familiar with the characteristics of good writing as a result of reading from a variety of British and world authors.  College preparatory composition is emphasized.  Analogies and etymologies invigorate the vocabulary program.


ESL English IV
(Enrollment based)
Course No. 01100 A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: English III, Participation in ESL programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

Grades: 12

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

English IV is a study of writing and research skills integrated with the study of a variety of literary genre, both  fiction and nonfiction, including novels, plays, essays, and poems which center around the immortality of ideas found in every generation of English literature.  Students become familiar with the characteristics of good writing as a result of reading from a variety of British and world authors.  College preparatory composition is emphasized. Analogies and etymologies invigorate the vocabulary program.

English IV - Dual Enrollment - (fee-based) - See available college programs

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0959

Effective in the 2014-2015 school year, all dual credit courses will receive a weight equivalent to Pre-AP.

AP Literature and Composition (may count as English IV)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0112

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Senior Classification

Pre-AP/AP English Courses Recommended

The  course aligns to an introductory college sophomore level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.  This course prepares students to take the AP Literature and Composition exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit.  Reading requirements include the ability to read text written on the college level.

GT AP Literature and Composition* (may count as English IV)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0112G

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Senior Classification

*  Must meet qualification for GT placement

GT AP Literature and Composition is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners. The course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.  This course prepares students to take the AP Literature and Composition exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. Reading requirements include the ability to read text written on the college level.

English Language Arts Electives

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Advanced Placement Seminar

Advanced Placement Research

Independent Study in English I, II, III

College Preparatory ELA

Creative Writing I

Literary Genre: World Literature

Literary Genre: Shakespeare

Practical Writing

The Bible As Literature

Reading I, II & III

Journalism I

Advanced Journalism/Newspaper I, II, III

Advanced Journalism/Yearbook I, II, III

Independent Study in Journalism

Independent Study in Journalism/Photo

Photojournalism I

Professional Communications

Debate I

Debate II, III

Oral Interpretation I, II, III

Independent Study in Speech I, II, III

Advanced Placement Seminar

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 01211

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior (concurrent with AP Language)

Recommended:  Junior/Senior Classification; Required Course for Capstone Certificate or Diploma

(AP Weighted Credit) The Advanced Humanities Seminar takes a multidisciplinary approach as an application based course that investigates real world issues and emphasizes research, collaboration, writing, and inquiry. This course will help support students understand research methodology as they evaluate issues from multiple perspectives, analyze arguments, develop their own questions for investigation, and work to produce solutions to real world issues. Students in this course need to be proficient writers and have already demonstrated mastery of the writing process.  This course will lead into a research-based course in which students continue their exploration of a topic of interest.

Advanced Placement Research

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0121

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Advanced Placement Seminar

Recommended:  Senior Classification; Required Course for Capstone Certificate or Diploma

(AP Weighted Credit) In Advanced Humanities Research, students develop the skills and discipline necessary to conduct independent research to produce and defend a scholarly academic thesis. This course allows students to explore deeply an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest and through this inquiry, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long mentored, research-based investigation. The course culminates in an academic thesis paper of approximately 5,000 words and a presentation, performance, or exhibition with an oral defense.

Independent Study in English I, II, III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I - 0115

Course No. II - 0116

Course No. III - 0117

Semesters:  1-6; Credits:  ½-3

Prerequisite:  Instructor Approval

Sophomore Classification

The Independent Study of English course is designed to prepare students for the US Academic Decathlon competition.  The purposes of the Academic Decathlon are to stimulate intellectual growth and achievement, to encourage students to develop a greater respect for knowledge, to promote wholesome inter-school competition in academic areas of study and interest, and to encourage public interest and awareness of outstanding programs in public schools. The competition includes six tests of academic strength, three demonstrations of communication ability, and the Super Quiz; a team event before a large audience.  In addition to an interview, an essay, and two speeches (prepared and impromptu), written comprehensive exams are given in economics,  fine arts, English and literature, Mathematics, science, and the social sciences.  Students are not required to be members of the team to take the class.


College Preparatory ELA
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 09990 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  0

Prerequisite:  EOC performance does not meet college readiness standard

Grade: 12

This course if offered in partnership with TCC to prepare students for success in college level Reading and Language Arts.  Students must be graduating on the minimum or foundation plans to take this course.

Creative Writing I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0120

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Sophomore Classification

Creative Writing I is an elective for students whose interests lie in the area of writing and creative expression. The course provides opportunities to explore and employ principles of creative writing in the production of original works.  Students will keep a journal, compile a poetry notebook, write a variety of short stories, write short descriptive passages, and have the opportunity to enter writing contests for publication.

Literary Genre: World Literature 

(Optional)

Course No. 0108

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Junior/Senior Classification

This course has a multicultural focus and is designed for students who enjoy reading and discussing literature. Students will have the opportunity to read particularly, but not exclusively, current literature written by minority authors.  Novel reading is the primary focus.  Through these readings, students will learn to identify cultural themes and appreciate the diversity of cultures in our world.  Students will be encouraged to acquire additional reading materials for this class.

Literary Genre: Shakespeare

(Optional)

Course No. 0109

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  None

The student is actively engaged in relating Shakespeare to art, music, and writing. Active learning is emphasized, capitalizing on personal interests and talents of set designing, costuming, and acting.  Students will read the plays and sonnets as archetypal of the human condition.  Special attention focuses on the sonnets and these plays:  Hamlet, King Lear, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Othello, Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, and Twelfth Night.  Students will be encouraged to acquire additional reading materials for this class.

Practical Writing

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0122

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  None

This course is designed for students who want to develop practical writing skills including letter writing and completion of applications, forms, and interviews.  Persuasive and reflective writing, formal and informal communication, grammar, and editing will be emphasized.  Individual study plans may be developed to meet a student's writing needs and standardized test objectives.

The Bible As Literature

(Enrollment based)

Course No. 0111

Semesters: 1; Credits: ½

Prerequisites: English I

This course will explore the literary genres, forms, and motifs of the Bible.  Students will research and discuss the influences of these narratives on western literature.  The course will compare the stories of origin, hero’s journey, psalm, and the theme of loss with modern literature.  Students will recognize similarities in biblical stories of love, jealousy and family with the writing of Shakespeare and other poets, Students will be required to furnish their own copy of the required textbook and a student-selected translation of the Bible.

Reading I, II & III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.  1-0124

Course No. II- 0125

Course No. III - 0126

Semesters:  1-6; Credits:  ½-3

Prerequisite:  None

Reading is an elective designed for the student interested in improving reading skills.  The instructional emphasis targets individual improvement in reading comprehension, vocabulary, critical thinking, reading rate, and study skills.  Skills are practiced through the use of relevant materials and computer software.  This course is recommended for all students and is individualized to target specific reading skills emphasized on standardized test. Ample time for silent reading is provided.

Journalism

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(1 – 3) following the course number indicates the number of times a student has been enrolled in a course, not the student’s grade classification.

Journalism I 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0140

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  None

Journalism I offers an introduction to the basics of print journalism.  Its scope includes forms and styles of journalistic writing, journalistic ethics, current events, layout, design, and production methods; and learning about the school newspaper and yearbook.

Advanced Journalism/Newspaper I, II & III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I - 0144

Course No. II - 0145

Course No. III - 0146

Semesters:  2-6; Credits:  1-3

Prerequisite:  Sophomore Classification

Application, Instructor Approval

Journalism I Strongly Recommended

This class is designed for journalism students who work on the school newspaper.  The student works in one or more of the following areas:  photography, editing, reporting news, sports, and feature writing.  Students should plan to work after school at deadline time.  Students are encouraged to attend a summer workshop for three to five days.  Costs will range from $150-$250.

Advanced Journalism/Yearbook I, II & III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I - 0141

Course No. II - 0142

Course No. III – 0143

Semesters:  2-6; Credits:  1-3

Prerequisite:  Sophomore Classification

Application, Instructor Approval

Journalism I Strongly Recommended

This course is designed for students who produce the school yearbook.  Students will have the opportunity to publish a digitally-produced high school yearbook, handle financial responsibilities, cover events, write feature stories, write cutlines and headlines, edit, and proofread copy.  Students should expect to work some evenings and weekends as well as during class time.  Students are encouraged to attend a summer workshop for three to five days.  Costs will range from $150-$250.

Independent Study in Journalism

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0147 (1 – 3)

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Advanced Journalism/Yearbook or Newspaper

Instructor Approval

Students must assume responsibility for editing the school's yearbook or newspaper.  In the spring, each student will work with the instructor on an individualized plan of study to compile a portfolio or project.  Students should expect to work before and after school on a regular basis to meet deadlines and complete assignments.

Independent Study in Journalism/Photo

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0149 (1 – 3)

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Photojournalism I

Instructor Approval

Students must assume responsibility for photographic coverage in the school's yearbook and newspaper, by working independently and fulfilling assignments.  In the spring, each student will work with the instructor on an individualized plan of study to compile a portfolio and mount a public showing of works.  Students should expect lab work and photography assignments before and after school on a regular basis.  Photographers should have their own 35mm SLR cameras.

Photojournalism I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0148

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Sophomore Classification

Photojournalism I teaches the basic skills of black and white photography and visual language.  The cost of supplies is $40 per semester.  Students are encouraged to have their own camera to use.

Speech / Debate

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Participation in speech/debate classes requires fees which will be communicated through parent meetings at different times of the year.  For more specific costs, please contact the activity sponsor at the campus.  Except for Communication Applications, tournament registration fees and expenses will be paid by the student.

Professional Communications

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0743

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½ (½ speech)

Professional Communications blends written, oral, and graphic communication in a career-based environment. Careers in the global economy require individuals to be creative and have a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong and solid academic foundation, and a proficiency in professional oral and

written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop and expand the ability to write, read, edit, speak, listen, apply software applications, manipulate computer graphics, and conduct Internet research.

Debate I 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0735

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

This course serves as an introduction to competitive debate.  Debate stresses the development of advanced research skills and higher level thinking.  Students learn to participate in a variety of debate formats including Cross-Examination Debate, Lincoln-Douglas Debate, and Parliamentary Debate.  In addition, students prepare for other competitive speaking events such as Extemporaneous Speaking, Original Oratory, and Impromptu Speaking.  Basic processes of logic and reasoning are taught in addition to persuasive argument construction.

All students approved for the course will become part of the high school debate team and are responsible for all team obligations and policies, including required practices and tournament participation. Minimum requirements include attending/ competing in one tournament per six weeks and attending weekly practice sessions.

This course fulfills the graduation requirement for Speech.

Debate II, III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. II - 0736

Course No. III - 0737

Semesters:  2-4; Credits:  1-2

Prerequisite:  Debate I

Instructor Approval Required

Debate II & III are specifically designed for the academic debater/speaker.  This course will focus on advanced skills necessary for successful varsity competition while also serving as preparation for competitive college and professional experiences.  Students work in a lab setting to prepare for tournament-style debate.  Advanced research and higher level thinking skills are refined.  Students continue to polish their communication skills through ongoing speaking drills.  All students approved for the course become part of the high school debate team and are responsible for all team requirements including attending or competing in two tournaments per six weeks and attending weekly practice sessions.  This course fulfills the graduation requirement for Speech.

Oral Interpretation I, II, III 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I - 0732

Course No. II - 0733

Course No. III - 0734

Semesters:  2-6; Credits:  1-3

Prerequisite:  Instructor Approval

Speech or Theatre Strongly Recommended

Oral Interpretation is designed for the student who is considering competitive speech or drama. The class will focus on prose, poetry, storytelling, Reader's theater, monologue, and one act plays. Students will learn how to choose, cut, and perform literature. This class is reserved for students who have prior experience in speech or drama. Students are expected to attend tournaments each six weeks. A material fee will be required for this course. Tournament registration fees and expenses will be paid by the student.

Independent Study in Speech I, II, III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I – 0738

Course No. II - 0739

Course No. III - 0740

Semesters:  2-6; Credits:  1-3

Prerequisite:  Debate I

Concurrent Enrollment in Advanced Debate; Instructor Approval

This course taken with Debate II or III has the same goals, obligations, and requirements. Activities are individually tailored for high-achieving students.  Students complete individual research assignments using a variety of sources. Local university and community resources are used in completing projects.  Students continue refinement of advanced speaking and writing skills in a specific area of interest.  Peer tutoring is used for students to share their work.  Cooperative efforts with feeder programs will utilize student projects. All activities are used in competitive or community forensic presentations. This course does not fulfill the graduation requirement for Speech.

Fine Arts

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Information regarding graduation requirements:  Credit for Fine Arts may be earned in one of the following four areas:  Art, Dance, Music, and Theatre.  Dance I-IV and Band I-IV may earn Fine Arts or PE credits.

There may be additional material costs associated with fine arts classes for which the student will be responsible in which the resultant product is in excess of minimum requirements and, at the student’s option, becomes the personal property of the student.

Visual Arts

Art I

Pre-AP Art I

Pre-AP Art II

Art Ceramics I - III

Art Drawing I - III

Art Painting I - III

Art Sculpture I - III

AP Studio Art: Drawing

AP Studio Art: 2D Design

AP Studio Art: 3D Design

Art Portfolio - Independent Study

Pre-AP Art History

AP Art History

Advanced Art History Seminar - Post AP Art History

CTE - Floral Design

Partners in Art

Art I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0750

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

This course offers the beginning art student a foundational survey of studio art.  A variety of media, techniques, themes, vocabulary, and processes will be explored throughout the year.  Basic drawing, painting, and sculpture skills will be developed, and color theory will be explored.  Two-dimensional and three-dimensional designs will integrate the elements and principles of art through intentional composition and will incorporate student voice.  Art history tie-ins and student critiques will help the student gain a greater understanding of how artists work.  Each student will demonstrate his/her accomplishments through a digital portfolio of work.

Pre-AP Art I  

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0775

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: portfolio review and/or teacher recommendation

This course offers art students interested in a path towards Advanced Placement courses a strong fundamental experience in studio art.  A variety of media, techniques, themes, and thinking processes will provide a strong foundational survey of studio art.  Drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and photography skills will be developed through meaningful projects.  Color theory will also be explored.  Two-dimensional and three-dimensional designs will integrate the elements and principles of art through intentional compositions. Students will have a platform to investigate original artworks that incorporate their student voice. Art history tie-ins and student critiques will help the student gain a greater understanding of how artists work.  Each student will demonstrate his/her accomplishments through a digital portfolio of work.

Pre-AP Art II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.  0776

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Art I, Art I, or teacher recommendation, Portfolio Review by Instructor

This course builds upon the fundamentals and rigor of Pre-AP Art 1 for the art student interested in pursuing Advanced Placement studio courses.  This course focuses on developing techniques and processes in a variety of areas including drawing, painting, collage, sculpture and mixed media. Emphasis will be on developing compositional skills using the art elements to enhance the principles of design, expressing the student’s individual creativity and voice through artistic themes.  Art history tie-ins and student critiques will help articulate student’s greater understanding of personal experimentation and investigation of art making processes.  Each student will demonstrate his/her accomplishments through a digital portfolio of work.

Art Ceramics I – III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I –0770

Course No. II – 0771

Course No. III – 0772

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1-3

Prerequisite:  Art I

This course is a continuation of the study of three-dimensional art with a focus on clay as a sculptural medium.  Advanced methods and techniques using clay will be explored, including potters wheel and hand-built sculpture.  Individual creativity will be stressed.

Art Drawing I – III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I – 0754

Course No. II – 0755

Course No. III – 0756

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1-3

Prerequisite:  Art I

In this class, a variety of drawing possibilities will be explored as students are introduced to a range of drawing techniques and materials.  Each student will demonstrate his/her accomplishments through a portfolio of artwork.

Art Painting I – III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I - 0767

Course No. II - 0768

Course No. III - 0769

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1-3

Prerequisite:  Art I

Students will study color theory through a variety of painting and design projects.  Various color theories and painting styles will be learned while completing acrylic canvas paintings and mixed media paintings.  Students will need a personal painting kit, including paints, brushes and canvases. Students are responsible for the purchase of these supplies.

Art Sculpture I – III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I - 0751

Course No. II - 0752

Course No. III - 0753

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Art I

A variety of sculpture media will be explored including plaster, wire, rock, mosaic, wood and clay.  Students will explore the works of great sculptors throughout history while developing skills in a variety of sculpture techniques.  Individual creativity will be stressed.

AP Studio Art: Drawing

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0758

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  2 years of high school level art classes (1 year with teacher recommendation). Portfolio review by instructor.

This course is designed to provide the experienced art student with the opportunity to create a comprehensive portfolio based on Advanced Placement Drawing guidelines.  This portfolio will address competent and expressive mark making through light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth.  Abstract, observational, and inventive works may be demonstrated through a variety of art media.  In the first week of May, the portfolio will be submitted to the College Board for college-level AP credit.  Critiques will play an integral role in articulating conceptual thinking and experimental processes.  Students will be expected to work outside of class in order to complete portfolio requirements.

AP Studio Art: 2D Design

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0757

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  2 years of high school level art classes (1 year with teacher recommendation). Portfolio review by instructor.

This course is designed to provide the experienced art student with the opportunity to create a comprehensive portfolio based on AP 2-D design guidelines.  This portfolio is intended to address purposeful decision making about how to employ the elements and principles of art in an integrative, conceptual, and graphic design way.  For this portfolio, students are asked to demonstrate mastery of 2-D design through any two-dimensional medium or process, including, but not limited to, Photography, Graphic Design, and Performance.  In the first week of May, the portfolio will be submitted to the College Board for college-level AP credit.  Critiques will play an integral role in articulating conceptual thinking and experimental processes.  Students will be expected to work outside of class in order to complete portfolio requirements.

