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2019-20 Secondary Academic Program Handbook
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GRACE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

Secondary

Academic Program Handbook

Chiang Mai, Thailand

2019-20

Secondary Principal: Ms. Megan Randolph

Academic Counselor: Mr. Brad Johnson

Korean Academic Counselor: Ms. Hyunjoo Jeong

Director of Curriculum & Instruction: Mr. Ken Mungle

MISSION STATEMENT

Mission Inspired. Called Staff. Christ-integrated education.

Equipping students to influence the world for Christ.

2021 VISION STATEMENT

A vibrant workplace for staff. An inspiring learning environment for students.

CORE VALUES

We are Christ-centered. We care for students. We are committed to excellence.

ACCREDITATION

Western Association of Schools and Colleges

Member since 2005

Association of Christian Schools International

Member since 2005 Accreditation #20935

Transfer Students

Students transferring to Grace International School from other schools are expected to complete all GIS graduation requirements, including a total of 24 credits.

Testing

Entrance Testing - Students requesting admission into GIS are required to provide recent standardized testing.

Advanced Placement Examinations - Students who complete AP courses are encouraged, on completion of the course, to take the advanced placement examination overseen by the College Board. These exams provide students with the opportunity to potentially gain college credit.

PSAT 8 and PSAT 10 - Full time students in grades 8 and 10 will be tested in Semester 2.

PSAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test - Offered in October for any students grades 9-11 (note exception above). PSAT/NMSQT will not be offered at GIS for 2019 due to October Break.

SAT/ACT - Students in grades 11 & 12 are encouraged to take the SAT and/or ACT.  GIS School code: 695409

Table of Contents

Grades 7 & 8

Requirements

Grade 7 Courses

Grade 8 Courses

Electives

Thai Language Courses

Educational/ESL Support

Grades 9-12

Graduation Requirements

Course Terminology

Online Courses

Language Arts

Mathematics

Performing Arts

Physical Education

Religious Studies

Science

Social Studies

Technology, Art, and Design

Digital Technology

Technical Education

Visual Arts

World Languages

Non-Departmental

Educational/ESL Support



Grades 7 & 8

Course Requirements

Grade 7 required courses

Grade 8 required courses

2019-20 students in grade 8, see specifics below

Language Arts 7

Language Arts 8

Math 7 (or Advanced Math w/ placement test)

Math 8 (or Algebra 1 w/ placement test)

Science 7

Science 8

Social Studies 7

Social Studies 8

Religious Studies 7

Religious Studies 8

Thai (1 semester) or National Thai (full year)*

Thai (1 semester) or National Thai (full year)*

Digital Citizenship & Technology (1 semester)

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Minimum Elective Requirements (Effective 2019-20 school year):

1 semesters of performing arts

2 semesters of Technology, Art & Design - TAD (Technology & Digital Citizenship required in grade 7)

1 semester of Physical Education

2 semesters of Thai Language (1 semester each year)*

2 semesters free to choose

If entering GIS in Grade 8 (& grade 8 students in 2019-20 School Year) requirements:

1 semester Thai Language*

1 semester Performing Arts

1 semester Technology & Digital Citizenship Course

1 Semester PE

*National Thai students are required by the Ministry of Education to be enrolled in a full year of Thai Language thus 2 semesters in both grades 7 & 8.


Grade 7 Courses

Language Arts 7         SS070

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 7

Language Arts 7 is a class designed to help students gain a strong foundation in their reading, writing and speaking skills. The course will read short stories, poems, essays and novels to expose students to different forms of writing and help them learn to effectively navigate through different types of text. The class will focus on building the foundations of a strong grammar understanding starting with understanding the different parts of speech and what makes a solid complete sentence. Students will write creative pieces as well as analytical pieces explaining how writers convey meaning. The focus is on giving students multiple types of literature to read to understand and appreciate the broad scope of communication.

Math 7     MA070

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: none

Grade: 7

This course will extend and sharpen basic arithmetic skills to prepare students for future algebra based understandings. Students will learn about a variety of topics such as ratios, percents, equations, inequalities, geometry, graphing and probability. Students in this course typically move on to grade 8 maths the following year.

Math 7 Accelerated     MA071

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: placement test

Grade: 7

This course is designed to give students the fundamental skills necessary to succeed in Algebra 1 the following year. Key course topics include integers, order of operations, algebraic expressions, one and two-step equations, proportions, percents, probability, geometry, and linear equations.

