ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 7                                                                                                                 Page  of

Units:

Unit 1 - Bold Actions

Unit 2 - Perception & Reality

Unit 3 - Nature at Work/Analyzing Poetry

Unit 4 - Risk & Exploration

Unit 5 - Journeys & Survival

Unit 6 - Guided by a Cause




Unit Title

Unit 1 - Bold Actions

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

“Be bold, take courage…and be strong of soul.” - Ovid

In this unit, students will explore what it means to face challenges fearlessly, even if it means failing in the attempt.  They will meet risk-takers and record breakers who have battled incredible odds.  Students will interact with a variety of literary texts, including Greek myths, and informational texts.  Students will learn how to read closely and critically, annotate a text, and track evidence in order to make inferences, draw conclusions, analyze story elements, and evaluate an argument. The writing focus will be argumentation.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What are the rewards and risks of undertaking bold actions?
  • Are taking bold actions worth the risks?
  • How does facing a challenge fearlessly impact who we are and influence others?
  • Is there a difference between being bold & courageous and being reckless?
  • How is language used to manipulate or persuade?
  • How do authors use the resources of language to impact an audience?
  • In what ways are all narratives influenced by bias and perspective?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Facing challenges fearlessly, even if it mean failing in the attempt, impacts who we are and can inspire others.  
  • There are risks and rewards to undertaking bold actions.
  • There is a difference between being bold & courageous and being reckless.
  • Language can be used to manipulate and persuade others.
  • All narratives are influenced by bias and perspective, and critical readers must recognize and question bias before accepting or rejecting ideas.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Story elements: plot structure, setting, characterization, and theme
  • Myth
  • Poetry terms: form, line, rhythm, stanza, alliteration
  • Vocabulary in context
  • Central idea & supporting details
  • Fact & opinion
  • Claim
  • Reasons & evidence
  • Counterarguments
  • Author’s purpose
  • Greek myths
  • Elements of narrative writing
  • Elements of argument writing

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Analyze and make inferences about the characters and elements of a short story using textual evidence
  • Analyze the elements of myth and determine two or more themes
  • Understand how the elements of form and use of alliteration emphasize ideas and meaning in a poem
  • Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
  • Determine two or more central ideas in a text using textual evidence
  • Analyze and compare news stories about the same event from various sources
  • Trace and evaluate an argument
  • Assess claims, reasons, and evidence in a text
  • Identify, analyze, and draw conclusions about an author’s purpose for writing informational texts
  • Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence  
  • Engage effectively in collaborative discussions
  • Conduct short research projects
  • Present claims and findings in a clear/coherent manner with support/evidence

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Quizzes
  • Journals
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, LetsRecap, etc.
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Exit Tickets
  • Text-dependent Questions

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Write a Short Story (Narrative)
  • Write an Argumentative Essay
  • Benchmark Assessment

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of writing prompt

Learning Activities

  • Collection openers (quote, video, art) to explore unit essential questions

Literature:

  • Read and/or listen to audio of text
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Making Inferences (use Google App, Mindmapping, or Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12, Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity) CRP12, Differentiated group work
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts
  • Writing Activity: Movie Outline & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP2
  • Close reading screencasts & modeled discussions (Student creation of these through written script or audio [Audacity: Create audio files to share online.) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11, CRP4
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking
  • HISTORY Channel Short Videos: "Greek Gods"  "Spartans Deconstructed" (Myths)

Writing:

  • Read and analyze mentor texts
  • Brainstorming activities – Developing a topic
  • Prewriting & organization charts/story map/character sketch (Google Apps, Mindmapping, or Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Conferencing with teacher
  • Peer reviews CRP12
  • (Narrative) Mini-lessons on narrative writing process and skills and conventions of standard English (see Purdue Owl Writing Lab Online and my.hrw.com)
  • (Narrative) Example prompt: Performance Task A p. 53 (Primary 1) Created on Google Docs 8.1.8.A.2, CRP2, CRP4, CRP6
    Short stories such as “Rogue Wave” often present characters that take bold actions in order to overcome great challenges.  Use “Rogue Wave” and other texts we’ve read as models for writing your own short story in which a main character or characters take bold actions in the face of a seemingly overwhelming challenge. (See writing rubric for evidence of written expression.)
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Writing/Language
  • (Argument) Read and analyze sources
  • (Argument) Mini-lessons on creating an argument & citations
  • (Argument) Mini-lessons on argument writing process and skills and conventions of standard English (see Purdue Owl Writing Lab Online and my.hrw.com)

Informational Texts:

  • Read informational texts/view accompanying videos/listen to audio of text
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Media Activity: Blog p. 30 8.1.8.B.1, 8.1.8.D.1, 8.1.8.D.5, CRP4
  • Analyzing Media: 5Ws and H Organizer (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Analyzing Media Questions: Fact v. Opinion, Trace & Evaluate an Argument CRP8

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Online News Article by Paul Harris, “Parents of Rescued Teenage Sailor Abby Sunderland Accused of Risking Her Life”

Editorial by Joanna Weiss, “Ship of Fools”

TV News Interview by CBS News, “Was Abby Too Young to Sail?”

 

Close Reader Text: Essay by Robert Medina, “Finding Your Everest”

 

Informational Writing by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, “Women in Aviation”

Anchor Text: Short Story by Theodore Taylor, “Rogue Wave”

Close-Reader Text: Short Story by Eleanora E. Tate, “Big Things Come in Small Packages”

 

Anchor Text: Greek Myth by Sally Benson, “The Flight of Icarus”

Close-Reader Text: Greek Myth retold by Olivia E. Coolidge, “Arachne” (Due to higher Lexile level, “Arachne” is recommended for advanced readers.  To meet needs of other students, use an alternate Greek Myth at lower Lexile, modify the text depending on student needs, or only use Icarus.)

Resource: Leveled Texts for Classic Fiction: Mythology

Poem by Stephen Dobyns, “Icarus’s Flight”

Equipment

Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazine, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232181788-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-7

Student Selected Independent Reading Fiction or Nonfiction Texts with Literature Circles

Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading, Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Writing, by Harvey “Smokey” Daniels/Nancy Steineke

Leveled Texts for Classic Fiction: Mythology

Leveled Text Dependent Question Stems

 

*See Suggested Open Educational Resources Page at End of Curriculum Document

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

*RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

*RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

•        Paraphrase evidence from text

•        Correctly cite evidence

•        Closely read the text (questioning, determining importance, looking for patterns) to  extract quality evidence to support a claim

•        Use evidence from the text to make and check predictions as you read

•        Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global connections, when relevant

•        Gather evidence from the text to support inferences or explicit meaning

•        Read and analyze a variety of literary genres and informational texts

•        Probe a segment of text in order to study and evaluate its multiple, deeper, and varied meanings

•        Combine text information and prior knowledge (personal experience and/or previous reading) to create new information in the form of inferences

•        Refer to the text for support when analyzing and drawing inferences

*RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

*RI.7.2  Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text

•        Provide a statement of a theme(s) or a central idea(s) of a fictional text, based on textual evidence

•        Explain the theme or central idea of a fictional piece using key details as evidence, including details from the beginning, middle, and end of the text

•        Analyze the development of the theme or central idea over the course of the fictional text, including the relationship between characters, setting, and plot over the course of a text

•        Evaluate recurring ideas and changes in the characters and plot over the course of the text (why did the author make those changes, impact on the reader, effectiveness of the author’s choices)

•        Identify how the theme or central idea relates to the characters, setting, and/or plot over the course of the text

•        Explain how two or more central ideas in a nonfiction piece develop over the course of the text, including the relationship between people, ideas, and events

•        Identify and use knowledge of common graphic features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations) to help determine two or more central idea of a text

•        Summarize the text objectively, capturing the main ideas

•        Distinguish between essential and nonessential details of a text to create an objective summary of the text

*RL.7.3  Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact

*RI.7.3  Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

RL.7.3

•        Analyze the impact specific story elements have on the text

•        Relate the change in character to changes in setting or plot and vice versa (change in setting affects character or plot, change in plot affects character and setting)

•        Analyze  how the plot and setting affect the actions/choices of the characters

•        Explain why the author chose to have elements of a story interact in a specific way

•        Analyze the impact of the relationship between characters, setting, and plot on the reader

•        Evaluate the author’s effectiveness in determining the interactions between character, setting, and plot

RI.7.3

•        Use a note taking structure to track key individuals, events, and/or ideas in informational texts.

•        Explain the relationships between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

•        Reflect on how historical figures influenced ideas or events of the time period and vice versa

•        Analyze why the author chose to describe the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in a particular way

•        Analyze the impact of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events on the reader

Analyze the effectiveness of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in communicating the author’s central idea

*RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetition of sounds on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.  

•        Demonstrate the ability to determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text (e.g., figurative, connotative, technical)  

•        Analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and/or tone

•        Explain poetic devices used in text

•        Analyze the impact of poetic sound devices (rhyme scheme, alliteration, consonance, etc) on a particular section of a text

•        Analyze why the author used a specific word choice or sound device

•        Analyze the impact of a word choice or sound device on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s word choice or sound device

RL.7.5  Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g. soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning

•        Describe the form and structure of a drama or poem

•        Explain how text structure impacts overall meaning of text

•        Identify how the differing form or structure of a text contributes to its meaning

•        Analyze how parts of a text contribute to meaning

•        Explain why the author chose a specific form or structure

•        Analyze the impact of the form or structure on the reader (how would the text be different if the form changed?)

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the chosen form or structure

*RL.7.6  Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.

*RI.7.6  Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others

RL.7.6

•        Identify the viewpoints of characters in a text

•        Compare and contrast the characters’ points-of-view

•        Trace how the author created and conveyed the similar and/or dissimilar characters

•        Analyze the impact of the author’s point of view choices on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s point of view choices

RI.7.6:

•        Identify the author’s point of view

•        Explain the techniques the author uses to distinguish his/her point of view from others

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques the author uses to distinguish his/her point of view from others

*RI.7.8  Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

•        Support arguments presented in text with evidence.

•        Identify arguments and specific claims in a text

•        Determine which textual segments most strongly support the author's claim

•        Determine the validity of the reasoning

•        Determine the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence

•        Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text

RI.7.9  Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts.

•        Track key individuals, events, and/or ideas in informational texts from two or more authors.

•        Investigate how one topic may be presented in different ways

•        Compare and contrast two or more authors’ presentations of key information.

•        Analyze the importance of the different information each author emphasized and excluded

•        Analyze how the authors use the same information, but produce different texts because of interpretation

•        Use a variety of previous knowledge (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) to make connections to and reflect on the text

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the authors’ emphasis of specific evidence  and different interpretations of facts for promoting their view

*W.7.1.a-e  Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (a-e)

a. Introduce claims, acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically

b. Support claims with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating and understanding of the topic or text.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence

d.  Establish and maintain a formal style/academic style, approach, and form.

e.  Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

•        Write arguments to support claims

•        Support arguments with clear reasons and relevant evidence

•        Introduce claim(s)

•        Write a clear thesis statement

•        Address opposing claims

•        Organize the reasons and evidence logically.

•        Choose appropriate reasoning and evidence to support claims

•        Evaluate sources for accuracy and reliability

•        Demonstrate an understanding of the topic or text

•        Use transitional words and phrases

•        Use transitions to clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence

•        Choose a consistent style, approach, and form for the task

•        Close the text with a conclusion

*W.7.3.a-e  Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events

e. Provide a conclusion that follows form and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

•        Engage the reader with a story hook

•        Introduce a narrator and/or characters

•        Establish a point of view and background story

•        Organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically

•        Use narrative techniques effectively to develop experiences, events, and/or characters

•        Transition from one idea to the next by using appropriate words and phrases

•        Use figurative language to aid in description

•        Describe ideas by using sensory and specific language

•        Write a conclusion that brings the story events to a meaningful close

•        Clearly convey a conflict and a resolution to the conflict

W.7.4  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, voice and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

•        Identify defining characteristics of different genres of writing

•        Unpack the writing prompt

•        Write for a specific purpose and audience

•        Select an appropriate text structure or format for the task

•        Use language that is precise and powerful to create voice in writing

•        Create a tone that is appropriate for one’s audience

W.7.5  With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

•        Revise and edit intentionally to improve writing.