AP Studio Art: 3D Design

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0762

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  2 years of high school level art classes (1 year with teacher recommendation). Portfolio review by instructor.

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to create three dimensional works of art and submit them for Advanced Placement credit.   Students will be exploring specific media and subjects that were found in their general survey of sculpture classes and will look at their work critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and attempt to articulate what they see and experience.  In the first week of May, the portfolio will be submitted to the College Board for college-level AP credit.  Critiques will play an integral role in articulating conceptual thinking and experimental processes.  Students will be expected to work outside of class in order to complete portfolio requirements.

Art Portfolio - Independent Study

(Enrollment Based)

(Local Credit Only)

Course No. 0774

Semesters:  2 - 4; Credits:  1 - 2

Prerequisite:  Junior or Senior Classification

Requirement:  must be concurrently enrolled in Art AP

This course is designed for the advanced art student who wants to continue the study of art and develop a personal style.  The student works with the art teacher to select projects which will help expand his/her knowledge and skills.  Each student works independently toward set goals.  Students planning to major in art in college will complete their application portfolio.  Students may be enrolled in Art Independent Study for no more than four semesters. This course is also designed for the advanced art history student who wants to continue the study of art history. Curricula will be on a case-by-case scenario.

Pre-AP Art History

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0782

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Recommended: Freshman

This course is designed to introduce students to themes and concepts of art history with the goal of preparing students to be successful in Advanced Placement Art History.  The aim of the course is to introduce students to the rich traditions of western and non-European architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms through factual knowledge and the skillful use of principles of aesthetics and comparative criticism.  Students will learn how to respond to works of art with intelligence and sensitivity, examining the major forms of artistic expression of the past and the distant cultures as well as those of their own time and environment.  Project-based learning will be incorporated to deepen conceptual understanding and research and writing will be used to strengthen analytical skills.

AP Art History

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0773

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Sophomore, Junior or Senior Classification

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Art History, AP Human Geography, and/or Pre-AP or AP World Geography strongly recommended

Advanced Placement Art History invites students to discover the diversity in and connections among forms of artistic expression throughout history and from around the globe. Students learn about how people have responded to and communicated their experiences through art making by exploring art in its historic and cultural contexts. This course welcomes students into the global art world as active participants, engaging with its forms and content as they research, discuss, read, and write about art, artists, art making, and responses to and interpretations of art. Culture, religion, and artistic practices are interwoven with historical context. This course culminates in the AP exam offered by the College Board in the first week of May.

Advanced Art History Seminar - Post AP Art History

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0783

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Required Prerequisite: Senior or Junior Classification,  AP Art History required with “A” average, Enrollment Essay due in Spring of preceding year received by April 1.

 

This course is designed specifically for juniors and seniors who have successfully completed AP Art History and are looking to deepen their understanding of art history, research methodology,  and contemporary aesthetics. The Advanced Art History Seminar allows students to engage in rigorous, theoretical and conceptual dialogue. Students will further their understanding and experience with art history through research, writing, seminar discussion, comparative analysis, formal analysis, and presentations.

CTE - Floral Design

(Enrollment Based)  TECC

Course No 0826

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

This course satisfies a Fine Art Credit for High School Graduation

Floral Design is designed to develop students' ability to identify and demonstrate the principles and techniques related to floral design as well as develop an understanding of the management of floral 50 enterprises. Through the analysis of artistic floral styles and historical periods, students will develop respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Students will respond to and analyze floral designs, thus contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and evaluations. To prepare for careers in floral design, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to horticultural systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings.

Partners in Art

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 1750P

Semesters: 2   Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Junior Classification

Instructor Approval, Selection Process

 This course is designed to promote an inclusive educational environment for special education students in Art.  Students will assist teachers in general education and special education settings by helping to facilitate inclusion in the Art classroom.  Students will assist their partners in meeting goals and standards in Art class and will be responsible for designing, preparing, and presenting a lesson to the class. This course does NOT fulfill the fine arts graduation requirement, but it will be counted as a state elective.

Dance

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Dance I, II, III, IV

Dance Team Prep I, II, III, IV

Dance Guard I, II, III, IV

Junior Varsity Dance Team

Varsity Dance Team

Descriptions of dance courses are also listed under physical education.  

Students are required to purchase specified dance attire and dance shoes for class (cost range $50-$100).

Public performance in the Dance I-IV annual production will be required.

Note:  Dance I – IV may earn either Fine Arts and/or PE waiver credits.

Dance I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No 0531

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

This is an introductory dance class of the following genres – ballet, jazz, hip hop, modern/lyrical, performance, and choreography. In each unit, the students learn history, influence on/impact of pop culture, technique, terminology, movement. Skills test are graded for effort, memory, technique performance. Dance classes perform in the spring show on campus and students may be selected to participate in the D.E.A.L. Dance I Annual Assessment.

*There is a wide range of level/ability in this class. Instructors tailor/modify technique combinations & dance combinations to accommodate every level of dancer in the class.

 

Dance II, III, IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course Nos. 0532, 0533,0534

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Preceding level of Dance in sequence.

Each subsequent course builds upon the preceding course. Each level explores each genre in more depth. Skills test are graded for effort, memory, technique performance. Performance in the spring show is required..

 

Dance Team Prep I-IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.  0549

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite:  Level I - None. Levels II-IV - Preceding level of Dance in sequence.

 

This class is an intermediate-advanced class for the dancer who wishes to audition for the Dance Guard or  Dance Teams.. The sole purpose of this class is to build technique & full prepare for dance team auditions. Styles include: Jazz, Hip Hop, Lyrical/contemporary, Pom and High Kicks. Dance classes perform in the Spring Show on campus.

Dance Guard I-IV*

(Enrollment Based)

Course Nos. 5311X, 5322X, 5333X, 5344X

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1 Fine Arts + .5 PE waiver

*BAND GUARD and DANCE GUARD must be concurrently enrolled.

Prerequisite:  Director Approval

 

The Dance Guard (CHHS: Charms, GHS: Elegance) is an auditioned group of 9th-12th graders who dance & provide visual elegance in the High School Marching Band Field Show. They perform at varsity football games & travel to competitions with the Marching Band from August-November. In the spring, the Dance Guard continues working on dance technique & training, is introduced to Winter Guard & performs in the Spring Dance Show on campus. The dance season for Dance Guard is August-November, then they will continue with technique development, Winter Guard performance opportunities and preparation for Dance Guard and Dance Team auditions.

Dance Junior Varsity Dance Team

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0536

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Director Approval per audition.

The Junior Varsity Dance Team (CHHS: Pantherettes, GHS: Belles) is an auditioned  group chosen for their dance ability and willingness to promote school spirit at the junior varsity level. These students participate in precision dance performances on a local level throughout the school year. This is a preparatory group for future varsity drill team members. The junior varsity drill team works in a cooperative effort in the development of the overall program.

Dance Varsity Dance Team

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0535

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Previous dance experience, Director approval per required audition.

The Varsity Dance Team (CHHS: Panteras, GHS: Fillies) is an auditioned group that performs precision dance routines at community and athletic events, as well as at regional, state and national level competitions. The students selected for the dance/drill team are chosen for their dance ability and for their commitment to promoting school spirit. The Varsity Dance Team is involved in school and community events on a year- round basis.

Music

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Band - Varsity

Band - Sub Non-Varsity B

Band - Sub Non-Varsity A

Band - Non-Varsity

Band - Percussion

GCISD HS Band Program

Band is a rigorous, full year course concentrating on the continued development of fundamental wind and percussion skills. The curriculum focuses mainly on marching band in the fall and concert band in the spring. The rehearsal and performance schedules are very demanding, including outside-of-school practices, football games, pep rallies, contests, sectionals, and concerts. Students in all bands are members of a team, and are required to participate in all team activities outside of the school day including rehearsals, concerts and performances. Participation in fall marching band

allows students to waive ½ credit of the required 1 P.E. credit towards graduation, so two years of participation in band satisfies the PE requirement. Participation in two years of band also satisfies the 1 fine arts credit required for graduation. Students enrolling in any band course are required to participate in marching band, including all rehearsals and performances. Additional expenses for supplies and required fees are associated with this activity. The campus activity sponsor will provide a specific list of costs.

GCISD District-owned Instrument Usage Fee

All wind and percussion performers that utilize a district-owned instrument are assessed a $50 instrument usage fee per semester to cover maintenance and repair of that instrument through the normal wear and tear produced in a season.  Participation in this activity requires additional fees which will be communicated through parent meetings before the start of the year.  For more specific costs, please contact the activity sponsor at the campus.  Students will be given several opportunities to earn money through fundraisers which can be used to cover any costs throughout the year.

BAND Sub Non-Varsity B (CHHS-Concert II; GHS-Concert)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0650

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous Band experience required.

Sub Non-Varsity B band is an auditioned group composed primarily of students continuing to develop their basic performance skills. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of proper tone production, technical ability and sight-reading skills. Depending on instrumentation year-to-year, this ensemble may or may not compete at UIL or other outside band competitions. Students perform music of many genres and styles. Private lessons are encouraged.  Students will be required to audition with a HS band director for approval into this course.

BAND Sub Non-Varsity A (CHHS-Concert I; GHS-Symphonic)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0652

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous band experience required.

Sub Non-Varsity A band is an auditioned group composed primarily of students with intermediate tone production, technical ability and sight-reading skills. Students are expected to perform at solo & ensemble contest and are strongly encouraged to audition for the TMEA All-Region Band if they are taking private lessons. Students perform music of many genres and styles at an intermediate level. Private lessons are encouraged.  Students will be required to audition with a HS band director for approval into this course.

BAND Non-Varsity (CHHS-Symphonic; GHS-Honors)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0654

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous band experience required.

Non-Varsity band is an auditioned group composed primarily of students with advanced tone production, technical ability and sight-reading skills. Students are required to audition for the TMEA All-Region Band and to perform at Solo & Ensemble contest.  Students perform music of many genres and styles at an advanced level. Private lessons are required.  Students will be required to audition with a HS band director for approval into this course.

BAND Varsity (CHHS-Wind Symphony; GHS-Wind Ensemble)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0656

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous band experience required.

Varsity band is an auditioned group composed primarily of students with exceptional tone production, technical ability and sight-reading skills. Students are required to audition for the TMEA All-Region & All-State Band and to perform at solo & ensemble contest. Students perform music of many genres and styles at a very challenging level. Students will be required to audition with a HS band director for approval into this course.  Private lessons are required.

BAND Percussion

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0653

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous band experience required.

Percussion is an auditioned group composed entirely of students with prior percussion training at the middle or high school levels. Students perform music of many genres and styles at a very challenging level. Percussion students will be required to perform at all band performances as well as additional percussion performances over the course of the fall and spring semesters. Students are required to audition for the TMEA All-Region & All-State Band and to perform at solo & ensemble contest. Private lessons are required. Students will be required to audition with a HS band director for approval into this course.  

Choir

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Choir Beginning - Sub Non-Varsity

Choir Choralier Men - Non-Varsity

Choir Choralier Women - Non-Varsity

Choir Concert Men - Junior Varsity

Choir Concert Women - Junior Varsity

Choir Varsity Mixed

Choir Vocal Ensemble

Music Theory Pre-AP

Music Theory AP

Applied Music I, II, III, IV

GCISD Choral Program

GCISD offers a variety of performing organizations to meet the educational needs of all students interested in singing. Each choir caters to the student’s individual musical needs in effort to provide the most complete and effective musical education to each student. All choirs offer performance opportunities and focus on expanding the student’s knowledge of basic music theory, sight-reading skills, vocal technique, and music history. In addition to the development of individual musical skills, each choir is designed to teach self-discipline, commitment and teamwork. Students in all choirs are required to participate in activities outside of the school day including rehearsals, concerts and performances. Individual competitive opportunities for students include concert solos, solo and ensemble contests and auditions for the TMEA Region Choir and Texas All-State Choir. Choir is a full-year enrollment class. There are required fees associated with this activity. The campus Choral Director will provide a specific lists of costs.

 

Choir Beginning (Sub Non-Varsity)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0670

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None.

This non-auditioned choir serves as an introduction to choral and vocal music for 9-12th grade students. The class is focused on building vocal technique and music reading skills. Membership is open to any interested student with a desire to grow as a singer and musician.

 

Choir Choralier Men /Choralier Women (Non-Varsity)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0671 (Men)/0674 (Women)

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous Choral music experience recommended.

Choraliers (non-varsity) is an entry-level high school choir composed primarily of students experiencing their first year of high school choral music. Most students have previous choral experience in middle school choir, basic sight-reading skills, and an understanding of proper tone production. Students are admitted to this ensemble either through audition or the recommendation of their middle school choral director.  Students perform choral literature of many genres and styles.

Choir Concert Men / CHOIR Concert Women (Junior Varsity)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0675 (Men)/0672 (Women)

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous high school choral music experience recommended.

Concert Choir (junior varsity) is an auditioned group of primarily 10-12th grade students most of which have previous choral experience in high school choir, above average sight-reading skills and an outstanding academic record. Students perform moderate level choral literature of many genres and styles.


Choir Varsity Mixed (VARSITY)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0676

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous high school choral music experience required.

Chorale / A Cappella is the varsity choir at the high school level. Membership is through audition and open primarily to students with previous choral experience in grades 10-12 with advanced tone production and sight-reading skills and an outstanding academic record. Students perform advanced choral literature of many genres and styles.

Choir Vocal Ensemble

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0678

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Director Approval. Previous  choral music experience recommended. Concurrent enrollment in a varsity or non-varsity choir required.

Vocal Ensemble is an auditioned ensemble that specializes in small group singing that may include pop, jazz, or other choral literature. Concurrent enrollment in another choir is required for participation in this ensemble. Students that are enrolled in a vocal ensemble that includes a dance element (choreography) may earn either Fine Arts or PE waiver credits.

Music Theory Pre-AP

Course No. 0662

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

This course deals with the elements of music including a study of such basics as scale structure, chord structure, chord progression, key and meter signatures, rhythmic and melodic dictation and notation. Composing and music arranging are studied, as well as sight singing and ear training.

Music Theory AP

Course No. 0784

Semesters 2; Credit 1

Recommended: A minimum of three years of public school band/orchestra/choir ensemble experience, or three years of private instrumental/vocal study with a credible instructor.

AP Music Theory course will provide students with an intensive study of the principles and trends found in the Common Practice Period of Western music composition and history. Students will study vocal and instrumental music across a number of different time periods and genres and will analyze scores based on the aforementioned trends. Students will also study aural skills, learn to sight-read music using the Kodaly system, and will write chorales in four-part texture using their knowledge of chords and tonal relationships.


Applied Music I
Course No. 0630 A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Band or Choir class concurrent and Director Approval

Grades: 9

Students will perform a mastery based curriculum on their principal instrument/voice. Topics will include the performance of various fundamentals such as scales, arpeggios, etudes and sight-reading. The students will also perform chamber works, solo literature and TMEA All State audition material, and other project based learning opportunities as designed by the instructor.  This course will require outside the school day commitment for auditions and performances.

Applied Music II
Course No. 0631 A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Band or Choir class concurrent and Director Approval

Grades: 10

Students will perform a mastery based curriculum on their principal instrument/voice. Topics will include the performance of various fundamentals such as scales, arpeggios, etudes and sight-reading. The students will also perform chamber works, solo literature and TMEA All State audition material, and other project based learning opportunities as designed by the instructor.  This course will require outside the school day commitment for auditions and performances.

Applied Music III
Course No. 0632 A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Band or Choir class concurrent and Director Approval

Grades: 11

Students will perform a mastery based curriculum on their principal instrument/voice. Topics will include the performance of various fundamentals such as scales, arpeggios, etudes and sight-reading. The students will also perform chamber works, solo literature and TMEA All State audition material, and other project based learning opportunities as designed by the instructor.  This course will require outside the school day commitment for auditions and performances.

Applied Music IV
Course No. 0633 A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Band or Choir class concurrent and Director Approval

Grades: 12

Students will perform a mastery based curriculum on their principal instrument/voice. Topics will include the performance of various fundamentals such as scales, arpeggios, etudes and sight-reading. The students will also perform chamber works, solo literature and TMEA All State audition material, and other project based learning opportunities as designed by the instructor.  This course will require outside the school day commitment for auditions and performances.

Theatre

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Theatre Arts I, II, III, IV

Theatre Production I, II, III, IV

Technical Theatre I, II, III, IV

Theatre Arts I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0700

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

As a general introduction to theatre arts, this course incorporates the basic acting techniques of movement, mime, voice, improvisation, and scene presentation with interpretation of dramatic literature, historical perspective, and evaluation of community productions.

Theatre Arts II-IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0701, 0702, 0703

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Theatre Arts I, II, III

Theatre Arts II - IV builds on the background established in Theatre Arts I, II, III while continuing the development of acting skills through physical, vocal and improvisation exercises. Acting and directing principles are applied through performances in various theatrical modes including classical and contemporary theatre, dance, drama, mime, and theatre for youth.  Theater III: Emphasis on the elements of directing and playwriting as students write original plays and participate in student directed works. Various styles of theatre will be used including but not limited to children's theatre, puppetry, classical theatre, musical theatre, and video. Theatre IV students are expected to take leadership roles in after-school production. Students enrolled in this class will participate in ONE production that will be rehearsed in class but performed after school.