Religious Studies 7        RS070

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 7

Religious Studies 7th Grade is a biblical overview and critical thinking tools class that aims to prepare students to read and interpret the Bible as well as form an understanding of the basic tenets of the Bible. Critical thinking tools will include the use of Bible commentaries and dictionaries in order to facilitate better interpretation, contextualization of the books in the Bible, and understanding their intent and targeted audience. This course will also use Route 66 Travel Through the Bible by Positive Action Bible Curriculum as the main course book. The end goal is for students to learn the foundational tenets of the Bible upon which they will be able to build a deeper understanding of the Bible. The fundamental focus of this class is the overview of the Old Testament books of Law, History, Poetry, Wisdom and Major Prophets of the Bible. In II Timothy 3:16-17 we are instructed. “that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work” by studying scripture. We aim to facilitate this consumption of the Word by providing a strong foundation of the Bible.


Science 7     SC070

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 7

Grade 7 science provides learning experiences to continue the development of science literacy. Instruction is planned to engage the interest of grade seven students. Instruction includes ongoing opportunities for hands-on investigation. Students are expected to grow their abilities for cooperative and team science learning. The main science content in grade seven includes (1) “Earth History” (geology), (2) “Chemical Interactions” (properties of matter), and (3) “Populations and Ecosystems” (biology/ecology). Students are introduced to procedures for maintaining a science notebook and for writing a report of “laboratory” investigations.

Social Studies 7         SS070

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 7

Social Studies 7 uses the framework of the five themes of geography: movement, region, human-environment interaction, location, and place to structure the material about the Eastern Hemisphere (Asia, Africa, and Oceania). The course explores the past and connects what we learn to our lives today through the study of human and physical geography, history, and current events.

Grade 8 Courses

Language Arts 8         LA080

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 8

The goal of 8th grade Language Arts is to build on the skills that were developed last year. These skills will help you to be successful in high school and beyond. We will read more novels this year and will do some structured writing assignments responding to what happens in those novels. We will also build on the knowledge of writing solid analytical essays that reflect clear thinking and writing. Grammar instruction will continue focusing on writing clear complete sentences. Parts of speech will also be reinforced helping cement the foundations of grammar. Reading and understanding as well as writing poetry will be included as well as some creative writing opportunities as students continue to use language effectively to interact with their world.

Math 8     MA080

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: none

Grade: 8

This course is designed to reinforce and extend concepts learned in Math 7 in preparation for Algebra 1.   Math 8 covers various topics of introductory algebra, including integers and algebraic expressions, rational numbers, the coordinate plane, applications of proportions, applications of percent, algebraic functions, polynomials, and properties of exponents.  Within these topics, the ability to solve various types of word problems is also developed.



Algebra 1     MA090

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: MA090--placement test

Grades: 7, 8

This course covers various aspects of basic algebra, including graphs and formulas, ratios and proportions, variation, powers and roots, simple and multiple-step equations, and systems of equations.  After the students develop understanding of solving a certain type of problem with numbers, similar types of problems with literal answers are introduced to reinforce the concepts and further develop the students' problem solving abilities. Within the context of the course, the ability to solve various types of word problems is also stressed. Time is spent in instructing students in the use of graphing calculators.

Religious Studies 8        RS080

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 8

Religious Studies (8th grade) is a year-long course that introduces students to the biblical storyline through a book-by-book approach. This course is a continuation of the 7th grade curriculum and covers the Minor Prophets, the Gospels, the Book of Acts, Paul’s Epistles, and the General Epistles. Throughout the year students will read, interpret, and apply Scripture through various assignments, interactive exercises, and group discussions. This course also affords students with the experience of being in a spiritual formation group (led by a mentor) where students learn about spiritual disciplines within a small-group dynamic. The course has two overarching goals: (1) to give students a broad overview of each book of the Bible and (2) to introduce and encourage the practice of spiritual disciplines. As a result of this course students will gain a better understanding of the main themes and teachings of the Bible and hopefully develop the formative habit of personal devotions and spiritual disciplines.

Social Studies 8        SS080

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 8

Social Studies 8 uses the framework of the five themes of geography: movement, region, human-environment interaction, location, and place to structure the material about the Western Hemisphere (Europe and the Americas). The course explores the past and connects what we learn to our lives today through the study of human and physical geography, history, and current events.

