Keating Memorial Self Research

Help us build a memorial to curiosity.

How to participate

Why self-research?

Questions you might ask

Would you like to get help with your self-research project from an active, experienced group?  You’re invited to join a weekly online chat in which we share and discuss our self-research projects and support each other in our efforts. This is an opportunity to try self-research for the first time – or to pursue a project you already have – by doing it with a small group of people who have diverse skills, lots of experience, and a desire to support you.

About the memorial: On July 19 2019, Steven Keating – an inspiring advocate for patient data access – passed away. Curiosity was a driving force in Steven's life. He recorded and shared videos of his brain surgery, explored his cancer's genetic data, and printed 3D models of his tumor. Steven was also a supporter of Open Humans, and served as a director up until his passing. In his memory and in celebration of his life, we would like to help more people be curious about themselves. Our goal is to share reports about what we learned this July 22, in honor of Steven.

How to participate

The Keating Memorial is facilitated through weekly self-research chats that are held online: We meet every Thursday at 10am Pacific time. You can find the agenda, notes & links to the Zoom room in our continuous notes-document! We're inviting you to join these calls and share your self-research ideas, projects etc. Whether you're an experienced self-researcher or just curious to get started: You don't have to come every week and of course you don't need to present anything.

Why self-research?

Anybody can do self-research! It can range from structured journaling to rigorous N-of-1 studies. It's about you – and it can be about nearly anything. From introspection to data analysis, self-research can help people find what habits work for them, manage chronic conditions, and learn more about themselves. You can find some examples

Questions you might ask

How do I study this? Maybe you have something you're curious about, but no idea how to study it. Sometimes the first challenge is: how can we observe ourselves?

Examples:
Jakob Eg Larsen asking "can I track my headaches?" and Maggie Delano wondering "can I track my recovery from concussion?"

What causes this? Observation can help you explore the causes of things.

Examples:
Thomas Blomseth Christiansen using to answer "what causes my allergies?" and Whitney Erin Boesel wondering "is my high cholesterol caused by nursing my baby?"

Does this work for me? There's a lot of advice out there. But does it help you? Sorting through what works for you can be especially challenging for complex health conditions – and even common challenges have unclear answers.

Examples: Sara Riggare tracked the impact of treatments of Parkinson's Disease symptoms and Lindsay Meyer asked "do steroids help me recover hearing?" when facing sudden, unexplained hearing loss.

How does this affect me? A more open-ended question is to wonder how aspects of our life affect us. Are you experiencing a major change in your life? Curious about what effect a particular habit has?

Examples: Rocio Chongtay wondered "does music affect my aim in archery?", and Steven Jonas wondered "what happens if I stop using the internet at home?"

Between July 2021 and March 2022, the weekly self-research chats were organized with the support of the ERASMUS+ programme of the European Union under Grant Agreement no. 2020-1-UK01-KA226-HE-094667