Theatre Production I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I – 0704

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Theatre I, Instructor Approval

Production I is intended for the acting student who wants to continue to develop skills that were learned while working on a main-stage performance or in the middle school theatre program. Acting and directing principles are applied through performances in various theatrical modes including classical and contemporary theatre, dance, drama, mime, and theatre for youth.  

Students are expected to audition for all school productions and to participate in at least one major production during the school year. The class requires a substantial amount of after-school commitment.  Enrollment in this class is contingent upon a referral from a middle-school theatre teacher or an audition with the high school department.

Theatre Production II– IV 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. II - 0705

Course No. III - 0706

Course No. IV - 0707

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Theatre I, Instructor Approval per required audition.

This course is designed for the serious drama student. Emphasis will be on public and competitive performances. There will be work on acting skills, improvisation, and script interpretation, writing original scripts, and developing skills with video equipment. Each student will be expected to work at an independent level in research and rehearsal of individual material. Students will be expected to remain after school for rehearsal during production runs. Students are required to audition for all school productions and perform in or work on all shows.  Enrollment is contingent upon a department audition that takes place in May of the previous school year.

Technical Theatre I – IV 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. I - 0708

Course No. II - 0709

Course No. III – 0710

Course No. IV - 0711

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1-4

Technical theatre focuses on the offstage work in theatre including, but not limited to, set design, safety, lighting, sound, costume, makeup, set construction and production. This course is hands on and students will be asked to work extra-curricular assignments as needed. The courses advance from teacher led to independent projects. Upon enrollment in Tech. Theatre III or IV students are expected to take leadership roles in after-school productions.

Extra-Curricular Activities

International Thespian Society

International Thespian Society State Convention

Children’s Theatre Workshop

Fall Production

Annual Musicals

UIL One Act Play Competition

Halloween Production

Student Directed One Act Plays

Mathematics

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All mathematics classes use graphing calculators or other graphing technology when appropriate.  Calculators are available for use in class.  A personal unit would be advantageous; however, one can be checked out from the school for home use.

Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) courses are generally designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) mathematics courses and to meet the unique needs of the district's gifted and talented mathematics students.  Basic content is the same as the on level course, but instruction allows for greater depth and complexity in the curriculum.

Advanced Placement (AP) courses will challenge students with college level material that enables them to successfully pass the Advanced Placement exam and receive college credit.  Reading requirements include the text written on the college level an additional outside reading.  AP courses may require summer assignments.

Algebra I

ESL Algebra I

Pre-AP Algebra I

Geometry

ESL Geometry

Pre-AP Geometry

Pre-AP Geometry/STEM

GT Pre-AP Geometry

Mathematical Models with Applications

ESL Mathematical Models with Applications

Algebra II

ESL Algebra II

Pre-AP Algebra II

Pre-AP Algebra II/STEM

GT Pre-AP Algebra II

Advanced Algebra

Pre-AP Statistics

ESL Pre-AP Statistics

Precalculus

Pre-AP Precalculus

GT Pre-AP Precalculus

Pre-AP Calculus

AP Calculus AB

GT AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus BC

AP Statistics

AP Computer Science A II

Math Improvement

Multivariable Calculus

Differential Equations

College Preparatory Mathematics

Independent Study in Mathematics Dual Enrollment

College Algebra - Dual Enrollment

Advanced Placement Seminar

Advanced Placement Research

Algebra I

(Standard)

Course No. 0202

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Math grade 8 or its equivalent

Algebra I consists of the study of linear functions, equations, and inequalities; quadratic functions and equations; exponential functions and equations; as well as number and algebraic methods.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

ESL Algebra I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0202; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Math grade 8.  Participation in ESL programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

             The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

             served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

 

Algebra I consists of the study of linear functions, equations, and inequalities; quadratic functions and equations; exponential functions and equations; as well as number and algebraic methods.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

Pre-AP Algebra I

(Standard)

Course No. 0203

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Math grade 8 or its equivalent

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses in mathematics.  Students will engage in learning Algebra I curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

Geometry 

(Standard)

Course No. 0205

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I

Geometry consists of the study of coordinate and transformational geometry; logical argument and constructions; proof and congruence; similarity, proof, and trigonometry; two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures; circles; and probability.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

ESL Geometry 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0205; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I.  Participation in ESL programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

             The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

             served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

Geometry consists of the study of coordinate and transformational geometry; logical argument and constructions; proof and congruence; similarity, proof, and trigonometry; two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures; circles; and probability.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

Pre-AP Geometry

(Standard)

Course No. 0206

Pre-AP Geometry/STEM

Course No. 0206S A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I

Recommended: Pre-AP Algebra I

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses in mathematics.  Students will engage in learning Geometry curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.


GT Pre-AP Geometry
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 02060 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ASPIRE or GT Qualification and Algebra I or equivalent

Grades: 9, 10, 11

GT Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) Geometry is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses in mathematics.  Students will engage in learning Geometry curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

Mathematical Models with Applications 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0204

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I

In preparation for Algebra II, students will apply mathematical modeling in the fields of personal finance, science and engineering, fine arts, and social sciences.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

ESL Mathematical Models with Applications 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0204E; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I; Participation in ESL programs’ Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

            The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

             served in the ESL program and/are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

 

In preparation for Algebra II, students will apply mathematical modeling in the fields of personal finance, science and engineering, fine arts, and social sciences.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

Algebra II 

(Standard)

Course No. 0207

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Algebra II consists of the study of attributes of functions and their inverses; systems of equations and inequalities; quadratic and square root functions, equations, and inequalities; exponential and logarithmic functions and equations; cubic, cube root, absolute value and rational functions, equations, and inequalities; number and algebraic methods; and data.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

ESL Algebra II 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0207E

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Algebra I; Participation in ESL programs’ Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

             served in the ESL program and/are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

 

Algebra II consists of the study of attributes of functions and their inverses; systems of equations and inequalities; quadratic and square root functions, equations, and inequalities; exponential and logarithmic functions and equations; cubic, cube root, absolute value and rational functions, equations, and inequalities; number and algebraic methods; and data.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

Pre-AP Algebra II 

(Standard)

Course No. 0208

Pre-AP Algebra II/STEM

Course No. 0208S

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Recommended: Pre-AP Algebra I

May be taken concurrently with Pre-AP Geometry upon recommendation of Math Instructor

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses in mathematics.  Students will engage in learning Algebra II curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

GT Pre-AP Algebra II
(Enrollment Based) 

Course No. 2206 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ASPIRE or GT Qualification and Algebra 1 or equivalent.  May be taken concurrently with Pre-AP Geometry upon recommendation of Math Instructor.

Grades: 9, 10, 11

GT Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) Algebra II is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) courses in mathematics.  Students will engage in learning Algebra II curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

Advanced Algebra

(Standard) 

Course No. 0229

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Geometry and Algebra II

This course provides students with a third year of algebra skills development before they begin college level mathematics.  Solving techniques, functions, and mathematical modeling are heavily emphasized. Preparation for college placement math tests will be included.

Pre-AP Statistics

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0220

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Recommended: Algebra II

The focus of the course will be practical application of statistical topics and the use of technology to process data. While the course is not designed to prepare students for the AP Statistics Exam, it will provide a strong foundation for those planning on taking statistics in college. Course topics will include statistical process sampling and experimentation, variability, categorical and quantitative data, probability and random variables, inference and bivariate data. This course may be taken concurrently with other higher level high school math courses and is recommended for upperclassmen.


ESL Pre-AP Statistics
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 02201 A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra I (and recommended Algebra II); Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12


The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

The focus of the course will be practical application of statistical topics and the use of technology to process data. While the course is not designed to prepare students for the AP Statistics Exam, it will provide a strong foundation for those planning on taking statistics in college. Course topics will include statistical process sampling and experimentation, variability, categorical and quantitative data, probability and random variables, inference and bivariate data. This course may be taken concurrently with other higher level high school math courses.

Precalculus 

(Standard)

Course No.  0209

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II

Precalculus consists of the study of functions, relations including conic sections and geometric reasoning, number and measure including trigonometry, as well as algebraic reasoning.  Use of mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding are emphasized.  Students are expected to use these processes together with graphing calculator technology and other mathematical tools to develop conceptual understandings and solve problems.

Pre-AP Precalculus 

(Standard)

Course No. 0210

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II

Recommended: Pre-AP Algebra I, Pre-AP Geometry and Pre-AP Algebra II

This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus.  Students will engage in learning Precalculus curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

GT Pre-AP Precalculus
(Enrollment Based)

Course No.  02170 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ASPIRE or GT Qualification and Algebra II and Geometry

Grades: 9, 10, 11

GT Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) Precalculus is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  This course is designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus.  Students will engage in learning Precalculus curriculum with increased depth and complexity.  Critical thinking and creative problem solving skills are incorporated throughout this course.

Pre-AP Calculus

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0222A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Precalculus or its equivalent

[Offered under Independent Study in Math course number]

Pre-AP Calculus is designed for the college-bound student who has completed the appropriate prerequisites and plans to enter a college program requiring a strong mathematics background without the rigor and depth of an AP course.  Some of the topics covered include rate of change, limits, derivatives, and applications of derivatives. Definite integrals, indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite and indefinite integral are among the topics covered.  Reading requirements include text written on the college level.

AP Calculus AB 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0217

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Precalculus or its equivalent

Recommended:  Pre-AP Precalculus

AP Calculus is designed for the college-bound student who has completed the appropriate prerequisites and plans to enter a college program requiring a strong mathematics background.  Some of the topics covered include rate of change, limits, derivatives, and applications of derivatives. Definite integrals, indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite and indefinite integral are among the topics covered.  Reading requirements include text written on the college level.


GT AP Calculus AB
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 02171 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: ASPIRE or GT Qualification and Precalculus or equivalent

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

GT Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  AP Calculus is designed for the college-bound student who has completed the appropriate prerequisites and plans to enter a college program requiring a strong mathematics background.  Some of the topics covered include rate of change, limits, derivatives, and applications of derivatives. Definite integrals, indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite and indefinite integral are among the topics covered.  Reading requirements include text written on the college level.

AP Calculus BC 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0218

Semesters: 2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB or its equivalent

This course includes all the topics covered in Calculus AB along with such topics as arc length and surfaces of revolution, work, trigonometric integrals, sequences and series.  Taylor and Maclaurin polynomials and series, derivatives of parametric equations, differentiation and integration of vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and additional integration techniques will also be covered.  Reading requirements include text written on the college level.

AP Statistics 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0214

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Algebra II

Recommended:  Pre-AP Algebra II and AP/Pre-AP English 3

AP Statistics is designed for the college-bound student who has completed Algebra 2 and has a strong background in technical writing and logical problem solving.  The course will be built around four essential themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns and statistical inference.  The class will also focus on technology and its use in statistical processing.  Reading requirements include text written on the college level.  Students may be concurrently enrolled in another math class such as AP Calculus or on level or Pre-AP Precalculus.

AP Computer Science A II
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0253

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Algebra II

Recommended:  Pre-AP Computer Science I
Fulfills 4
th year math credit

AP Computer Science II continues the emphasis on programming

methodology and algorithm development from Computer Science I. The students will learn well-known

algorithms and data structures.The importance of selecting the appropriate algorithm based on analysis of the algorithm efficiency will be stressed. Data abstractions will be developed and implemented in student programs using objects and classes.  Case studies will be used to give the student practice in the management of complexity and to motivate the use of object-oriented programming.  The language used to implement the computer science skills in this course is JAVA.

Math Improvement 
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0223

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  Local

This is not to replace Algebra I, Geometry, or Mathematical Models with Applications.

This class is strongly recommended for students who are interested in improving their math skills or any student interested in improving math abilities.  Required for students who failed STAAR the previous year.

Multivariable Calculus 
(Enrollment Based) 

Course No. 0213

Semesters: 2 Credits: 1

Prerequisite: AP Calculus BC

[Offered under Independent Study in Math course number—for weighted credit]

(AP Weighted Credit) Multivariable calculus addresses advanced topics in calculus, such as vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, LaGrange multipliers, multiple integrals, Jacobians, application of the line integral, Green’s Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and Stokes’ Theorem.

Differential Equations

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0216

Semesters 2 Credits: 1

Prerequisite: AP Calculus BC and Multivariable Calculus

[Offered under Independent Study in Math course number—for weighted credit]

(AP Weighted Credit) Differential equations provides instruction in the concepts and skills associated with solving first-order differential equations, linear differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, first-order systems, homogeneous and non-homogeneous systems, and applicable real-world problems.

College Preparatory Mathematics

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0220

Semesters: 2; Credits: 0 (local-not for a math credit)

[This is the course required by HB5 offered in partnership with TCC]

This course is offered in partnership with TCC to prepare students for success in college level mathematics. Students must be graduating on the minimum or foundation plans to take this course.

Independent Study in Mathematics Dual Enrollment – See Available College Programs

College Algebra - Dual Enrollment - (fee-based) - See available college programs

(Enrollment Based)

Effective as of the 2014-2015 school year, all dual credit courses will receive a weight equivalent to Pre-AP.

Advanced Placement Seminar

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 01211

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior (concurrent with AP Language)

Recommended:  Junior/Senior Classification; Required Course for Capstone Certificate or Diploma

(AP Weighted Credit) The Advanced Humanities Seminar takes a multidisciplinary approach as an application based course that investigates real world issues and emphasizes research, collaboration, writing, and inquiry. This course will help support students understand research methodology as they evaluate issues from multiple perspectives, analyze arguments, develop their own questions for investigation, and work to produce solutions to real world issues. Students in this course need to be proficient writers and have already demonstrated mastery of the writing process.  This course will lead into a research-based course in which students continue their exploration of a topic of interest.

Advanced Placement Research

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0121

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Advanced Placement Seminar

Recommended:  Senior Classification; Required Course for Capstone Certificate or Diploma

(AP Weighted Credit) In Advanced Humanities Research, students develop the skills and discipline necessary to conduct independent research to produce and defend a scholarly academic thesis. This course allows students to explore deeply an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest and through this inquiry, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long mentored, research-based investigation. The course culminates in an academic thesis paper of approximately 5,000 words and a presentation, performance, or exhibition with an oral defense.

Physical Education, Health and Athletics

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:

One-half credit of Health is required for graduation.

One credit of Physical Education is required for graduation.

Drill Team, Dance IA, Cheerleading, Marching Band, Athletics, and PE substitutions may substitute for Foundations of Personal Fitness.  Marching Band, Drill Team and Cheerleading may be substituted for Physical Education during the fall semester only.  Athletics may substitute for Physical Education.  Dance I-IV may earn Fine Arts or Physical Education credits.

Athletics courses are offered as competitive sports and are governed by the rules and regulations of the University Interscholastic League.  Membership on these teams may count in lieu of Physical Education as required for graduation.

Fees are authorized for materials used in any program in which the resultant product is in excess of minimum requirements and, at the student’s option, becomes the personal property of the student.

PE I: Foundations of Personal Fitness

PE II - B: Individual Sports

PE II - C: Team Sports

PE III - B: Advanced Weight Training

Health

PE/Walk, Jog, and Run Fitness

PE/Adventure/Outdoor Education

Outdoor Education 2

Partners in Physical Education

Athletics

Athletic Training

Sports Medicine I

PE I: Foundations of Personal Fitness

(Standard)

Course No. 0500

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  None

Foundations of Personal Fitness represents a new approach in physical education and the concept of personal fitness.  The basic purpose of this course is to motivate students to strive for lifetime personal fitness with an emphasis on the health-related components of physical fitness.  The knowledge and skills taught in this course include teaching students about the process of becoming fit as well as achieving some degree of fitness within the class.  The concept of wellness, or striving to reach optimal levels of health, is the cornerstone of this course and is exemplified by one of the course objectives - students designing their own personal fitness program.  This course is a prerequisite for all other physical education classes.  Students are required to purchase a PE uniform to be worn during this class period.

PE II - B: Individual Sports 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0502

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  None

Students in Individual Sports are expected to participate in a wide range of individual sports that can be pursued for a lifetime.  The continued development of health-related fitness and the selection of individual sport activities that are enjoyable are major objectives of this course.  Activities may include but are not limited to tennis, badminton, golf, table tennis, pickle ball, and disc golf.  Students are required to purchase a PE uniform to be worn during this class period.

PE II - C: Team Sports 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0503

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  None

Students enrolled in Team Sports are expected to develop health-related fitness and an appreciation for team work and fair play.  Like the other high school physical education courses, Team Sports is less concerned with the acquisition of physical fitness during the course than reinforcing the concept of incorporating physical activity into a lifestyle beyond high school.  Activities may include but are not limited to basketball, flag football, soccer, volleyball, ultimate Frisbee, softball, and gym hockey.  Students are required to purchase a PE uniform to be worn during this class period.

PE III - B: Advanced Weight Training

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0505

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Foundations of Personal Fitness

The students will identify health and fitness benefits of a weight training program. The student will demonstrate proper technique, safety precautions, and knowledge of a variety of lifts.

Students will be expected to design and implement an individual strength and conditioning program.

Students are required to purchase a PE uniform to be worn during this class period.

Health

(Standard)

Course No. 0504

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  None

In health education, emphasis is placed on acquiring knowledge and skills regarding healthy behaviors that will safeguard one's health, particularly pertaining to health risks.  Students develop skills that will make them health-literate adults.  By using problem-solving, research, goal-setting, and communication skills, they will gain knowledge and skills to protect their health and that of the community including an introduction to CPR. Abstinence-based programs such as “Choosing the Best Path”, Aim for Success, and "Play It Safe" are major components in providing this health information.  CPR certification is provided for the $15 fee.