Science 8        SC080

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 8

Grade 8 science provides learning experiences to continue the development of science literacy. Instruction is planned to engage the interest of grade eight students. Instruction includes ongoing opportunities for hands-on investigation. Students are expected to grow their abilities for cooperative and team science learning. The main science content in grade eight includes (1) “Planetary Science” (astronomy), (2) “Gravity and Kinetic Energy” (physics - energy), (3) “Waves” (physics - wave phenomena), (4) “Heredity and Adaptation” (biology), and (5) “Hyman Systems Interactions” (human biology). Students extend habit and skills for maintaining a science notebook and for writing reports of “laboratory” investigations.


Thai Language Courses

Grade 7 & 8 National Thai        LS071          

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: Thai National or non-Thai student who passes a placement test with the approval of the Thai teachers.

Grades: 7, 8

Grade 7 & 8 national Thai students experience a two year cycle of curriculum topics that develop communication skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening in Thai language. The topics offered throughout the courses include modern short stories, basic Thai law, basic domestic economy, biography of national figures,news and Thai literature both contemporary and national heritage. Students will write short essays, short news, simple poetry and reports.

Grade 7 Thai                LS072

Grade 8 Thai                LS082

Length: Semester

Grades: 7, 8

After being placed in Grade 7 Thai or Grade 8 Thai, students will be placed into one of the following levels of Thai based on their proficiency and prerequisites:

Grades 7 & 8 Thai 1

Prerequisite: None

Grade 7 & 8 Thai 1 is designed  for non-Thai students who has little or no experience in Thai language. This course consists of basic communication in Thai and emphasizes listening and speaking skills. Thai culture is explored along with language learning.

Grade 7 & 8 Thai 2

Prerequisite:  Grade 7 & 8 Thai 1 (or placement test)

Grade 7 & 8 Thai 2 is designed for non-Thai students to continue to build an understanding of communication in Thai. Listening and speaking skills are emphasized while students are introduced to basic Thai reading and writing.  Thai culture is explored along with language learning.

Grade 7 & 8 Thai 3

Prerequisite:  Grade 7 & 8 Thai 2 (or placement test)

Grade 7 & 8 Thai 3 is designed for non-Thai students to continue to build a strong foundation for Thai language communication.  Students are provided opportunities to learn and practice using all four skills in Thai: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Thai culture is explored along with language learning.

Electives

Grades 7 & 8 Art        FA070

Length: One semester

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 7 & 8

Students in Art will experiment with two- and three- dimensional art forms, such as drawing, painting, and three-dimensional art, building upon the objectives developed in elementary art class. Emphasis is placed on the art elements and principles of design throughout the course. A variety of materials and processes are explored together with appropriate art vocabulary.  Students will gain confidence in creative expression and hopefully have fun too.


Grade 7 & 8 Band         MU072

Length: One Semester

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 7, 8

Grade 7 & 8 Band will present classic band literature as well as popular music at a beginning to intermediate level. This is a performance class where students are expected to participate in concerts and other school functions.

Grade 7 & 8 Choir         MU071

Length: One semester

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 7, 8

Students are introduced to proper vocal technique and given the opportunity to learn and perform music from different styles and periods.  The choir student will gain appreciation for the use of the human voice as an instrument of expression and communication.  Basic music theory skills are incorporated to enhance each student's music reading capabilities.

Grade 7 & 8 Physical Education      PE070

Length: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 7-8

In this course, students will be exposed to a wide variety of games and physical activities. This class focuses on traditional games and sports such as basketball, football, soccer, and volleyball. Emphasis placed on working together as a team and interpersonal skills related to sport. Students will be graded on their skill, meeting class requirements for participation, and attitude. Skills taught include teamwork, social skills, fitness, and game specific rules and skills. PE uniform and proper athletic footwear required.

Technology & Digital Citizenship        CS071

Length: One semester

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 7 (& grade 8 students in 2019-20)

Provide a working knowledge and ability to utilize Google Apps, a basic introduction to computer science and programming skills, and an understanding of what it means to be a modern Digital Citizen by empowering “students to think critically, behave safely, and participate responsibly in our digital world. These 21st-century skills are essential for students to harness the full potential of technology for learning.”


Grade 7 & 8 Educational/ESL Support

Courses listed under this section are available by special arrangement with the Educational Support (ES) Division and the Academic Counselor.  At this time, they will not appear as choices in the online Course Requests in GIS FamilyWeb.  If you feel your student might need to enroll in one or more of these courses in lieu of the equivalent grade 7 or 8 course, please contact the Educational Support Division.  Those needing to enroll in one or more of these courses will be scheduled manually by the Academic Counselor.  For students requiring ESL support, tests for incoming and returning students will be used to determine appropriate level of support, and students will also be scheduled manually.

