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GATEWAY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

Advance Placement Civics/US Government 

PACING GUIDE

PURPOSE STATEMENT/PHILOSOPHY

This course will be open to high school students who have an interest in history, government, and politics. Enrollment is a full year Government course. Students

are expected to take the AP Exam near the completion of the course AP United States Government and Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes,

through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments. Summer work is required.

PACING GUIDE

Month

# Days

Standards

Strand

Skills

Content

Activities

(w/ Integration of Technology and Career Ready Practices)

Assessments

September

Constitutional Underpinnings of the United States Government

15

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

APGUS.1.A

APGUS.1.B

APGUS.1.C

APGUS.1.D

APGUS1.E

6.1.12.A.1.a

6.1.12.A.1.b

6.1.12.A.2.a

6.1.12.A.2.b

6.1.12.A.2.c

6.1.12.A.2.d

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Constitutional Underpinnings

Constitutional Underpinnings

Constitutional Underpinnings

Constitutional Underpinnings

Constitutional Underpinnings

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

Considerations that influenced the formation and adoption of the Constitution

Separation of Powers

Checks and Balances

Federalism

Theories of democratic government

Explain how British North American colonies adapted the British governance structure to fit their ideas of individual rights, economic growth, and participatory.

Analyze how gender, property ownership, religion, and legal status affected political rights.

Analyze the intellectual origins of the major ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

Evaluate the importance of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights to the spread of democracy around the world.

Compare and contrast state constitutions, including New Jersey’s 1776 constitution, with the United States Constitution, and determine their impact on the development of American constitutional government.

Compare and contrast the arguments of Federalists and Anti-Federalists during the ratification debates, and assess their continuing relevance.

In this unit, students will gain an understanding of the constitutional underpinnings of the United States Government. Students will interact with a variety of texts that influenced and focus on the unit theme, “The Constitution.”  We will review events and considerations that influenced the formation and adoption of the Constitution in the 1780’s. Additionally, we will examine three essential aspects of the Constitution: separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism.  We will also encounter selected theories of democratic government. [SC1]

Class debate regarding the strengths and weaknesses of small vs. large government

Tocqueville:  “Democracy in America” (CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.)

Constitutional Power Grab Simulation

Hofstadter:  “The American Political Tradition” (CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

Class review of the summer assessment and discussion on the importance of government maintaining order while ensuring the protection of rights. (CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.) (8.1.12.A.3  Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.)

Gonzalez v. Raich Research; Observe polls, charts, map of the public support of case (CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies). (8.1.12.A.4  Construct a spreadsheet workbook with multiple worksheets, rename tabs to reflect the data on the worksheet, and use mathematical or logical functions, charts and data from all worksheets to convey the results.

)

  • Summer assessment (Essay, Film Analysis, Scavenger Hunt)
  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Formative Assessment

October

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

20

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

APGUS.2.A

APGUS.2.B

APGUS.2.C

APGUS.2.D

APGUS.2.E

6.3.12.D.1

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

History, Culture, and Perspectives

. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

Beliefs that citizens hold about their government and its leaders

Processes by which citizens learn about politics

The nature, sources, and consequences of public opinion

The ways in which citizens vote and otherwise participate in political life

Factors that influence citizens to differ from one another in terms of political beliefs and behaviors

Analyze the impact of current governmental practices and laws affecting national security and/or individual civil rights/privacy.

In this unit, students will gain an understanding of the political nature of the United States.  Students should become familiar with the workings of the electoral process; the role of money and interest groups on campaigns; the laws governing elections; and the way individual campaigns operate on the local, state, and national level. [SC2] Examine contemporary news and Internet coverage and analysis of elections and campaigns. Engage in discussion of exit poll data. [SC9]

Take Political Compass Test/ Chart: Trust in Government (CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.) (8.1.12.A.4  Construct a spreadsheet workbook with multiple worksheets, rename tabs to reflect the data on the worksheet, and use mathematical or logical functions, charts and data from all worksheets to convey the results.)

“Speed Dating Activity” (CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence)

Formations of an Ideological Spectrum PPT and Discussion (CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.)

Observe OntheIssues.org for support (8.1.12.A.3  Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.)


“How do we vote” Activity based on different demographics

( CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

Classroom timeline on Disenfranchisement as a visual (CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.)

  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Homework Readings
  • Formative Assessment

November

Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Mass Media

15

APGUS.3.A.1-5

APGUS.3.C.1-3

APGUS.3.B.1-4

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

6.1.12.A.14.f

6.1.12.A.14.d

Political Parties and Elections

The Mass Media

Interest groups, including political action committees, PACs

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

1. Functions

2. Organization

3. Development

4.  Effects on the political process

5. Electoral laws and systems

1.The functions and structures of the news media

2.The impacts of the news media on politics

3.  The news media industry and its consequences

1.  The range of interests represented

2.  The activities of interest groups

3.  The effects of interest groups on the political process

4.  The unique characteristics and roles of PACs in the political process

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

Determine the extent to which nongovernmental organizations, special interest groups, third party political groups, and the media affect public policy.

Analyze the conflicting ideologies and actions of political parties regarding spending priorities, the role of government in the economy, and social reforms.

In this unit, students will gain an understanding of the Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Mass Media in the United States.  Students should understand the mechanisms of transmitting interests to government action, including interest groups, political action committees, and mass media; the role of media coverage and the press on elections and government actions; [SC3], [SC4] & [SC5] the different historical and ideological beliefs of political parties; demographic groups in the U.S. and their political beliefs; and ways of understanding political beliefs and behavior.

Research Proportional, National Bonus Plan, Congressional District, etc. ( CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies. ) (8.1.12.C.1  Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.)

Compare Pres. Candidate to National Platform Activity

 ( CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

Discussion: Campaign Finance Overview- Colbert SuperPAC video (8.1.12.A.3  Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.)

Article Analysis: Matt Bai, “How much has Citizens United changed the Political Game” (CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

Citizens United Debate

( CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.)

Political Driving Suits and Explain and Discuss Iron Triangles(CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

  • Campaign Presentations
  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Formal Assessment

December

Unit Title: Institutions of the National Government

Part 1: Congress

20

APGUS.4A-B

APGUS.4.C.1-5

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

Institutions of National Government

Institutions of National Government

 

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

A.  The major formal and informal institutional arrangements of power

B.  Relationships among these four institutions and varying balances of power.

C.  Linkages between institutions and the following:

1.  Public Opinion and voters

2.  Interest groups

3.  Political parties

4.  The media

5.  State and local governments

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

Students should understand the workings of the legislative process; the functions and powers of Congress; the relationship to other branches of government under the Constitution; and the change and evolution of congressional powers as a result of specific events in American history. [SC6]

Article Analysis on following:

Mayhew, “Congress: The Electoral Connection”

Starobin, “Pork: A Time-Honored Tradition Lives On”

Price, “The Congressional Experience”

“Why Woodrow Wilson Hated the Filibuster”

(CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

Model Congress Research

& Model Congress Bill Development ( CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies. ) (8.1.12.E.1  Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.)

Model Congress Floor Debate and Markup/ Class Discussion

( CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.)

  • Model Congress Evaluation
  • Moot Court Evaluations
  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Formative Assessment

January

Unit Title: Institutions of the National Government

Part 2: President and Bureaucracy

20

APGUS.4A-B

APGUS.4.C.1-5

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

Institutions of National Government

Linkages between institutions and the following:

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

A.  The major formal and informal institutional arrangements of power

B.  Relationships among these four institutions and varying balances of power.

1.  Public opinion and voters

2.  Interest Groups

3.  Political Parties

4.  The media

5.  State and local governments

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

Students should understand the functions and powers of the executive branch; its relationship to other branches of government under the Constitution; the changes and evolution of the executive branch and the bureaucracy as a result of specific events in American history; the relationship between the national government and state and local government bureaucracies; and the role of the bureaucracy in formulating a budget. [SC6]

Discussion: Presidential Approval Rating, Presidential Impeachments, and Signing Statements ( CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.)

Article Analysis:

“Presidential Pen is Still Mighty” ( CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

Presidential Approval Rating Project (8.1.12.E.1  Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.)