PE / Walk, Jog and Run Fitness

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0511

Grade Placement: 9-12

Semesters: 1-2 Credits:  ½-1

This a fitness course that is designed to increase cardiovascular endurance and emphasizes walking, jogging and running with ease, efficiency and building the proper mechanic’s associated with each stage of activity. Students will build capacity in cardio-respiratory endurance while learning about injury prevention and health benefits associated with Walk, Jog, and Run.

PE /Adventure/Outdoor Education

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.05461

Semesters:  1-2 Credits:  ½-1

Grade Placement: 9-12

(Physical Education or Elective credit)

This course offers the student the opportunity to participate in and learn about outdoor activities that promote a respect for the environment and that can be enjoyed for a lifetime. Lessons on angling, environmental needs, Taxidermy, swimming/water safety, scuba, and rock climbing will be included in this course. The course will also provide career information to students interested in these fields.


Outdoor Education 2
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 05462 A/B

Semesters: 1-2; Credits: .5 or 1 (local credit only)

Prerequisite: Outdoor Education 1

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Learners will take their skills acquired in Outdoor Education 1 and apply them to a more advanced level.  Topics will include how hunting and conservation affects the quality of the environment, how wildlife management works and the steps needed for a successful program.  Learners will further enhance their skills in archery, fishing, orienteering and camping.

Partners in Physical Education

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 1760P

Semesters: 2  Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Sophomore Classification

Instructor Approval, Selection Process

 This course is a success-oriented physical education program featuring supervised peer tutors and individualized learning and instruction. Through a variety of physical fitness activities, all students will learn to appreciate physical fitness. This course addresses the unique physical education needs of students in a setting that allows for positive interaction with peers. Students will work with their special education student partner, be encouraging at all times and dress appropriately for activities. This course fulfills the PE graduation requirement.

Athletics 

(Enrollment Based)

Students who participate in school-sponsored trips shall be required to ride in transportation provided by the school to and from the event.  Exceptions may be made if the student's parent or guardian presents a written request to the principal before the scheduled trip requesting that the student be allowed to ride with the parent, that the student be allowed to ride with another person designated by the parent, or that the student be allowed to drive him or herself to the event.  In those instances where the District does not provide transportation to an extracurricular school-related activity in a non-required course, students are responsible for obtaining their own transportation. The District shall not be liable for any injuries that occur to students riding in vehicles that are not provided by the school.

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Interest, Ability and

Instructor approval

A pre-participation physical exam must be completed by a physician each year a student is in athletics.

(1 – 4) following the course number indicates the number of times a student has been enrolled in a course, not the student’s grade classification.

Boys Athletics

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Course Name

Course Number

Boys 9th Athletics

0506

Baseball

0510 (1-4)

Basketball

0509 (1-4)

Cross Country

0512 (1-4)

Diving (JV)

0537 (1-4)

Diving (Varsity)

0530 (1-4)

Football

0508 (1-4)

Golf

0520 (1-4)

Gymnastics

0523 (1-4)

Soccer

0513 (1-4)

Swim Team (JV)

0540 (1-4)

Swim Team (Varsity)

0528 (1-4)

Tennis (JV)

0518 (1-4)

Tennis (Varsity)

0519 (1-4)

Track (No Credit)

0516 (1-4)

Water Polo

0517 (1-4)

Wrestling

0507 (1-4)

Girls Athletics

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Course Name

Course Number

Girls 9th Athletics

0524  

Basketball

0521 (1-4)

Cross Country

0512 (1-4)

Diving (JV)

0537 (1-4)

Diving (Varsity)

0530 (1-4)

Golf

0520 (1-4)

Gymnastics

0523 (1-4)

Soccer

0514 (1-4)

Softball

0529 (1-4)

Swim Team (JV)

0540 (1-4)

Swim Team (Varsity)

0528 (1-4)

Tennis (JV)

0518 (1-4)

Tennis (Varsity)

0519 (1-4)

Track (No Credit)

0516 (1-4)

Volleyball

0522 (1-4)

Water Polo

0517 (1-4)

Wrestling

0507 (1-4)

Athletic Training

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0525 (1 – 4)

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Instructor Approval

Concurrent Enrollment or Completion of Health and Biology is recommended

Athletic Training does not satisfy a P.E. credit.

This class is an introduction to athletic training and will cover basic first aid, injury management, taping techniques, and training room procedures.  Students will need to attend practices and games in order to meet class requirements.

Sports Medicine I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0527

Semesters:  2, Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Sports Medicine I is a program designed for students interested in fields such as athletic training, physical therapy, medicine, fitness, physiology of exercise, kinesiology, nutrition, nursing, and other medicine related fields.  Sports Medicine I includes class work and practical hands-on application in the following areas:  prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries, taping and wrapping of injuries, first aid/CPR, emergency procedures, and sports medicine careers.  This course is available to students in grades 9 – 12.

Dance

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Students are required to purchase specified dance attire and dance shoes for class (cost range $50-$100).  Public performance in the Dance I-IV annual production will be required.

Note: Dance I-IV and Dance Guard I-IV may earn either Fine Arts or PE waiver credits

Dance I, II, III, IV

Dance Team Prep I, II, III, IV

Dance Guard I, II, III, IV

Junior Varsity Dance Team

Varsity Dance Team

Dance I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No 0531

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

This is an introductory dance class of the following genres – ballet, jazz, hip hop, modern/lyrical, performance, and choreography. In each unit, the students learn history, influence on/impact of pop culture, technique, terminology, movement. Skills test are graded for effort, memory, technique performance. Dance classes perform in the spring show on campus and students may be selected to participate in the D.E.A.L. Dance I Annual Assessment.

*There is a wide range of level/ability in this class. Instructors tailor/modify technique combinations & dance combinations to accommodate every level of dancer in the class.

 

Dance II, III, IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course Nos. 0532, 0533,0534

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Preceding level of Dance in sequence.

Each subsequent course builds upon the preceding course. Each level explores each genre in more depth. Skills test are graded for effort, memory, technique performance. Performance in the spring show is required..

 

Dance Team Prep I-IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.  0549

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite:  Level I - None. Levels II-IV - Preceding level of Dance in sequence.

 

This class is an intermediate-advanced class for the dancer who wishes to audition for the Dance Guard or  Dance Teams.. The sole purpose of this class is to build technique & full prepare for dance team auditions. Styles include: Jazz, Hip Hop, Lyrical/contemporary, Pom and High Kicks. Dance classes perform in the Spring Show on campus.

 

Dance Guard I-IV*

(Enrollment Based)

Course Nos. 5311X, 5322X, 5333X, 5344X

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1 Fine Arts + .5 PE waiver

*BAND GUARD and DANCE GUARD must be concurrently enrolled.

Prerequisite:  Director Approval

 

The Dance Guard (CHHS: Charms, GHS: Elegance) is an auditioned group of 9th-12th graders who dance & provide visual elegance in the High School Marching Band Field Show. They perform at varsity football games & travel to competitions with the Marching Band from August-November. In the spring, the Dance Guard continues working on dance technique & training, is introduced to Winter Guard & performs in the Spring Dance Show on campus. The dance season for Dance Guard is August-November, then they will continue with technique development, Winter Guard performance opportunities and preparation for Dance Guard and Dance Team auditions.

Dance Junior Varsity Dance Team

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0536

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Director Approval per audition.

The Junior Varsity Dance Team (CHHS: Pantherettes, GHS: Belles) is an auditioned  group chosen for their dance ability and willingness to promote school spirit at the junior varsity level. These students participate in precision dance performances on a local level throughout the school year. This is a preparatory group for future varsity drill team members. The junior varsity drill team works in a cooperative effort in the development of the overall program.

Dance Varsity Dance Team

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0535

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Previous dance experience, Director approval per required audition.

The Varsity Dance Team (CHHS: Panteras, GHS: Fillies) is an auditioned group that performs precision dance routines at community and athletic events, as well as at regional, state and national level competitions. The students selected for the dance/drill team are chosen for their dance ability and for their commitment to promoting school spirit. The Varsity Dance Team is involved in school and community events on a year- round basis.

Drill Team and Cheerleading

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(1 – 4) following the course number indicates the number of times a student has been enrolled in a course, not the student’s grade classification.

Participation in drill team and cheerleading activities requires fees which will be communicated through parent meetings at different times of the year.  For more specific costs, please contact the activity sponsor at the campus.

Drill Team

(Enrollment Based)

Jr. Varsity – Course No. 0536 (1 – 2)

Varsity – Course No. 0535 (1 – 2)

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Audition

Instructor Approval

The junior varsity drill team is a select group chosen for their dance ability and willingness to promote school spirit at the junior varsity level.  These students participate in precision dance performances on a local level throughout the school year. This is a preparatory group for future varsity drill team members. The junior varsity drill team works in a cooperative effort in the development of the overall program. This varsity drill team performs precision dance routines at community and athletic events, as well as at state and national level competitions. The students selected for the dance/drill team are chosen for their dance ability and for their commitment to promoting school spirit.  The drill team is involved in school and community events on a year- round basis.  

Cheerleading

(Enrollment Based)

Freshman – Course No. 0554 (1)

Jr. Varsity – Course No. 0554 (2)

Varsity – Course No. 0554 (3–4)

Cheer 1 (1 State)

Cheer 2 (1 State)

Cheer 3 (1 State)

Cheer 4 (1 State)

Prerequisite:  Cheerleader

Instructor Approval

This select group of students creates, promotes, and upholds school spirit and supports the athletic teams.  The cheerleaders participate in competitions at the state and national levels and are involved in school and community events on a year-round basis. Tryouts are generally in March for the upcoming school year.

Science

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Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) courses are designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) science courses and to meet the unique needs of the district’s gifted and talented science students.  They are designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and issues in science.  Basic content is the same as the on level course, but instruction allows for greater depth and complexity in the curriculum.

Advanced Placement (AP) courses will challenge students with college level material that enables them to successfully pass the Advanced Placement exam and receive college credit.  Reading requirements include the text written on the college level and additional outside reading.  AP courses may require summer assignments.

Integrated Physics and Chemistry

ESL Integrated Physics and Chemistry

Pre-AP Integrated Physics and Chemistry

Biology

ESL Biology

Pre-AP Biology

AP Biology

Scientific Research and Design: Advanced Topics in Biology

Chemistry

ESL Chemistry

Pre-AP Chemistry

Pre-AP Chemistry/STEM

GT Pre-AP Chemistry

AP Chemistry

Physics

ESL Physics

Food Science

AP Physics C - Mechanics

AP Physics C - Electricity and Magnetism

Scientific Research & Design: Advanced Topics in Physics

Scientific Research & Design: Advanced Topics in Chemistry

AP Physics I

AP Physics I/STEM

AP Physics II

Environmental Systems

AP Environmental Science

Anatomy and Physiology

Astronomy

Aquatic Science

Forensic Science

Advanced Animal Science

Medical Microbiology

Pathophysiology

Advanced Placement Seminar

Advanced Placement Research

Integrated Physics and Chemistry

(Standard)

Course No. 0300

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

In Integrated Physics and Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigation, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: force, motion, energy, and matter. Students who choose this course must take it before earning credit in Chemistry or Physics.

ESL Integrated Physics and Chemistry

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0300E; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools. Students who choose this course must take it before earning credit in Chemistry or Physics.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

served in the ESL program and/are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

In Integrated Physics and Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigation, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: force, motion, energy, and matter.

Pre-AP Integrated Physics and Chemistry 

(Standard)

Course No. 03065

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

In Integrated Physics and Chemistry,Students conduct laboratory and field Investigations, use scientific methods During investigation, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: force, motion, energy, and matter. Students who choose this course must take it before earning credit in Chemistry or Physics.  This course is taught with increased depth and complexity, infusing skills necessary to be successful in future Advanced Placement science course.

Biology 

(Standard)

Course No. 0302

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

In Biology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving.  Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; and ecosystems and the environment.

ESL Biology 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0302E; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

served in the ESL program and/are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

             

In Biology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving.  Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; and ecosystems and the environment.

Pre-AP Biology

(Standard)

Course No. 0303

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

In Biology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; and ecosystems and the environment. This course involves greater detail in the above topics and will move at a faster pace.  Dissections are required.  Special projects and independent/group activities are required.

AP Biology

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0304

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:   Junior/Senior Classification

Prerequisite: On level or PAP Biology and on level or PAP Chemistry

AP Biology is a detailed study in molecules and cells, genetics and evolution, and organisms and populations.  Curriculum is outlined by The College Board.  Experiments are required utilizing advanced laboratory techniques and technologies.  Laboratory topics include Diffusion/Osmosis, Enzyme Catalyst, Mitosis, Plant Pigments/Photosynthesis, Cellular Respiration, DNA Extraction/Electrophoresis, Drosophila Genetics, Population Genetics, Behavior/Habitat Selection,

and Dissolved Oxygen and Primary Productivity.  Reading requirements include college level text and research of professional articles.

Scientific Research & Design:  Advanced Topics in Biology
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 03020 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Senior Classification

Prerequisite: AP Biology

This course is designed for students who have completed AP Biology.  

(AP Weighted Credit) Students will design, plan and implement laboratory activities and research projects around current issues in the field of biology.  Topics may include but are not limited to: immunology, molecular biology, environmental geo-biology and medical applications.

Chemistry

(Standard)

Course No. 0305

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I

In Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include characteristics of matter, use of Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives.

ESL Chemistry

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0305E; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I, Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

served in the ESL program and/are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

             

In Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include characteristics of matter, use of Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives.

Pre-AP Chemistry 

(Standard)

Course No. 0306

Pre-AP Chemistry/STEM 

Course No. 0306S

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I

In Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include characteristics of matter, use of Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives. Topics covered in Chemistry Pre-AP are more in-depth and involve a more mathematical approach than regular Chemistry.  Emphasis is placed on individual study and problem solving.

GT Pre-AP Chemistry
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 03050 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: ASPIRE or GT Qualification

Grade: 9

GT Pre-Advanced Placement Chemistry is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners. Students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include characteristics of matter, use of Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives. Topics covered in this course are more in-depth and involve a more mathematical approach.

AP Chemistry 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0307

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Junior Classification

Pre-AP Chemistry Recommended

Pre-AP Algebra II or Concurrent Enrollment Recommended

AP Chemistry is a course designed to be equivalent to a general Chemistry class taken during the first year of college.  AP Chemistry students will cover atomic and molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, periodicity, gases, thermochemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and organic chemistry.  Reading requirements include the text written on the college level, as well as scientific research of professional articles.

Physics

(Standard)

Course No. 0308

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Physics is a first-year algebra-based introductory physics course dealing with a broad range of topics. Students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion, changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; forces; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and atomic, nuclear, and quantum physics. Students who successfully complete Physics will acquire factual knowledge within a conceptual framework, practice experimental design and interpretation, work collaboratively with colleagues, and develop critical-thinking skills.

ESL Physics

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0308E; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

served in the ESL program and/are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

Physics is a first-year algebra-based introductory physics course dealing with a broad range of topics. Students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion, changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; forces; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and atomic, nuclear, and quantum physics. Students who successfully complete Physics will acquire factual knowledge within a conceptual framework, practice experimental design and interpretation, work collaboratively with colleagues, and develop critical-thinking skills.

Food Science

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0315

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Junior Classification, three units of science

4th year science credit only available at Bridges Accelerated Learning Center

In Food Science students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Food Science is the study of the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public.

AP Physics C - Mechanics

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0310

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Recommended:  Junior/Senior Classification

Prerequisite:  AP Physics 1, Concurrent Enrollment in AP Calculus

AP Physics C is a two-semester, calculus-based physics course.  Methods of calculus are used in formulating physical principles and in applying them to problems.  Strong emphasis is placed on solving a variety of challenging problems, some of which require calculus. The student will apply their knowledge of physics and be able to apply it to problems they have never seen.  The course covers the topic of mechanics: kinematics, dynamics, vectors, energy conservation, momentum and collisions, center of mass, rotation, static equilibrium, oscillations, and gravitation.  In the future, electricity and magnetism may be added.  AP Physics C is the equivalent of a first semester Engineering Physics course which is taken by science, engineering, medical and telecommunications majors.  

AP Physics C - Electricity and Magnetism

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0313

Semesters:  2; Credits: 1

Recommended:  Junior/Senior Classification

Prerequisite:  AP Physics C - Mechanics or concurrent enrollment, Concurrent Enrollment in AP Calculus

AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism is a one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. The course explores topics such as electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.  This course is an optional extension to AP Physics C - Mechanics and not required to earn credit for that course.

Scientific Research & Design:  Advanced Topics in Physics

(Enrollment based)

Course No. 0328

Semesters: up to 2; Credits: ½-1

Prerequisites: AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2, AP Physics C (1.5 credits), AP Calculus and teacher recommendation, Students may earn the last ½ credit (EM) for AP Physics C concurrently.

(AP Weighted Credit) This post-AP, calculus-based physics course is designed for advanced students who have exhausted all AP Physics courses and are expecting to study physics or engineering in college. Students will delve much deeper into some topics covered previously, such as thermodynamics and fluids. Students will also explore light, optics and waves.

Scientific Research & Design: Advanced Topics in Chemistry

(Enrollment based)

Course No. 0331

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Prerequisites: AP Chemistry

(AP Weighted Credit) Description: Students will use AP Chemistry knowledge to perform in-depth experiments. We will discuss lab technique and reporting of data. Students will improve on previous lab technique for efficiency and learn new lab technique. As a class, we will look at current research trends and discuss different research papers and their implications. The end goal would have students asking their own questions, designing their own experiments, and presenting their own results to these experiments by the end of the year.