Math Foundations I--Grades 7-8        SN095

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: Written approval by parents, math department, and ES Division

Grades 7-8

Math Foundations is a math program for students in grades 9-12 who are identified as having a math disability, or for those who need more support for mathematics than can be provided in the regular classroom. This class uses grade-level standards while providing individualized pacing, a smaller class size, and extra teacher support. Grades for Math Foundations will be designated as a "modified grade" on transcripts and report cards only if the subject is modified.

Grades 7 & 8 ESL        SN090

Length: Year-long

Prerequisite: Recommendation of ESL Supervisor

Grades: 7-8

This course is designed to develop students’ English language proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Through various units of study, students will expand their English vocabulary and usage, become familiar with social idiomatic expressions , and master necessary grammar topics for this level of English development. Grammar topics will include upper-intermediate levels of count and non-count noun forms, complex quantifiers, conditional forms, phrasal verbs, and present tenses. In class, students will be given time to directly apply new information to their current content area studies. In addition, there will be time provided for students to work on homework and receive support as needed.


Grades 9-12

GIS Graduation Requirements & Diploma Options

Grace International School is a college preparatory high school with a foundation in the US educational system. This system grants credits earned for courses successfully passed according to the Carnegie credit allocation system. Grades are determined by teachers in subject courses during the term.  Although our curriculum is US based, we are a Christian international school and seek to meet the needs of our diverse student body.

GIS seeks to help all our students to be well-educated and prepared to transition to postgraduate educational institutions, whether in their passport country or wherever they desire to pursue higher education. As a result, students may choose which of the following graduation requirement options best support their plans for education after graduation from GIS. Parents must indicate which option they are following and sign a contract agreeing to the requirements and consequences of following that option.

Graduation Requirement Option A:

All students who are US citizens, hold dual citizenship with the US, or any student who plans to study in the U.S. must follow option A.  Non-US citizens can choose option A or B depending on the country where they plan to attend university.  Students choosing option A may choose from one of the following three tracks to earn a high school diploma from GIS. A minimum of 24 credits is required for graduation from GIS.  Graduation is not an end in itself but a stepping stone to other opportunities.   Because not all students have the same goals, the following tracks are provided to assist in planning a student’s GIS course of study.

Each track is not a rigid criteria but a guided suggestion depending on post-graduation goals. There is flexibility in changing tracks to meet changing goals. All educational plans should be in conference between parents, students, and the school counselor. All tracks lead to a high school diploma from GIS.

Track 1:  High School Diploma Track

This track meets minimum requirements for a high school diploma from GIS.  It will not be an adequate track to prepare for college entrance. It may be sufficient to lead to admission in community colleges or trade schools.

Track 2: College Prep Track

This track recognizes the current requirements of a rigorous schedule in the U.S. and prepares a student to apply and succeed in most colleges and universities.   This track can include AP courses.

Track 3: AP College Prep Track

This track is the most rigorous schedule and prepares students for entrance into most colleges or universities. The credits listed are simply a suggested criterion and can be modified to meet individual situations.  For a list of current AP courses offered at GIS contact the Academic Counselor.

Subject Area

High School Track

Credits Required

College Prep Track

Credits Required

AP College Prep Track

Credits Required

Religious Studies

0.5 for each year of attendance

0.5 for each year of attendance

0.5 for each year of attendance

English

4

4

4 including AP

Mathematics

2

3-4

4 including AP

Social Studies*

3

3-4

3-4 including AP

Science

2

3-4

3-4 including AP

PE/Health

1.0/0.5

1.0/0.5

1.0/0.5

Language

1.0

3 (d)

3-4

Digital Technology

1.0

1.0

1.0

Electives**

8

4

4

Minimum Total**

24

24

24

Grade Point Average (GPA)

        2.0 (Required)

 3.0 (Recommended)

  3.0 (Recommended)

*All students with U.S. citizenship are required to take at least 3.5 credits of Social Studies courses, one of which must be U.S. Government starting with the class of 2021.

