11th Grade Year One Language A: Language and Literature Syllabus

Part One and Part Two

Tutorial Times for Mrs. MacFarland & Ms. Cameron

Tuesday & Thursday 7:35-8:20

Tuesdays after school by appointment from 4:05-4:45 p.m.

Contact Information

Mrs. MacFarland is available via email at m.macfarland@mwschool.org and by phone at (512) 660-5230.  A detailed calendar & helpful links are  also available on Mrs. MacFarland’s website at http://www.mrsmacfarland.com.  Mrs. MacFarland will also post formative and summative assignments in Managebac as well.

Ms. Cameron is available at r.cameron@mwschool.org and by phone at  (512) 660-5230.  Helpful documents and links are also available on Ms. Cameron’s website at http://www.mscameron.com.  Ms. Cameron will also post formative and summative assignments in Managebac as well.

Required Supplies

Students should bring the following items to class: post-its, a black or blue pen, and a set of colored highlighters (preferably five colors) and a COMPUTER (you will need a computer every day). 

Turnitin.com

Students will turn in all digital assignments through turnitin.com. Turnitin.com checks for originality of the student and will detect plagiarism. Students are expected to adhere to our academic honesty policy.  More information is available at https://www.mrsmacfarland.com/turnitincom-for-written-assignments.html.

Major Assessment Retake Policy                                                                                     

If a student scores below a 70% on a major grade, the student may retest or redo for up to a 70%. Students must work with the teacher to relearn the material or master the necessary skills before the retake.  This means at least one tutorial or Saturday Opportunity School (SOS) session must take place prior to the retest.

Late Work:

Under Meridian Secondary School rules, work turned in late will incur a penalty of -10 points per school day past the due date.  Summative assessments that are three or more days late can receive no higher than a 70.  Formative assessments that are five or more days late can receive no higher than a 50.  Late work is not accepted after the end of a grading period.

If you would like to earn up to five points on an essay, you may conference with your teacher  and review the area that needs the most improvement. Revised work needs to have the original work attached with the assessed rubric. Points will be rewarded based on the quality of the revision.

Grading for a Nine Weeks Quarter

Summative assignments will include assessments such as Written Tasks (1 & 2), Paper One practices, Creative Writing, Further Oral Activities, etc.  Formative Assessments will include Socratic seminars, monthly journals, classroom activities, etc.

SEMESTER BREAK-DOWN

THE FINAL GRADE FOR THE CLASS WILL BE THE AVERAGE OF THE TWO SEMESTERS.

1st 9 weeks average                                         42.5%                        

2nd 9 weeks average                                          42.5%                

Final Exam                                        15%

_______________________                          100%

Overview of Language and Literature

Language A: language and literature comprises four parts—two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. Study of language  will be primarily studied in 11th grade, while the study of literature will be primarily studied in 12th grade.  See pages four and five to see an overview of Parts I and II.

Language A: language and literature and theory of knowledge

Group 1 aims: The aims of language A: literature and language

1. introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles, and genres

2. develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections

3. develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication

4. encourage students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received

5. encourage, through the study of texts, an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning

6. encourage students to appreciate the formal, stylistic, and aesthetic qualities of texts

7. promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature.

8. develop in students an understanding of how language, culture, and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts

9. encourage students to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience, and purpose.

Assessment Objectives

There are four assessment objectives at SL and at HL for the language A: language and literature course.