This course will earn AP weighted credit.

AP Physics I

Course No. 0327

AP Physics I/STEM

Course No. 0327S A/B

Semesters: 2, Credits: 1

Prerequisite:  Algebra I

This course is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics.  The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power, mechanical waves and sound.  It will also introduce electric circuits.

The course is taught conceptually around seven big ideas with an emphasis on scientific practices as outlined in The College Board Curriculum Framework.

AP Physics  II

Course Number: 0319

Semesters: 2, Credits: 1

Prerequisite:  AP Physics 1, Algebra II Recommended

This course is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics.  The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; atomic and nuclear physics.  This course is taught conceptually around seven big ideas with an emphasis on scientific practices as outlined in The College Board Curriculum Framework.

Environmental Systems

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0314

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry

In Environmental Systems, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving.  Students study a variety of topics that include: biotic and abiotic factors in habitats, ecosystems and biomes, interrelationships among resources and an environmental system, sources and flow of energy through an environmental system, relationship between carrying capacity and changes in populations and ecosystems, and changes in environments.

AP Environmental Science

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0323

Prerequisite: On level or PAP Biology and on level or PAP Chemistry

Grades: Junior/Senior level course

Semesters: 2 Credits: 1

This course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Anatomy and Physiology 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0311

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 - will satisfy 4th year science credit

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry

Anatomy and Physiology is offered for students interested in biological, medical, and health-related fields of study.  Course topics include chemistry, cell function, tissues, introduction to the human body, support and movement, control systems, maintenance, continuity, and development.  Dissections are required.  Special projects requiring independent work may also be required.

Astronomy

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0316

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

In Astronomy, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study the following topics: astronomy in civilization, patterns and objects in the sky, our place in space, the moon, reasons for the seasons, planets, the sun, stars, galaxies, cosmology and space exploration.  Students who successfully complete Astronomy will acquire knowledge within a conceptual framework, conduct observations of the sky, work collaboratively, and develop critical-thinking skills.

Aquatic Science

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0317

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry

In Aquatic Science, students study the interactions of biotic and abiotic components in aquatic environments, including impacts on aquatic systems. Investigations and field work in this course may emphasize fresh water or marine aspects of aquatic science depending primarily upon the natural resources available for study near the school. Students who successfully complete Aquatic Science will acquire knowledge about a variety of aquatic systems, conduct investigations and observations of aquatic environments, work collaboratively with peers, and develop critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.

Forensic Science

(Enrollment Based)

Course No 0318

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry

Forensic Science is a course that uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes and the psychology of criminal behavior.  Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection and scientific procedures used to solve crimes.  Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis.  Students will learn the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science.

Advanced Animal Science

(Enrollment Based) TECC

Course No. 0854

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grades: 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Must have Biology and Chemistry or IPC; Algebra I and Geometry; and either Small Animal Mgt, Equine Science, or Livestock Production - Fulfills 1 high school Science graduation Requirement

Advanced Animal Science examines the interrelatedness of human, scientific, and technological dimensions of livestock production. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through field and laboratory experiences. To prepare for careers in the field of animal science, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry standards. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

Medical Microbiology

(Enrollment Based)

Course No 0325

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 – This course satisfies a high school science graduation requirement

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry

Recommended Prerequisite:  One course from the Health Science Cluster

To receive credit in science, students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement identified in §74.3(b) (2) (C) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum).

The Medical Microbiology course is designed to explore the microbial world, studying topics such as pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms, laboratory procedures, identifying microorganisms, drug resistant organisms, and emerging diseases.

Pathophysiology

(Enrollment Based)

Course No 0326

Semesters:  2 Credits: 1 – This course satisfies a high school science graduation requirement

Grades:  11-12

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry

Recommended Prerequisite:  One course from the Health Science Cluster

To receive credit in science, students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement identified in §74.3(b) (2) (C) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum).

The Pathophysiology course is designed for students to conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Pathophysiology will study disease processes and how humans are affected. Emphasis is placed on prevention and treatment of disease. Students will differentiate between normal and abnormal physiology.

Advanced Placement Seminar

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 01211

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior (concurrent with AP Language)

Recommended:  Junior/Senior Classification; Required Course for Capstone Certificate or Diploma

(AP Weighted Credit) The Advanced Humanities Seminar takes a multidisciplinary approach as an application based course that investigates real world issues and emphasizes research, collaboration, writing, and inquiry. This course will help support students understand research methodology as they evaluate issues from multiple perspectives, analyze arguments, develop their own questions for investigation, and work to produce solutions to real world issues. Students in this course need to be proficient writers and have already demonstrated mastery of the writing process.  This course will lead into a research-based course in which students continue their exploration of a topic of interest.

Advanced Placement Research

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0121

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Advanced Placement Seminar

Recommended:  Senior Classification; Required Course for Capstone Certificate or Diploma

(AP Weighted Credit) In Advanced Humanities Research, students develop the skills and discipline necessary to conduct independent research to produce and defend a scholarly academic thesis. This course allows students to explore deeply an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest and through this inquiry, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long mentored, research-based investigation. The course culminates in an academic thesis paper of approximately 5,000 words and a presentation, performance, or exhibition with an oral defense.

Social Studies

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All social studies classes address the TEKS for the course and are taught using a variety of instructional strategies including print and digital material.  Students will be expected to read, write, reflect, and discuss across texts and time periods.

Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) courses are designed to prepare students for entry into Advanced Placement (AP) Social Studies courses and to meet the unique needs of the district’s gifted and talented social studies students. They are designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and issues in social studies.  Basic content is the same as the on level course (and covers the TEKS), but instruction allows for greater depth and complexity in the curriculum.

Advanced Placement (AP) courses will challenge students with college level material that enables them to successfully pass the Advanced Placement exam and possibly earn college credit while still ensuring that the TEKS are addressed. Reading requirements include the ability to read and comprehend college-level texts and complete additional outside reading. AP courses may require summer assignments.

There may be additional material costs associated with some Social Studies classes for which the student will be responsible in which the resultant product is in excess of minimum requirements and, at the student’s option, becomes the personal property of the student.

World Geography

Pre-AP World Geography

ESL World Geography

AP Human Geography

AP Human Geography/STEM

GT AP Human Geography

ASPIRE AP Human Geography

World History

ESL World History

Pre-AP World History

AP World History

AP World History/STEM

GT AP World History

United States History

ESL United States History

Pre-AP United States History

AP United States History

GT AP United States History

United States History Dual Enrollment

United States Government

ESL United States Government

GT AP United States Government

AP Comparative Government and Politics

United States Government Dual Enrollment

Economics

ESL Economics

AP Microeconomics

GT AP Microeconomics

Principles of Macroeconomics Dual Enrollment

Psychology

AP Psychology

Sociology

AP European History

Advanced Placement Seminar

Advanced Placement Research

Personal Financial Literacy

World Geography

(Standard)

Course No. 0400

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Freshman Classification

The scope of this course will include physical, economic and cultural geography. Students will become familiar with geographical terminology.  They also will be provided opportunities to locate and describe major landforms and features of the earth as well as major natural resources of the world. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the impact that the environment has on social, cultural and economic life in a region.  An examination of uses, abuses, and preservation of natural resources and the physical environment will be included.

Pre-AP World Geography

(Standard) 

Course No. 0401

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Freshman Classification, Recommended:  Pre-AP Social Studies Courses

Students in Pre-AP World Geography will study geography in greater depth and complexity. Emphasis will be placed on physical, economic, environmental, and cultural geography.  Students will be required to participate in oral and written presentations, write various essays and read required selections taken from primary and secondary sources.  Content selection will provide higher level thinking skills as well as a basis for students to compare and analyze man and his global environment.

ESL World Geography

(Enrollment Based) 

Course No. 0401E; Section number will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

 

The scope of this course will include physical, economic and cultural geography. Students will become familiar with  geographical terminology.  They also will be provided opportunities to locate and describe major landforms and features of the earth as well as major natural resources of the world. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the impact that the

environment has on social, cultural and economic life in a region.  An examination of uses, abuses, and preservation of natural resources and the physical environment will be included.

AP Human Geography*

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0427

AP Human Geography/STEM*

Course No. 0427S

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Freshman Classification

Satisfies World Geography Credit when taken in its entirety

AP Human Geography is an advanced placement course that can substitute for World Geography or Pre-AP World Geography.  The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface.  Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine the human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.  This course prepares students to take the AP Human Geography exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit.

*  According to Texas Education Code §113.56, students who opt to "level down" from AP Human Geography after only one semester are only allowed to receive elective course credit for the fall semester. The elective credit a student receives for the first semester of AP Human will be a weighted elective credit with whatever grade the student earned during the fall semester of AP Human. The student will need to demonstrate mastery of 1st semester World Geography TEKS (options provided by counselors) in order to satisfy graduation requirements for the freshman Social Studies credit.

GT AP Human Geography*

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0427G

Semesters:  2; Credits: 1

Prerequisite:  Freshman Classification

Satisfies World Geography Credit when taken in its entirety

*  Must meet qualification for GT placement

GT AP Human Geography is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  The GT AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface.  Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine the human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.  This course prepares students to take the AP Human Geography exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit.

*  According to Texas Education Code §113.56, students who opt to "level down" from AP Human Geography after only one semester are only allowed to receive elective course credit for the fall semester. The elective credit a student receives for the first semester of AP Human will be a weighted elective credit with whatever grade the student earned during the fall semester of AP Human. The student will need to demonstrate mastery of 1st semester World Geography TEKS (options provided by counselors) in order to satisfy graduation requirements for the freshman Social Studies credit.


ASPIRE AP Human Geography
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0428 A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ASPIRE Qualification

Grade: 9

ASPIRE AP Human Geography is designed specifically to serve ASPIRE students in order to provide a learning environment commensurate with the academic and affective needs of highly gifted students.   The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface.  Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.  This course prepares students to take the AP Human Geography exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit.

World History

(Standard)

Course No. 0402;

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Sophomore Classification

World History is a survey course of the history of civilization which has evolved since early man.  It includes the social, economic, and political development, as well as the contributions of each major area of the world.  Content selected will provide a basis for students to compare and analyze ways of life and patterns of culture, emphasizing both the diversity and commonality of mankind's behavior.

ESL World History

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0403; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

             

World History is a survey course of the history of civilization which has evolved since early man.  It includes the social, economic, and political development, as well as the contributions of each major area of the world.  Content selected will provide a basis for students to compare and analyze ways of life and patterns of culture, emphasizing both the diversity and commonality of mankind's behavior.

Pre-AP World History

(Standard)

Course No. 0403

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Sophomore Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP/AP Social Studies Courses

Students in Pre-AP World History will study the history of the world in greater depth than the regular course.  Emphasis will be placed on the major political, social, economic, and artistic movements throughout the various periods covered.  Students will be required to participate in oral and written presentations, write various essays, and read required selections taken from primary sources.  Content selected will provide higher level thinking skills as well as a basis for the students to compare and analyze ways of life and patterns of culture, emphasizing both the diversity and commonality of mankind's behavior.

AP World History 

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0424

AP World History/STEM

Course No. 0424S A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Sophomore Classification

Recommended: Pre-AP World Geography/AP Social Studies Courses

AP World History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past.  Five themes of equal importance - focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures - provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course.  AP World History encompasses the history of the five major geographical regions of the globe:  Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with a special focus on historical developments and processes that cross multiple regions.  This course prepares students to take the AP World History exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. AP World History will fulfill the requirements for sophomore level World History.

GT AP World History*  

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0424G

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Sophomore Classification

*  Must meet qualification for GT placement

GT AP World History is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  GT AP World History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past.  Five themes of equal importance - focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures - provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course.  GT AP World History encompasses the history of the five major geographical regions of the globe:  Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with a special focus on historical developments and processes that cross multiple regions.  This course prepares students to take the AP World History exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. GT AP World History will fulfill the requirements for sophomore level World History.

United States History

(Standard)

Course No. 0404

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

This course focuses on modern United States history from Reconstruction to the present period.  Emphasis is placed on present day issues which have their roots in the past. Using a chronological as well as a thematic approach, the course will explore the emergence of the United States as a world power through the various social, environmental, economic, and political implications.

ESL United States History

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0404E; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

            served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

           

This course focuses on modern United States history from Reconstruction to the present period.  Emphasis is placed on present day issues which have their roots in the past. Using a chronological as well as a thematic approach, the course will explore the emergence of the United States as a world power through the various social, environmental, economic, and political implications.

Pre-AP United States History

(Standard)

Course No. 0425

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

Recommended: Pre-AP/AP Social Studies Courses

This course focuses on modern United States history from Reconstruction to the present period and includes supplementary readings in the form of documents, essays, or books on special themes, providing substantive and thematic coverage.  Students will learn to assess historical materials and their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance.  Students will develop skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay form.  Pre-AP United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and issues in United States History.  This course is highly recommended for students interested in taking AP Social Studies courses.

AP United States History

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0405

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP World History /AP Social Studies Courses

This course focuses on developing students’ understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present.  Students investigate the content of U.S. history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past.  The course also provides seven themes (American and national identity, migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places.  This course prepares students to take the AP United States History exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. AP United States History will fulfill the requirements for junior level US History.

GT AP United States History*

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0405G

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

*  Must meet qualification for GT placement

GT AP United States History is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners.  This course focuses on developing students’ understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present.  Students investigate the content of U.S. history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past.  The course also provides seven themes (American and national identity, migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places.  This course prepares students to take the AP United States History exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. GT AP United States History will fulfill the requirements for junior level US History.

United States History Dual Enrollment – See Available College Programs

Course No. 0964

United States Government

(Standard)

Course No. 0406

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Senior Classification

This course provides students with both a factual background and a conceptual understanding of the American political system.  Units included are the origins of government, beginning governments in the early United States, development of our national government with emphasis on each branch, and civil rights.  Attention will also be given to voting, political parties, and government at the state and local level.

ESL United States Government

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0406E; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

            served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

 

This course provides students with both a factual background and a conceptual understanding of the American political

system.  Units included are the origins of government, beginning governments in the early United States, development of our national government with emphasis on each branch, and civil rights.  Attention will also be given to voting, political parties, and government at the state and local level.

AP United States Government

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0407

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Senior Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP/AP Social Studies Courses

This course introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments and includes elements of the Parallel Curriculum Model to address needs of gifted learners.  This course prepares students to take the United States Government and Politics Exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. AP United States Government will fulfill the requirements for senior level government.

GT AP United States Government

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0407G

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Senior Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP/AP Social Studies Courses

GT AP United States Government and Politics applies gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners. This course introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments and includes elements of the Parallel Curriculum Model to address needs of gifted learners.  This course prepares students to take the United States Government and Politics Exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. AP United States Government will fulfill the requirements for senior level government.

AP Comparative Government and Politics

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0428

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Junior/Senior Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP/AP Social Studies Courses

AP Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings.  The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. This course does not fulfill the requirement for senior level government.

United States Government - Dual Enrollment  - See Available College Programs

Course No. 0960

Economics

(Standard)

Course No. 0408

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Senior Classification

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of economic theory and to provide them with a realistic view of how the economy has an effect on daily lives.  Emphasis is placed on the various aspects of the free enterprise system as it relates to the consumer with comparisons to other economic systems.  Areas of instruction include basic economic concepts, the role of supply and demand, national production, the role of labor, business organizations and markets, and the role of the government through spending, taxes, money and banking. Additionally, the course will include information on personal financial literacy and postsecondary financial aid. Students deal with current economic problems determining causes and possible solutions.

ESL Economics

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0408E; Section numbers will be determined by the campus.

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Participation in ESL Programs; Rated Beginning or Intermediate on TELPAS or are newcomers to US schools.

The ESL section of this course is delivered using Sheltered English strategies and is limited in enrollment to students being

            served in the ESL program and are: rated beginning or intermediate on TELPAS and/or are newcomers to US schools.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of economic theory and to provide them with a realistic view of how the economy has an effect on daily lives.  Emphasis is placed on the various aspects of the free enterprise system as it relates to the consumer with comparisons to other economic systems.  Areas of instruction include basic economic concepts, the role of supply and demand, national production, the role of labor, business organizations and markets, and the role of the government through spending, taxes, money and banking. Additionally, the course will include information on personal financial literacy and postsecondary financial aid. Students deal with current economic problems determining causes and possible solutions.

AP Microeconomics

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0409

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Senior Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP/AP Social Studies Courses

Microeconomics deals with specific economic units and a detailed consideration of these individual units.  At this level of analysis, the economist figuratively puts an economic unit, or a very small segment of the economy, under the microscope to observe details of its operation.  Here we talk in terms of an individual industry, firm or household, concentrating upon such magnitudes as the output or price of a specific product, the number of workers employed by a single firm, the revenue or income of the particular household, or the expenditures of a given firm or family. The course includes elements of the Parallel Curriculum Model to address needs of gifted learners.  This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Microeconomics Exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit. AP Microeconomics will fulfill the requirements for senior level economics.  

GT AP Microeconomics

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0408G

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Senior Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP/AP Social Studies Courses

GT AP Microeconomics is designed to apply gifted education practices in order to appropriately challenge and develop the potential of gifted learners. GT AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole with an instructional design to address needs of gifted learners. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination; it also develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts.  This course prepares students to take the AP Microeconomics exam, which may allow them to qualify for college credit.