•        Generate ideas to develop topic

•        Revise writing with a partner or self-editing checklists

•        View writing from the vantage point of the audience in order to determine the effectiveness of their words, organization, etc

W.7.6  Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

•        Use technological resources to enhance writing

•        Follow appropriate typing format and conventions

•        Use technology to broaden research base

•        Use evidence found online to support ideas

•        Give and receive feedback using technology

•        Seek out authentic publishing opportunities

W.7.7  Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.

•        Engage in short research projects to answer a self-selected or teacher-assigned questions

•        Develop research questions

•        Determine keywords or topics for each question

•        Search for informational sources in an effort to answer the question

•        Compose follow-up research questions based on the initial search

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Research and synthesize information from several sources

•        Conduct research and synthesize multiple sources of information

W.7.8.  Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

•        Use search terms effectively

•        Write a clear thesis statement

•        Draw evidence from texts to support thesis

•        Assess the credibility and accuracy of each source

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Follow published guidelines (MLA, APA, etc) to cite direct and indirect quotations

•        Identify examples of plagiarism in writing

•        Paraphrase source information to avoid plagiarism in writing

*W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

b.  Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary non-fiction

•        Incorporate ideas from literary or informational texts to support writing

•        Deconstruct and reflect upon textual evidence

•        Identify evidence that supports claims in literary analysis

•        Logically connect evidence to claims in writing

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Cite in-text direct and indirect quotations appropriately

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Recognize and identify multiple organizational models

•        Apply a specific organizational strategy to a writing

W.7.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, metacognition/self correction, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

•        Practice writing in a myriad of situations (journals, dialogues, creative tasks, etc.)

•        Reflect on and be able to explain decisions made while crafting a piece of writing

•        Produce written reflections

•        Write for a variety of audiences and purposes on an array of cross-curricular topics

SL.7.1.a-d Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a.  Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

b.  Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed

c.  Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.

•        Read required texts prior to discussions

•        Prepare for discussions

•        Use previous knowledge to expand discussions about a topic

•        Engage in conversations about grade-appropriate topics and texts

•        Participate in a variety of rich, structured conversations

•        Define and identify rules for discussions, including group and individual roles

•        Model appropriate behavior during discussions

•        Craft and respond to specific questions based on the topic or text, elaborating when necessary

•        Reflect on and paraphrase what was discussed

•        Summarize the ideas expressed

SL.7.2  Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

•        Extract the main ideas and the details used to support it presented in different media formats

•        Synthesize the information, sorting between the main points and smaller details that work to support the main points

•        Use a graphic organizer (e.g., web, outline, etc)to analyze presented information

•        Explain how the main idea and supporting details help to clarify a topic, text, or issue

SL.7.4  Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

•        Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner.

•        Build arguments to prepare for persuasive speeches on topics of interest or address the class on a teacher-assigned topic

•        Use practices that engage the audience (ie: eye contact, volume, pronunciation)

•        Emphasize important points with different pitch or volume

•        Elaborate on a point that listeners may need more explanation to understand

L.7.1  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal different relationships among ideas.

c.  Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

•        Discern the differences in structure and use between simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences

•        Intentionally use a combination of simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas

•        Identify phrases and clauses in sentences when reading

•        Accurately use phrases and clauses within a sentence in writing

•        Recognize and correct misplaced and dangling modifiers

L.7.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives.

b. Spell correctly.

•        Identify a series of adjectives in writing

•        Use a comma to separate adjectives in a series

•        Apply common rules and patterns to spell words correctly

L.7.3  Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

a.Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

•        Select precise language

•        Revise writing for wordiness and redundancies

*L.7.4  Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

*a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word

c.  Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

d.  Very the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary)

•        Use a combination of context clues, structural clues, and the word’s position in a sentence to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to find the pronunciation of a word

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to determine the actual meaning of a word or its part of speech

•        Verify the inferred meaning of a word is the actual meaning by using dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses

•        Consult reference materials that are both printed and digital

L.7.5  Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings

a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.

•        Define and identify figures of speech

•        Determine the meaning of and purpose of figures of speech in context

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers, including Greek culture and myths and the role of women in aviation.

Current Events:  Students will connect the unit theme with various informational texts and current events.

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 2 - Perception & Reality

Timeframe 

6 weeks

Unit Summary

“Now I do now know whether it was then I dreamt I was a butterfly, or whether I am not a butterfly, dreaming I am a man.” - Chuang Tzu

In this unit, students will explore how things in life are not always how we perceive them to be.  Students will interact with a variety of literary texts, including a folk tale and drama, visual media, and informational texts.  Students will learn how to read closely and critically, annotate a text, and track evidence in order to summarize a text and analyze text features. The writing focus will be literary analysis.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Is seeing believing?

  • How does a single action dramatically change a person’s perception?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • How things in life are not always how we perceive them to be
  • Our perceptions can change when presented with new information
  • People can perceive situations differently and have a different “truth”

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Elements of a folk tale
  • Summarization
  • Poetic structures
  • Figurative language and sound devices
  • Text features
  • The effect of setting on character traits, motivations, and actions
  • Elements of a drama
  • Elements of writing a literary analysis
  • How to engage in collaborative discussions

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Analyze visual media
  • Analyze elements of a folk tale and summarize the story
  • Analyze a poem’s form and use of figurative language and sound devices to understand their effects on meaning
  • Analyze how text features contribute to a text
  • Summarize a text objectively
  • Identify and analyze how setting affects characters’ traits, motivations, and actions
  • Analyze the elements of a drama and make comparisons between a script and a performance
  • Write a literary analysis (informative/explanatory) essay
  • Engage effectively in collaborative discussions

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Quizzes
  • Journals
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, LetsRecap, etc.
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Exit Tickets
  • Text-dependent Questions

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Literary Analysis Essay
  • Benchmark Assessment

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of writing prompt

Learning Activities

Intro to Unit:

  • “Pavement Chalk Art” by Julian Beever (Create a poster or flyer that announces an exhibit of Beever’s art in a city.  Use Google Draw or a program of your choosing to lay out your work, including images and text.
  • Highlight the effectiveness of Beever’s drawings as public art
  • Promote the advantages of having sidewalk art in a city
  • Present your completed flyer or poster to your small group, explaining what you intended to communicate and how you accomplished that goal.
  • Journal writing with intro to new unit theme - quote, art, video intro
  • View visual media pieces and engage in collaborative discussions CRP12
  • Students use the internet to find and analyze another piece of visual media. Analyzing the Media questions CRP8
  • Graphic Organizer: Element -> Effect (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11

Informational Texts:

  • Read informational texts and/or listen to audio
  • HISTORY Channel Short Video: "Steve Cohen’s Lost Magic" (For use with “Magic and the Brain”)
  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Written objective summaries of texts CRP4
  • Student created graphic organizers (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12
  • Cooperative group work CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • Media Activity: Blog Entries Cont'd 8.1.8.B.1, 8.1.8.D.1, 8.1.8.D.5, CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts or other activities
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking

Literature:

  • Read short story and/or listen to audio of text
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Symbolism, Characterization (use Google App, Mindmapping, or Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12
  • Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity) CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, or other activites
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • Writing Activity: Narrative (Creative narrative prompts about character development and description, letter from character, poem about character, etc.) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP4, CRP6
  • Writing Activity: Character Profile (p. 108) in Google Docs 8.1.8.A.2, CRP2, CRP4
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking

Writing:

  • Read and analyze mentor texts (Step 1 in Performance Assessment Book)
  • Read and analyze sources
  • Mini-lessons on writing a literary analysis (informative/explanatory) essay & citations
  • Prewriting & organization charts (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Conferencing with teacher
  • Peer reviews CRP12
  • Mini-lessons on writing process and skills and conventions of standard English (see Purdue Owl Writing Lab Online and my.hrw.com)
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Writing/Language
  • Example Literary Analysis Essay Prompts 8.1.8.A.2, CRP2, CRP4, CRP8
  • Option 1: Performance Assessment Book Step 2 –
  • How does an author develop a theme?
  • Students will read:
  • 1. What is a…Universal Theme? (Informative Essay)
  • 2. “The Old Grandfather and His Little Grandson” (Folk Tale)
  • 3. “Abuelito Who” (Poem)
  • Literary Analysis Prompt: What universal theme is expressed in the folk tale and the poem?
  • Resource Modification: Students read folktales (“The Six Men and Elephant” and “Red and Blue Coat.” Students write literary analysis comparing and contrasting the theme in each.
  • *Option 2: Performance Assessment Book Step 3:
  • What techniques do authors use to create characters?
  • Students will read:
  • 1. “Characters: The Human Experience” (Informative Essay)
  • 2. “The Open Window” (Short Story)
  • Literary Analysis Prompt: How does Saki develop the characters of Nuttel and Vera in “The Open Window”?
  • *If option 2 is chosen, the assessment can be completed after reading “Another Place, Another Time” as long as the grade will be before mid-marking period progress reports.

 Drama:

  • Read drama and/or listen to audio of text (Various reading structures should be considered)
  • View film clip
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Dialogue & Characters
  • Analyze Form: Drama (use Google App, Mindmapping, or Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • On-Demand Writing Prompt:In Sorry, Wrong Number and other texts in this Collection, you learned that a single action or event can dramatically change a person’s perception.  Taking evidence and examples from Sorry, Wrong Number, and write an essay that shows how this dramatic change occurs. Consider: How do the main characters perceive the people and world around them? Which events cause the characters to change their perception? How does their change in perception affect their actions? 8.1.8.A.2, CRP2, CRP4, CRP8

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Public Art by Julian Beever, “Pavement Chalk Art”

Magazine Article by Susana Martinez-Conde & Stephen L. Macknik, “Magic and the Brain” – (High Lexile Level – Suggested for honors/advanced readers only)

Science Article by Reynaldo Vasquez, “Saving the Lost”

Newspaper Article by Alan Schwarz, The New York Times (Found in Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading): “Dementia Risk Seen in Players in NFL Study”

Newspaper Article by Rick Montgomery, Chicago Tribune (Found in Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading): “More People Escaping to a World Less Ordinary”

Novel by Charles Dickens, from A Christmas Carol

Drama by Charles Dickens (dramatized by Israel Horovitz), from A Christmas Carol: Scrooge and Marley

Graphic Story by Marvel Comics, from A Christmas Carol

Folk Tale by Virginia Hamilton, “The People Could Fly”

Short Story by David Yoo, “Heartbeat”

Short Story by Cory Doctorow, “Another Place, Another Time”

Drama by Lucille Fletcher, Sorry, Wrong Number

Film Clip by Anatole Litvak, from Sorry, Wrong Number

Equipment

Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazine, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232181788-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-7

Student Selected Independent Reading Fiction or Nonfiction Texts with Literature Circles

Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading, Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Writing, by Harvey “Smokey” Daniels/Nancy Steineke

Leveled Text Dependent Question Stems

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

*RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

*RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

•        Paraphrase evidence from text

•        Correctly cite evidence

•        Closely read the text (questioning, determining importance, looking for patterns) to  extract quality evidence to support a claim

•        Use evidence from the text to make and check predictions as you read

•        Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global connections, when relevant

•        Gather evidence from the text to support inferences or explicit meaning

•        Read and analyze a variety of literary genres and informational texts

•        Probe a segment of text in order to study and evaluate its multiple, deeper, and varied meanings

•        Combine text information and prior knowledge (personal experience and/or previous reading) to create new information in the form of inferences

•        Refer to the text for support when analyzing and drawing inferences

*RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

*RI.7.2  Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text

•        Provide a statement of a theme(s) or a central idea(s) of a fictional text, based on textual evidence

•        Explain the theme or central idea of a fictional piece using key details as evidence, including details from the beginning, middle, and end of the text

•        Analyze the development of the theme or central idea over the course of the fictional text, including the relationship between characters, setting, and plot over the course of a text

•        Evaluate recurring ideas and changes in the characters and plot over the course of the text (why did the author make those changes, impact on the reader, effectiveness of the author’s choices)

•        Identify how the theme or central idea relates to the characters, setting, and/or plot over the course of the text

•        Explain how two or more central ideas in a nonfiction piece develop over the course of the text, including the relationship between people, ideas, and events

•        Identify and use knowledge of common graphic features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations) to help determine two or more central idea of a text

•        Summarize the text objectively, capturing the main ideas

•        Distinguish between essential and nonessential details of a text to create an objective summary of the text

*RL.7.3  Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact

RL.7.3

•        Analyze the impact specific story elements have on the text

•        Relate the change in character to changes in setting or plot and vice versa (change in setting affects character or plot, change in plot affects character and setting)

•        Analyze  how the plot and setting affect the actions/choices of the characters

•        Explain why the author chose to have elements of a story interact in a specific way

•        Analyze the impact of the relationship between characters, setting, and plot on the reader

•        Evaluate the author’s effectiveness in determining the interactions between character, setting, and plot

*RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetition of sounds on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.  