Bureaucracy Debate: Bloated/Too Much? ( CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.)

  • Presidential Approval and Bureaucracy Presentations
  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Formative Assessments

February

Unit Title: Institutions of the National Government

Part 3: The Judiciary

20

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

APGUS.4A-B

APGUS.4.C.1-5

6.1.12.A.14.1

6.3.12.A.1

6.1.12.A.13.b

6.1.12.A.16.c

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Institutions of National Government

Linkages between institutions and the following:

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

A.  The major formal and informal institutional arrangements of power

B.  Relationships among these four institutions and varying balances of power.

1.  Public opinion and voters

2.  Interest Groups

3.  Political Parties

4.  The media

5.  State and local governments

Evaluate the effectiveness of the checks and balances system in preventing one branch of national government from usurping too much power during contemporary times.

Develop a plan for public accountability and transparency in government related to a particular issue (s) and share plan with the appropriate government officials.

Analyze the effectiveness of national legislation, policies, and Supreme Court decisions (i.e., the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, the Equal Rights Amendment, Title VII, Title IX, Affirmative Action, Brown v. Board of Education, and Roe v. Wade) in promoting civil liberties and equal opportunities.

Analyze government efforts to address intellectual property rights, personal privacy, and other ethical issues in science, medicine, and business that arise from the global use of new technologies.

Students should understand the workings of the judicial process; the functions and powers of the federal court system; the relationship of the Supreme Court to other branches of the government under the Constitution; and the change and evolution of the judiciary as a result of specific events in American history [SC6]

Judicial Activism vs. Judicial Restraint: Write an accurate, well-reasoned and organized argument using supporting case evidence (8.1.12.E.1  Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.) (CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

Generate an interview of past justices by creating video using: Research (8.1.12.C.1  Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.) (CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. )

Moot Court Research (CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies)

  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Formative Assessment

March

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

15

APGUS.6A-B

6.1.12.A.14.a-h

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

6.1.12.A.2.A

6.1.12.A.2.d

6.1.12.A.16.b

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

A.  The development of civil liberties and civil rights by judicial

B.  Knowledge of substantive rights and liberties

a. Evaluate the effectiveness of the checks and balances system in preventing one branch of national government from usurping too much power during contemporary times.

b.  Analyze how the Supreme Court has interpreted the Constitution to define the rights of the individual, and evaluate the impact of public policies.

c.  Assess the merit and effectiveness of recent legislation in addressing the health, welfare, and citizenship status of individuals and groups

d.  Analyze conflicting ideologies and actions of political parties regarding spending priorities, the role of government in the economy, and social reforms.

e.  Evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of the process by which national, state, and local officials are elected and vote on issues of public concern.

f.  Determine the extent to which nongovernmental organizations, special interest groups, third party political groups, and the media affect public policy.

g.  Analyze the impact of community groups and state policies that strive to increase the youth vote (i.e., distribution of voter registration forms in high schools)

h.  Assess the effectiveness of government policies in balancing the rights of the individual against the need for national security.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

Assess the importance of the intellectual origins of the Foundational Documents (i.e., Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and Bill of Rights) and assess their importance on the spread of democracy around the world.

Explain how judicial review made the Supreme Court an influential branch of government, and assess the continuing impact of the Supreme Court today.

Analyze the government efforts to address intellectual property rights, personal privacy, and other ethical issues in science, medicine, and business that arise from the global use of new technologies.

We will familiarize ourselves with the rights and liberties of the American people. It is an examination of the Constitutional, historical, and philosophical underpinnings of those freedoms, the government institutions that define and uphold them, the laws and policy mechanisms that apply them, and the role they play in the American political system. It is an examination of the Bill of Rights and attending Constitutional Amendments, legislation, and federal and state court rulings. If the preceding units are the means of the American political system, civil rights and liberties are their end.

Provide video instruction of the actions of protections against abusive power.

Debate the Patriot Act.

Selective Incorporation: Moot Court Session

Develop class civil rights timeline.

  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Student-generated video
  • Formative Assessment

April

Unit 6: Public Policy

15

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

APGUS5.A-D

APGUS5.E.6

6.1.12.A.14.b-e

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Public Policy

Linages between policy processes and the following:

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

A.  Policymaking in a federal system

B.  The formation of policy agendas

C.  The role of institutions in the enactment of policy

D.  The role of bureaucracy and the courts in policy implementation and interpretation.

Policy Networks

b.  Analyze how the Supreme Court has interpreted the Constitution to define the rights of the individual, and evaluate the impact of public policies.

c.  Assess the merit and effectiveness of recent legislation in addressing the health, welfare, and citizenship status of individuals and groups

d.  Analyze conflicting ideologies and actions of political parties regarding spending priorities, the role of government in the economy, and social reforms.

e.  Evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of the process by which national, state, and local officials are elected and vote on issues of public concern.

This unit's focus is on public policy, what and who influences, how its implementation affects Americans. Students engage in in-depth examination of how policy agendas are formed, how these agendas are advocated by interest groups and politicians, how they are enacted by Congress and the President, and the methods by which they are carried out by the federal bureaucracy and enforced by the courts. By the end of this unit students are able to better understand the impact that federalism, interest groups, political parties, and elections have on policy-making.

Small research project on personal budget

“Bad Money” by Phillips (CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies)

Budget Hero Simulation http://www.marketplace.org/topics/economy/budget-hero 

(8.1.12.E.1  Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.) (CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee. )

Debate contributing factors to poverty in the United States, Propose solutions for “fixing poverty” ( CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason. )

Observe timeline of past social welfare programs; Case study on FDRs New Deal

Moot Court: Constitutionality of the War Powers Act

Holyk, "Drones, Gitmo, and Drawdown Give Obama Foreign Policy Cred," ABC News  (CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.)

Jigsaw Activity on Presidential Candidates  (CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation. )

  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Moot Court Sessions
  • Debate Research
  • Formative Assessments

May

        

Course Review

10

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1-3

ELA Literacy.RH.11-12.4-6

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7-9

APGUS.2.A

APGUS.2.B

APGUS.2.C

APGUS.2.D

APGUS.2.E

APGUS.3.A.1-5

APGUS.3.C.1-3

APGUS.3.B.1-4

APGUS.4A-B

APGUS.4.C.1-5

APGUS.6A-B

6.1.12.A.14.a-6.1.12.A.14.h

Key Ideas and Details

Craft and Structure

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Political Parties and Elections

The Mass Media

Interest groups, including political action committees, PACs

Institutions of National Government

Linkages between institutions and the following:

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g. how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (eg., visually, quantitatively, as well as  in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

Beliefs that citizens hold about their government and its leaders

Processes by which citizens learn about politics

The nature, sources, and consequences of public opinion

The ways in which citizens vote and otherwise participate in political life

Factors that influence citizens to differ from one another in terms of political beliefs and behaviors

1. Functions

2. Organization

3. Development

4.  Effects on the political process

5. Electoral laws and systems

1.The functions and structures of the news media

2.The impacts of the news media on politics

3.  The news media industry and its consequences

1.  The range of interests represented

2.  The activities of interest groups

3.  The effects of interest groups on the political process

4.  The unique characteristics and roles of PACs in the political process

A.  The major formal and informal institutional arrangements of power

B.  Relationships among these four institutions and varying balances of power.

1.  Public opinion and voters

2.  Interest Groups

3.  Political Parties

4.  The media

5.  State and local governments

A.  The development of civil liberties and civil rights by judicial

B.  Knowledge of substantive rights and liberties

a. Evaluate the effectiveness of the checks and balances system in preventing one branch of national government from usurping too much power during contemporary times

b.  Analyze how the Supreme Court has interpreted the Constitution to define the rights of the individual, and evaluate the impact of public policies.

c.  Assess the merit and effectiveness of recent legislation in addressing the health, welfare, and citizenship status of individuals and groups

d.  Analyze conflicting ideologies and actions of political parties regarding spending priorities, the role of government in the economy, and social reforms.

e.  Evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of the process by which national, state, and local officials are elected and vote on issues of public concern.