 1. Knowledge and understanding

– Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a range of texts

– Demonstrate an understanding of the use of language, structure, technique and style

 – Demonstrate a critical understanding of the various ways in which the reader constructs meaning and of how context influences this constructed meaning

– Demonstrate an understanding of how different perspectives influence the reading of a text

2. Application and analysis

 – Demonstrate an ability to choose a text type appropriate to the purpose required

 – Demonstrate an ability to use terminology relevant to the various text types studied

– Demonstrate an ability to analyse the effects of language, structure, technique and style on the reader

– Demonstrate an awareness of the ways in which the production and reception of texts contribute to their meanings

– Demonstrate an ability to substantiate and justify ideas with relevant examples

3. Synthesis and evaluation

– Demonstrate an ability to compare and contrast the formal elements, content and context of texts – Discuss the different ways in which language and image may be used in a range of texts

– Demonstrate an ability to evaluate conflicting viewpoints within and about a text

– At HL only: Produce a critical response evaluating some aspects of text, context and meaning

 4. Selection and use of appropriate presentation and language skills

– Demonstrate an ability to express ideas clearly and with fluency in both written and oral communication

– Demonstrate an ability to use the oral and written forms of the language, in a range of styles, registers and situations

 – Demonstrate an ability to discuss and analyse texts in a focused and logical manner

– At HL only: Demonstrate an ability to write a balanced, comparative analysis

Understanding the Assessment Weighting for the TWO Year course, DP Language and Literature

Assessment

Assessment Component Weighting


PART TWO: LANGUAGE AND MASS COMMUNICATION OVERVIEW

FALL  JUNIOR YEAR: DP Language and Literature

In part 2 students consider the way language is used in the media. Mass media include newspapers, magazines, the internet (for example, social networking), mobile telephony, radio and film. This section also addresses the issue of how the production and reception of texts is influenced by the medium through which they are delivered. The study of language and mass communication means that students will be able to meet the following learning outcomes.

  • Examine different forms of communication within the media.
  • Show an awareness of the potential for educational, political, or ideological influence of media.
  • Show the way mass media use language and images to inform, persuade, or entertain.

Types of Texts: Advertisement, Encyclopedia entry, Parody, Appeal Essay , Pastiche,  Biography,  Film/television, Photographs, Blog, Guide book, Radio broadcast, Brochure/leaflet,  Interview Report,  Cartoon Letter (formal), Screenplay Chart Letter (informal), Set of instructions Database Magazine article, Song lyric , Diagram, Manifesto Speech,  Diary, Memoir, Textbook, Editorial News report, Travel writing , Electronic texts , Opinion column , etc. In addition to the text types mentioned above, literary genres may be used to complement the study of a topic in parts 1 and 2 but should not form the basis of the study. Short texts or extracts from a literary work will usually be more suitable than complete works

1st Quarter: August -October

UNIT ONE: DEFINING MEDIA LITERACY

What is media literacy? How is media constructed? What are the commercial implications of media? How does it have its own unique aesthetic form?How can audience negotiate meaning? How is media social and political? What is language?What are the various text types?

What are characteristics of the various text types? What is textual bias? What is fake news?

UNIT TWO: CONSTRUCTING GENDER AND RACE IN THE MEDIA

How is gender constructed in news, sports coverage, advertising?  What textual bias is seen in portraying genders and races?  What is being said about women? What is being said about different races? How is language offensive or insulting toward a particular gender, male, females, etc.? How is masculinity and femininity portrayed in advertising, television, film, or music? How are various groups represented in television, advertising, film, or music e.g. race and racial identity? How are various groups represented in the news media? How does one determine a textual bias in news reporting or sports coverage? What are advertising techniques used to persuade? How can we be media literate? How does media use euphemistic language to persuade?

2nd Quarter: October - December

UNIT THREE:  RHETORIC IN SPEECH AND POLITICAL MESSAGES

Is there such a thing as political correctness? What does it look like? How does style and appeals influence meaning in a message? How is language used for political correctness or taboo for a specific purpose?How is language manipulated in order to get a particular message across without being direct? How do politicians use language to persuade citizens and voters?  What do persuasive texts reveal about cultural values? What is sensationalism and how can the media use it to alter a message?

Major Assignments

Practice Written Task #1: Creative Piece with Language with Rationale

Students will PRODUCE A TEXT TYPE by choosing one of the learning outcomes (e.g. examining forms of media, influences, purposes) and one of topics covered (textual bias, stereotypes, persuasive language, speeches, media institutions, popular cultural, advertising, etc). Possible products could include advertising campaign, advertorial, chapter, magazine article, speech, travel writing, editorial, diary, pastiche,  short story, brochure, parody, letter, TV script, news report, blog, poetry, etc.)