Graduation Requirement Option B:

Students who are citizens from countries using standardized external exams may require AP courses for admission into universities and may use this diploma option. A diploma contract must be signed prior to pursuing this diploma. Parents and students should research the policies of their country and specific university policies to find out what courses they need to take and what AP scores will count for admission.  Not all credits within a subject will be AP courses, but there are prerequisites for admission into an AP course and a usual progression building on prior material. For more information on course progressions please, visit the GIS website or contact the Academic Counselor.

AP courses may not be offered due to teacher availability or low student enrollment. Students who are US citizens are not eligible for this option.

Subject Area

AP University Track

Credits

AP Courses Offered

By subject area

Notes

Religious Studies

0.5 for each year of attendance

 Religious Studies credits are to be from GIS courses. Exceptions may be considered in case of transfer students.

English

4

English Literature & Composition

Students may take US or British Literature in 11th grade and AP English 12th grade with counselor & instructor prior approval.

Mathematics

4

Calculus, Statistics

Social Studies

3-4

European History, US History, World History, Psychology, Seminar

Science

3-4

Biology, Chemistry, Physics 1, Physics 2

PE/Health

0.5 Health

Language**

National Thai students must take National Thai every year

Digital Technology**

0

Electives**

0-1.5

With prior permission a student may independently study an AP course not offered and take the exam. GIS is not obligated to provide resources or a teacher.

Electives depend on credits in other categories. Students must have 18 total credits with a minimum of 4 AP courses.

Minimum Total

18

4

Total number of credits required for graduation is not reduced for transfer students.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

3.0 (Recommended)

**Please note that while language, digital technology, and a variety of elective courses are not required in this option, universities may expect or require that you have skills in these areas.  Check the specific requirements of your country and university.

Notes for Specific Graduation Requirements:

  1. The ability to read and write is critical to all endeavors, especially to university admittance and continuing education. Therefore, GIS requires 4 years of English and students must take an English course every year.
  2. As a Christian school our religious studies courses are essential to fulfilling our mission and vision and achieving our GOALs.  In accordance with ACSI accreditation policies, the teaching of religious study courses is a priority. Religious Studies credits are to be from GIS courses. Exceptions may be considered in case of transfer students.
  3. Option B requires a minimum of 4 AP course credits. Taking an AP exam does not constitute a course. Students may study an AP course for credit but stipulations are:
  1. Academic Counselor approval
  2. Must be completed from an accredited educational program
  3. Must be listed by College Board as an AP Audit approved program.

AP Capstone Diploma™:

Both Option A & Option B students can pursue an AP Capstone™ Diploma. This is in addition to the graduation requirements above. AP Capstone™ is a diploma program from the College Board. It’s based on two year-long AP courses: AP Seminar and AP Research. Rather than teaching subject-specific content, these courses develop students’ skills in research, analysis, evidence-based arguments, collaboration, writing, and presenting. Students who complete the two-year program and 4 additional AP courses can earn the AP Capstone Diploma™, which is valued by colleges across the United States and around the world.

Course Terminology

On-Level - The course is aligned to our subject standards for that course.  The ability levels of the students who take this course are broadly distributed and their needs diverse. There is enough time in this course for the teacher to assist all students in mastering the content and skills.  The course is weighted with a 1 in the GPA.

An on-level course is taught on a high school course level.  Complex ideas are taught so that everyone should be able to understand the foundational principles.  The mastery of skills needed for students to pursue further studies in the topic in preparation for college is emphasized.

Honors - Honors courses at GIS are aligned to our subject standards for that course and may include some additional standards.  The College Board states that “honors classes often offer the same curriculum as regular classes but are tailored for high-achieving students—covering additional topics or some topics in greater depth.”  The focus of an honors course is to better prepare students for the level of difficulty of AP courses.  The course is weighted with a multiplier of 1.2 in the GPA.

For students applying to more selective universities, it is important that the university sees that they have chosen to take rigorous courses.  The honors course designation on the transcript shows universities that students have taken rigorous courses (“Honors and AP Courses”).

An honors course is taught on a high school level but includes some of the higher demands of college level work.  Students are expected to be more self-motivated and able to engage in abstract thinking and application problems.  They are expected to synthesize concepts that they previously learned and apply them as they complete more complex tasks.  

Entrance into an honors course is based on relevant teacher approval along with the requirements listed in the course description.

 “Honors and AP Courses." Collegeboard.org. The College Board, 2012. Web. 12 Dec. 2012.