Course Review Guide

Kahoot! Review Games

CNN Cram for the US

  • Practice AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • Practice AP style Free Response essays

2nd week of May

Exam

May/June

        

Post-Test

25

APGUS5.A-D

APGUS5.E.6

6.1.12.A.14.b-e

Public Policy

Linages between policy processes and the following:

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

A.  Policymaking in a federal system

B.  The formation of policy agendas

C.  The role of institutions in the enactment of policy

D.  The role of bureaucracy and the courts in policy implementation and interpretation.

Policy networks

b.  Analyze how the Supreme Court has interpreted the Constitution to define the rights of the individual, and evaluate the impact of public policies.

c.  Assess the merit and effectiveness of recent legislation in addressing the health, welfare, and citizenship status of individuals and groups

d.  Analyze conflicting ideologies and actions of political parties regarding spending priorities, the role of government in the economy, and social reforms.

e.  Evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of the process by which national, state, and local officials are elected and vote on issues of public concern.

f.  Determine the extent to which nongovernmental organizations, special interest groups, third party political groups, and the media affect public policy.

h.  Assess the effectiveness of government policies in balancing the rights of the individual against the need for national security.

Analyze “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”

School Trip to Washington, D.C.

Course Test/Reflection

Current Event Presentations: Current Scandals, Influences, and Make Predictions

Research Paper

Formative Assessment



 GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN

Content Area: AP Government and Politics

Unit Title: Constitutional Underpinnings of the United States Government

Timeframe: 15 days

Lesson Components

UNIT SUMMARY

In this unit, students will gain an understanding of the constitutional underpinnings of the United States Government. Students will interact with a variety of texts that influenced and focus on the unit theme, “The Constitution.”  We will review events and considerations that influenced the formation and adoption of the Constitution in the 1780’s. Additionally, we will examine three essential aspects of the Constitution: separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism.  We will also encounter selected theories of democratic government. [SC1]

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

How have theory, conflict, and compromise influenced the U. S. constitutional system?

How have constitutional and political developments affected public policy today?

Is federalism a viable form of government today?

Is the concept of “separation of powers” a reality today?

The founding fathers used the ideas of Enlightenment philosophers to develop a new system for exercising political power.

The American system of government creates a balance between government authority and individual liberty through the use of a system of checks and balances and federalism.

21st Century Themes

Global Awareness: Understanding and analysis of relations between various groups of people and how these relations affect American Government and Politics. Understanding psychological explanations for human behavior at it applies to American Government and Politics.

Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy: Analysis of public, private, and national, and international economies and how these impact American Government and Politics.

Civic Literacy: Acquire the skills needed to be active, informed citizens who value diversity and promote cultural understanding by working collaboratively to address the challenges that are inherent in living in an interconnected world.

Health Literacy: Understanding how knowledge of factors affecting human health has affected American Government and Politics.

21st Century Skills

Creativity and Innovation:. Developing research based arguments in support of a thesis, like the debate on small vs. large government.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving:  Writing well focused responses to free response questions utilizing knowledge and analysis of prompt materials (Foundational documents)

Communication and Collaboration: Form a debate team and generate a strategic plan in collaborative groups for debate topics.

Information Literacy: Evaluates information in the sources presented and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system. Free Response Samples will provide opportunities for this.

Media Literacy: Understand the complex messages observed for classroom discussion through television, radio, Internet, newspapers, magazines, books, billboards, video games, music, and any other forms of media.

ICT Literacy-Information, Communications and Technology:  Utilize Google Classroom to access materials (videos, documents, articles) to extend classroom discussion.

Life and Career Skills: Apply ability to serve roles on a team and collaborate in several activities in this unit.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment

  • Summer assessment (Essay, Film Analysis, Scavenger Hunt-Constitution is broken down in a packet to help gain a basis of understanding for Unit 1 ahead of in-class instruction)
  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Homework Readings
  • Vocabulary Quizzes

Integration of Technology:

  • Simulations, PowerPoint Presentations, Availability of Google Classroom Resources

Materials/Equipment: Handouts, texts, articles, YLI Resources, AP Central Resources

Goals/Objectives

Students will:

CPI#

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

(Interdisciplinary Connections; Technology;

Integration of 21st Century Skills)

 Assessment Tasks

(More on the summative side)

  1. Practice and Grade FRQ in Ice Breaker Activity.

Read Aloud while Grading with rubric based on Pairs

Rubrics

  1. Examine Political Power and give examples of the exercise of Political Power.

Group Discussion in U seating

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs.1-10

  1. Examine Democracy and Republican Government and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of these forms of government.

Class debate regarding the strengths and weaknesses of small vs. large government

Tocqueville:  “Democracy in America”

Lanahan Reading Questions

  1. Examine different views of political power and the decision-making in “who governs.”

Constitutional Power Grab Simulation

Hofstadter:  “The American Political Tradition”

Vocabulary Quiz,  Textbook pgs 11-20

  1. Define political agenda and identify which groups have the most influence developing agendas.

Debate the War Powers Act- 2 days

http://208.81.226.245/central/lesson_plans/465?_yli_session=1d42e23d05be3fef1fc17ab9fd1b3b9e

Lanahan Reading Questions

  1. Debate American Federalism and Nationalism through the given list of recent federal mandates.

SAS in Schools-  Analyze the Response to Hurricane Floyd (Federalism) 1 day

Madison: Federalist 10

Cornell Notes,  Textbook pgs 23-33

  1. List the contributions of influential Enlightenment Philosophers and explain the impact of Enlightenment Philosophy on the creation of the Declaration of Independence, State Constitutions, Articles of Confederation.

Class review of the summer assessment and discussion on the importance of government maintaining order while ensuring the protection of rights.

Vocabulary Quiz

  1. Examine how the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation led to the arguments and decisions made at the Constitutional Convention.

Simulation that requires students to assume the roles of delegates at the Constitutional Convention and to make opening arguments in favor of the Bill of Rights.

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs 33-43

  1. Identify the different views on Constitutional Reform post-convention.

Write newspaper articles from the Federalist and Anti-Federalist perspective.

Madison: Federalist 51

Develop a newspaper that defends the points expressed by both Federalist and Anti-Federalists.

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs 50-60

  1. Analyze and predict outcomes of federalism cases in Supreme Court.

Gonzalez v. Raich Research; Observe polls, charts, map of the public support of case

  1. Connect the key principles of the Constitution to current events in American government and politics today.

Current Event Analysis

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs  60-73

  1. Assess the content obtained over the course of the unit.

Test Materials generated from Past AP tests

Unit Exam

MC 50 Questions

2 Free Response Questions

Differentiation/Adaptations/Modifications:

  •   Simulations offer students who are hands-on learners rather than traditional instructional approach.
  •   Resources can also be found electronically on Google Classroom.
  • Unit “Roadmap” is handed out at the beginning of every unit to help all students plan their individual approach.

Resources Provided

  • Lanahan Readings in American Polity 5th Ed
  • Federalist 10 (pg. 56), Federalist 51 (pg. 97), “Who Governs?” by  Robert Dahl (pg. 88) , “American Federalism” by Elazar (pg 124)
  • American Government: Institutions and Policies by Wilson, Dilulio, and Bose
  • Video Republic v Democracy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdS6fyUIklI

  • Video Basic Forms of Government

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klm6yZxDmJc

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.5

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6

Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8

Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

6.1.12.A.1.a

Explain how British North American colonies adapted the British governance structure to fit their ideas of individual rights, economic growth, and participatory government.

6.1.12.A.1.b

Analyze how gender, property ownership, religion, and legal status affected political rights.                                                             

6.1.12.A.2.a

Analyze the intellectual origins of the major ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence.                                                                                                                          

6.1.12.A.2.b

Evaluate the importance of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights to the spread of democracy around the world.                                                                                                                          

6.1.12.A.2.c

Compare and contrast state constitutions, including New Jersey’s 1776 constitution, with the United States Constitution, and determine their impact on the development of American constitutional government.                                                                                                                          

6.1.12.A.2.d

Compare and contrast the arguments of Federalists and Anti-Federalists during the ratification debates, and assess their continuing relevance.   

SC1

This course provides instruction in constitutional underpinnings of the United States Government.

SC11

This course provides supplemental readings included including primary source materials.