Paper One Practice: Comparing and Contrasting Language Texts

Types of Unseen Texts: The pairing could include two non-literary texts or one literary and one non-literary text. There will never be two literary texts in a pair. Each pair will be linked in such a way that invites investigation of similarities and differences.Students are instructed to compare and analyse one of the pairs of texts, including comments on the similarities and differences between the texts, the significance of any possible contexts, audience and purpose, and the use of linguistic and literary devices.  Students should consider text type, context, bias, and ideological positions.Students need to have a balance of comments on similarities and differences between the two paired texts. Students should focus on how such aspects are used to create  a particular effect.

Major Assignments

Practice Written Task #2: Critical Response: Students write a critical response and include an outline that explores and reflects the language of a text. Students will focus on learning outcomes by examining different forms of media, its influences, and its purposes.

Further Oral Activity #1: Students develop a ten minute oral activity to that shows the examination of a medium in relation to their intercultural understanding.  Students are expected to choose their activity in consultation with the teacher and link it to one (or more) specific learning outcome(s) of the part of the course.Following the completion of the activity students are required to complete a reflective statement on the oral, commenting on their performance and the progress they made in achieving the aims they had set. Oral activities could include a presentation of a product (advertising campaign, interview, speech, dramatic scene, debate, spoken word poetry, critique of texts, live news broadcast, etc.)  followed by an interactive oral with the class.

Final Exam: Practice Paper One Practice

See previous column for description

SPRING JUNIOR YEAR: DP Language and Literature

Part One: Language in Cultural Context

In this part of the course students are given the opportunity to explore how language develops in specific cultural contexts, how it impacts on the world, and how language shapes both individual and group identity. Topics for stimulating approaches to the unit are listed below, each of which implies a range of vocabulary and writing styles with which students should become familiar. Students studying this part of the course should pay particular attention to the role of language in relation to the many areas involved in the construction of meaning and understanding of particular issues in the world.

  • The study of language in cultural context aims to enable students to meet the following learning outcomes.
  • Analyse how audience and purpose affect the structure and content of texts.
  • Analyse the impact of language changes.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of how language and meaning are shaped by culture and context.
  • Students will explore some of the following types of texts:
  • Advertisement, Advertorial, Appeal (an open letter /usually for money), Biography chapter, Blog, Brochure/leaflet, Editorial, Encyclopedia entry, Essay, Film/television script, Foreword (in a book), Interview (published in magazine), Letter (formal), Letter (informal), Magazine article, Manifesto, Memoir. News report (newspaper), Opinion column (news, style, arts), Podcast website (e.g.Radio broadcast), Report (e.g. from police, social worker, and other professional disciplines), Reviews (movies, food, tv, etc.), Screenplay, Set of instructions, Speech (script), Textbook entry (subject specific), Travel writing, Website
  • NOTE: Teacher will pull pieces from various text types to correspond the topics of the course. Some literature will be interspersed as it relates to the topic such as short stories or poetry.

3rd Quarter: January - March

4th Quarter: March - April

UNIT FOUR: EVOLUTION OF LANGUAGE

How is language evolved and changed? What factors contribute to the change of language over time? How can technological, social, regional, economical, historical, and political reasons play a factor in the development of language?

  1. Are there social reasons that contribute to a person or group’s language?
  1. Consider factors related to the family, children, women, gender roles, education, social classes, ethnic groups, population movement, health care, disease, famine, language, religion, beliefs, rites, rituals, observances, music, literature, intellectual movements, science, philosophy, technology, etc.
  1. Are there regional reasons why language changed? Does geography impact language?
  1. Consider factors related to the physical landscape, cultural geography, political geography, etc.
  1. Are there economical reasons why language changed? How does money influence what language is used?
  1. Consider factors such as jobs, economic policies, economic theories, economists, agriculture, industry, labor, urbanization, markets, trade, trade organizations, tariffs, ranching, etc.
  1. Are there historical and political reasons for a language changing or developing?
  1. Consider factors such as nations/states, government leaders, political elites, laws/acts, government policies, government actions, rights, political persecution, revolution, nationalism, imperialism, wars, treaties, conferences/diplomacy, strategy, allies, international organizations, etc.
  1. Are there technological reasons why language has changed?
  1. Consider factors as the emergence of smart phones, internet, social media, computers, etc.