Principles of Macroeconomics Dual Enrollment – See Available College Programs

Course No. 0961

Psychology

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.  0412

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

Course emphasis is placed on learning psychology for the purpose of developing skills in understanding one's self and others.  This is accomplished by helping the students to understand what wholesome personality is, how it can be developed, and the benefits that result from a wholesome personality to both the individual and society.

AP Psychology

(Enrollment Based) 

Course No. 0413

Semesters:  2; Credits:  ½ State (AP weighted) and ½ Local (non-weighted)

Prerequisite:  Junior/Senior Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP/AP Social Studies Courses

AP Psychology is equivalent to a college-level Introduction to Psychology course.  The students will study the nature of psychology, human growth, development, behavior, and the development of the individual.  

Sociology

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0414

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Prerequisite:  Junior classification

Sociology is a social science that studies human society and social behavior.  Sociology is about how people act, react, and interact, both in their everyday lives and under extraordinary circumstances.  In Sociology, students will explore a variety of topics such as cultures, the socialization of children, theories on individual and group behavior, riots, cult groups, leadership styles, crime, poverty, and current social issues.  Sociology helps students gain a new perspective for looking at themselves and the world around them.

AP European History

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0411

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior/Senior Classification

Recommended:  Pre-AP World History

AP European History is designed to be equivalent to a college-level introductory course in European History from 1450 to the present.  The course emphasizes the political, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history of Europe. Analytical and research skills will be used to study primary sources and scholarly works.  The course goals are to develop an understanding of the principal themes in modern European history, to analyze historical evidence, and to express that understanding and analysis in written form.

Advanced Placement Seminar

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 01211

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior (concurrent with AP Language)

Recommended:  Junior/Senior Classification; Required Course for Capstone Certificate or Diploma

(AP Weighted Credit) The Advanced Humanities Seminar takes a multidisciplinary approach as an application based course that investigates real world issues and emphasizes research, collaboration, writing, and inquiry. This course will help support students understand research methodology as they evaluate issues from multiple perspectives, analyze arguments, develop their own questions for investigation, and work to produce solutions to real world issues. Students in this course need to be proficient writers and have already demonstrated mastery of the writing process.  This course will lead into a research-based course in which students continue their exploration of a topic of interest.

Advanced Placement Research

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0121

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Advanced Placement Seminar

Recommended:  Senior Classification; Required Course for Capstone Certificate or Diploma

(AP Weighted Credit) In Advanced Humanities Research, students develop the skills and discipline necessary to conduct independent research to produce and defend a scholarly academic thesis. This course allows students to explore deeply an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest and through this inquiry, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long mentored, research-based investigation. The course culminates in an academic thesis paper of approximately 5,000 words and a presentation, performance, or exhibition with an oral defense.

Personal Financial Literacy

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0440

Semesters:  1; Credits:  ½

Recommended Grades: 10-12

Personal Financial Literacy will develop citizens who have the knowledge and skills to make sound, informed financial decisions that will allow them to lead financially secure lifestyles and understand personal financial responsibility.  Students will apply critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to analyze decisions involving earning and spending, saving and investing, credit and borrowing, insuring and protecting, and college and post-secondary education and training.

Special Education Course Offerings

Modified Courses

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Modified courses may be accessed by students eligible for special education services as determined by the ARD committee.  When a student cannot access general education curriculum due to their disability the ARD committee may determine the student is in need of one or more modified courses.  A modified course allows students to access grade level content with  modifications and individualized supports while replacing the general education course(s). Modified courses are aligned with the general education TEKS. When a STAAR End of Course Exam (EOC) is required in a particular content area students in special education will be required to take the EOC, however, it may be the general assessment with accommodations, the accommodated assessment or alternate version of the EOC assessment depending on the review of the eligibility requirements by the student’s ARD committee. A student may not be enrolled in a modified course until after an ARD committee has determined that it is the most appropriate course based on the student’s needs related to their disability. A modified course may be provided in the general education setting, a combination of general education and special education settings or self-contained in a special education setting as determined by the ARD committee.  Modified course will be indicated with a capital M following the course name.

Algebra I M

Course No. 1205M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 9th

This course provides the connection between symbolic language and real world applications. It includes the study of function families and multiple representations of them, various solutions strategies for systems of equations, and graphing skills, with and without technology.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Geometry M

Course No. 1206M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10th

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Geometry consists of the study of geometric figures of zero, one, two, and three dimensions and the relationships among them. Students use spatial reasoning and geometric thinking to understand mathematical concepts and the relationships among them. Students study properties and relationships having to do with size, shape, location, direction, and orientation of these figures. They will study the connection between geometry and algebra using real world applications and use geometric ideas, relationships and properties to solve problems. They will solve meaningful problems by representing figures, transforming figures, and analyzing and proving relationships.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Math Models M

Course No. 1207M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11th or 12th

Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry

Students, in preparation for taking Algebra II, continue to build on Algebra I and Geometry foundations as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Students will use algebraic, graphical and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structures, to model information, and to solve problems from various disciplines. They will use mathematical methods and understanding of functions to model and solve real-life problems involving money, data, probability, patterns, music, design, and science.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

Algebra II M

Course No. 1203M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11th or 12th

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

The emphasis in Algebra II is on equation solving and its application to solving word problems. It includes such topics as solving and graphing systems of equations and inequalities, direct and inverse variation, arithmetic sequences, polynomials and word problems. It also includes the student of functions, radicals and exponents, quadratic equations, conics, and logarithms.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Math Applications M

Course No. 1208M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 12th

Prerequisite: 3 credits of math previously completed

This course addresses a variety of necessary mathematical skills for life after high school. Personal math for daily living including finance skills, consumer math and money management will be addressed. In addition, preparatory math skills will be addressed to prepare students for entrance exams for post-secondary learning.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  


Financial Mathematics M​
Course No. 0786M A/B

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Algebra 1

This course satisfies a high school mathematics graduation requirement.​

Financial Mathematics is a course about personal money management. Students will apply critical thinking skills to analyze personal financial decisions based on current and projected economic factors.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

English I-III M

Course No.  I – 1101M

Course No. II – 1102M

Course No. III – 1103M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 for each course

Grade Placement: 9th, 10th and 11th

Prerequisite: English I for English II and English II for English III

These courses address the following areas: reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; listening and speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and oral and written conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative – students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to the standards for their grade. In English I-III, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

English IV M

Course No. 1104M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 12th

Prerequisite: English I, II, III

The focus is on the study of integrated language arts as it relates to language/writing, literature/reading and speaking/listening. Students will practice oral and written uses of language, as well as discuss and respond to relevant literature.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Biology M

Course No. 0302M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 9th

Prerequisite: None

In Biology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; and ecosystems and the environment.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Integrated Physics and Chemistry M

Course No. 0300M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10th or 11th

Prerequisite: None

In Integrated Physics and Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigation, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: force, motion, energy, and matter.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Physics M

Course No. 1313M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10th or 11th

Prerequisite: Algebra I or concurrent enrollment in Algebra I

Physics is an algebra-based introductory physics course dealing with a broad range of topics. Students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion, changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; forces; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and atomic, nuclear, and quantum physics. Students who successfully complete Physics will acquire factual knowledge within a conceptual framework, practice experimental

design and interpretation, work collaboratively with colleagues, and develop critical-thinking skills.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Chemistry M

Course No. 1314M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11th or 12th

Prerequisite: Algebra I

In Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include characteristics of matter, use of Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Environmental Systems M

(Enrollment based)

Course No. 0314M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11th or 12th

Prerequisite: 2 completed Science courses

In Environmental Systems, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: biotic and abiotic factors in habitats, ecosystems and biomes, interrelationships among resources and an environmental system, sources and flow of energy through an environmental system, relationship between carrying capacity and changes in populations and ecosystems, and changes in environments.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Aquatic Sciences M

(Enrollment based)

Course No. 0317M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11th or 12th

Prerequisite: 2 completed Science courses

In Aquatic Science, students study the interactions of biotic and abiotic components in aquatic environments, including impacts on aquatic systems. Investigations and field work in this course may emphasize freshwater or marine aspects of aquatic science depending primarily upon the natural resources available for study near the school. Students who successfully complete Aquatic Science will acquire knowledge about a variety of aquatic systems, conduct investigations and observations of aquatic environments, work collaboratively with peers, and develop critical-thinking and problem solving skills.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

World Geography M

Course No. 1411M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 9th

Prerequisite: Freshman Classification

The scope of this course will include physical, economic and cultural geography. Students will become familiar with geographical terminology. They also will be provided opportunities to locate and describe major landforms and features of the earth as well as major natural resources of the world. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the impact that the environment has on social, cultural and economic life in a region. An examination of uses, abuses, and preservation of natural resources and the physical environment will be included.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

World History M

Course No. 1412M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10th

Prerequisite: Sophomore Classification

World History is a survey course of the history of civilization which has evolved since early man. It includes the social, economic, and political development, as well as the contributions of each major area of the world. Content selected will provide a basis for students to compare and analyze ways of life and patterns of culture, emphasizing both the diversity and commonality of mankind’s behavior.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

US History M

Course No. 1413M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11th

Prerequisite: Junior Classification

A brief review is given to the period of colonization through the Civil War. The remainder of the course includes Reconstruction to the present period. Emphasis is placed on present day issues which have their roots in the past. Using a chronological as well as a thematic approach, the course will explore the emergence of the

United States as a world power through the various social, environmental, economic, and political implications.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

United States Government M

Course No. 1414M

Semesters:  1; Credits:  .5

Grade Placement: 12th

Prerequisite: Senior Classification

This course provides students with both a factual background and a conceptual understanding of the American political system. Units included are the origins of government, beginning governments in the early United States, development of our national government with emphasis on each branch and civil rights. Attention will

be given to voting, political parties, and government at the state and local level.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Economics M

Course No. 1415M

Semesters:  1; Credits:  .5

Grade Placement: 12th

Prerequisite: Senior Classification

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of economic theory and to provide them with a realistic view of how the economy has effect on daily lives. Emphasis is placed on the various aspects of the free enterprise system as it relates to the consumer with comparisons to other economic systems. Areas of instruction include basic economic concepts, the role of supply and demand, national production, the role of labor, business organizations and markets, and the role of the government through spending, taxes, money and banking. Students deal with current economic problems determining causes and possible solutions.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Alternate Courses

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Alternate courses are for students receiving special education services that require instruction in the prerequisite skills leading to the grade level content or TEKS.  Alternate courses are aligned with the general education TEKS. When a STAAR End of Course Exam (EOC) is required in a particular content area special education students will be required to take the EOC, however it may be the general assessment with accommodations, the accommodated assessment or alternate version of the EOC assessment depending on the review of the eligibility requirements by the student’s ARD committee.  An alternate course may be provided in the general education setting, a combination of general education and special education settings or self-contained in a special education setting as determined by the ARD committee.  Alternate course will be indicated with a capital A following the course name.

Algebra I A

Course No. 1221M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 9th

This course addresses the prerequisite skills of connecting symbolic language and real world applications. It includes tasks related to the following essence statements: basic understanding of functions, simplifying expressions and solving problems, representations of linear functions, and formulating and solving systems of linear equations.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Geometry A

Course No. 1222M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10th

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Geometry TEKS are addressed through prerequisite skills that address the foundation of functional and academic skills that students may apply to their mathematical experiences. Students will complete tasks related to the following essence statements: recognizing the foundations of geometric concepts, using geometric representation to solve problems, using the concepts of congruence in geometric figures, and using the concept of similarity in geometric figures.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Math Models A

Course No. 1223M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11-12th

Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry

Students, in preparation for taking Algebra II, continue to build on Algebra I and Geometry foundations as they expand their understanding through prerequisite mathematical experiences. Students will complete tasks related to the understanding of numbers, operation and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry and spatial reasoning; measurement; and probability and statistics.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Math Applications A

Course No. 1225M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 12th

Prerequisite: 2 credits of math previously completed

This course addresses a variety of necessary mathematical skills for life after high school. Personal math for daily living including finance skills, consumer math and money management will be addressed. Foundational math skills will be addressed to support students preparing for post-secondary entrance exams.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Algebra II A

Course No. 1224M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11-12th

Prerequisite: Algebra I A and Geometry A

Students will continue to study the skills linked to Algebra II TEKS through completion prerequisite tasks in the areas of equation solving and its application to solving word problems, graphing systems of equations, arithmetic sequences and word problems. It also includes the study of functions, radicals and exponents, quadratic equations, conics and logarithms. This course is not required for graduation as the minimum number of math credits may be obtained through completion of Algebra I A, Geometry A and Math Models A.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  


Financial Mathematics A
Course No. 1786M A/B

Semesters: 2; Credits: 1

Grade Placement: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course satisfies a high school mathematics graduation requirement.​

Financial Mathematics is a course about personal money management. Students will apply critical thinking skills to analyze personal financial decisions based on current and projected economic factors.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

English I-III A

Course No. I- 1121M

Course No. II – 1122M

Course No. III – 1123M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1 for each course

Grade Placement: 9th, 10th and 11th

Prerequisite: English I for English II and English II for English III

These courses address prerequisite skills in the following areas: reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; listening and speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and oral and written conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative – students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to the standards for their grade. In English I-III, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

English IV A

Course No. 1127M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 12th

Prerequisite: English I, II, III

The focus is on the study of prerequisite skills pertaining to integrated language arts as it relates to language/writing, literature/reading and speaking/listening. Students will practice oral and written uses of language, as well as discuss and respond to relevant literature.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Biology A

Course No. 1301M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 9th

Prerequisite: None

In Biology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Biology study prerequisites concepts for a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; and ecosystems and the environment.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Integrated Physics and Chemistry A

Course No. 1302M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10th or 11th

Prerequisite: None

In Integrated Physics and Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigation, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. This course integrates prerequisite skills in the the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: force, motion, energy, and matter.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Physics A

Course No. 1323M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10th or 11th

Prerequisite: Algebra I or concurrent enrollment in Algebra I

Students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of prerequisite concepts for topics that include: laws of motion, changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; forces; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and atomic, nuclear, and quantum physics.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Chemistry A

Course No. 1324M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11th or 12th

Prerequisite: Algebra I

In Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of prerequisite concepts for topics that include characteristics of matter, use of Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

World Geography A

Course No. 1421M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 9th

Prerequisite: Freshman Classification

The scope of this course will include prerequisite tasks in the areas of physical, economic and cultural geography concepts. Students will be provided opportunities to locate and describe major landforms and features of the earth as well as major natural resources of the world. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the impact that the environment has on social, cultural and economic life in a region. An examination of uses, abuses, and preservation of natural resources and the physical environment will be included.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

World History A

Course No. 1422M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10th

Prerequisite: Sophomore Classification

World History is a survey course of the history of civilization which has evolved since early man. It includes prerequisite skills in the areas of social, economic, and political development, as well as the contributions of each major area of the world. Content selected will provide a basis for students to compare and analyze ways of life and patterns of culture, emphasizing both the diversity and commonality of mankind’s behavior.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

US History A

Course No. 1423M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 11th

Prerequisite: Junior Classification

A brief review is given to the period of colonization through the Civil War. The remainder of the course includes Reconstruction to the present period. Emphasis is placed on present day issues, which have their roots in the past. Using a chronological as well as a thematic approach, the course will explore the emergence of the

United States as a world power through the various social, environmental, economic, and political implications. Concepts will be based on necessary prerequisite skills linked to the grade level TEKS.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

United States Government A

Course No. 1424M

Semesters:  1; Credits:  .5

Grade Placement: 12th

Prerequisite: Senior Classification

This course provides students with both a factual background and a conceptual understanding of the American political system based on prerequisite skills. Units included are the origins of government, beginning governments in the early United States, development of our national government with emphasis on each branch and civil rights. Attention will be given to voting, political parties, and government at the state and local level.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Economics A

Course No. 1425M

Semesters:  1; Credits:  .5

Grade Placement: 12th

Prerequisite: Senior Classification

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the prerequisite skills of the economic theory and to provide them with a realistic view of how the economy has an effect on daily lives. Emphasis is placed on the various aspects of the free enterprise system as it relates to the consumer with comparisons to other economic systems. Areas of instruction include basic economic concepts, the role of supply and demand, national production, the role of labor, business organizations and markets, and the role of the government through spending, taxes, money and banking. Students deal with current economic problems determining causes and possible solutions.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Electives

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The following electives are elective courses for students that are not able to participate in the general education elective even with supplementary aids and accommodations and significant modifications to the TEKS. The following courses are instructed by educators certified in special education. Course work may be instructed in the general education setting, a combination of general and special education settings or self-contained in a special education environment.  Courses may not be available each semester and will be determined based on minimum enrollment rate.