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses - Advanced Placement, or AP, is a program that offers high school students the opportunity to take college level courses during high school.  Students take courses during the year and then take the exam in May.  Students taking AP courses are not obligated to take the exam but are encouraged to do so.  The AP courses offered vary from school to school.  The AP grades that are reported to students, high schools, colleges, and universities in July are on a five-point scale:

Many colleges and universities in the US grant college credits or advanced placement based on AP exam grades.  Universities in countries outside the US use AP courses and exam grades as criteria for admissions.  Policies vary by institution, so you should research the country and university to determine their policies.  

AP courses are aligned to the standards for that course outlined by the College Board. AP courses are taught as college level courses as they “cover the breadth of information, skills, and assignments found in corresponding college courses” (“Honors and AP Courses”).  Considering that high school students are still developing intellectually and emotionally, they are given more guidance and structure than they would receive in an actual college course.  At GIS an AP course is weighted with a multiplier of 1.25 in the GPA.

The following prerequisites are established by GIS and are not the requirements of College Board or the AP program.  These requirements are established due to the demanding nature of the AP program.  

All AP courses have an application process.  This process involves relevant teacher approval in addition to the requirements listed below.  The application for AP courses is at this link:  AP Application. Every student who is approved for an AP course must sign a GIS AP contract.

“Honors and AP Courses." Collegeboard.org. The College Board, 2012. Web. 12 Dec. 2012.

Online Courses

A student may choose to take an online course at GIS if they would like to take a special interest course or a course that is not offered at GIS for that academic session, or if they need to retake a failed course or makeup missing credits and cannot do so at GIS and graduate on time. For more about the potential for online courses and the Online Course Request Form, see here.


Language Arts

English 9     LA100

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 9

English 9 is a multi-genre, literature-based course providing instruction in the following areas: reading comprehension, vocabulary, mechanics and usage, and essay writing. This course exposes students to short stories, dramas, poetry, and novels studying the unique characteristics and literary terms associated with each.  Speaking and listening skills will be improved through class discussions, oral assignments, and group work.  One research paper will be required.

English 10: World Literature     LA200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: English 9

Grade: 10

English 10 builds upon the short story, drama, novel, and poetry genres discussed in English 9 and adds an emphasis on non-fiction.  It is based upon a variety of world literature, comparing and contrasting ideas found within different cultures. An emphasis will be made on understanding the rhetorical skills used to construct solid arguments, and students will develop skill in building effective arguments in writing.  Emphasis will be placed upon analyzing written material through written essays and class discussion. Vocabulary building is a yearlong activity.  One research paper will be required.  A written report on one book read outside of class (fiction or non-fiction) will also be required.

U.S. (American) Literature     LA300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: English 10 or administrative approval

Grades: 11-12 (Required for Grade 11 unless alternate approved by Academic Counselor)

U.S. Literature is a study of literature from the United States, ranging from the colonial period to the twentieth century.  Students will be required to analyze various aspects of literature through class discussion and in writing.  Vocabulary building is a yearlong activity. A research paper will be required.  

British Literature     LA400

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: English 10 or administrative approval

Grades: 11-12

British Literature is a study of literature from England, ranging from Beowulf to the twentieth century.  As students study each time period, they will focus on how historical events affected the literature and critically examine the authors’ ideas and worldviews with Biblical truth.  Students will come away from this class with experience in writing resumes/CVs, college entrance essays, analysis essays, and exploration of texts in different media.  Vocabulary building is a yearlong activity.  

AP English Literature and Composition     LA500

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Three previous English courses, overall B average.  Application essay required.

Grades: 11-12

Advanced Placement English offers a curriculum in literature and writing for grade 11 and 12 students who wish to experience a college-level course.  In this course, students will acquire the technical vocabulary and critical skills needed to analyze classic works of fiction, poetry, and drama.  They will write critical essays, make oral presentations, do peer revision, participate in class discussions, do research, and take practice exams.  Students are required to complete pre-course reading and writing assignments over the summer preceding the course. They should also be prepared to do a larger amount of outside reading for class each day. Frequent essay writing will be required.

The following courses are listed under the Language Arts Department but do not fulfill the graduation requirement for English credit:

Drama      LA230 (offered 1st semester only)        

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 10-12

This course includes a survey approach to the history of Western theatre from ancient Greece to the present day, including a sampling of theatre literature selected from various periods of history and representing different genres and styles. This course is an introduction to the many skills and crafts involved in mounting a successful theatre production. Students will gain hands-on experience in rehearsing, performing, and producing a live show for an audience. Activities will include reading and analyzing scripts, acting games and exercises, creating a character, preparing scenes and monologues for class presentation, practical projects in set, prop, costume, makeup, lighting, sound, and publicity design/production. Each student should expect to participate fully in all aspects of the class: academics, acting, and backstage crew. The main project for the course will be the public presentation of either several one-act plays or a single longer play.