*RI.7.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

•        Demonstrate the ability to determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text (e.g., figurative, connotative, technical)  

•        Analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and/or tone

•        Explain poetic devices used in text

•        Analyze the impact of poetic sound devices (rhyme scheme, alliteration, consonance, etc) on a particular section of a text

•        Analyze why the author used a specific word choice or sound device

•        Analyze the impact of a word choice or sound device on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s word choice or sound device

RL.7.5  Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g. soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning

*RI.7.5  Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas

•        Describe the form and structure of a drama or poem

•        Explain how text structure impacts overall meaning of text

•        Identify how the differing form or structure of a text contributes to its meaning

•        Analyze how parts of a text contribute to meaning

•        Explain why the author chose a specific form or structure

•        Analyze the impact of the form or structure on the reader (how would the text be different if the form changed?)

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the chosen form or structure

RL.7.7  Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).

•        Analyze how content differs because of the medium in which it is presented

•         Interact with content expressed through multiple and varied formats (written, audio, staged, multimedia)

•        Generate a list of techniques expressed in each medium

•        Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem o its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version

•        Determine how the techniques of a particular medium affect the content

•        Analyze the effects of techniques unique to each medium

•        Explain what makes each medium unique

•        Analyze the impact of each medium on the reader

•        Make judgments about which medium best represents the content

*W.7.2.a-e Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using text structures (e.g., definition, classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, etc.) and text features (e.g., headings, graphics, and multimedia) when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.7.2.B. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

W.7.2.C. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

W.7.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

W.7.2.E. Establish and maintain a formal style/academic style, approach, and form.

W.7.2.F. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

•        Focus writing on thoroughly describing or explaining a topic

•        Identify the defining elements of this specific writing genre

•        Explore topics from their content area classes.

•        Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow

•        Organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect

•         Include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension

•        Include relevant supporting facts, information, and details

•        Transition between ideas using appropriate words and phrases

•        Select precise language and domain-specific vocabulary

•        Consistently use an appropriate style

•        Create language that is appropriate to one's audience and follows a formal tone

•        Write a conclusion to bring the text to a close

W.7.4  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, voice and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

•        Identify defining characteristics of different genres of writing

•        Unpack the writing prompt

•        Write for a specific purpose and audience

•        Select an appropriate text structure or format for the task

•        Use language that is precise and powerful to create voice in writing

•        Create a tone that is appropriate for one’s audience

W.7.5  With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

•        Revise and edit intentionally to improve writing.

•        Generate ideas to develop topic

•        Revise writing with a partner or self-editing checklists

•        View writing from the vantage point of the audience in order to determine the effectiveness of their words, organization, etc

W.7.6  Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

•        Use technological resources to enhance writing

•        Follow appropriate typing format and conventions

•        Use technology to broaden research base

•        Use evidence found online to support ideas

•        Give and receive feedback using technology

•        Seek out authentic publishing opportunities

*W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

b.  Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary non-fiction

•        Incorporate ideas from literary or informational texts to support writing

•        Deconstruct and reflect upon textual evidence

•        Identify evidence that supports claims in literary analysis

•        Logically connect evidence to claims in writing

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Cite in-text direct and indirect quotations appropriately

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Recognize and identify multiple organizational models

•        Apply a specific organizational strategy to a writing

W.7.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, metacognition/self correction, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

•        Practice writing in a myriad of situations (journals, dialogues, creative tasks, etc.)

•        Reflect on and be able to explain decisions made while crafting a piece of writing

•        Produce written reflections

•        Write for a variety of audiences and purposes on an array of cross-curricular topics

SL.7.1.a-d Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a.  Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

b.  Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed

c.  Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.

•        Read required texts prior to discussions

•        Prepare for discussions

•        Use previous knowledge to expand discussions about a topic

•        Engage in conversations about grade-appropriate topics and texts

•        Participate in a variety of rich, structured conversations

•        Define and identify rules for discussions, including group and individual roles

•        Model appropriate behavior during discussions

•        Craft and respond to specific questions based on the topic or text, elaborating when necessary

•        Reflect on and paraphrase what was discussed

•        Summarize the ideas expressed

SL.7.2  Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

•        Extract the main ideas and the details used to support it presented in different media formats

•        Synthesize the information, sorting between the main points and smaller details that work to support the main points

•        Use a graphic organizer (e.g., web, outline, etc)to analyze presented information

•        Explain how the main idea and supporting details help to clarify a topic, text, or issue

SL.7.5  Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.

•        Use multimedia and visual displays to enhance work

•        Identify the various types of multimedia (text, audio, still images, animation, and video) and visual displays (posters, props)

•        Find meaningful ways to include these tools in presentations

•        Identify where to incorporate multimedia and visual displays, as well as implement specific video clips to enhance audience interest and learning

•        Use multimedia to help make claims and findings clear and to emphasize important points for the audience

•        Determine when it is appropriate to use informal language versus formal English

SL.7.6  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 here for specific expectations.)

•        Orally present information, using appropriate speech, in a variety of situations

•        Recognize and consider the audience

•        Determine  if the topic and language style correspond appropriately

•        Reflect on the use of language and revise as needed

L.7.1  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal different relationships among ideas.

c.  Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

•        Discern the differences in structure and use between simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences

•        Intentionally use a combination of simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas

•        Identify phrases and clauses in sentences when reading

•        Accurately use phrases and clauses within a sentence in writing

•        Recognize and correct misplaced and dangling modifiers

L.7.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives.

b. Spell correctly.

•        Identify a series of adjectives in writing

•        Use a comma to separate adjectives in a series

•        Apply common rules and patterns to spell words correctly

L.7.3  Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

a.Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

•        Select precise language

•        Revise writing for wordiness and redundancies

*L.7.4  Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

*a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word

c.  Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

d.  Very the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary)

•        Use a combination of context clues, structural clues, and the word’s position in a sentence to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to find the pronunciation of a word

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to determine the actual meaning of a word or its part of speech

•        Verify the inferred meaning of a word is the actual meaning by using dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses

•        Consult reference materials that are both printed and digital

L.7.5  Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings

a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.

•        Define and identify figures of speech

•        Determine the meaning of and purpose of figures of speech in context

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media:  Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme through various artistic mediums.

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.

Science:  Students will connect the unit theme with various informational texts relating to the brain.

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home,work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 3 - Nature at Work/Analyzing Poetry

Timeframe 

3 weeks

Unit Summary

“Those who dwell...among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.” -Rachel Carson

In this unit, students will focus on poetry analysis.  Students will also explore memoir and informational texts related to the unit theme.  Students will write informative/explanatory texts.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How and why do people develop strong and emotional connections with elements of nature?

  • Why is an appreciation of nature important?

  • How can language be powerful?
  • How does language influence the way we think, act, and perceive the world?
  • How do authors use the resources of language to impact an audience?

Bronx Masquerade by Nikki Grimes

  • How does the progression of a conflict change a character or individual’s thoughts, feelings, and actions through a novel or in the real world?
  • How can learning about the different dimensions of a character lead us to a greater understanding of a character and the people around us?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The beauty, power and mystery of nature and how nature impacts people’s lives in different ways
  • Language impacts the way we think, act, and perceive the world.
  • Literature can be used to better understand the world and people around us.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Memoir
  • Elements of author’s style
  • Structure of an expository essay
  • Poetic forms
  • Figurative language
  • How to conduct short research projects using reliable sources
  • How to write informative/explanatory texts
  • How to engage in collaborative discussions

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Analyze features of a memoir and analyze author’s style
  • Analyze elements of an expository essay and its structure
  • Analyze poetic form and how poets use figurative language to express feelings and ideas
  • Conduct short research projects
  • Write informative/explanatory texts
  • Engage effectively in collaborative discussions

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Quizzes
  • Journals
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, LetsRecap, etc.
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Exit Tickets
  • Text-dependent Questions

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Poetry Analysis Project
  • Benchmark Assessment

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of project topics/presentation methods

Learning Activities

Poetry:

  • Read poems and/or listen to audio of text
  • Video Options: BIO Channel – Biography: William Shakespeare, HISTORY Channel – “Science of a Hurricane”
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Figurative Language (use Google App, Mindmapping, or Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12
  • Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity) CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks (writing poems), written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Close reading screencasts & modeled discussions (Student creation of these through written script or audio [Audacity: Create audio files to share online.) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11, CRP4
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, or other activities
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking
  • Poetry Project

Memoir:

  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies CRP8
  • ABC’s of my Life
  • Expand a Moment story

Informational Text Sets:

  • Read informational texts and/or listen to audio
  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Student created graphic organizers: Analyzing Text Structure/Central Ideas (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, or other activities
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking
  • Oral Report: Choose a concept or term about geology from “Big Rocks’ Balancing Acts” (for example: earthquake tremors, granite, bedrock, accelerator-mass spectrometer, erosion, Ice Age, or geology itself.) [If different texts were read in class, replace topic with those that apply.]
  • Think of a question related to that term to explore, such as “How many ice ages have taken place on Earth?” Research your topic and present the findings to your class in a brief oral report.
  • Find at least two informational print or online articles on the topic.  Make sure these sources are credible and believable.
  • List the most important ideas you want to present in your report.
  • Begin your report with an introduction that specifies your topic clearly, establishes your central idea, and hooks listeners into listening further.
  • Support your central idea or ideas with evidence from your research. 8.1.8.A.2, 8.1.8.D.2, 8.1.8.D.3, 8.1.8.D.4, 8.1.8.E.1, CRP2, CRP4, CRP7, CRP11

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Poetry Options (Choose what works best for student needs):

“The Song of Wandering Aengus” by W.B. Yeats (Collection 2)

“Sonnet 43” by William Shakespeare (Collection 2)

Soliloquy from The Tempest by William Shakespeare (Collection 3)

“Ode to enchanted light” by Pablo Neruda (translated by Ken Krabeenhoft) (Collection 3)

“Sleeping in the Forest” by Mary Oliver (Collection 3)

“Problems with Hurricanes” by Victor Hernandez Cruz (Collection 3)

“Prayer to the Pacific” by Leslie Marmon Silko (Collection 3)

“Tornado at Talladega” by Gwendolyn Brooks (Collection 3)

“Inside a Poem” by Eve Merriam (Performance Assessment Book Unit 4)

“Introduction to Poetry” by Billy Collins (Performance Assessment Book Unit 4)

OR

Bronx Masquerade by Nikki Grimes

Poetry Selections from the Harlem Renaissance

Memoirs

From Mississippi Solo by Eddy Harris

From Polar Dream by Helen Thayer

Choose at least one from the following text sets:

  1.  Expository Essay by Douglas Fox, “Big Rocks Balancing Act,” Essay by James Vlahos, “The Hidden Southwest: The Arch Hunters”
  2. Invasive Species Text Set in Texts & Lessons for Content-Area Reading book:
  1. “Outback Steakhouse” by Marina Kamenev, The Atlantic
  2. “Scientists Fear Spread of Exotic Snakes” from United Press International
  3. “Fire Ants” from FireAnt.net
  4. “Killer Bees” from National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution
  5. “Zebra Mussels” from Wikipedia
  6. “Asian Carp and the Great Lakes” from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  1. Performance Assessment Book Unit 4
  1. “Burmese Python: Not the Ideal Pet” by Matt Piven, “Florida’s Python Hunt” by Andrew Ng, “Burmese Python: The Ecosystem Challenge” by EcoEchoes
  2. “Past and Present: The Florida Everglades” by Tobey Haskell, “Can We Fix the Water Supply” by Caleb Hughes, “Water Quality Nearly Halts Everglades Restoration” by Robin Martelli

Equipment

Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazine, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232181788-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-7

Student Selected Independent Reading Fiction or Nonfiction Texts with Literature Circles

Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading, Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Writing, by Harvey “Smokey” Daniels/Nancy Steineke

Leveled Text Dependent Question Stems

 

*See Suggested Open Educational Resources Page at End of Curriculum Document

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

*RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

*RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

•        Paraphrase evidence from text

•        Correctly cite evidence

•        Closely read the text (questioning, determining importance, looking for patterns) to  extract quality evidence to support a claim

•        Use evidence from the text to make and check predictions as you read

•        Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global connections, when relevant

•        Gather evidence from the text to support inferences or explicit meaning

•        Read and analyze a variety of literary genres and informational texts

•        Probe a segment of text in order to study and evaluate its multiple, deeper, and varied meanings

•        Combine text information and prior knowledge (personal experience and/or previous reading) to create new information in the form of inferences

•        Refer to the text for support when analyzing and drawing inferences

*RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

*RI.7.2  Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text

•        Provide a statement of a theme(s) or a central idea(s) of a fictional text, based on textual evidence

•        Explain the theme or central idea of a fictional piece using key details as evidence, including details from the beginning, middle, and end of the text

•        Analyze the development of the theme or central idea over the course of the fictional text, including the relationship between characters, setting, and plot over the course of a text

•        Evaluate recurring ideas and changes in the characters and plot over the course of the text (why did the author make those changes, impact on the reader, effectiveness of the author’s choices)

•        Identify how the theme or central idea relates to the characters, setting, and/or plot over the course of the text

•        Explain how two or more central ideas in a nonfiction piece develop over the course of the text, including the relationship between people, ideas, and events

•        Identify and use knowledge of common graphic features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations) to help determine two or more central idea of a text

•        Summarize the text objectively, capturing the main ideas

•        Distinguish between essential and nonessential details of a text to create an objective summary of the text

RI.7.3  Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

RI.7.3

•        Use a note taking structure to track key individuals, events, and/or ideas in informational texts.

•        Explain the relationships between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

•        Reflect on how historical figures influenced ideas or events of the time period and vice versa

•        Analyze why the author chose to describe the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in a particular way

•        Analyze the impact of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events on the reader

Analyze the effectiveness of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in communicating the author’s central idea

*RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetition of sounds on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.  

*RI.7.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

•        Demonstrate the ability to determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text (e.g., figurative, connotative, technical)  

•        Analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and/or tone

•        Explain poetic devices used in text

•        Analyze the impact of poetic sound devices (rhyme scheme, alliteration, consonance, etc) on a particular section of a text

•        Analyze why the author used a specific word choice or sound device

•        Analyze the impact of a word choice or sound device on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s word choice or sound device

RL.7.5  Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g. soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning

*RI.7.5  Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas

•        Describe the form and structure of a drama or poem

•        Explain how text structure impacts overall meaning of text

•        Identify how the differing form or structure of a text contributes to its meaning

•        Analyze how parts of a text contribute to meaning

•        Explain why the author chose a specific form or structure

•        Analyze the impact of the form or structure on the reader (how would the text be different if the form changed?)

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the chosen form or structure

W.7.4  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, voice and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

•        Identify defining characteristics of different genres of writing

•        Unpack the writing prompt

•        Write for a specific purpose and audience

•        Select an appropriate text structure or format for the task

•        Use language that is precise and powerful to create voice in writing

•        Create a tone that is appropriate for one’s audience

W.7.6  Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

•        Use technological resources to enhance writing

•        Follow appropriate typing format and conventions

•        Use technology to broaden research base

•        Use evidence found online to support ideas

•        Give and receive feedback using technology

•        Seek out authentic publishing opportunities

W.7.7  Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.

•        Engage in short research projects to answer a self-selected or teacher-assigned questions

•        Develop research questions

•        Determine keywords or topics for each question

•        Search for informational sources in an effort to answer the question

•        Compose follow-up research questions based on the initial search

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Research and synthesize information from several sources

•        Conduct research and synthesize multiple sources of information

*W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

b.  Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary non-fiction

•        Incorporate ideas from literary or informational texts to support writing

•        Deconstruct and reflect upon textual evidence

•        Identify evidence that supports claims in literary analysis

•        Logically connect evidence to claims in writing

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Cite in-text direct and indirect quotations appropriately

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Recognize and identify multiple organizational models

•        Apply a specific organizational strategy to a writing

W.7.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, metacognition/self correction, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

•        Practice writing in a myriad of situations (journals, dialogues, creative tasks, etc.)

•        Reflect on and be able to explain decisions made while crafting a piece of writing

•        Produce written reflections

•        Write for a variety of audiences and purposes on an array of cross-curricular topics

SL.7.1.a-d Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a.  Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

b.  Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed

c.  Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.

•        Read required texts prior to discussions

•        Prepare for discussions

•        Use previous knowledge to expand discussions about a topic

•        Engage in conversations about grade-appropriate topics and texts

•        Participate in a variety of rich, structured conversations

•        Define and identify rules for discussions, including group and individual roles

•        Model appropriate behavior during discussions

•        Craft and respond to specific questions based on the topic or text, elaborating when necessary

•        Reflect on and paraphrase what was discussed

•        Summarize the ideas expressed

SL.7.4  Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

•        Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner.

•        Build arguments to prepare for persuasive speeches on topics of interest or address the class on a teacher-assigned topic

•        Use practices that engage the audience (ie: eye contact, volume, pronunciation)

•        Emphasize important points with different pitch or volume

•        Elaborate on a point that listeners may need more explanation to understand

L.7.1  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal different relationships among ideas.

c.  Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

•        Discern the differences in structure and use between simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences

•        Intentionally use a combination of simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas

•        Identify phrases and clauses in sentences when reading

•        Accurately use phrases and clauses within a sentence in writing

•        Recognize and correct misplaced and dangling modifiers

L.7.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives.

b. Spell correctly.

•        Identify a series of adjectives in writing

•        Use a comma to separate adjectives in a series

•        Apply common rules and patterns to spell words correctly

*L.7.4  Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

*a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word

c.  Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

d.  Very the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary)

•        Use a combination of context clues, structural clues, and the word’s position in a sentence to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to find the pronunciation of a word

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to determine the actual meaning of a word or its part of speech

•        Verify the inferred meaning of a word is the actual meaning by using dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses

•        Consult reference materials that are both printed and digital

L.7.5  Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings

a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.

•        Define and identify figures of speech

•        Determine the meaning of and purpose of figures of speech in context

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Science:  Students will read informational texts connected to Science content. (See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home,work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 4 - Risk & Exploration

Timeframe 

3 weeks

Unit Summary

“All adventures, especially into new territory, are scary.” – Sally Ride

In this unit, students will interact with a variety of literary and informational texts on the unit theme, “Risk and Exploration.”  Students will focus on argument writing and conducting short research projects using reliable sources.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What are the risks of exploration in extreme conditions?  
  • Is exploration worth the risks and costs?
  • Should be keep exploring unknown places in space?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Exploration affects our world
  • There is sometimes a high cost for exploration and we must weigh if it’s worth the cost

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • How to evaluate an author’s argument
  • How to identify tone
  • How to evaluate reasoning used to support a claim
  • Author’s point of view
  • Author’s purpose
  • Various text structures
  • How to paraphrase central ideas and details
  • How to decipher the meaning of unknown words and phrases
  • How to conduct short research projects using reliable sources
  • Elements of argument writing

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Trace and evaluate an argument
  • Identify tone and evaluate the reasoning used to support a claim
  • Identify and evaluate author’s point of view and purpose
  • Analyze the structure of informational texts and paraphrase central ideas and details
  • Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
  • Conduct short research projects
  • Write an argumentative essay

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Quizzes
  • Journals
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, LetsRecap, etc.
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Exit Tickets
  • Text-dependent Questions

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Write an Argumentative Essay
  • Benchmark Assessment

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of writing prompt

Learning Activities

  • Collection openers (quote, video, art) to explore unit essential questions
  • Option: Use poem “Your World” (p. 213) as intro to new unit: Risk and Exploration- Journal response with questions as conversation starter.

Writing:

  • Read and analyze mentor texts
  • Create individualized student goals from previous argument writing earlier in year
  • Brainstorming activities – Developing a topic
  • Prewriting & organization charts/story map/character sketch (Google Apps, Mindmapping, or Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Conferencing with teacher
  • Peer reviews CRP12
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Writing/Language
  • (Argument) Read and analyze sources
  • (Argument) Mini-lessons on creating an argument & citations
  • (Argument) Mini-lessons on argument writing process and skills and conventions of standard English (see Purdue Owl Writing Lab Online and my.hrw.com)
  • Example of prompts: 8.1.8.A.2, CRP2, CRP4, CRP7, CRP8
  • Performance Assessment Book STEP 3 - Do people have the right to rescue services when they put themselves at risk?
  • Unit theme argument: Is space/ocean exploration worth the cost? (See writing rubric for evidence of written expression.)

Informational Texts:

  • Read informational texts and/or listen to audio
  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Student created graphic organizers: Analyzing Text Structure/Central Ideas (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12
  • Cooperative group work CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, or other activities
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking
  • Writing Activity: Research Report (for use with “Remarks at the Dedication…” but can be modified for use with all texts with space focus)
  • Research a recent or planned space mission for medical research by NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration).
  • Identify one mission and write a brief description of its purpose and outcome.
  • Explain whether or not it is in keeping with Kennedy’s views about space research.
  • Share your findings with the class.  8.1.8.A.2, 8.1.8.D.2, 8.1.8.D.3, 8.1.8.D.4, 8.1.8.E.1, CRP2, CRP4, CRP7, CRP11
  • Speaking Activity: Informal Debate (for use with “Why Exploring the Ocean is Mankind’s Next Giant Leap”)
  • Philippe Cousteau begins by mentioning the 1960s exploration of the Mariana Trench.  Would further exploration of this deep-sea region be worthwhile?  Divide your group into two teams to informally debate that question.
  • First, research the Mariana Trench and any attempts to explore it in recent years.
  • Investigate the potential for benefits in exploring the region.
  • Identify the potential risks involved.  Find out if any issues or problems have been reported.
  • Listen well to any opponent’s points to help you prepare your responses.  8.1.8.A.1, 8.1.8.D.4, 8.1.8.E.1, CRP2, CRP4, CRP7, CRP8
  • Writing Activity (for use with “Living in the Dark”):  Argument
  • Think about Santiago Herrera’s statement at the end of the excerpt from “Living in the Dark.”  Why does he have that opinion?  Why might someone else have a different opinion?  Do you agree with Herrera’s statement?  Use your answers to write a short argument:
  • In your introduction, state your claim clearly.
  • Present valid reasons for your claim and support them with evidence from the text and other sources that you can rely on.
  • Try to present and refute one counterargument to your claim.  8.1.8.A.2, CRP2, CRP4, CRP7, CRP8

Resource Modification: Resource Rooms cover the Civil Rights Movement in preparation for The Watsons Go to Birmingham (next unit) and read “Letters from Birmingham Jail” in order to identify and evaluate protest tactics. (Same unit standards covered with different content)

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

[Text & Audio] Speech by John F. Kennedy, “Remarks at the Dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center”

Commentary by Philippe Cousteau, “Why Exploring the Ocean is Mankind’s Next Giant Leap”

Science Article by Cheryl Bardoe, from “Living in the Dark”

Science Article by Elizabeth Rosenthal, “Stinging Tentacles Offer Hint of Ocean’s Decline”

(The above 4 texts have higher Lexile levels and are recommended for advanced readers/honors level students.  They should be modified for other readers, or alternates from below may be selected.)