Art I A

Course No. 0750M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This course offers the beginning art student a general survey of studio art. A variety of media and techniques will be explored throughout the year. Basic drawing skills, color theory, painting and printmaking will all be presented. Students will engage in creating two-dimensional and three-dimensional designs. Each student will demonstrate his/her accomplishments through a portfolio of work. Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Drawing II A

Course No. 0754M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 10-12

Prerequisite: None

In this class, a variety of drawing possibilities will be explored as students are introduced to a range of drawing techniques and materials. Students will be provided instruction linked to the prerequisite skills needed to access Drawing II TEKS.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Ceramics II A

Course No. 0770M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 10-12

Prerequisite: None

This course is a continuation of the study of three-dimensional art with a focus on clay as a sculptural medium. Advanced methods and techniques using clay will be explored, including potters wheel and hand-built sculpture. Individual creativity will be stressed. Students will be provided instruction linked to the prerequisite skills needed to access Ceramics II TEKS.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Jewelry II A

Course No. 0759M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 10-12

Prerequisite: None

This course is a study of the use of a variety of media such as paper, fibers, glass, clay and metal for wearable art. A variety of techniques will be explored while stressing craftsmanship and personal creativity. Students will be provided instruction linked to the prerequisite skills needed to access Jewelry II TEKS.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Painting II A

Course No. 0767M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 10-12

Prerequisite: None

Students will study color theory through a variety of painting and design projects. Various color theories and painting styles will be learned while completing acrylic canvas paintings and mixed media paintings.  Students will be provided instruction linked to the prerequisite skills needed to access Painting II TEKS.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Sculpture II A

Course No. 0751M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 10-12

Prerequisite: None

A variety of sculpture media will be explored including plaster, wire, rock, mosaic, wood and clay. Students will explore the works of great sculptors throughout history while developing skills in a variety of sculpture techniques. Individual creativity will be stressed.   Students will be provided instruction linked to the prerequisite skills needed to access Sculpture II TEKS.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Choir I, II, III and IV A (Alternate)

Course No. I -6701M

Course No. II 6702M

Course No. III 6703M      

Course No. IV 6704M          

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  .5-1

Grade Placement 9-12

Prerequisite: None

The non-varsity choirs are non-auditioned organizations that are comprised of freshmen and students who are new to choir.  Course work is modified for a student in special education based on their disability based needs.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Theatre Arts I A

Course No. 0700M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 9-12

Prerequisite: None

As a general introduction to theatre arts with modified curriculum, this course incorporates the basic acting techniques of movement, mime, voice, improvisation, and scene presentation with interpretation of dramatic literature, historical perspective, and evaluation of community productions.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Theatre Arts II A

Course No. 0701M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Theatre Arts II with modified curriculum builds on the background established in Theatre Arts I while continuing the development of acting skills through physical, vocal and improvisation exercises. Acting and directing principles are applied through performances in various theatrical modes including classical and contemporary theatre, dance, drama, mime, and theatre for youth. Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Health A

Course No.  1521M

PEIMS:  03810100

Semesters:  1; Credits:  .5

Grade Placement 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This course is intended to foster development of functional personal health skills to support independent living.  Areas of study include feeding, dressing, toileting, grooming, safety, self-concept and wellness.  Emphasis is on the application of skills for independent living within the range of each student’s ability.  Coursework will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

PE I: Foundations of Personal Fitness A

Course No. 0500M

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  .5-1

Grade Placement 9-12

Prerequisite: None

The basic purpose of this course is to motivate students to strive for lifetime personal fitness. The components of physical fitness. The knowledge and skills taught in this course include teaching students about the process of becoming fit as well as achieving some degree of fitness within the class. The concept of wellness is the

cornerstone of the course. Student design their own personal fitness program. This is a modified course based on the general PE I Foundations of Personal Fitness. Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

PE II: Walk, Jog, Run A

Course No. 0511M

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  .5-1

Grade Placement 10-12

Prerequisite: PE I: Foundations of Personal Fitness A

This a fitness course that is designed to increase cardiovascular endurance and emphasizes walking, jogging and running with ease, efficiency and building the proper mechanic’s associated with each stage of activity. Students will build capacity in cardiorespiratory endurance while learning about injury prevention and health benefits associated with Walk, Jog, and Run. Physical activities are modified based on the unique needs of the learner related to their disability.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

PE II: Individual Sports A

Course No. 0502M

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  .5-1

Grade Placement 10-12

Prerequisite: PE I: Foundations of Personal Fitness A

Students in Individual Sports are expected to participate in a wide range of individual sports that can be pursued for a lifetime. Physical activities are modified based on the unique needs of the learner related to their disability.  The continued development of health-related fitness and the selection of individual sport activities that are enjoyable are major objectives of this course. Activities may include but are not limited to tennis, badminton, golf, table tennis, pickle ball, and disc golf.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

PE II: Team Sports A

Course No. 0503M

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  .5-1

Grade Placement 10-12

Prerequisite: PE I: Foundations of Personal Fitness A

Students enrolled in Team Sports are expected to develop health-related fitness and an appreciation for teamwork and fair play. Like the other high school physical education courses, Team Sports is less concerned with the acquisition of physical fitness during the course than reinforcing the concept of incorporating physical activity into a lifestyle beyond high school. Activities may include but are not limited to basketball, flag football, soccer, volleyball, ultimate Frisbee, softball, and gym hockey.  Physical activities are modified based on the unique needs of the learner related to their disability.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Professional Communications A

Course No. 1721M

Semesters:  1; Credits:  .5

Grade Placement 11th-12th

Prerequisite: None

This basic speech course is designed to assist students with disabilities learn basic communication skills when speaking, writing, and expressing their ideas visually. Technology is embedded throughout this course, in addition to any assistive devices students may require based on their disability.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Reading I, II, III A (Alternate)

Course No. I -1124M

Course No. II 1125M

Course No. III 1126M                

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  .5-1

Grade Placement 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Reading is an elective designed for the student interested in improving reading skills. The instructional emphasis targets individual improvement in reading comprehension, vocabulary, critical thinking, reading rate, and study skills. Skills are practiced through the use of relevant materials and computer software. This course is designed to provide instruction of the prerequisite skills linked to grade level Reading TEKS.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.  

Reading I, II, III M (Modified)

Course No. I - 0124M

Course No. II - 0125M

Course No. III - 0126M                

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  .5-1

Grade Placement 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Reading is an elective designed for the student interested in improving reading skills. The instructional emphasis targets individual improvement in reading comprehension, vocabulary, critical thinking, reading rate, and study skills. Skills are practiced through the use of relevant materials and computer software. This course is designed to provide instruction of modified grade level Reading TEKS.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

Study Skills and Learning Strategies M (Modified)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 1011M

Semesters:  1  Credits:  .5

Grade Placement 11-12

Prerequisite: None

(Enrollment Based)

This course is designed to support the unique needs of a student with disabilities to teach skills and strategies necessary for success in post high school educational environments.  The instruction is a modified course linked to the general education TEKS for the College Readiness and Study Skills course.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

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Career Preparation Courses

Career Preparation courses are special education courses designed to prepare students to assist the student to moving towards their post-secondary career goals.  Participation in the courses below is determined by the student’s admission, review, and dismissal (ARD) committee.  Courses are set up in a sequence however enrollment is based on a student’s ARD committee determination.  The ARD committee may take into account the student experiences and preparedness when selecting which course most closely aligns with their IEP.  

Career Prep I M

Course No. 1932M

Semesters:  2; Credits: 1

Grade Placement: 9th, 10th or 11th

Prerequisite: None

The career development process is unique to every person and evolves through one’s life. In this class students will use decision-making and problem-solving skills for post-secondary education and career planning. In the first semester of this course students will explore valid, reliable educational and career information to learn more about themselves and their interests and abilities. Students integrate skills from academic subjects, information technology, and interpersonal communication to make informed decisions.  This course designed to guide students through the process of investigation and development of a post-secondary education and career achievement plan. Second semester the student will explore post-secondary educational options and career planning within specific career clusters. The students research labor market information, learn job-seeking skills, and create documents required for employment. Students use self-knowledge to explore and set realistic goals.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

Career Prep II M

Course No. 1933M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 10 - 12

Prerequisite: Career Prep I

The goal of this course is to create a culture of high expectation and continuous improvement that provides students with a foundation for success in high school, future studies, and careers.  Students explore college and /or career planning within a specific career cluster(s).  The students research labor market information, learn job seeking skills, and create documents required for employment.  Students use self-knowledge to explore and set realistic goals.  Students will begin to apply skills taught in the classroom during Career Prep I into actual job tasks on campus to simulate real life work experience.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

           Practicum of Human Services I M

Course No. 4812M

Semesters:  2; Credits: 2 (Double Blocked)

Grade Placement 11th-12th

Practicum of Human Services I Modified provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with district level work experiences, volunteer experiences, and employment and supports strong partnerships among school, business, and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations, and portfolio success. This is a double blocked course to allow for students to work up to 5 days a week.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

Practicum of Human Services II M

Course No. 4822M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  2 (Double Blocked)

Grade Placement: 12

Prerequisite: ARD Recommendation

Practicum of Human Services II Modified develops essential knowledge and skills through on-the-job training in an approved business and industry training area. This practicum provides relevant and rigorous work experience,  supports student attainment of academic standards, and effectively prepares students for a career after high school.  Students will develop skills for lifelong learning, employability, leadership, management, work ethics, safety, and communication as a group; however, each student will have an individual training plan that will address job-specific knowledge and skills. This is a double blocked course to allow for students to work up to 5 days a week.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

           Principles of Human Services M

           Course No. 0812M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 9-10th

Prerequisite: None

(Enrollment based)

This comprehensive laboratory course provides the knowledge and skills related to personal human development. It will enable students to investigate careers in the human services career cluster, including early childhood development, family and community, mental health and personal care services. Content includes decision making, positive relationships, child development, nutrition and food production, finance, and personal grooming as it relates to personal and professional settings.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

Money Matters M

Course No. 0785M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement 10-12th

Prerequisite: None

Students discover new ways to maximize their earning potential, develop strategies for managing their resources, explore skills for the wise use of credit, and gain insight into the different ways of investing money. Students will discuss current trends and issues consumers face in today’s marketplace. Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee. 

Touch Systems Data Entry M

Course No. 0721M

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This course provides keyboarding skills for students with special needs. This course will train students to create documents and input data using the “touch system” of keyboarding. Emphasis is placed on student accuracy, speed and production of documents using the touch system.  Student course work will be based on their individual educational plan (IEP). Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

Community Transition Courses

Course No. I - 1941  

Course No. II – 1942

Course No. III – 1943

Course No. IV - 1944

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Grade Placement: Post 12th Grade

Prerequisite: ARD Recommendation

Community Transition coursework provides the necessary instruction for access to individualized post secondary goals.  The course work addresses needs as determined by the ARD committee focusing on the following areas:   independent living, career and vocational preparation,  post-secondary instruction and training and recreation and leisure.  Course work will be based on the individual educational plan (IEP) determined by the ARD committee.

World Languages

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American Sign Language: Students should note that while colleges accept ASL as a foreign language entrance requirement, colleges may not recognize ASL as a foreign language. Students may need to begin in another foreign language in college. Level V is not offered by GCISD.

 

American Sign Language I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0172

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

ASL I is a foundational course in vocabulary, grammar structures of ASL, and introduction of Deaf Culture.  ASL is the language that the deaf use incorporating signs, facial expressions, gestures  and body language. This course teaches receptive and expressive signing, interactive communication, culture, and language concepts. Students will be expected to learn the operation of languages, the study of linguistics and the learning processes involved in acquiring a second language.

 

American Sign Language II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0173

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ASL I

 

ASL II builds on the foundation laid in ASL I for a more in depth study of vocabulary and grammar, and includes several student presentations in ASL.  Students will continue to develop proficiency in receptive and expressive signing, interactive communication, culture, and language concepts. Students will be expected to participate in dialogues about familiar  situations using complex sentences  and grammatical patterns, short  stories, and narratives. Linguistic and cultural elements of signing will continue to be studied in greater depth.

American Sign Language III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0174

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ASL II

 

ASL III continues to develop proficiency in receptive and expressive signing, interactive communication, culture, and language concepts. Students will continue to learn the complexities of specific grammatical features of ASL. Prepared dialogues will be used as a vehicle for providing the student with contextual exposure and practice of targeted grammatical features. Students are accountable for mastery of increasingly more complex features across the same range of linguistic behaviors.

American Sign Language IV -  Independent Study

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.  0197

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  ASL III

Students will continue to master proficiency in receptive and expressive signing, interactive communication, culture, and language concepts in ASL IV.  Students will continue to learn the complexities of specific grammatical features of ASL.  Students will gain proficiency in translation skills both from English to ASL and ASL to English.  Students will have opportunities to participate in deaf cultural events and a variety of interpretation platforms while also providing support to beginning level students through peer teaching.   A community service project to benefit the deaf community will be the capstone assignment for this course.

Chinese I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0183

Semesters: 2  Credits: 1

Prerequisite: None

 

Chinese I is a high school level course. It is an introductory course intended for students with little or no knowledge of the language. Its aim is to present essential vocabulary and grammar, and to develop the pronunciation, listening, reading and writing skills necessary for basic communication and comprehension. An emphasis will be on producing the sounds, stress patterns, and intonation of the language. Basic Chinese radicals (components of the characters) and structure of the characters will be stressed for future character building. Customs and cultural insights are also presented.

Pre-AP Chinese II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No.0185

Semesters: 2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Chinese I

PRE-AP Chinese II is a more rigorous reinforcement and expansion of the four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Greater emphasis is placed on oral and written communication skills at this level. Vocabulary is expanded through reading and writing exercises, and conversational practice. Advanced Chinese radicals (components of the characters) and structure of the characters will be stressed for future character building. Students continue to acquire cultural insights and appreciation of the culture of Chinese speaking countries. This course will prepare students for the rigor and successful completion of Pre-AP Chinese III.

Pre-AP Chinese III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0186

Semesters: 2  Credits: 1

Prerequisite:  Pre-AP Chinese II

Students will further develop the depth of their language proficiency in Mandarin and their understanding of Chinese culture. Students will engage in reading, writing (including typing Chinese), listening to and speaking Mandarin, but at a higher level than before and with an emphasis on refinement of (spoken) tone. Students will continue to learn new characters and will learn more advanced grammatical concepts in the context of “Real Life” scenarios. Advanced Chinese radicals (components of the characters) and structure of the characters will be stressed for future character building.

This course is designed for those students planning to continue their language study (specifically AP Chinese IV).

AP Chinese IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0193

Semesters: 2  Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Pre-AP  Chinese III

AP Chinese IV is designed to further develop knowledge of and proficiency in Chinese language and culture - reading, writing (including typing Chinese), listening to and speaking Mandarin.  The learning activities continuously reinforce student-centered learning and cooperative learning, the use of information technology, and encourage creative learning and thinking.

More advanced and authentic writing material as well as more “Real Life” scenarios will be used in AP Chinese IV. This course is designed for those students planning to continue their language study and for those students planning to take the Chinese AP Exam.

Chinese Cultural and Linguistic Topics (INDEPENDENT STUDY)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0198

Semesters: 2  Credits: 1

Prerequisite: AP  Chinese IV

             (AP Weighted Credit) This is an independent study course. Students will explore Chinese Literature, the arts, culinary

             study, among other instructor-approved topics.

French I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0162

Semesters:  2 Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Students will learn to understand and produce the sounds, stress patterns, and intonation of the language. The content of this course will include an introduction to all five language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural literacy) with emphasis on the ability to communicate orally from the core of this course of study. Students will take part in everyday simple conversations using basic grammatical structures and learn to read and write simple questions and answers as they develop as world citizens. Students will also study basic facts about the geography, customs, and culture of the country.

 

Pre-AP French II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 01651

Semesters:  2 Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  French I

PRE-AP FRENCH II expands the five areas of language study based on Advanced Placement themes The Advanced Placement themes include Families and Communities, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Science and Technology, Global Challenges, and Beauty and Aesthetics. Through the use of authentic materials and resources, students will increase their proficiencies using the three modes of communication. The three modes of communication include Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational. The course will prepare students for the rigor and successful completion of Pre-AP French III.

 

Pre-AP French III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0165

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Pre-AP French II

Pre-AP French III students will review and refine the grammatical structures and communicative skills they have already learned.  The content of this course will be accelerated and expanded to include an extensive study of grammar and advanced vocabulary so that students may communicate in different time frames, and at a higher, more complex level. This course is designed for those students planning to continue their language study and to prepare them for the rigor and successful completion of  the Advanced Placement Exam.

 

AP French IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0187

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Pre-AP French III

AP French students will review and refine the grammatical structures and communicative skills they have already learned. AP French Language and Culture is a college-level course intended for students in their fourth year of study of French. The three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational) defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning. Coursework provides students with opportunities to demonstrate their proficiency at an advanced level in each of the three modes, as described in the ACTFL Performance Guidelines.

French Cultural and Linguistic Topics (INDEPENDENT STUDY)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0190

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  AP French IV

(AP Weighted Credit) This is an independent study course. Students will explore French Literature, the arts, culinary study, among other instructor-approved topics.

German I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0168

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Students will learn to understand and produce the sounds, stress patterns, and intonation of the language. An introduction to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) with emphasis on the ability to communicate orally forms the core of this course of study. Students will take part in everyday simple conversations using basic grammatical structures and learn to read and write simple questions and answers.  Students will also study basic facts about the geography, customs, and culture of Germany.

Pre-AP German II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 01691

Semesters:  2  Credits 1

Prerequisite:  German I

Students will continue to develop proficiency in a more rigorous expansion of all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Greater emphasis is placed on oral and written communication skills at this level. Students will participate in dialogues about familiar situations using more complex sentences and grammatical patterns. Students will read familiar material and write short directed compositions. A study of family structure, school life, holidays and culture in Austria will be completed. Vocabulary is expanded through reading and writing exercises, and conversational practice. Students continue to acquire cultural insights and appreciation of the culture of German speaking countries. This course will prepare students for the rigor and successful completion of Pre-AP German III.

 

Pre-AP German III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0181

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Pre-AP German II

The content of this course will be accelerated and expanded to include  an extensive study of grammar language structure and advanced vocabulary so that students may communicate in different time frames, and at a higher, more complex level. Students will also study basic facts about the geography, customs, and culture of the country of Switzerland. This course is designed for those students planning to continue their language study and/or prepare for the Advanced Placement Exam.