Creative Writing              LA250

Credit: One semester course 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

 

This course is designed to enable students who are accomplished, analytical, and imaginative in their use of English to refine their understanding and appreciation of the cultural roles and significance of writing. It is designed for those who possess a particular passion to pursue a specialized study of English. In creative writing you will be able to pursue areas of interest with a greater degree of independence than in other English courses. Through extended engagement in investigation and composition, students will explore multiple meanings and values of texts, delving into reading and writing practices that will widen their repertoire and deepen their insight.

Mathematics

Math Sequence Options:

On-Level Sequence

7th Grade – Math 7 (based solely on placement test score)

8th Grade – Math 8 (based solely on placement test score)

9th Grade – Algebra 1

10th Grade – Geometry or Personal Finance

11th Grade – Algebra 2, Honors Algebra 2, Geometry

12th Grade - Algebra 2, Honors Algebra 2, Geometry, Pre-Calculus, AP Statistics

Accelerated Sequence

7th Grade – Math 7 Accelerated (based solely on placement test score)

8th Grade – Algebra 1 (based solely on placement test score)

9th Grade – Geometry

10th Grade – Algebra 2, Honors Algebra 2

11th Grade – Pre-Calculus, AP Statistics, Personal Finance

12th Grade – Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus (AB), Calculus, AP Statistics

If students wish to accelerate faster than the above course sequences, they must prove that they have mastered the course content by taking the course following the Transfer Credit Policy – Secondary found in the Parent, Student, and Member Organization Handbook. Students may not take an online course during the school year for a course that GIS is currently offering. Online courses must be completed during the summer, and only with approval of the Academic Counselor. Parents are responsible for any costs related to courses taken online.  

A graphing calculator is suggested for all mathematics courses and required for Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus, and AP Statistics. See the calculator policy in the PSMO Handbook.

Algebra 1        MA100

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: none

Grades: 7-12

This course covers various aspects of basic algebra, including graphs and formulas, ratios and proportions, variation, powers and roots, simple and multiple-step equations, and systems of equations.  After the students develop understanding of solving a certain type of problem with numbers, similar types of problems with literal answers are introduced to reinforce the concepts and further develop the students' problem solving abilities. Within the context of the course, the ability to solve various types of word problems is also stressed. Time is spent in instructing students in the use of graphing calculators.

Geometry     MA200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1

Grades: 9-12

This course applies the logical principles of inductive and deductive reasoning to various areas of both two and three-dimensional geometry. The course includes a wide range of definitions, symbols, theorems, constructions, and simple proofs.  The topics of area, volume, symmetry, and some trigonometry are also included. Time is spent in instructing students in the use of graphing calculators.

Algebra 2     MA300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry

Grades: 9-12

This course is a continuation of Algebra 1. Included in this course are various concepts of factoring, formulas, quadratic functions and equations, powers and roots, imaginary numbers, sequences and series, inverse functions, logarithms, and more trigonometry. Time is spent in instructing students in the use of graphing calculators. Topics similar to those covered in Algebra 1 are covered in greater depth and covered on a more advanced level.  

Honors Algebra 2     MA 350

Credit:  Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite:  Algebra 1, Geometry (can be co-enrolled in Geometry) - B+ average

Grades: 9-12

This course is for the mathematically advanced student who desires an extensive and comprehensive development of Algebra 2 topics.  Students will be expected to develop an in-depth understanding of the topics including functional analysis and will be expected to draw relationships among the concepts studied.  

Pre-Calculus     MA400

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Geometry, Algebra 2 (at least B average in both recommended)

Grades: 10-12

This challenging course is designed to prepare students for calculus and AP calculus, but also serves as a fitting end for those who will take it as a final mathematics course in high school. Topics include advanced features of algebra, trigonometry, polar coordinates, conic sections, sequences and series, matrices, transformations, logarithms, and introductory limits.  

AP Calculus     MA500

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Pre-calculus – B+ average

Grades: 10-12

This challenging course is designed for mathematically advanced students who will pursue mathematics beyond high school.  The topics covered are those set by the College Board for the AP Calculus AB exam.  Students may register to take the AP Calculus AB or BC exam in May.