SC12

The course includes supplemental readings, including contemporary news analyses that strengthen

student understanding of the curriculum

SC13

The course requires students to answer analytical and interpretive free response questions on a

frequent basis

CRP12.1

Career-ready individuals positively contribute to every team, whether formal or informal. They apply an awareness of cultural difference to avoid barriers to productive and positive interaction. They find ways to increase the engagement and contribution of all team members. They plan and facilitate effective team meetings.

 GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN

Content Area: AP Government and Politics

Unit Title: Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Timeframe: 15 days

Lesson Components

UNIT SUMMARY

In this unit, students will gain an understanding of the political nature of the United States.  Students should become familiar with the workings of the electoral process; the role of money and interest groups on campaigns; the laws governing elections; and the way individual campaigns operate on the local, state, and national level. [SC2] Examine contemporary news and Internet coverage and analysis of elections and campaigns. Engage in discussion of exit poll data. [SC9]

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

How does the American “mosaic” define our political beliefs and shape our political behaviors?

Individuals engage in multiple forms of political participation, including voting, protest, and mass movements.

Political beliefs and behaviors are influenced by family, school, media, race, gender, and geography.

21st Century Themes

Global Awareness: Understanding and analysis of relations between various groups of people and how these relations affect American Government and Politics. Understanding psychological explanations for human behavior at it applies to American Government and Politics.

Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy: Analysis of public, private, and national, and international economies and how these impact American Government and Politics.

Civic Literacy: Acquire the skills needed to be active, informed citizens who value diversity and promote cultural understanding by working collaboratively to address the challenges that are inherent in living in an interconnected world.

Health Literacy: Understanding how knowledge of factors affecting human health has affected American Government and Politics.

21st Century Skills

Creativity and Innovation:. Developing research based arguments in support of a thesis, like political spectrum activity.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving:  Writing well focused responses to free response questions utilizing knowledge and analysis of prompt materials.

Communication and Collaboration: Form a debate team and generate a strategic plan in collaborative groups for debate topics.

Information Literacy: Evaluates information in the sources presented and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system. Free Response Samples will provide opportunities for this.

Media Literacy: Understand the complex messages observed for classroom discussion through television, radio, Internet, newspapers, magazines, books, billboards, video games, music, and any other forms of media. Charts will be presented and analyzed through PEW Research resources.

ICT Literacy-Information, Communications and Technology:  Utilize Google Classroom to access materials (videos, documents, articles) to extend classroom discussion. Students will utilize sites presenting statistics and identify bias.

Life and Career Skills: Apply ability to serve roles on a team and collaborate in several activities in this unit.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment

  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Homework Readings
  • Vocabulary Quizzes

Integration of Technology:

  • Simulations, PowerPoint Presentations, Availability of Google Classroom Resources

Materials/Equipment: Handouts, texts, articles, YLI Resources, AP Central Resources

Goals/Objectives

Students will:

CPI#

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

(Interdisciplinary Connections; Technology;

Integration of 21st Century Skills)

 Assessment Tasks

(More on the summative side)

  1. Define public opinion, and identify at least two ways public opinion impacts government actions.

Take Political Compass Test/ Chart: Trust in Government

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs.77-86

  1. Compare survey results to classmates in Spectrum activity.

“Speed Dating Activty” 2 minutes per pair to gain knowledge of where the student is on the political spectrum/ Class discussion and gain visual by seating arrangement

Warm-up Sheet

  1. Evaluate how the political socialization process shapes political attitudes, opinions, and behavior; explain the impact of demographic characteristics on political behavior.

Formations of an Ideological Spectrum PPT and Discussion

Observe OntheIssues.org for support

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs.86-94

  1. Analyze factors that determine political participation.

Public Opinion/ Political Socialization PPT and Discussion

Video from PEW Research

Warm-up Sheet

  1. Describe three forms of social media, and explain how social media can shape political decisions or events.

Vocabulary Quiz

“Regular Votes, Intermittent Voters, and Those Who Don’t” Reading

“Where do you get your news from?” Discussion

Vocab Quiz

Lanahan Reading Questions

  1. Debate the impact of race/gender/ socioeconomic status on political philosophy.

Structured Debate format

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs.153-164

  1. Discuss the factors that influence voting turnout in the United States, and compare American voting turnout to that of other nations.

“How do we vote” Activity based on different demographics

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs. 164-168

  1. Describe the historical restrictions on the vote in the United States, and explain how these restrictions have been ended.

Classroom timeline on Disenfranchisement as a visual

Lanahan Reading Questions

  1. Evaluate the impact of the mechanics and technology of voting on voting turnout, vote fraud, and the ability of citizens to trust the process.

CNN FYI article, “Understanding Public Opinion Polls”

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs. 172-179

Vocabulary Quiz

  1. Research given election coalitions and formulate presentation for the class.

Plan provided and student pair up/ Google Slides will allow students to edit the document and work in team based scenario

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs.179-184

  1. Analyze and grade FRQ based on rubric with grading team.

Sample FRQs given by AP Central and analyze

Used rubrics

  1. Instruct the class with your presentation based on research on election coalitions.

Serve the role as the teacher of the classroom with your project partner

Cornell Notes, Textbook pgs. 245-247

  1. Assess the information obtained throughout the unit on Political Behavior.

Test Materials generated from Past AP tests

Unit Exam

MC 50 Questions

2 Free Response Questions

Differentiation/Adaptations/Modifications:

  •   Simulations offer students who are hands-on learners rather than traditional instructional approach.
  •   Resources can also be found electronically on Google Classroom.
  • Unit “Roadmap” is handed out at the beginning of every unit to help all students plan their approach.

Resources Provided

  • Lanahan Readings in American Polity 5th Ed
  • YLI Resources
  • Five Myths About Turning Out the Vote by The Washington Post
  • Readings: “Regular Votges, Intermittent Voters, and Those Who Don’t”, “Direct Democracy”, “One Nation Slightly Divisible”
  • American Government: Institutions and Policies by Wilson, Dilulio, and Bose
  • Election Results with Electoral Vote Map on Various Resources

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.5

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6

Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8

Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

8.1.12.C.1

Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

CRP11

Utilize technology to enhance productivity.

CRP8

Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

APGUS.2.A

Beliefs that citizens hold about their government and its leaders

APGUS.2.B

Processes by which citizens learn about politics

APGUS.2.C

The nature, sources, and consequences of public opinion

APGUS.2.D

The ways in which citizens vote and otherwise participate in political life

APGUS.2.E

Factors that influence citizens to differ from one another in terms of political beliefs and behaviors

6.3.12.D.1

Analyze the impact of current governmental practices and laws affecting national security and/or individual civil rights/ privacy.

SC11

This course provides supplemental readings included including primary source materials.

SC12

The course includes supplemental readings, including contemporary news analyses that strengthen

student understanding of the curriculum

SC13

The course requires students to answer analytical and interpretive free response questions on a

frequent basis

 GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN

Content Area: AP Government and Politics

Unit Title:  Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Mass Media

Timeframe: 15 days

Lesson Components

UNIT SUMMARY

In this unit, students will gain an understanding of the Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Mass Media in the United States.  Students should understand the mechanisms of transmitting interests to government action, including interest groups, political action committees, and mass media; the role of media coverage and the press on elections and government actions; [SC3], [SC4] & [SC5] the different historical and ideological beliefs of political parties; demographic groups in the U.S. and their political beliefs; and ways of understanding political beliefs and behavior.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

Is the political party an effective linkage institution?

Why is there a proliferation of interest groups in the United States?

What is the role of the media as a linkage institution?

The students will understand that citizens organize and communicate their interests in a variety of ways including political parties, elections, political action committees, interest groups and the media.

21st Century Themes

Global Awareness: Understanding and analysis of relations between various groups of people and how these relations affect American Government and Politics. Understanding psychological explanations for human behavior at it applies to American Government and Politics.

Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy: Analysis of public, private, and national, and international economies and how these impact American Government and Politics.

Civic Literacy: Acquire the skills needed to be active, informed citizens who value diversity and promote cultural understanding by working collaboratively to address the challenges that are inherent in living in an interconnected world.

Health Literacy: Understanding how knowledge of factors affecting human health has affected American Government and Politics.