 

AP German IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0191

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Pre-AP German III

Students will develop more sophisticated communication skills and refine reading and writing skills. A survey of the history of target countries will be presented. Students will hear reports in the target language and recognize subtle points and moods as conveyed by the speakers. Emphasis is placed on increasing the student's reading comprehension, command of vocabulary, fluency in oral expression, and grammatical accuracy in written composition. Students will describe, summarize, explain, and discuss practical subjects. Students will express ideas using complete sentences and broaden their appreciation of the foreign culture. The class will prepare students for the rigor and successful completion of AP German IV and the AP German Language and Culture Exam.

German Cultural and Linguistic Topics (INDEPENDENT STUDY)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0192

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  AP German IV

 

(AP Weighted Credit) Students  will delve into 4 thematic units: German History, Germany Today,  German Literature and Business German. Taught primarily in German. Acquisition and application of German vocabulary in business and economics, german literature and music. Literature topics may focus on a genre, author or theme. Contemporary topics will consist of German current events and relation to the European Union, while history will concentrate on 19th and 20th Century German history.

Latin I

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0158

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Latin I is the study of the language, the culture, and the attitude of the Roman Empire. Students study basic grammar and learn the essential elements of Latin pronunciation, as well as build a comprehensive and practical vocabulary through the use of Latin roots, terms, prefixes, suffixes, and phrases. Points of grammar and syntax are developed through the study of literary passages on topics such as the mythology, history, government, geography, and culture of the Romans.

 

Pre-AP Latin II

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 01591

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Latin I

Students learn additional vocabulary and new points of grammar and syntax in order to read more complex sentences and paragraphs. Roman life and Rome's contribution to our civilization and language will be studied. There is an additional emphasis on the study of Roman mythology.

 

Pre-AP Latin III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0180

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Pre-AP Latin II

The content of this course will be accelerated and expanded to include  an extensive study of grammar and advanced vocabulary so that students may communicate in different time frames, and at a higher, more complex level. This course is designed for those students planning to continue their language study and/or prepare for the Advanced Placement Exam.

 

AP Latin IV

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0194

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Latin III

Students will study the literary techniques used by Roman authors such as Livy, Cicero, Martial, Ovid and Vergil. Works will be analyzed for content, style, and connotation of words. Students will study the life and times of Julius Caesar, as well as additional authors, including the early part of the Empire. In addition to translating works by the above authors, students will also read works by several Roman authors in translation in order to give them a well-rounded knowledge of  Latin literature. Students will be refining their ability to read, understand, and interpret Latin prose and poetry related to the readings of Vergil and Julius Caesar. This course is designed to refine Latin skills, focusing on Advanced Placement strategies.  

Latin Cultural and Linguistic Topics (INDEPENDENT STUDY)

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0195

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  AP Latin IV

(AP Weighted Credit) This is an independent study course. Students will explore appropriate instructor-approved topics in Latin.

Spanish I

(Standard)

Course No. 0150

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  None

Spanish I is a course that serves as an introduction to beginning Spanish. The class focuses on sound production, stress patterns and language intonation, and also highlights introductory level geographical facts, social customs, and cultural celebrations. At the conclusion of the course, students will perform at the novice level proficiency in the following language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing.

Spanish II

(Standard)

Course No. 0152

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Spanish I

This course is a continuation of beginning Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to communicate orally as a global citizen. Students will participate in dialogues about familiar situations, using more complex sentences and grammatical patterns. Familiar materials will be read, and short, directed compositions will be written. In this course students will continue to develop proficiency in the following language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing.

Pre-AP Spanish II

(Enrollment based)

Course No. 01521

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Spanish I

This course is the more rigorous continuation of beginning Spanish designed for students who intend to take the AP Spanish Language Test in Spanish IV AP.  Emphasis will be placed on the ability to communicate orally as a global citizen. Students will participate in dialogues about familiar situations, using more complex sentences and grammatical patterns toward a higher proficiency level. Familiar materials will be read, and short, directed compositions will be written. In this course students will continue to develop proficiency in the following language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing.


Spanish III On-Level
(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 01530 A/B
Semesters: 2;  credits: 1

Prerequisite: Spanish II

Grades: 10, 11, 12


In this course students will continue to develop proficiency in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Emphasis will be placed on consistent and sustained use of the language with more complex grammatical structures. Reading selections using structures of increased complexity will be discussed.  Students will recognize word relationship and associate them with proper meaning.  This course does not lead to enrollment AP Spanish IV.

Pre-AP Spanish III

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0154

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Spanish II

This course will be accelerated and expanded to include an extensive study of grammar and advanced vocabulary so that students will reach an intermediate level of proficiency This course is designed for those students planning to continue their Spanish language study and/or prepare for the Advanced Placement Exam. Students will continue to develop proficiency in the following language skills:  reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and showing. There will be an emphasis on Advanced Placement strategies and skills.

Spanish Cultural And Linguistic Topics

            (Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0199

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Spanish II

Grades: 9-12

This personalized course focuses on the students' continued development of oral proficiency in Spanish, with applicable

practice of real-world situations. Students will be provided ample opportunities to engage in conversations, to present information to an audience, and to interpret culturally authentic materials by listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. The course is interactive and engages students in current events and cultural topics through project based learning.  This is a stand-alone course, and not part of a coherent sequence of leveled Spanish courses.

Pre-AP Spanish III For Spanish Speakers

Enrollment Based

Course No. 0177

Semesters: 2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Demonstrated intermediate proficiency in Spanish

This course is designed to meet the unique needs of Spanish speakers including an extensive study of advanced grammar and vocabulary so that students may communicate at a higher, more complex level. Students will read critically and be able to synthesize information in order to write a well-organized essay. This course is designed to develop the communication skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and showing, with an emphasis on Advanced Placement strategies and skills.

 

AP Spanish IV Language and Culture

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0196

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Spanish III

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a rigorous course taught exclusively in Spanish that requires students to improve their proficiency across the three modes of communication: interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive. The course focuses on the integration of authentic resources including online print, audio, and audiovisual resources; as well as traditional print resources that include literature, essays, and magazine and newspaper articles; and also a combination of visual/print resources such as charts, tables, and graphs; all with the goal of providing a diverse learning experience. Students communicate using rich, advanced vocabulary and linguistic structures as they build proficiency in all modes of communication toward the advanced level. This course is designed to refine the communication skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and showing, focusing exclusively on Advanced Placement strategies and skills.  

 

AP Spanish IV Language and Culture For Spanish Speakers

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0178

Semesters: 2  Credits: 1

Prerequisite:  Pre-AP Spanish III for Spanish Speakers

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a rigorous course taught exclusively in Spanish that requires students to improve their proficiency across the three modes of communication: interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive. The course focuses on the integration of authentic resources including online print, audio, and audiovisual resources; as well as traditional print resources that include literature, essays, and magazine and newspaper articles; and also a combination of visual/print resources such as charts, tables, and graphs; all with the goal of providing a diverse learning experience. Students communicate using rich, advanced vocabulary and linguistic structures as they build proficiency in all modes of communication toward the advanced level. This course is designed to refine the communication skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and showing, focusing exclusively on Advanced Placement strategies and skills.  

AP Spanish V Literature

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0176

Semesters:  2  Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  AP Spanish IV

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Literature Examination given each spring.  Students will study an introductory  and diverse quantity of Peninsular and Latin American literary texts. The reading list will expose students to Spanish works from a variety of  genres and historical periods that also influenced literature and art around the world. Students will learn to analyze the poetry, themes, and literary text.  The course also will provide interpretive and reading comprehension skills. Students will be expected to learn to analyze passages that may or may not be familiar to them and also be familiar with the basic elements of Spanish meter and rhyme.

Local Credit Courses

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Will not count toward 26 required credits for graduation.

Communication Application - Teen Leadership Skills

(Optional)

Course No. 0728

Semesters:  1; Credits:  .5

Prerequisite:  Communication Application I (High School Level) Instructor Approval

This course is the continuation of Communication Application designed to prepare students to be the leaders of this generation. Students will continue to improve presentation techniques and explore the importance of effective interpersonal communication skills in strengthening relationships and organizations.  The curriculum is focused on building the confidence and experience of students as ethical and responsible leaders. Emphasis will be on the practical application of effective communication strategies while working on a variety of service projects.  Students will learn and utilize: conflict resolution strategies leadership, democracy and citizenship skills motivational strategies effective visual aids including powerpoints and video organizational structures research techniques.

Office Assistant

(Optional)

Course No. 0950

Semesters:  1-4; Credits:  ½-2 (local credit only)

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

Administrator Approval

Office assistants are needed in the main office, attendance office, counseling office and library.  To be an assistant, one must have approval from the office (or library). A student may receive 1/2 credit per semester for a maximum of two credits.  A student may not be concurrently enrolled as an office and teacher assistant.

Portfolio Art - Independent Study

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0774

Semesters:  2 - 4; Credits:  1 - 2

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

Requirement:  must be concurrently enrolled in Art AP

This course is designed for the advanced art student who wants to continue the study of art and develop a personal style.  The student works with the art teacher to select projects which will help expand his/her knowledge and skills. Each student works independently toward set goals.  Students planning to major in art as a career will complete their portfolio for college.  Students may be enrolled in Art Independent Study for no more than four semesters.

Teacher Assistant

(Optional)

Course No. 0951

Semesters:  1-4; Credits:  ½-2

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification, Teacher Approval

The student will assist the teacher in various classroom duties. Teachers may have only one assistant.  A student may receive 1/2 credit per semester for a maximum of two credits.  A student may not be concurrently enrolled as an office and teacher assistant.

Service Learning

(Optional)

Course No. 0421

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

This course is designed to promote involvement in the community.  Students will volunteer to serve with local governments, public programs, or community organizations.  The purpose of this course is to direct students into practical settings where the primary motivation is service.  This course will offer students the opportunity to be responsible, caring, and participating members of society.  Students must provide their own transportation.  If this course is taken a second year, it is awarded local credit only.

PSAT Team

Course No. 0731

Semesters: 1 Credits ½ (Local)

Invitation only for students that meet a standard set by the PSAT teachers after the scores from the 10th grade administration. The PSAT Team is an intensive educational course that prepares a select group of students for the PSAT/NMSQT.  After the PSAT, the instruction will shift to the SAT.  The rigorous instruction is designed to improve Critical Reading, Math and Writing scores.

College Readiness Exam Prep

Course No. 09991

Semesters: 1   Credits: ½ (Local)

Recommended:  9th-12th

Prerequisite: None

The College Readiness Exam Prep. course is available to any student seeking dedicated instructional time for  SAT/ACT preparation. Test taking skills and specific test items are emphasized for both the verbal and quantitative sub-tests.

Miscellaneous

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Leadership Class

(Optional)

Course No. 0419

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  ½-1

Prerequisite:  Junior Classification

Instructor Approval

The Student Leadership Course provides an opportunity to study, practice, and develop group and individual leadership and organizational skills.  These skills include, but are not limited to, decision making skills, problem solving techniques, communication skills, leadership roles, human relations skills, and understanding the need for civic responsibility.

Students who take this course will apply these skills in dealing with peers, school administrators, and the community.  It is a hands-on, lab oriented approach to leadership.  Students enrolled should be a member of Student Council and must have written teacher approval.

Peer Assistance and Leadership

(Optional)

Course No. 0417

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Junior or Senior Classification

Instructor Approval

Selection Process

PALS is a program designed to help students learn listening, communication, and decision making skills.  Class members are trained and actively provide support services to fellow students.  PALS also adopt elementary school students and act as positive role models for these young people.

Peer Assistance and Leadership – Advanced 

(Optional)

Course No. 0418

Semesters:  2; Credits:  1

Prerequisite:  Previous Membership in Beginning PALS Class

Instructor Approval

Selection Process

The Advanced PALS class continues the training and goals of the beginning PALS class.  In addition, the Advanced PALS class talks with middle school students about important issues in their lives, conducts peer mediations on the high school campus and has a community service project each semester.

Senior Release

(Optional)

Course No. 0953 – 7th & 8th Periods

Course No. 0954 – 1st & 2nd Periods

Course No. 0955 – 8th Period

Course No. 0956 – 1st Period

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  None

Prerequisite:  Senior Classification

Description: Seniors who will meet graduation requirements and who are enrolled in three credits each semester may request release from high school.

Optional Opportunities for Credit

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If students need to pursue other avenues for credit, the following options are available.  Information on the following options is available through the counseling office.

Credit By Exam Without Prior Instruction

The District shall give a student in grades 6-12 credit for an academic subject in which the student has received no prior instruction if the student scores 80 percent or above on a criterion-referenced examination for acceleration for the applicable course.  If such credit is given, the District shall enter the examination score on the student’s transcript.  Courses for which credit is earned by examination in grades 9-12 shall not be included in the calculation of the weighted grade point average for purposes of class ranking.  Requests for these examinations are made to the Director of Accountability and Continuous Improvement.

Credit By Exam With Prior Instruction

The District shall give a student in grades 6-12 credit for an academic subject in which he or she had some prior instruction (courses which students have not successfully completed), if the student scores 70 percent or better on a criterion-referenced test for the applicable course.  If such credit is given the District shall enter the examination score on the student’s transcript.  Courses for which credit is earned by examination in grades 9-12 shall not be included in the calculation of the weighted grade point average for purposes of class ranking.  Requests for these examinations are made to the Director of Accountability and Continuous Improvement

Correspondence Courses

High school students may earn up to two (2.0) credits toward graduation through correspondence courses.  Students wishing to enroll in correspondence courses must consult with a counselor.  Correspondence courses shall be used for emergencies or enrichment only and should not become a substitute for residence work.  Courses are subject to approval by the principal.  Students are responsible for paying all fees for course materials and resources.  Correspondence courses are not included in the calculation of GPA or class rank.

Other Requirements:

If a student wishes to take Health via correspondence, the student must prove CPR certification prior to approval.  All correspondence courses must be COMPLETE before the first day of a student’s senior year.

Students must submit the online form that can be under the counseling tab of their current school’s webpage PRIOR to enrolling in a correspondence course.

Summer Classes

One full credit may be earned in each session of the Secondary Summer School program.  Courses in core subjects as well as electives are available on a fee basis.

College Readiness Electives

AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)

Course No. 0430 Freshman AVID

Course No. 0431 Sophomore AVID1 credit / Speech .5 credit

Course No. 0434 Junior AVID

Course No. 0435 Senior AVID

Semesters 2; Credits: 1 (high school)

Prerequisite: Application and Instructor Approval

AVID is a structured, college preparatory system for students who want to take on challenges and advanced courses. Each week, students in the AVID elective class engage in a rigorous college preparatory curriculum, college-age tutor-facilitated study groups, collaborative activities and academic success skills. In AVID, students participate in activities that incorporate strategies focused on writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization, and reading to support their success in advanced courses. Each year, the AVID Elective class reviews and then builds upon skills learned in prior years of AVID. Potential students will need to apply and interview before being accepted into the elective.

Available College Programs

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Three opportunities to earn college credit exist for students in high school.  Students may earn credit through Concurrent Enrollment and Dual Enrollment.  Qualifications begin with senior classification and also require a minimum grade point average of 80.  The THEA (Texas Higher Education Assessment) test is required before any student is allowed to enroll.  Students must take the test in the spring or summer of their junior year.  Visit your counselor to learn how to take advantage of these programs.

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT

(Enrollment Based)

Course No. 0957

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  College Only

Prerequisite:  Junior or Senior Classification

Meet College Early Entrance Requirements

The concurrent enrollment program is designed to provide students with the opportunity to complete college courses during their last two years of high school.  All students must be enrolled in a minimum of six high school credits; three credits per semester.  The concurrent college class does not count as one of the six required credits.  Concurrent enrollment provides the opportunity for juniors and seniors to take any course offered at any university or college campus. See your counselors for additional information about this opportunity, including courses offered on the high school campuses.

DUAL ENROLLMENT

(Enrollment Based)

Eng III - Course No. 0963

US History - Course No. 0964

Eng IV - Course No. 0959

Government - Course No. 0960

Economics - Course No. 0961

Semesters:  1-2; Credits:  College and High School

Prerequisite:  Junior or Senior Classification

Meet TCC Early Entrance Requirements

The Dual Enrollment Program allows students to take courses that apply toward both high school and college graduation.  Only a limited number of courses meet the strict requirements of this program.  See your counselor about the availability of these courses and requirements.  Students must maintain a 70 or above to receive high school credit for the course. The following TCC courses are available for Dual credit:

GCISD

TCC Dual Enrollment

English III and US History

12 hours/year (Juniors)

Fall-ENGL 1301 & HIST 1301

Spring-ENGL 1302 & HIST 1302

English Composition I and US History I

English Composition II and US History II

English IV and ECON/GOVT

12 hours/year (Seniors who started Dual English as a Junior)

Fall-ENGL 2322 & ECON 2301

Spring-ENGL 2323 & GOVT 2305

British Literature I and Macroeconomics

British Literature II and US Government

English IV

12 hours/year (Seniors who start Dual English as a Senior)

Fall-ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302

Spring - ENGL 2322 & ENGL 2322

English Composition I and II

British Literature  I and II

Independent Study in Mathematics

Math 1314

Functional Mathematics Approach to College Algebra

Government

Government 2305

US Government

Economics

Econ 2301

Principles of Macroeconomics

TEXAS VIRTUAL SCHOOL NETWORK

Texas Education Code 26.0031 requires that at the time and in the manner that a school district or open-enrollment charter school informs students and parents about courses that are offered in the district’s or school’s traditional classroom setting, the district or school shall notify parents and students of the option to enroll in a course offered through the state virtual school network under Chapter 30A.