Essay by Joan Vernikos, “Is Space Exploration Worth the Cost?”

Newsela.com Text Set: NASA’s New Frontiers – https://newsela.com/text-sets/52/science--nasa-frontiershmh.fyi.

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts: http://hmhfyi.com/6-12/grades/grade-7/risk-and-exploration/

**Resource Modification: Resource Rooms covered the Civil Rights and read “Letters from Birmingham Jail” in order to identify and evaluate protest tactics. Additional Resources: http://www.readworks.org/passages/courage-take-action-lesson-rosa-parks

Equipment

Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazine, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232181788-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-7

Student Selected Independent Reading Fiction or Nonfiction Texts with Literature Circles

Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading, Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Writing, by Harvey “Smokey” Daniels/Nancy Steineke

Leveled Text Dependent Question Stems

 

*See Suggested Open Educational Resources Page at End of Curriculum Document

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

*RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

•        Paraphrase evidence from text

•        Correctly cite evidence

•        Closely read the text (questioning, determining importance, looking for patterns) to  extract quality evidence to support a claim

•        Use evidence from the text to make and check predictions as you read

•        Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global connections, when relevant

•        Gather evidence from the text to support inferences or explicit meaning

•        Read and analyze a variety of literary genres and informational texts

•        Probe a segment of text in order to study and evaluate its multiple, deeper, and varied meanings

•        Combine text information and prior knowledge (personal experience and/or previous reading) to create new information in the form of inferences

•        Refer to the text for support when analyzing and drawing inferences

*RI.7.2  Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text

•        Explain how two or more central ideas in a nonfiction piece develop over the course of the text, including the relationship between people, ideas, and events

•        Identify and use knowledge of common graphic features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations) to help determine two or more central idea of a text

•        Summarize the text objectively, capturing the main ideas

•        Distinguish between essential and nonessential details of a text to create an objective summary of the text

*RI.7.3  Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

•        Use a note taking structure to track key individuals, events, and/or ideas in informational texts.

•        Explain the relationships between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

•        Reflect on how historical figures influenced ideas or events of the time period and vice versa

•        Analyze why the author chose to describe the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in a particular way

•        Analyze the impact of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events on the reader

Analyze the effectiveness of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in communicating the author’s central idea

*RI.7.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.  

•        Demonstrate the ability to determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text (e.g., figurative, connotative, technical)  

•        Analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and/or tone

•        Explain poetic devices used in text

•        Analyze the impact of poetic sound devices (rhyme scheme, alliteration, consonance, etc) on a particular section of a text

•        Analyze why the author used a specific word choice or sound device

•        Analyze the impact of a word choice or sound device on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s word choice or sound device

RI.7.5  Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

•        Explain how text structure impacts overall meaning of text

•        Identify how the differing form or structure of a text contributes to its meaning

•        Analyze how parts of a text contribute to meaning

•        Explain why the author chose a specific form or structure

•        Analyze the impact of the form or structure on the reader (how would the text be different if the form changed?)

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the chosen form or structure

RI.7.7  Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g. how the delivery of a speech affects the impacts of the words)

•        Analyze how content differs because of the medium in which it is presented

•         Interact with content expressed through multiple and varied formats (written, audio, staged, multimedia)

•        Generate a list of techniques expressed in each medium

•        Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem o its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version

•        Determine how the techniques of a particular medium affect the content

•        Analyze the effects of techniques unique to each medium

•        Explain what makes each medium unique

•        Analyze the impact of each medium on the reader

•        Make judgments about which medium best represents the content

*RI.7.8  Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

•        Support arguments presented in text with evidence.

•        Identify arguments and specific claims in a text

•        Determine which textual segments most strongly support the author's claim

•        Determine the validity of the reasoning

•        Determine the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence

•        Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text

*W.7.1.a-e  Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (a-e)

a. Introduce claims, acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically

b. Support claims with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating and understanding of the topic or text.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence

d.  Establish and maintain a formal style/academic style, approach, and form.

e.  Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

•        Write arguments to support claims

•        Support arguments with clear reasons and relevant evidence

•        Introduce claim(s)

•        Write a clear thesis statement

•        Address opposing claims

•        Organize the reasons and evidence logically.

•        Choose appropriate reasoning and evidence to support claims

•        Evaluate sources for accuracy and reliability

•        Demonstrate an understanding of the topic or text

•        Use transitional words and phrases

•        Use transitions to clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence

•        Choose a consistent style, approach, and form for the task

•        Close the text with a conclusion

W.7.4  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, voice and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

•        Identify defining characteristics of different genres of writing

•        Unpack the writing prompt

•        Write for a specific purpose and audience

•        Select an appropriate text structure or format for the task

•        Use language that is precise and powerful to create voice in writing

•        Create a tone that is appropriate for one’s audience

W.7.5  With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

•        Revise and edit intentionally to improve writing.

•        Generate ideas to develop topic

•        Revise writing with a partner or self-editing checklists

•        View writing from the vantage point of the audience in order to determine the effectiveness of their words, organization, etc

W.7.6  Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

•        Use technological resources to enhance writing

•        Follow appropriate typing format and conventions

•        Use technology to broaden research base

•        Use evidence found online to support ideas

•        Give and receive feedback using technology

•        Seek out authentic publishing opportunities

W.7.7  Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.

•        Engage in short research projects to answer a self-selected or teacher-assigned questions

•        Develop research questions

•        Determine keywords or topics for each question

•        Search for informational sources in an effort to answer the question

•        Compose follow-up research questions based on the initial search

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Research and synthesize information from several sources

•        Conduct research and synthesize multiple sources of information

*W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

b.  Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary non-fiction

•        Incorporate ideas from literary or informational texts to support writing

•        Deconstruct and reflect upon textual evidence

•        Identify evidence that supports claims in literary analysis

•        Logically connect evidence to claims in writing

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Cite in-text direct and indirect quotations appropriately

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Recognize and identify multiple organizational models

•        Apply a specific organizational strategy to a writing

W.7.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, metacognition/self correction, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

•        Practice writing in a myriad of situations (journals, dialogues, creative tasks, etc.)

•        Reflect on and be able to explain decisions made while crafting a piece of writing

•        Produce written reflections

•        Write for a variety of audiences and purposes on an array of cross-curricular topics

SL.7.1.a-d Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a.  Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

b.  Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed

c.  Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.

•        Read required texts prior to discussions

•        Prepare for discussions

•        Use previous knowledge to expand discussions about a topic

•        Engage in conversations about grade-appropriate topics and texts

•        Participate in a variety of rich, structured conversations

•        Define and identify rules for discussions, including group and individual roles

•        Model appropriate behavior during discussions

•        Craft and respond to specific questions based on the topic or text, elaborating when necessary

•        Reflect on and paraphrase what was discussed

•        Summarize the ideas expressed

SL.7.3 Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence

•        Determine the speaker’s argument and claims

•        Evaluate whether the speaker’s reasoning is rational and legitimate

•        Evaluate whether there is enough evidence to support the claims

SL.7.4  Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

•        Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner.

•        Build arguments to prepare for persuasive speeches on topics of interest or address the class on a teacher-assigned topic

•        Use practices that engage the audience (ie: eye contact, volume, pronunciation)

•        Emphasize important points with different pitch or volume

•        Elaborate on a point that listeners may need more explanation to understand

L.7.1  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal different relationships among ideas.

c.  Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

•        Discern the differences in structure and use between simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences

•        Intentionally use a combination of simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas

•        Identify phrases and clauses in sentences when reading

•        Accurately use phrases and clauses within a sentence in writing

•        Recognize and correct misplaced and dangling modifiers

L.7.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives.

b. Spell correctly.

•        Identify a series of adjectives in writing

•        Use a comma to separate adjectives in a series

•        Apply common rules and patterns to spell words correctly

L.7.3  Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

a.Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

•        Select precise language

•        Revise writing for wordiness and redundancies

*L.7.4  Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

*a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word

c.  Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

d.  Very the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary)

•        Use a combination of context clues, structural clues, and the word’s position in a sentence to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to find the pronunciation of a word

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to determine the actual meaning of a word or its part of speech

•        Verify the inferred meaning of a word is the actual meaning by using dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses

•        Consult reference materials that are both printed and digital

L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

•        Understand and apply conversational, academic, and domain specific vocabulary

•        Interpret unknown words and their meanings, using context clues, understanding Greek and Latin roots, and applying grammatical knowledge of function and form

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Science:  Students will connect the unit theme with various informational texts on space and ocean exploration.

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 5 - Journeys & Survival

Timeframe 

6 weeks

Unit Summary

The central text of this unit is Linda Sue Park’s A Long Walk to Water.  Students will explore the historical context, setting, and larger themes of the text through informational texts.  Students will focus on writing literary analysis and will engage in an interdisciplinary research project that allows students to take various roles to solve a real-world problem.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How do individuals survive in challenging environments?
  • How do culture, time, and place influence the development of identity?
  • How does juxtaposing multiple characters help an author develop and contrast their points of view?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • personal identity is a function of an individual’s culture, time, place, geography, interaction with groups, influences from institutions, and lived experiences.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Citing text to support analysis
  • Theme
  • How to determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text
  • How to identify and contrast the different points of view of characters
  • How to objectively summarize a text
  • Author’s point of view
  • Author’s purpose
  • Elements of an informative/explanatory essay

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text
  • analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout a literary text
  • determine the meaning of words and phrases in text
  • analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters and narrators in a literary text
  • cite several pieces of evidence to support an analysis of an informational text
  • objectively summarize informational text
  • determine an author’s point of view or purpose in an informational text
  • write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Quizzes
  • Journals
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, LetsRecap, etc.
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Exit Tickets
  • Text-dependent Questions

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Informative/Explanatory Writing Task: Literary Analysis
  • Benchmark Assessment