21st Century Skills

Creativity and Innovation:. Developing research based arguments in support of a thesis, like the Electoral College and political parties.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving:  Writing well focused responses to free response questions utilizing knowledge and analysis of prompt materials.

Communication and Collaboration: Form a debate team and generate a strategic plan in collaborative groups for debate topics.

Information Literacy: Evaluates information in the sources presented and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system. Free Response Samples will provide opportunities for this.

Media Literacy: Evaluate the importance of the media’s influence in the political process. Understand the complex messages observed for classroom discussion through television, radio, Internet, newspapers, magazines, books, billboards, video games, music, and any other forms of media.

ICT Literacy-Information, Communications and Technology:  Utilize Google Classroom to access materials (videos, documents, articles) to extend classroom discussion. Students will use Google Slides to generate presentation for the rest of the class.

Life and Career Skills: Apply ability to serve roles on a team and collaborate in several activities in this unit.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment

  • Campaign Presentations
  • Poster Activities
  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Homework Readings
  • Vocabulary Quizzes

Integration of Technology:

  • Simulations, PowerPoint Presentations, Availability of Google Classroom Resources,  Using Living Room Candidate website for visual research in activity

Materials/Equipment: Handouts, texts, articles, YLI Resources, AP Central Resources, Living Room Candidate website

Goals/Objectives

Students will:

CPI#

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

(Interdisciplinary Connections; Technology;

Integration of 21st Century Skills)

 Assessment Tasks

(More on the summative side)

  1. Summarize the American electoral system on all governmental levels.

Revisit Federalist 10 [SC11]

189-198

Cornell Notes

  1. Debate the effectiveness and fairness of the Electoral College system.

Research Proportional, National Bonus Plan, Congressional District, etc.

198-206

Screenshot of Redistricting Game

Cornell Notes

  1. Explain the function, structure, and development of Political Parties.

Michael Simons, “Redistricting, Why should you care?”  

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Share your findings on our two party system.

Why 2 Parties? Think, Pair, and Share Discussion

Vocab Quiz

 211-215, 219-223

Cornell Notes/ Vocab Quiz

  1. Create posters that break down the dynamic of specific political parties.

Incumbency Advantage Discussion, Begin Political Party Posters

223-233

Completed Poster

  1. Explain the major differences in the demographics of the supporters of Republicans and Democrats, and discuss how their policy positions differ today.

Compare Pres. Candidate to National Platform Activity Research Day

233-237

Cornell Notes

  1. Define an interest group, and explain the constitutional and political reasons why so many groups are found in the United States.

Introduce Interest Groups- Types, Structure, and Discuss two Interest Group Articles

252-263

Cornell Notes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the evolution of campaign finance regulation, the development of political action committees (PACs) and the current state of such regulation.

Campaign Finance Overview- Colbert SuperPAC video

Matt Bai, “How much has Citizens United changed the Political Game”

263-273

Lanahan Readings and Questions

Cornell Notes

  1. Debate the “Citizens United” Ruling in relation to campaign finance.

Citizens United Debate

237-241, 241-249

Debate Research

Cornell Notes

  1. Generate a visual displaying those involved in campaign finance in a more modern outlook.

Political Driving Suits and Explain and Discuss Iron Triangles

277-282

Driving Suits completed

Cornell Notes

  1. Judge the fairness of the current voting system and relate to instances today.

Making it Easier to Vote vs. Guarding against Election Fraud - Vocab Quiz

282-292

Cornell Notes

  1. Synthesize the outlook on certain topics over the course of time using political ads.

Political Ad Project

Use Living Room Candidate for commercials

292-298

Presentation in selected format

Cornell Notes

  1. Evaluate the role of the media and identify bias in certain presented scenarios.

Media Conglomeration Discussion/ Stanley Article Discussion

Alessandra Stanley, “No Jokes or Spin. It’s Time (Gasp) to Talk”

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Assess the content obtained over the course of the unit.

Test Materials generated from Past AP tests

Unit Exam

MC 50 Questions

2 Free Response Questions

Differentiation/Adaptations/Modifications:

  •   Simulations offer students who are hands-on learners rather than traditional instructional approach.
  •   Resources can also be found electronically on Google Classroom.
  • Unit “Roadmap” is handed out at the beginning of every unit to help all students plan their individual approach.
  • Students provided with multiple choices based on interests throughout the unit.

Resources Provided

  • Lanahan Readings in American Polity 5th Ed
  • Alessandra Stanley, “No Jokes or Spin. It’s Time (Gasp) to Talk”,  Matt Bai, “How much has Citizens United changed the Political Game”,  Richard Skinner, “More than Money”,  Michael Simons, “Redistricting, Why should you care?”  
  • American Government: Institutions and Policies by Wilson, Dilulio, and Bose

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.5

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6

Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8

Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

8.1.12.C.1

Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

CRP11

Utilize technology to enhance productivity.

CRP8

Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

SC11

This course provides supplemental readings included including primary source materials.

SC12

The course includes supplemental readings, including contemporary news analyses that strengthen

student understanding of the curriculum

SC13

The course requires students to answer analytical and interpretive free response questions on a

frequent basis

CRP7

Employ valid and reliable research strategies

APGUS.3.A.1-5

Functions, Organization, Development, Effects of political process, and electoral laws and systems

APGUS.3.C.1-3

The functions and structures of the news media, the impacts of the news media on politics, and the news media industry and its consequences

APGUS.3.B.1-4

The activities of interest groups, the effects of interest groups on the political process, the unique characteristics and roles of PACs in the political process, and the range of interests represented

6.1.12.A.14.f

Determine the extent to which nongovernmental organizations, special interest groups, third party political groups, and the media affect public policy.

6.1.12.A.14.d

Analyze the conflicting ideologies and actions of political parties regarding spending priorities, the role of government in the economy, and social reforms.

 GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN

Content Area: AP Government and Politics

Unit Title: Institutions of the National Government

Part 1: Congress

Part 2: President and Bureaucracy

Part 3: The Judiciary

Timeframe: 60 days (3 parts/tests)

Lesson Components

UNIT SUMMARY

Students should understand the workings of the legislative process; the functions and powers of Congress; the relationship to other branches of government under the Constitution; and the change and evolution of congressional powers as a result of specific events in American history. [SC6]

Students should understand the functions and powers of the executive branch; its relationship to other branches of government under the Constitution; the changes and evolution of the executive branch and the bureaucracy as a result of specific events in American history; the relationship between the national government and state and local government bureaucracies; and the role of the bureaucracy in formulating a budget. [SC6]

Students should understand the workings of the judicial process; the functions and powers of the federal court system; the relationship of the Supreme Court to other branches of the government under the Constitution; and the change and evolution of the judiciary as a result of specific events in American history [SC6]

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

Has the presidency, as an institution, become too powerful?

Is there effective legislative oversight of the bureaucracy?  Where does the “real” work of Congress occur?

How does the organization of the three branches of government affect legislation and policy interpretation?

Power balances and relationships between institutions of government (formal and informal) may evolve gradually or change dramatically as a result of crises.

21st Century Themes

Global Awareness: Understanding and analysis of relations between various groups of people and how these relations affect American Government and Politics. Understanding psychological explanations for human behavior at it applies to American Government and Politics.

Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy: Analysis of public, private, and national, and international economies and how these impact American Government and Politics.

Civic Literacy: Acquire the skills needed to be active, informed citizens who value diversity and promote cultural understanding by working collaboratively to address the challenges that are inherent in living in an interconnected world.

Health Literacy: Understanding how knowledge of factors affecting human health has affected American Government and Politics.

21st Century Skills

Creativity and Innovation:. Developing research based arguments in support of a thesis, like the bureaucracy and presidential approval activities.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving:  Writing well focused responses to free response questions utilizing knowledge and analysis of prompt materials.

Communication and Collaboration: Students will collaborate in teams during simulations like Model Congress and Mock Trials.

Information Literacy: Evaluates information in the sources presented and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system. Free Response Samples will provide opportunities for this.

Media Literacy: Understand the complex messages observed for classroom discussion through television, radio, Internet, newspapers, magazines, books, billboards, video games, music, and any other forms of media.