UNIT FIVE: LANGUAGE AND COMMUNITIES

How do communities communicate in different ways? How do professionals communicate? How do different subject matters have their own jargon? How do teenagers communicate differently in different contexts? How do writers incorporate more than one language in a text when they are bilingual? How are some groups marginalized or target in media? What is the role of ethics in media?

Major Assignments

  • Evolution of English Language Presentation: Students will research and analyze a topic and reasons for the evolution of language. Students will look at various factors that caused the evolution including historical, political technological, social, , regional,  and economic reasons.
  • Practice Written Task #1: Creative Piece with Language with Rationale: Students will PRODUCE A TEXT TYPE by choosing one of the learning outcomes (e.g. examining forms of media, influences, purposes) and one of topics covered (textual bias, stereotypes, persuasive language, speeches, media institutions, popular cultural, advertising, etc). Students will write 800-1,000 words with a 200-300  word rationale to explain the intent and choices made in the creative piece.Possible products could include advertising campaign, advertorial, chapter, magazine article, speech, travel writing, editorial, diary, pastiche,  short story, brochure, parody, letter, TV script, news report, blog, poetry, etc.)

UNIT FIVE: LANGUAGE, IDENTITY,  AND CULTURE

How do we make sense out of popular culture? How does my language help affirm my identity? How do we filter media to gain an understanding?  How is dialect and slang connected to social class and how does it impact a reader’s understanding of a text? How does colloquial or informal language represent a social class in advertising, TV, film, or music? How is language lost or enhanced through translation? How do we address taboo topics in media?

Major Assignments

Practice Written Task #2: Critical Response: Students write a critical response and include an outline that explores and reflects the language of a text, such as the audience and purpose, how language is shaped by culture and context.

Further Oral Activity #2 (Best one goes to IB): Students develop a ten minute oral activity to that shows the examination of a medium in relation to their intercultural understanding.  Students are expected to choose their activity in consultation with the teacher and link it to one (or more) specific learning outcome(s) of the part of the course.Following the completion of the activity students are required to complete a reflective statement on the oral, commenting on their performance and the progress they made in achieving the aims they had set. Oral activities could include a presentation of a product (advertising campaign, interview, speech, dramatic scene, debate, spoken word poetry, critique of texts, live news broadcast, etc.)  followed by an interactive oral with the class.

Activities: Interdisciplinary connections with Spanish in short stories/short texts


Meridian School Academic Honesty Policy

ACADEMIC HONESTY RATIONALE

Meridian School Academic Honesty Policy is based on the idea that true learning is built on honesty and integrity. In order to maintain an ethical environment centered on learning, students must be principled and commit themselves to upholding the Meridian School Academic Honesty Policy, facilitating our school’s mission to develop responsible citizens who can artfully navigate our complex world.

The following actions represent a breach of the Meridian Academic Honesty and are subject to disciplinary action.

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is a form of dishonesty where a student presents the work of another as his or her own. It is important to acknowledge that plagiarism is not only the theft of words but also of ideas.

Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to:

CHEATING

Cheating is acting dishonestly for your own gain and is a form of intellectual theft.  Academic honesty promotes good character while dishonesty prevents students from gaining a full grasp of information presented to them. Cheating prevents teachers from fully evaluating the progress of students.

Cheating includes, but is not limited to:

Group Work/Collaboration

Collaboration and group work will be explicitly assigned by the teacher.