Alternative Assessments

  • Water Changes Everything Project
  • Student choice of writing prompt

Learning Activities

  • Building Background Knowledge: Perspectives in Southern Sudan, “The Lost Boys” by Sara Corbett
  • Read novel and/or listen to audio of text
  • Keep a journal while reading for notes and reflection
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12
  • Cooperative group work (eg. Placemat Activity) CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • View helpful videos on: “From the Author, Linda Sue Park” http://www.clpmsmedia.org/backgrounds-to-reading-a-long-walk-to-water.html
  • For specific text analysis questions, close-reading activites, writing activites, and graphic organizers, visit: http://commoncoresuccess.eleducation.org/curriculum/ela/grade-7/module-1
  • Graphic organizers/questions/prompts should focus on: citing evidence, character analysis, theme, point of view juxtaposition
  • (Example: Column 1: What Salva or Nya though, said, or did. Quote/Detail/Evidence, Column 2: What this shows about how culture, time, or place influenced Salva’s or Nya’s identity  Inference/Reasoning-Explanation
  • AND  Column 1: Experiences of people in the Dinka tribe/Similarities and/or differences between the Dinka and Nuer tribes Quote/Detail/Evidence, Column 2: EXPLAIN what this shows about the perspective of the Dinka or Nuer tribe (or both) Inference/Reasoning-Explanation) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Reader’s Notebook (Can be digital)  8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Vocabulary TIP Charts, Word Splash, Reader’s Dictionary, etc.
  • World Café Discussion Protocol to Analyze and Discuss Point of View: Found in Module 1 Unit 1, Lesson 9  CRP12, CRP4 http://commoncoresuccess.eleducation.org/curriculum/ela/grade-7/module-1
  • Literature Circles with meetings focusing on skills and/or Learning Menu CRP2, CRP4, CRP8, CRP12
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. 8.1.8.A.2, CRP4, CRP6
  • View Lost Boys of Sudan
  • Possible blogging/ SKYPE/Collaboration with students from other schools and countries who have read text. 8.1.8.C.1
  • Students explore and research: www.waterforsouthsudan.org
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking
  • Tic-Tac-Toe Research Project
  • Option 1:  Create a TIP chart using the provided vocabulary.
  • Option 2:  Research the setting of the book to create a brochure.
  • Option 3:  Research the health benefits to water and write an objective summary.
  • Option 4: Create a map of Sudan.
  • Option 5:  Research the different refugees from around the world and create an Acrostic poem.  
  • Option 6:  Research the importance and inspiration for this book to create a book cover.  
  • Option 7:  Research background on the author and create a biography.
  • Option 8:  Research the Dinka and Nuer tribes and create a Venn Diagram.
  • Option 9:  Research the civil war of Sudan and write a newspaper article.  https://docs.google.com/document/d/10dMQnpUeLelhgqdG_aFyFzrh0E4plR6oyETqV8sk46I/edit

Writing:

  • Read and analyze mentor texts (Provided essay for Option 1 in supplemental resources: Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 11 http://commoncoresuccess.eleducation.org/curriculum/ela/grade-7/module-1 )
  • Mini-lessons on creating an informative/explanatory essay & citations CRP7
  • Prewriting & organization charts (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet – Can use organizers from reading to assist in writing) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Conferencing with teacher
  • Peer reviews CRP12
  • Mini-lessons on writing process and skills and conventions of standard English (see Purdue Owl Writing Lab Online and my.hrw.com)
  • *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking
  • Literary Analysis Essay (Primary 3) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP2, CRP4, CRP8
  • Option 1: Focusing Question: “How do individuals survive challenging environments in A Long Walk to Water?”
  • After reading the novel and accounts of the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War, write an essay that addresses the theme of survival by answering the question: What factors made survival possible for Salva in A Long Walk to Water? Support your discussion with evidence from the novel and be sure to explain your thinking about how this evidence relates to a factor in Salva’s survival.
  • Option 2: (More Challenging)
  • Use text-based evidence to compare and contrast the characters of Salva and Nya. Explain how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of both characters to convey her themes/messages more strongly.

Project Options:

  • Students work in groups to plan a school-wide awareness campaign/fundraiser to help www.waterforsouthsudan.org or another charity on a global issue. Projects can be shared on class blog/ presented. 8.1.8.A.1, 8.1.8.A.2, 8.1.8.B.1, 8.1.8.C.1, 8.8.8.D.2-4, 8.1.8.E.1, CRP2, CRP4, CRP7, CRP8, CRP11, CRP12  (For more information about Inquiry Projects:  See the following text available in IS office: Comprehension & Collaboration)

  • Water Changes Everything Project 8.1.8.A.1, 8.1.8.A.2, 8.1.8.B.1, 8.1.8.C.1, 8.8.8.D.2-4, 8.1.8.E.1, CRP2, CRP4, CRP7, CRP8, CRP11, CRP12

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Novel by Linda Sue Park: A Long Walk to Water

Alternate Text Option: I am Malala, The Watsons Go to Birmingham (Resource Room)

Equipment

Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazine, and other online sources as needed

Leveled Text Dependent Question Stems

Informational Text Options:

“The Lost Boys” by Sara Corbett (https://mhs.springbranchisd.com/Portals/175/teachers/language%20arts/jaseklindsay/The%20Lost%20Boys.pdf?ver=2011-01-03-200503-120)

(The three excerpts below can be found in the lesson resources here: http://commoncoresuccess.eleducation.org/curriculum/ela/grade-7/module-1)

“Time Trip: Sudan’s Civil War” (Excerpt from: “Life and Death in Darfur: Sudan’s Refugee Crisis Continues,” Current Events, April 7, 2006)

•        Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6

 “Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War” by Karl Vick (Washington Post Foreign Service, 1997)

•        Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 10 (Excerpt 1)

•        Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 12 (Excerpt 2)

“Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps” by Stephen Buckley (Washington Post Foreign Service, 1997)

•        Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 13

A Long Walk to Water Text Sets from Newsela.com (multiple lexile levels): https://newsela.com/text-sets/31336/a-long-walk-to-water

Connected Informational Text Articles Include the Following Titles:

“In South Africa, volunteers deliver water to ease drought emergency”

“For many of world’s poor, drinking water can kill”

“A home lost, a home found: Some Syrian refugees find way to Chicago”

“Being called a refugee could help some Central American kids”

“Refugee children making dangerous trip to safety in Europe without parents”

“Ukranian refugees in Russia asking, ‘now what?’”

“Child migrants to U.S. try to escape Central American turmoil”

“U.S. will accept more refugees, but security rules will limit how many”

“Doors open and close for Syrians in growing refugee camp”

"Crisis in Africa" - Readworks.org

“Author’s Note,” from A Long Walk to Water

Other Resources:

www.waterforsouthsudan.org

http://www.clpmsmedia.org/backgrounds-to-reading-a-long-walk-to-water.html

http://commoncoresuccess.eleducation.org/texts/ELA/7#196

*See Suggested Open Educational Resources Page at End of Curriculum Document

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

*RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

*RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

•        Paraphrase evidence from text

•        Correctly cite evidence

•        Closely read the text (questioning, determining importance, looking for patterns) to  extract quality evidence to support a claim

•        Use evidence from the text to make and check predictions as you read

•        Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global connections, when relevant

•        Gather evidence from the text to support inferences or explicit meaning

•        Read and analyze a variety of literary genres and informational texts

•        Probe a segment of text in order to study and evaluate its multiple, deeper, and varied meanings

•        Combine text information and prior knowledge (personal experience and/or previous reading) to create new information in the form of inferences

•        Refer to the text for support when analyzing and drawing inferences

*RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

*RI.7.2  Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text

•        Provide a statement of a theme(s) or a central idea(s) of a fictional text, based on textual evidence

•        Explain the theme or central idea of a fictional piece using key details as evidence, including details from the beginning, middle, and end of the text

•        Analyze the development of the theme or central idea over the course of the fictional text, including the relationship between characters, setting, and plot over the course of a text

•        Evaluate recurring ideas and changes in the characters and plot over the course of the text (why did the author make those changes, impact on the reader, effectiveness of the author’s choices)

•        Identify how the theme or central idea relates to the characters, setting, and/or plot over the course of the text

•        Explain how two or more central ideas in a nonfiction piece develop over the course of the text, including the relationship between people, ideas, and events

•        Identify and use knowledge of common graphic features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations) to help determine two or more central idea of a text

•        Summarize the text objectively, capturing the main ideas

•        Distinguish between essential and nonessential details of a text to create an objective summary of the text

*RL.7.3  Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact

*RI.7.3  Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

RL.7.3

•        Analyze the impact specific story elements have on the text

•        Relate the change in character to changes in setting or plot and vice versa (change in setting affects character or plot, change in plot affects character and setting)

•        Analyze  how the plot and setting affect the actions/choices of the characters

•        Explain why the author chose to have elements of a story interact in a specific way

•        Analyze the impact of the relationship between characters, setting, and plot on the reader

•        Evaluate the author’s effectiveness in determining the interactions between character, setting, and plot

RI.7.3

•        Use a note taking structure to track key individuals, events, and/or ideas in informational texts.

•        Explain the relationships between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

•        Reflect on how historical figures influenced ideas or events of the time period and vice versa

•        Analyze why the author chose to describe the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in a particular way

•        Analyze the impact of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events on the reader

Analyze the effectiveness of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in communicating the author’s central idea

*RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetition of sounds on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.  

*RI.7.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

•        Demonstrate the ability to determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text (e.g., figurative, connotative, technical)  

•        Analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and/or tone

•        Explain poetic devices used in text

•        Analyze the impact of poetic sound devices (rhyme scheme, alliteration, consonance, etc) on a particular section of a text

•        Analyze why the author used a specific word choice or sound device

•        Analyze the impact of a word choice or sound device on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s word choice or sound device

*RL.7.6  Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.

*RI.7.6  Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others

RL.7.6

•        Identify the viewpoints of characters in a text

•        Compare and contrast the characters’ points-of-view

•        Trace how the author created and conveyed the similar and/or dissimilar characters

•        Analyze the impact of the author’s point of view choices on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s point of view choices

RI.7.6:

•        Identify the author’s point of view

•        Explain the techniques the author uses to distinguish his/her point of view from others

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques the author uses to distinguish his/her point of view from others

RL.7.10. **By the end of the year read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems at grade level text-complexity (see Appendix A) or above, scaffolding as needed.  

•        Determine difficulties in comprehending and making meaning

•        Apply appropriate strategies in order to increase comprehension when encountering grade level text

•        Encounter appropriate texts at each grade level in order to develop the mature language skills and the conceptual knowledge needed for success in school and life

•        Encounter the text with scaffolding when needed Make an increasing number of connections among ideas and between texts

*W.7.2.a-f   Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using text structures (e.g., definition, classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, etc.) and text features (e.g., headings, graphics, and multimedia) when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.7.2.B. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

W.7.2.C. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

W.7.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

W.7.2.E. Establish and maintain a formal style/academic style, approach, and form.

W.7.2.F. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

•        Focus writing on thoroughly describing or explaining a topic

•        Identify the defining elements of this specific writing genre

•        Explore topics from their content area classes.

•        Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow

•        Organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect

•         Include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension

•        Include relevant supporting facts, information, and details

•        Transition between ideas using appropriate words and phrases

•        Select precise language and domain-specific vocabulary

•        Consistently use an appropriate style

•        Create language that is appropriate to one's audience and follows a formal tone

•        Write a conclusion to bring the text to a close

W.7.4  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, voice and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

•        Identify defining characteristics of different genres of writing

•        Unpack the writing prompt

•        Write for a specific purpose and audience

•        Select an appropriate text structure or format for the task

•        Use language that is precise and powerful to create voice in writing

•        Create a tone that is appropriate for one’s audience

W.7.5  With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

•        Revise and edit intentionally to improve writing.

•        Generate ideas to develop topic

•        Revise writing with a partner or self-editing checklists

•        View writing from the vantage point of the audience in order to determine the effectiveness of their words, organization, etc

W.7.6  Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

•        Use technological resources to enhance writing

•        Follow appropriate typing format and conventions

•        Use technology to broaden research base

•        Use evidence found online to support ideas

•        Give and receive feedback using technology

•        Seek out authentic publishing opportunities

W.7.7  Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.

•        Engage in short research projects to answer a self-selected or teacher-assigned questions

•        Develop research questions

•        Determine keywords or topics for each question

•        Search for informational sources in an effort to answer the question

•        Compose follow-up research questions based on the initial search

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Research and synthesize information from several sources

•        Conduct research and synthesize multiple sources of information

W.7.8.  Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

•        Use search terms effectively

•        Write a clear thesis statement

•        Draw evidence from texts to support thesis

•        Assess the credibility and accuracy of each source

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Follow published guidelines (MLA, APA, etc) to cite direct and indirect quotations

•        Identify examples of plagiarism in writing

•        Paraphrase source information to avoid plagiarism in writing

*W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

b.  Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary non-fiction

•        Incorporate ideas from literary or informational texts to support writing

•        Deconstruct and reflect upon textual evidence

•        Identify evidence that supports claims in literary analysis

•        Logically connect evidence to claims in writing

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Cite in-text direct and indirect quotations appropriately

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Recognize and identify multiple organizational models

•        Apply a specific organizational strategy to a writing

W.7.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, metacognition/self correction, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

•        Practice writing in a myriad of situations (journals, dialogues, creative tasks, etc.)