ICT Literacy-Information, Communications and Technology:  Utilize Google Classroom to access materials (videos, documents, articles) to extend classroom discussion.

Life and Career Skills: Apply ability to serve roles on a team and collaborate in several activities in this unit.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment

  • Model Congress Evaluation
  • Moot Court Evaluations
  • Presidential Approval and Bureaucracy Presentations
  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Homework Readings
  • Vocabulary Quizzes

Integration of Technology:

  • Simulations, PowerPoint Presentations, Availability of Google Classroom Resources, List of online resources for projects

Materials/Equipment: Handouts, texts, articles, YLI Resources, AP Central Resources

Goals/Objectives

Students will:

CPI#

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

(Interdisciplinary Connections; Technology;

Integration of 21st Century Skills)

 Assessment Tasks

(More on the summative side)

  1. Explain the differences between the House of Representatives and the Senate with regard to their constituencies, terms of office, powers and political processes.

Evolution of Congress PPT

Overview of Congress

303-311

Cornell Notes

  1. Evaluate the benefits of incumbents in Congressional elections.

Incumbency Advantage

Mayhew, “Congress: The Electoral Connection”

311-315

Lanahan Readings and Questions

Cornell Notes

  1. Describe the major powers of the Congress as granted by the U.S.Constitution.

Powers of Congress

Leadership in Congress

Vocab Quiz

Vocab Quiz

  1. Demonstrate how a bill becomes a law and explain how the different processes in the House and the Senate have an impact legislating.

Influences on Congress

How a Bill Becomes a Law

Starobin, “Pork: A Time-Honored Tradition Lives On”

316-322

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Discuss the importance of committees to the lawmaking process and to the ability of members of the Congress to do their jobs.

Committee System

Price, “The Congressional Experience”

322-325

Lanahan Readings and Questions

Cornell Notes

  1. Provide modern examples of both pork and filibuster and explain how both are utilized in modern politics.

Pork and the Filibuster

“Why Woodrow Wilson Hated the Filibuster”

325-330

Lanahan Readings and Questions

Cornell Notes

  1. Break down and grade a sample FRQ using the AP given rubric.

FRQ Breakdown

Group Grading

330-335

Student Rubrics

  1. Assign and research roles for model Congress. Develop a pet project.

Model Congress Research (2 days)

Federalist 55, Federalist 57

Cornell Notes

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Formulate a proper bill by utilizing the facts and statistics compiled from committee work.

Model Congress Bill Development

Cornell Notes

Congress Packet

  1. Debate class bills on the floor in Model Congress.

Model Congress Floor Debate and Markup/ Class Discussion

Cornell Notes

Congress Packet

  1. Review key terms from throughout the unit relating to Congress.

Vocabulary Jeopardy Review

Vocab Quiz/ Correct

Review

Vocab Quiz

  1. Assess the content obtained over the course of the unit on Congress.

Test Materials generated from Past AP tests

Unit Exam

MC 50 Questions

2 Free Response Questions

  1. Explain the formal and informal roles played by the president and discuss the constitutional or political origins of those roles.

Intro to the President- Constitutional Qualifications, Regulations, and Roles

Barber, “Presidential Character”

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Analyze the presidential powers in relation to our break down of the Constitution.

Presidential Power to Say NO!

339-349

Cornell Notes

  1. Explain factors that appreciate or depreciate presidential approval ratings.

Presidential Approval Rating, Presidential Impeachments, and Signing Statements

“Presidential Pen is Still Mighty”

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Research and analyze the approval ratings of past presidential era.

Presidential Approval Rating Project (2 days of research)

349-360

Cornell Notes

  1. Present your findings on your specific presidential era to the class.

Presidential Approval Rating Project Presentation

“Federalist #57”

360-368

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Describe the job of the vice president, and explain the circumstances under which the vice president becomes president.

The Vice President, Presidential Succession, and the White House Staff

Warm Up Response

  1. Describe the executive offices that support the president.

The Executive Branch: Foundation, Growth, and Today

Vocab Quiz

368-374

Vocab Quiz

Cornell Notes

  1. Define the concept of the bureaucracy, and explain why such organization is necessary.

Bureaucratic Oversight and Constraints

379-388

Warm-up Response

  1. Compare the structure and function of executive departments, executive agencies, independent regulatory agencies, and government corporations.

Bureaucracy Debate: Bloated/Too Much? (2 days)

388-402

Debate Research

  1. Assess the content obtained over the course of the unit on Congress.

Test Materials generated from Past AP tests

Unit Exam

MC 50 Questions

2 Free Response Questions

  1. Differentiate the federal, state, and local courts and types of courts.

Introduction to Federal Courts

Chart: Types of Supreme Court Cases

Federalist #78

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Identify Court Qualifications and Development of Judicial Review.

Court Qualifications, Development, and Supreme Court current state

407-416

Cornell Notes

  1. Explain how judges are nominated and confirmed for the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court PPT / Caseload

Senate Nomination Hearing

416-424

Cornell Notes

  1. Compare the concepts of judicial activism and judicial restraint, and link these concepts to the decisions of the Supreme Court in the last few decades.

Judicial Activism vs. Judicial Restraint: Write an accurate, well-reasoned and organized argument using supporting case evidence

Written Response

  1. Analyze Warren through the Rehnquist Courts.

How the Court Operates?/ Eras of the Court

“Politicians on the Court”

424-429

Lanahan Readings and Questions

  1. Determine the political influences on the Supreme Court.

Scalia and Breyer Interview and Discussion

429-432

Warm-up Response

  1. Compare past justices from different eras and their political agenda.

Generate an interview of past justices by creating video using: Research (2 days)

Interview Activity

  1. Simulate the court cases given and judge the class’ majority opinion.

Moot Court Research (2 days)

Moot Court Resources

  1. Simulate the court cases given and judge the class’ majority opinion.

Moot Court In-Class Presentation Day

Moot Court Resources

  1. Assess the content obtained over the course of the unit on Congress.

Test Materials generated from Past AP tests

Unit Exam

MC 50 Questions

2 Free Response Questions

Differentiation/Adaptations/Modifications:

  •   Simulations offer students who are hands-on learners rather than traditional instructional approach.
  •   Resources can also be found electronically on Google Classroom.
  •   Unit “Roadmap” is handed out at the beginning of every unit to help all students plan their individual approach.
  •   Model Congress allows students to assume different roles of choice within the group

Resources Provided

  • Lanahan Readings in American Polity 5th Ed
  • Mayhew, “Congress: The Electoral Connection”, Starobin, “Pork: A Time-Honored Tradition Lives On”,  Price, “The Congressional Experience”, “Why Woodrow Wilson Hated the Filibuster”,  
  • Barber, “Presidential Character”, “Presidential Pen is Still Mighty”, Federalist #57,  
  • Federalist #78, “Politicians on the Court”
  • American Government: Institutions and Policies by Wilson, Dilulio, and Bose

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.5

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6

Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8

Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

CRP4

Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5

Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP7

Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8

Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP11

Use technology to enhance productivity.

APGUS.4.A

The major formal and informal institutional arrangements of power

APGUS.4.B

Relationships among these four institutions and varying balances of power

APGUS.4.C.1-5

Public opinion and voters, Interest groups, political parties, the media, state and local governments

6.1.12.A.14.a

Evaluate the effectiveness of the checks and balances system in preventing one branch of national government from usurping too much power during contemporary times.

6.3.12.A.1

Develop a plan for public accountability and transparency in government related to a particular issue(s) and share the plan with appropriate government officials.

6.3.12.CS4

Critically analyze information, make ethical judgments, and responsibly address controversial issues.

6.3.12.CS6

Make informed and reasoned decisions and accept responsibility for the consequences of their actions and/or inactions.

6.1.12.A.13.b

Analyze the effectiveness of national legislation, policies, and Supreme Court decisions (i.e., the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, the Equal Rights Amendment, Title VII, Title IX, Affirmative Action, Brown v. Board of Education, and Roe v. Wade) in promoting civil liberties and equal opportunities.

6.1.12.A.16.c

Analyze government efforts to address intellectual property rights, personal privacy, and other ethical issues in science, medicine, and business that arise from the global use of new technologies.

 GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN

Content Area: AP Government and Politics

Unit Title: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Timeframe: 15 days

Lesson Components

UNIT SUMMARY

We will familiarize ourselves with the rights and liberties of the American people. It is an examination of the Constitutional, historical, and philosophical underpinnings of those freedoms, the government institutions that define and uphold them, the laws and policy mechanisms that apply them, and the role they play in the American political system. It is an examination of the Bill of Rights and attending Constitutional Amendments, legislation, and federal and state court rulings. If the preceding units are the means of the American political system, civil rights and liberties are their end.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

What are Civil Rights?  What are your Civil Liberties?  What is the difference between the two?  How have the Civil Rights of Minorities and Women developed?  What guarantees and protects your Civil Liberties?  What is selective incorporation and how has it developed?

There is a distinct difference between civil rights and civil liberties, which have both been interpreted over the course of U.S. history by Supreme Courts and other policy-influencing bodies.

21st Century Themes

Global Awareness: Understanding and analysis of relations between various groups of people and how these relations affect American Government and Politics. Understanding psychological explanations for human behavior at it applies to American Government and Politics.

Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy: Analysis of public, private, and national, and international economies and how these impact American Government and Politics.

Civic Literacy: Acquire the skills needed to be active, informed citizens who value diversity and promote cultural understanding by working collaboratively to address the challenges that are inherent in living in an interconnected world.

Health Literacy: Understanding how knowledge of factors affecting human health has affected American Government and Politics.

21st Century Skills

Creativity and Innovation:. Developing research based arguments in support of a thesis, like the debate on Patriot Act.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving:  Writing well focused responses to free response questions utilizing knowledge and analysis of prompt materials. Students will determine the best options from problem solving scenarios like our Moot Court.

Communication and Collaboration: Form a debate team and generate a strategic plan in collaborative groups for moot court assignment.

Information Literacy: Evaluates information in the sources presented and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system. Free Response Samples will provide opportunities for this.

Media Literacy: Understand the complex messages observed for classroom discussion through television, radio, Internet, newspapers, magazines, books, billboards, video games, music, and any other forms of media.

ICT Literacy-Information, Communications and Technology:  Utilize Google Classroom to access materials (videos, documents, articles) to extend classroom discussion. Students will create an instructional video on rights of the accused.

Life and Career Skills: Apply ability to serve roles on a team and collaborate in several activities in this unit.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment

  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Homework Readings
  • Vocabulary Quizzes
  • Student-generated video

Integration of Technology:

  • Simulations, PowerPoint Presentations, Availability of Google Classroom Resources

Materials/Equipment: Handouts, texts, articles, YLI Resources, AP Central Resources

Goals/Objectives

Students will:

CPI#

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

(Interdisciplinary Connections; Technology;

Integration of 21st Century Skills)

 Assessment Tasks

(More on the summative side)

  1. Explain the origin of the Bill of Rights, and discuss how these rights were applied to the states.

Research in small groups and analyzing the first amendment freedoms.

Google Docs

Cornell Notes

  1. Generate video to display the rights of the accused and the intention for including these rights through group video.

Provide video instruction of the actions of protections against abusive power.

Student-generated Instructional Video

  1. Discuss the concept of privacy rights, and give examples of how individual privacy is protected under the Constitution.

Debate the Patriot Act based on HW article and research.

Debate Research

Cornell Notes

  1. Identify the rights of the accused, and discuss the role of the Supreme Court in expanding those rights.

Supreme Court analysis: Wisconsin v. Yoder.

Warm-up Activity

Cornell Notes

  1. Define civil rights and locate in the U.S. Constitution the obligation on government to guarantee all citizens equal protection of the law.

Selective Incorporation: Moot Court Session

Moot court resources

Cornell Notes

  1. Summarize the limits of the state and federal law in guaranteeing equality to all people.

Speed dating formatted discussion

Warm-up; Vocabulary Quiz

Cornell Notes

  1. Generate a timeline explaining why the U.S. Supreme Court plays such an important role relative to civil rights.

Develop class civil rights timeline.

Timeline developed

Cornell Notes

  1. Analyze at least two significant Supreme Court decisions that advanced civil rights in the United States.

Choose two cases to analyze and make a judgment on.

Case Analysis

  1. Identify and explain three significant events related to each of the campaigns for civil rights undertaken by African Americans, women, the Latino community, persons with disabilities, and the LGBTQ community.

Current Event Project

Google Slides

Cornell Notes

  1. Assess the content obtained over the course of the unit.

Test Materials generated from Past AP tests

Unit Exam:

MC 50 Questions

2 Free Response Questions

Differentiation/Adaptations/Modifications:

  •   Simulations offer students who are hands-on learners rather than traditional instructional approach.
  •   In-class and additional resources can also be found electronically on Google Classroom.
  • Unit “Roadmap” is handed out at the beginning of every unit to help all students plan their approach.
  • Students are given choices for written assignments

Resources Provided

  • Lanahan Readings in American Polity 5th Ed
  • Affirmative Action: Don’t Mend it or End it—Bend It by Peter H. Schuck
  • U.S. Supreme Court Revisits the 2nd Amendment
  • American Government: Institutions and Policies by Wilson, Dilulio, and Bose

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.5

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6

Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8

Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

APGUS6.A

The development of civil rights and civil liberties by judicial

APGUS6.B

Knowledge of substantive rights and liberties

APGUS6.C

The impact of the Fourteenth Amendment on the constitutional development of civil rights and civil liberties

6.1.12.A.2.a

Assess the importance of the intellectual origins of the Foundational Documents (i.e., Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and Bill of Rights) and assess their importance on the spread of democracy around the world.

6.1.12.A.2.d

Explain how judicial review made the Supreme Court an influential branch of government, and assess the continuing impact of the Supreme Court today.

6.1.12.A.14.a

Evaluate the effectiveness of the checks and balances system in preventing one branch of government from usurping too much power during contemporary times.

6.1.12.A.14.b

Analyze how the Supreme Court has interpreted the Constitution to define the rights of the individual, and evaluate the impact of public policies.

6.1.12.A.14.c

Assess the merit and effectiveness of recent legislation in addressing the health, welfare, and citizenship status of individuals and groups

6.1.12.A.14.d

Analyze conflicting ideologies and actions of political parties regarding spending priorities, the role of government in the economy, and social reforms.

6.1.12.A.14.e

Evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of the process by which national, state, and local officials are elected and vote on issues of public concern.

6.1.12.A.14.f

f.  Determine the extent to which nongovernmental organizations, special interest groups, third party political groups, and the media affect public policy

6.1.12.A.14.g

Analyze the impact of community groups and state policies that strive to increase the youth vote (i.e., distribution of voter registration forms in high schools)

6.1.12.A.14.h

Assess the effectiveness of government policies in balancing the rights of the individual against the need for national security.

6.1.12.A.16.b

Analyze government efforts to address intellectual property rights, personal privacy, and other ethical issues in science, medicine, and business that arise from the global use of new technologies.

6.1.12.A.14.h

Assess the effectiveness of government policies in balancing the rights of the individual against the need for national security.

CRP11.1

Career-ready individuals take personal ownership of their own education and career goals, and they regularly act on a plan to attain these goals. They understand their own career interests, preferences, goals, and requirements. They have perspective regarding the pathways available to them and the time, effort, experience and other requirements to pursue each, including a path of entrepreneurship. They recognize the value of each step in the education and experiential process, and they recognize that nearly all career paths require ongoing education and experience. They seek counselors, mentors, and other experts to assist in the planning and execution of career and personal goals.

CRP7.1

Career-ready individuals are discerning in accepting and using new information to make decisions, change practices or inform strategies. They use reliable research process to search for new information. They evaluate the validity of sources when considering the use and adoption of external information or practices in their workplace situation.

CRP4.1

Career-ready individuals communicate thoughts, ideas, and action plans with clarity, whether using written, verbal, and/or visual methods. They communicate in the workplace with clarity and purpose to make maximum use of their own and others’ time. They are excellent writers; they master conventions, word choice, and organization, and use effective tone and presentation skills to articulate ideas. They are skilled at interacting with others; they are active listeners and speak clearly and with purpose. Career-ready individuals think about the audience for their communication and prepare accordingly to ensure the desired outcome.