Acceptable Collaboration

Unacceptable Collaboration

PROCEDURES AND CONSEQUENCES FOR ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

If a student is suspected of academic dishonesty, the following procedure will be followed:

  1. The student’s assessment or assignment will be taken and held by the teacher, and the teacher will conference with the student.
  2. If the teacher determines there is evidence that academic dishonesty has occurred,  1) a referral will be written to the assistant principal with attached documentation of evidence; and 2) the teacher will notify the parent about the incident and a grade of “Missing” will be recorded pending investigation.
  3. The assistant principal will investigate and if it is determined that academic dishonesty occurred, appropriate consequences will be assigned such as:
  1. The student will be assigned a three-hour Saturday detention (or equivalent as determined by the assistant principal)
  2. The student will write a reflection about what he/she did, why it was the wrong choice, and his/her intentions for approaching academic work honestly in the future.
  3. The student will be permitted to redo the assessment or an alternative assessment for up to a 70%.  This assessment can be done in the assigned Saturday detention or at another time determined by the teacher/student.
  4. The assistant principal will conference with the parent (in person or by phone) to explain the above consequences.  
  5. The reassessment or alternative assessment option is not available for academic dishonesty on a semester exam.
  6. The Assistant Principal will notify pertinent school organization sponsors/coaches of incidences of academic dishonesty so that appropriate measures can be taken in regards to membership/participation.

In cases where the administrator determines that there was no intentional breach of academic honesty, the student may still be required to write a reflection about the incident, including how to prevent such an incident in the future.

Repeated or more serious offenses

Additional or more serious incidents of academic dishonesty shall be dealt with more severely by the administration. Consequences for repeated or more serious offenses may include:

  1. Meeting with the parent(s)
  2. One to three days of out-of-school suspension
  3. Exclusion from extracurricular activities or school-sponsored social events
  4. No public recognition of the student at any honors function
  5. No distinguished academic or extracurricular recognition (if applicable)

Recommendation for Expulsion from Meridian School

Students who commit one or more of the following offenses in violation of the Meridian Code of Conduct may be recommended for expulsion:

  1. Theft, sales, or distribution of any materials including, but not limited to tests and/or quizzes
  2. Breaking into and/or examining a teacher’s personal possessions (e.g., desk, files, cabinet, etc.) to obtain or view assessments
  3. Changing and/or falsifying a grade in a teacher’s grade book, on the computer, or through other school devices used to record student grades
  4. Possession of a stolen assessment

Responsibilities of the Student

It is the responsibility of the student to be aware of and adhere to this Academic Honesty Policy. The policy is in place to foster true learning, built on honesty and integrity.  

Students have the responsibility to turn in work that is truly of their own creation and they must utilize the skills they have learned in citing and referencing sources. If a student is not clear on the expectations for a specific assignment, they should seek clarification from the teacher.

If a student is suspected of academic dishonesty, the student will have the opportunity to explain his/her perspective to the teacher and assistant principal as part of the investigative process.  The expectation is that the student be forthright in this process for his/her own benefit.  

Responsibilities of the Teacher

Faculty have the responsibility to clearly outline expectations for work that is assigned to students.  If students are not to collaborate with others (e.g. peers, parents, tutors, etc), or if they are not to use online resources (e.g. Google translate), the teacher needs to make this expectation clear in advance. Faculty have the responsibility to teach students the skills necessary to effectively cite and reference sources in their academic work. Faculty are asked to lead by example in regards to Academic Honesty, serving as role models for our students.  It is the responsibility of the teacher to be aware of and adhere to the expectations and procedures outlined in this Academic Honesty Policy.  

Responsibilities of the School

It is the responsibility of the school to uphold the expectations and procedures outlined in the aforementioned Academic Honesty Policy and to maintain the school’s commitment to an honest academic environment and the expectations set forth by the IB Programme.  

Responsibilities of the Parent(s)

It is the responsibility of the parent(s) to be aware of and encourage their student(s) to adhere to the aforementioned Academic Honesty Policy by promoting and supporting the school’s policy in the home thus advocating the expectations of academic honesty set forth by the school.