•        Reflect on and be able to explain decisions made while crafting a piece of writing

•        Produce written reflections

•        Write for a variety of audiences and purposes on an array of cross-curricular topics

SL.7.1.a-d Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a.  Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

b.  Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed

c.  Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.

•        Read required texts prior to discussions

•        Prepare for discussions

•        Use previous knowledge to expand discussions about a topic

•        Engage in conversations about grade-appropriate topics and texts

•        Participate in a variety of rich, structured conversations

•        Define and identify rules for discussions, including group and individual roles

•        Model appropriate behavior during discussions

•        Craft and respond to specific questions based on the topic or text, elaborating when necessary

•        Reflect on and paraphrase what was discussed

•        Summarize the ideas expressed

SL.7.4  Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

•        Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner.

•        Build arguments to prepare for persuasive speeches on topics of interest or address the class on a teacher-assigned topic

•        Use practices that engage the audience (ie: eye contact, volume, pronunciation)

•        Emphasize important points with different pitch or volume

•        Elaborate on a point that listeners may need more explanation to understand

SL.7.5  Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.

•        Use multimedia and visual displays to enhance work

•        Identify the various types of multimedia (text, audio, still images, animation, and video) and visual displays (posters, props)

•        Find meaningful ways to include these tools in presentations

•        Identify where to incorporate multimedia and visual displays, as well as implement specific video clips to enhance audience interest and learning

•        Use multimedia to help make claims and findings clear and to emphasize important points for the audience

•        Determine when it is appropriate to use informal language versus formal English

SL.7.6  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 here for specific expectations.)

•        Orally present information, using appropriate speech, in a variety of situations

•        Recognize and consider the audience

•        Determine  if the topic and language style correspond appropriately

•        Reflect on the use of language and revise as needed

L.7.1  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal different relationships among ideas.

c.  Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

•        Discern the differences in structure and use between simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences

•        Intentionally use a combination of simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas

•        Identify phrases and clauses in sentences when reading

•        Accurately use phrases and clauses within a sentence in writing

•        Recognize and correct misplaced and dangling modifiers

L.7.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives.

b. Spell correctly.

•        Identify a series of adjectives in writing

•        Use a comma to separate adjectives in a series

•        Apply common rules and patterns to spell words correctly

L.7.3  Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

a.Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

•        Select precise language

•        Revise writing for wordiness and redundancies

*L.7.4  Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

*a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word

c.  Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

d.  Very the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary)

•        Use a combination of context clues, structural clues, and the word’s position in a sentence to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to find the pronunciation of a word

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to determine the actual meaning of a word or its part of speech

•        Verify the inferred meaning of a word is the actual meaning by using dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses

•        Consult reference materials that are both printed and digital

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History/Geography:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and setting of the extended text, A Long Walk to Water.

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 6 - Guided by a Cause

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

 “The fullness of our heart comes in our actions.” – Mother Theresa

Students will explore historical writing and historical fiction and connect the theme of “Guided by a Cause” to today’s world.  Students will engage in short research projects and writing a personal essay. In addition to the unit theme texts, students will also participate in literature circles/book clubs with a text of their choosing.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What inspires people to take action to improve their world?
  • What causes are important to you and the authors in the unit?
  • What steps can one take to address a cause that is important to you?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Pursuing a cause that is important to you can make a difference in the lives of others, in the community, and in the larger world.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Central ideas and details
  • Various text structures
  • Point of view
  • How to compare and contrast
  • Personal essays
  • Documentary features
  • Style & theme in poetry
  • Characterization methods
  • Flashback
  • How to effectively conduct short research projects using reliable sources

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Determine central ideas and details
  • Analyze text structure (chronological order)
  • Analyze authors’ writings on the same topic
  • Analyze points of view in a text and compare and contrast different genres
  • Identify and analyze elements of a personal essay and determine an author’s point of view
  • Analyze the purpose of a documentary and understand the features used in it
  • Analyze a poet’s style and determine a theme
  • Analyze methods of characterization and flashback in a short story
  • Conduct short research projects
  • Write a personal essay

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Quizzes
  • Journals
  • Flipgrid, Kahoot, LetsRecap, etc.
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Exit Tickets
  • Text-dependent Questions

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Personal Essay
  • Benchmark Assessment

Alternative Assessments

  • Literature Circle Thoughts Logs/Projects
  • Student choice of writing prompts
  • Disaster Research Project (student choice of topics)

Learning Activities

  • Collection openers (quote, video, art) to explore unit essential questions
  • Read texts and/or listen to audio
  • HISTORY Channel Short Video: America The Story of Us: The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire
  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Close reading screencasts & modeled discussions (Student creation of these through written script or audio [Audacity: Create audio files to share online.) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11, CRP4
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Student created graphic organizers: Central Idea and Details/Compare Anchor Texts (Analyze Presentations of Information) (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Collaborative discussions CRP12 & Cooperative group work CRP12/ Differentiated group work
  • Level-up Tutorials & Interactive Whiteboard Lessons based on student need
  • Vocabulary TIP charts or other activities
  • Speaking Activity:
  • The Triangle Factory Fire raised issues about inadequate workplace safety, labor rights, and factory jobs.  Despite great progress in improving working conditions since 1911, these issues are still in the news. 8.1.8.A.1&2, 8.1.8.B.1, 8.1.8.C.1, 8.1.8.D.4, 8.1.8.E.1, CRP2, CRP4, CRP7, CRP8
  • Use online and print resources to learn about a recent event.
  • Use several sources to get varied viewpoints and interpretations of the event.
  • Prepare a short talk to tell about the event, the people, and the issues.
  • (Can be completed in small groups with Placemat & posted on class blog.)
  • How is this event similar to and different from the Triangle Factory Fire? *See Suggested Open Educational Resources Document at end of Curriculum Document for Instructional Ideas/Resources Relating to Reading, Writing/Language, Speaking & Listening, Critical Thinking
  • Disaster Research Project
  • Upon completion of  reading of “The Triangle Factory Fire,” select a current event and create a Google slide presentation. Students will be required to read and gather research on the event, as well as make connections to the events of the Triangle Factory Fire they have learned about in class.
  • https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ap7JaJjA7oFLBNexM6qbHrOXzxDYEOEitHfqVysYPEc/edit
  • HISTORY Channel Short Video: “The Fight to End Child Labor”
  • Student created graphic organizers: Author’s Point of View (Google Apps, Mindmapping, Padlet) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP11
  • Writing Activity: Critique
  • Has this (Craig Kielburger) essay persuaded you that global poverty can be ended?  Why or why not?  Consider: Does Kielburger do enough to convince you?  Does his choice of evidence effectively support his point of view?  If not, why is it inadequate and what additional evidence might he have included? CRP2, CRP4, CRP8
  • Write a Personal Essay
  • In this unit, you read about problems in the world that inspire people to take action to solve those problems.  For example, twelve-year-old Craig Kielburger was moved to expose the injustice of child labor practices around the world.  Write a personal essay about a cause that is important to you.
  • Determine Your Topic: Think about an experience that has affected you in a way that makes you want to inform others about it.  Consider how the experience affected you and your beliefs.  Identify a cause that is related to that experience.  Record your ideas about what you have done or would like to do to support the cause.
  • Resource Room Option for Personal Essay: “People who are passionate about a cause and want to take action usually have specific character traits.What is one of your best character traits?”
  • Organize Your Ideas
  • Consider Your Purpose and Audience
  • Students can also have choice of how to present this information creatively (brochure for charity, etc.) 8.1.8.A.2, CRP2, CRP4, CRP8
  • Analyze Media Organizer: Features of a Documentary/Strategies for Viewing p. 319 CRP8
  • Media Activity: Photo Documentary
  • What does it take to be committed to a cause despite great obstacles?  Let people know about a person in your school or community who works on an important social cause.  Create a photo documentary to tell that person’s story.  CRP6

Literature Circle:

  • Reflection Log
  • Resource: Literature Circles: Voice and Choice in Book Clubs & Reading Groups by Harvey Daniels, Mini-Lessons for Literature Circles by Daniels & Steinke
  • Reading Conferences

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

History Writing by Albert Marrin, from “Flesh and Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Factory Fire and Its Legacy”

History Writing by Zachary Kent, from “The Story of the Triangle Factory Fire”

History Writing by Lynne Olson, from “The Most Daring of [Our] Leaders” (This text has a higher Lexile level and is recommended for advanced readers.)

Connecting texts to current factory conditions in various parts of the world – See past editions of UpFront Magazine

Historical Novel by Margaret Peterson Haddix, from Uprising

Personal Essay by Craig Kielburger, “Craig Kielburger Reflects on Working Toward Peace”

Short Story by ZZ Packer, “Doris is Coming”

Documentary Clip by Judy Jackson, from It Takes a Child

Newspaper Article by David Karas, “Difference Maker: John Bergmann and Popcorn Park”

Poem by Nikki Giovanni, “A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long”

Short Story by D’Arcy McNickle, “Train Time”

Paired Text Set (found in Performance Assessment Book Unit 4)

“What is a Strike?” by Sharon Blumenstein

“New York School Bus Strike: Sign of National Pressure on Unions” by Stacy Teicher Khadaroo

“Why is it Rare for Public Sector Workers to Go on Strike?” by Mia Lewis

Suggested Student Novels for Literature Circles:

The Giver by Lois Lowry

Jeremy Fink and the Meaning of Life by Wendy Mass

Bronx Masquerade by Nikki Grimes

Freak the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick

The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis

Equipment

Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazine, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232181788-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-7

Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading, Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Writing, by Harvey “Smokey” Daniels/Nancy Steineke

Leveled Text Dependent Question Stems

 

*See Suggested Open Educational Resources Page at End of Curriculum Document

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

*RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

*RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

•        Paraphrase evidence from text

•        Correctly cite evidence

•        Closely read the text (questioning, determining importance, looking for patterns) to  extract quality evidence to support a claim

•        Use evidence from the text to make and check predictions as you read

•        Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global connections, when relevant

•        Gather evidence from the text to support inferences or explicit meaning

•        Read and analyze a variety of literary genres and informational texts

•        Probe a segment of text in order to study and evaluate its multiple, deeper, and varied meanings

•        Combine text information and prior knowledge (personal experience and/or previous reading) to create new information in the form of inferences

•        Refer to the text for support when analyzing and drawing inferences

*RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

*RI.7.2  Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text

•        Provide a statement of a theme(s) or a central idea(s) of a fictional text, based on textual evidence

•        Explain the theme or central idea of a fictional piece using key details as evidence, including details from the beginning, middle, and end of the text

•        Analyze the development of the theme or central idea over the course of the fictional text, including the relationship between characters, setting, and plot over the course of a text

•        Evaluate recurring ideas and changes in the characters and plot over the course of the text (why did the author make those changes, impact on the reader, effectiveness of the author’s choices)

•        Identify how the theme or central idea relates to the characters, setting, and/or plot over the course of the text

•        Explain how two or more central ideas in a nonfiction piece develop over the course of the text, including the relationship between people, ideas, and events

•        Identify and use knowledge of common graphic features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations) to help determine two or more central idea of a text

•        Summarize the text objectively, capturing the main ideas

•        Distinguish between essential and nonessential details of a text to create an objective summary of the text

*RL.7.3  Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact

*RI.7.3  Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

RL.7.3

•        Analyze the impact specific story elements have on the text

•        Relate the change in character to changes in setting or plot and vice versa (change in setting affects character or plot, change in plot affects character and setting)

•        Analyze  how the plot and setting affect the actions/choices of the characters

•        Explain why the author chose to have elements of a story interact in a specific way

•        Analyze the impact of the relationship between characters, setting, and plot on the reader

•        Evaluate the author’s effectiveness in determining the interactions between character, setting, and plot

RI.7.3

•        Use a note taking structure to track key individuals, events, and/or ideas in informational texts.