SC8

This course provides instruction in civil rights and civil liberties.

SC11

This course provides supplemental readings included including primary source materials.

SC12

The course includes supplemental readings, including contemporary news analyses that strengthen

student understanding of the curriculum

SC13

The course requires students to answer analytical and interpretive free response questions on a

frequent basis

[1]

 GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN

Content Area: AP Government and Politics

Unit Title: Public Policy

Timeframe: 15 days

Lesson Components

UNIT SUMMARY

This unit's focus is on public policy, what and who influences, how its implementation affects Americans. Students engage in in-depth examination of how policy agendas are formed, how these agendas are advocated by interest groups and politicians, how they are enacted by Congress and the President, and the methods by which they are carried out by the federal bureaucracy and enforced by the courts. By the end of this unit students are able to better understand the impact that federalism, interest groups, political parties, and elections have on policy-making.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

What are the factors that impact the policy-making process in both the domestic and foreign policy arenas?

 There are many determining ever-changing factors influencing the social, foreign, domestic, fiscal policies in the United States government today, mainly moved forward or held back by party politics.

21st Century Themes

Global Awareness: Understanding and analysis of relations between various groups of people and how these relations affect American Government and Politics. Understanding psychological explanations for human behavior at it applies to American Government and Politics.

Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy: Analysis of public, private, and national, and international economies and how these impact American Government and Politics.

Civic Literacy: Acquire the skills needed to be active, informed citizens who value diversity and promote cultural understanding by working collaboratively to address the challenges that are inherent in living in an interconnected world.

Health Literacy: Understanding how knowledge of factors affecting human health has affected American Government and Politics.

21st Century Skills

Creativity and Innovation:. Developing research based arguments in support of a thesis, like the Welfare reform and War Powers Act.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving:  Writing well focused responses to free response questions utilizing knowledge and analysis of prompt materials. Propose legitimate, fact-based solutions to “fix poverty” in America with a given budget.

Communication and Collaboration: Form a debate team and generate a strategic plan in collaborative groups for debate topics and moot court sessions.

Information Literacy: Evaluates information in the sources presented and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system. Free Response Samples will provide opportunities for this.

Media Literacy: Understand the complex messages observed for classroom discussion through television, radio, Internet, newspapers, magazines, books, billboards, video games, music, and any other forms of media.

ICT Literacy-Information, Communications and Technology:  Utilize Google Classroom to access materials (videos, documents, articles) to extend classroom discussion.

Life and Career Skills: Apply ability to serve roles on a team and collaborate in several activities in this unit.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment

  • AP style Multiple Choice tests
  • AP style Free Response essays
  • Homework Readings
  • Vocabulary Quizzes
  • Moot Court Sessions
  • Debate Research
  • Written Solutions

Integration of Technology:

  • Simulations, PowerPoint Presentations, Availability of Google Classroom Resources

Materials/Equipment: Handouts, texts, articles, YLI Resources, AP Central Resources

Goals/Objectives

Students will:

CPI#

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

(Interdisciplinary Connections; Technology;

Integration of 21st Century Skills)

 Assessment Tasks

(More on the summative side)

  1. Describe the policy making process as it applies to American national government institutions.

Warm-up activity, Speed-dating format about our policies today

Cornell Notes

Warm-up

  1. Manage your own personal budget to understand governments influence on the flow of everyday money.

Small research project on personal budget

“Bad Money” by Phillips

Budget Activity

  1. Explain how the financial crisis that began in 2008 has affected a range of national and state policies and how it is having a long-term impact on the lives of citizens.

Budget Hero Simulation http://www.marketplace.org/topics/economy/budget-hero 

Game Results

Cornell Notes

  1. Compare the fiscal and monetary policy, and explain the tools used by the institutions of the national government to shape economic policy.

Video and Video Questions “The Fed Today”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KN3kD4T3ltY&feature=related

Cornell Notes

Video Questions

  1. Explain the principles underlying the American health care system and the issues facing that system.

Obamacare perspectives: Read both sides of the issue and Structured Debate

Cornell Notes

“Welfare and Education Policy” Q’s

  1. Defend you position in regards to the national policies for ending poverty in the United States and alleviating the issues caused by economic downturns.

Debate contributing factors to poverty in the United States, Propose solutions for “fixing poverty”

Cornell Notes

Vocabulary Quiz

Proposed Solution

  1. Define entitlement programs, and describe how these programs are related to economic policies.

Observe timeline of past social welfare programs; Case study on FDRs New Deal

Cornell Notes

Timeline

  1. Explain the role of the president in setting foreign policy and national security policy, and compare those powers to the powers of the Congress.

Moot Court: Constitutionality of the War Powers Act

Holyk, "Drones, Gitmo, and Drawdown Give Obama Foreign Policy Cred," ABC News

Cornell Notes

Moot Court Resources

  1. Discuss the security and diplomatic challenges facing the United States today.

Moot Court: Constitutionality of the War Powers Act

Cornell Notes

Moot Court Resources

  1. Analyze the differing opinions on immigration in the United States policy.

Jigsaw Activity on Presidential Candidates

“Lockout” by Wucker

Cornell Notes

Jigsaw Analysis

  1. Assess the content obtained over the course of the unit.

Test Materials generated from Past AP tests

Unit Exam

MC 50 Questions

2 Free Response Questions

Differentiation/Adaptations/Modifications:

  •   Simulations offer students who are hands-on learners rather than traditional instructional approach.
  •   Resources can also be found electronically on Google Classroom.
  • Unit “Roadmap” is handed out at the beginning of every unit to help all students plan their approach.
  • Students are given choices for written assignments

Resources Provided

  • Lanahan Readings in American Polity 5th Ed
  • “Flat Broke with Children” by Hays, “Lockout” by Wucker, “Bad Money” by Phillips
  • Holyk, "Drones, Gitmo, and Drawdown Give Obama Foreign Policy Cred," ABC News
  • American Government: Institutions and Policies by Wilson, Dilulio, and Bose

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.5

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6

Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8

Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

APGUS5.A-D

  APGUS.5.A: Policy making in a federal system

  APGUS.5.B: The formation of policy agendas

  https://static-cdn.schoolnet.com/17.0.0_02/images/1x1.gifAPGUS.5.C: The role of institutions in the enactment of policy

  APGUS.5.D: The role of the bureaucracy and the courts in policy implementation and interpretation

APGUS5.E.6

Policy networks

6.1.12.A.14.c

Assess the merit and effectiveness of recent legislation in addressing the health, welfare, and citizenship status of individuals and groups.

6.1.12.A.14.d

Analyze the conflicting ideologies and actions of political parties regarding spending priorities, the role of government in the economy, and social reforms.

6.1.12.A.14.e

Determine the extent to which nongovernmental organizations, special interest groups, third party political groups, and the media affect public policy.

6.1.12.A.14.b

Analyze how the Supreme Court has interpreted the Constitution to define the rights of the individual, and evaluate the impact on public policies.

CRP11.1

Career-ready individuals take personal ownership of their own education and career goals, and they regularly act on a plan to attain these goals. They understand their own career interests, preferences, goals, and requirements. They have perspective regarding the pathways available to them and the time, effort, experience and other requirements to pursue each, including a path of entrepreneurship. They recognize the value of each step in the education and experiential process, and they recognize that nearly all career paths require ongoing education and experience. They seek counselors, mentors, and other experts to assist in the planning and execution of career and personal goals.

CRP7.1

Career-ready individuals are discerning in accepting and using new information to make decisions, change practices or inform strategies. They use reliable research process to search for new information. They evaluate the validity of sources when considering the use and adoption of external information or practices in their workplace situation.

CRP4.1

Career-ready individuals communicate thoughts, ideas, and action plans with clarity, whether using written, verbal, and/or visual methods. They communicate in the workplace with clarity and purpose to make maximum use of their own and others’ time. They are excellent writers; they master conventions, word choice, and organization, and use effective tone and presentation skills to articulate ideas. They are skilled at interacting with others; they are active listeners and speak clearly and with purpose. Career-ready individuals think about the audience for their communication and prepare accordingly to ensure the desired outcome.


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