•        Explain the relationships between individuals, events, and ideas in a text

•        Reflect on how historical figures influenced ideas or events of the time period and vice versa

•        Analyze why the author chose to describe the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in a particular way

•        Analyze the impact of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events on the reader

Analyze the effectiveness of the interaction between ideas, individuals, and events in communicating the author’s central idea

*RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetition of sounds on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.  

*RI.7.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

•        Demonstrate the ability to determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text (e.g., figurative, connotative, technical)  

•        Analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and/or tone

•        Explain poetic devices used in text

•        Analyze the impact of poetic sound devices (rhyme scheme, alliteration, consonance, etc) on a particular section of a text

•        Analyze why the author used a specific word choice or sound device

•        Analyze the impact of a word choice or sound device on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s word choice or sound device

*RL.7.6  Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.

*RI.7.6  Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others

RL.7.6

•        Identify the viewpoints of characters in a text

•        Compare and contrast the characters’ points-of-view

•        Trace how the author created and conveyed the similar and/or dissimilar characters

•        Analyze the impact of the author’s point of view choices on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s point of view choices

RI.7.6:

•        Identify the author’s point of view

•        Explain the techniques the author uses to distinguish his/her point of view from others

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques the author uses to distinguish his/her point of view from others

RL.7.9 Compare, contrast and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

*RI.7.9  Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts..

RL.7.9

•        Compare and contrast historical fiction and a factual text

•        Explain how authors of historical fiction omit, embellish, or alter the information found in factual text to create a story

•        Use a variety of previous knowledge (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) to make connections to and reflect on the text

•        Analyze the importance of the information each author emphasized and the importance of what was excluded

•        Analyze why the author of the fictional piece chose to  use or alter history

•        Analyze the impact that the author’s use or alteration of history has on the reader

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s choices to use and/or alter history  

RI.7.9

•        Track key individuals, events, and/or ideas in informational texts from two or more authors.

•        Investigate how one topic may be presented in different ways

•        Compare and contrast two or more authors’ presentations of key information.

•        Analyze the importance of the different information each author emphasized and excluded

•        Analyze how the authors use the same information, but produce different texts because of interpretation

•        Use a variety of previous knowledge (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) to make connections to and reflect on the text

•        Evaluate the effectiveness of the authors’ emphasis of specific evidence and different interpretations of facts for promoting their view

RL.7.10. **By the end of the year read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems at grade level text-complexity (see Appendix A) or above, scaffolding as needed.  

•        Determine difficulties in comprehending and making meaning

•        Apply appropriate strategies in order to increase comprehension when encountering grade level text

•        Encounter appropriate texts at each grade level in order to develop the mature language skills and the conceptual knowledge needed for success in school and life

•        Encounter the text with scaffolding when needed Make an increasing number of connections among ideas and between texts

*W.7.2.a-f   Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using text structures (e.g., definition, classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, etc.) and text features (e.g., headings, graphics, and multimedia) when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.7.2.B. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

W.7.2.C. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

W.7.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

W.7.2.E. Establish and maintain a formal style/academic style, approach, and form.

W.7.2.F. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

•        Focus writing on thoroughly describing or explaining a topic

•        Identify the defining elements of this specific writing genre

•        Explore topics from their content area classes.

•        Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow

•        Organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect

•        Include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension

•        Include relevant supporting facts, information, and details

•        Transition between ideas using appropriate words and phrases

•        Select precise language and domain-specific vocabulary

•        Consistently use an appropriate style

•        Create language that is appropriate to one's audience and follows a formal tone

•        Write a conclusion to bring the text to a close

W.7.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

•        Engage the reader with a story hook

•        Introduce a narrator and/or characters

•        Establish a point of view and background story

•        Organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically

•        Use narrative techniques effectively to develop experiences, events, and/or characters

•        Transition from one idea to the next by using appropriate words and phrases

•        Use figurative language to aid in description

•        Describe ideas by using sensory and specific language

•        Write a conclusion that brings the story events to a meaningful close

•        Clearly convey a conflict and a resolution to the conflict

W.7.4  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, voice and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

•        Identify defining characteristics of different genres of writing

•        Unpack the writing prompt

•        Write for a specific purpose and audience

•        Select an appropriate text structure or format for the task

•        Use language that is precise and powerful to create voice in writing

•        Create a tone that is appropriate for one’s audience

W.7.5  With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

•        Revise and edit intentionally to improve writing.

•        Generate ideas to develop topic

•        Revise writing with a partner or self-editing checklists

•        View writing from the vantage point of the audience in order to determine the effectiveness of their words, organization, etc

W.7.6  Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

•        Use technological resources to enhance writing

•        Follow appropriate typing format and conventions

•        Use technology to broaden research base

•        Use evidence found online to support ideas

•        Give and receive feedback using technology

•        Seek out authentic publishing opportunities

W.7.7  Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.

•        Engage in short research projects to answer a self-selected or teacher-assigned questions

•        Develop research questions

•        Determine keywords or topics for each question

•        Search for informational sources in an effort to answer the question

•        Compose follow-up research questions based on the initial search

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Research and synthesize information from several sources

•        Conduct research and synthesize multiple sources of information

W.7.8.  Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

•        Use search terms effectively

•        Write a clear thesis statement

•        Draw evidence from texts to support thesis

•        Assess the credibility and accuracy of each source

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Follow published guidelines (MLA, APA, etc) to cite direct and indirect quotations

•        Identify examples of plagiarism in writing

•        Paraphrase source information to avoid plagiarism in writing

*W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

b.  Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary non-fiction

•        Incorporate ideas from literary or informational texts to support writing

•        Deconstruct and reflect upon textual evidence

•        Identify evidence that supports claims in literary analysis

•        Logically connect evidence to claims in writing

•        Select direct and indirect quotations that relate to the topic as evidence

•        Cite in-text direct and indirect quotations appropriately

•        Explain quotations used as support to enhance meaning

•        Recognize and identify multiple organizational models

•        Apply a specific organizational strategy to a writing

W.7.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, metacognition/self correction, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

•        Practice writing in a myriad of situations (journals, dialogues, creative tasks, etc.)

•        Reflect on and be able to explain decisions made while crafting a piece of writing

•        Produce written reflections

•        Write for a variety of audiences and purposes on an array of cross-curricular topics

SL.7.1.a-d Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a.  Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

b.  Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed

c.  Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.

•        Read required texts prior to discussions

•        Prepare for discussions

•        Use previous knowledge to expand discussions about a topic

•        Engage in conversations about grade-appropriate topics and texts

•        Participate in a variety of rich, structured conversations

•        Define and identify rules for discussions, including group and individual roles

•        Model appropriate behavior during discussions

•        Craft and respond to specific questions based on the topic or text, elaborating when necessary

•        Reflect on and paraphrase what was discussed

•        Summarize the ideas expressed

SL.7.2 Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

•        Extract the main ideas and the details used to support it presented in different media formats

•         Synthesize the information, sorting between the main points and smaller details that work to support the main points

•        Use a graphic organizer (e.g., web, outline, etc)to analyze presented information

•         Explain how the main idea and supporting details help to clarify a topic, text, or issue

SL.7.4  Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

•        Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner.

•        Build arguments to prepare for persuasive speeches on topics of interest or address the class on a teacher-assigned topic

•        Use practices that engage the audience (ie: eye contact, volume, pronunciation)

•        Emphasize important points with different pitch or volume

•        Elaborate on a point that listeners may need more explanation to understand

SL.7.5  Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.

•        Use multimedia and visual displays to enhance work

•        Identify the various types of multimedia (text, audio, still images, animation, and video) and visual displays (posters, props)

•        Find meaningful ways to include these tools in presentations

•        Identify where to incorporate multimedia and visual displays, as well as implement specific video clips to enhance audience interest and learning

•        Use multimedia to help make claims and findings clear and to emphasize important points for the audience

•        Determine when it is appropriate to use informal language versus formal English

SL.7.6  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 here for specific expectations.)

•        Orally present information, using appropriate speech, in a variety of situations

•        Recognize and consider the audience

•        Determine  if the topic and language style correspond appropriately

•        Reflect on the use of language and revise as needed

L.7.1  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal different relationships among ideas.

c.  Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

•        Discern the differences in structure and use between simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences

•        Intentionally use a combination of simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas

•        Identify phrases and clauses in sentences when reading

•        Accurately use phrases and clauses within a sentence in writing

•        Recognize and correct misplaced and dangling modifiers

L.7.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives.

b. Spell correctly.

•        Identify a series of adjectives in writing

•        Use a comma to separate adjectives in a series

•        Apply common rules and patterns to spell words correctly

L.7.3  Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

a.Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

•        Select precise language

•        Revise writing for wordiness and redundancies

*L.7.4  Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

*a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word

c.  Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

d.  Very the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary)

•        Use a combination of context clues, structural clues, and the word’s position in a sentence to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to find the pronunciation of a word

•        Use dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses to determine the actual meaning of a word or its part of speech

•        Verify the inferred meaning of a word is the actual meaning by using dictionaries, glossaries, and/or thesauruses

•        Consult reference materials that are both printed and digital

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media:  Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme through various artistic mediums, including documentary film.

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers. (eg. Triangle Factory Fire)

Current Events:  Students will connect the unit theme with various informational texts and current events. (eg. Unions and strikes)

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.2 Develop a Personalized Student Learning Plan with the assistance of an adult mentor that includes information about career areas of interest, goals and an educational plan.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.8.C.1 Collaborate to develop and publish work that provides perspectives on a global problem for discussions with learners from other countries.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel

Suggested Open Educational Resources Grade 7 (Interactive Links)

Reading

●     Close In on Close Reading

●     Teaching Channel: Thinking Notes Strategy For Close Reading

●     Summarizing, Paraphrasing & Retelling

●     Strategies for Analyzing Argument

●     Common Core Reading Strategies Informational Text

●     Summarizing Non-Fiction Text

●     YouTube Reading Lessons Middle School

●     Common Core Strategies

●     Teaching Reading

●     Teaching Theme

●     Exploring Character

●     Literary Analysis

●    Vocabulary: Doing It Differently

 

Writing/Language

●      Teacher Tube - Counterclaims and rebuttals

●      Evidence Based Arguments

●      Writing Fix: Word Choice Resources

●      Writing Resources by Strand

●      Word Choice YouTube

●      Argumentative Writing YouTube

●      Writing Exemplars - Argument/Opinion

●      PARCC Writing Resources

●      Harvard College Writing Center

●      Teaching Narrative

●      Writing Exemplars by Grade Level and Aspects to Consider in Writing

●      Thesis Writing

●      Discussion, Planning and Questioning 

●      Literary Analysis Writing

●      Writing a Thesis Statement

 

Speaking & Listening

●       Inquiry Based Learning (Edutopia)

●       Engaging Students Using Discussion

●       Strategies for Student Centered Discussion 

●       Socratic Seminar: ReadWriteThink

●       Fishbowl Strategy

●       Stems on Fostering Class Discussion

●       Fishbowl Strategies: Teach Like This

●       Accountable Talk

●       AVID Socratic Seminar

Critical Thinking

●      Levels of Thinking in Bloom’s and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge

●      Cognitive Rigor Chart

●      5 Strategies For Middle School Classrooms

●      Spectrum of Standards by Grade; Breakdown of Standards and Sample Lessons

 

Technology Tools for Differentiation: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ihsTwYr1kFx9Jb08Z2w5i1MWoxYkRXZbTP4Gcbodp6I/htmlview?pli=1#gid=0

www.rewordify.com

 

Other Helpful Resources:

www.teachingchannel.org

www.theteachertoolkit.com