AP Statistics     MA510

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 – B average; B average in English courses recommended

Grades: 11-12

The purpose of AP statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  Students are exposed to the broad conceptual schemes: exploring data, describing patterns and departures, sampling and experimentation, planning random phenomena using probability and simulation, anticipating patterns, exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, statistical inference, and estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

Performing Arts

High School Band     MU205

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Previous band experience

Grades: 9-12

High school band will present classic band literature as well as popular music on a more difficult level. This is a performance class where students are expected to participate in concerts and other school functions.

Jazz Band     MU210

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit, zero period

Prerequisite: Enrolled in a Performing Arts course; audition or band director’s approval only

Grades: 9-12

Jazz band is a course in the study and performance of jazz, rock, Latin, funk, and fusion styles.  Improvisation will be an integral part of this class.  Students must have previous experience on their instrument.  To be a part of this band, students must play one of the following instruments: saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, bass, drums, or guitar or have approval from the director.

High School Choir     MU220

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Students are introduced to proper vocal technique and given the opportunity to learn and perform music from different styles and periods.  The choir student will gain appreciation for the use of the human voice as an instrument of expression and communication.  Basic music theory skills are incorporated to enhance each student's music reading capabilities.  Concerts may be given at the end of each quarter.  Choir is open to any student who can demonstrate some aptitude in music.

Chanson Select Ensemble     MU230

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit, zero period

Prerequisite: Enrolled in a Performing Arts course, by audition or director’s approval only

Grades: 9-12

Grace Chanson select ensemble is for the advanced choral music student with experience in high school choir. This ensemble provides an opportunity for more independent singing and often adds choreography to the songs. Singers need to be good sight-readers.


Physical Education

Physical Education 1: Recreational Sports (PE 1)     PE100

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

In this course, students will be exposed to a wide variety of games and physical activities. This class focuses on traditional games and sports such as basketball, football, soccer, and volleyball. Students will be graded on their skill, meeting class requirements for participation, and attitude. Skills taught include teamwork, social skills, fitness, and game specific rules and skills.

PE uniform and proper athletic footwear required.

Health     PE110

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite:  None

Grades: 9-12 (This course is required for graduation for all students)

This course is aimed at adopting a healthy lifestyle for life. Students will study a variety of topics including: health for living, the human body, drugs and health, and first aid. Students will learn about health through discussions, research, and practical experiences. Skills taught will include but are not limited to social skills, nutrition, and how to make good choices.

Bible journal required.

Physical Education 2: International Sports (PE 2)     PE120    

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

In this course, students will be exposed to a wide variety of games and physical activities. This class focuses on international games and sports such as cricket, rugby, and hockey. Students will be graded on their skill, meeting class requirements for participation, and attitude. Skills taught include teamwork, social skills, fitness, and game specific rules and skills.

PE uniform and proper athletic footwear required.

Beginning Sports Conditioning     PE250  

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 10-12

Students will alternate lifting weights and cardiovascular fitness. Weightlifting will focus on increasing muscular strength and endurance using free and machine weights.  Students will learn proper safety, technique, and spotting for lifting.  Fitness will focus on cardiovascular endurance through a variety of activities such as: running, biking, aerobics, jump rope, and HIIT training.  Students will keep a log of their progress and achievements in both weights and cardiovascular fitness.

PE uniform and proper athletic footwear required.

Sports Leadership 1--Teaching     PE200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: One PE course and teacher approval

Grades: 10-12

This course will introduce students to the concepts of teaching physical education and developing their God given leadership potential. This includes classroom management, child safety, early childhood development planning, preparing, and conducting PE lessons. The course is hands-on, and students will be required to teach elementary PE as well as assist with other athletic programs.

SL1 shirt required - SL students are held to a high standard of excellence as role models for others in the community.  

Sports Leadership 2--Officiating and Ministry     PE210

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Sports Leadership-Teaching and teacher approval

Grades: 12

This course trains students to use their God given leadership ability and passion to impact their community for Christ. Students are given the opportunity to serve others by teaching English in Thai schools, being involved in school activities as leaders and organizers, and traveling to remote places to conduct ministry using sports as a platform. Skills developed are discipleship, mentorship, organization, and community development. This course is hands on and students are expected to maintain and model excellence in and outside of the class at all times.

SL2 shirt required - SL students are held to a high standard of excellence as role models for others in the community.

Religious Studies

GIS students are required to complete one Religious Studies course for each year of attendance at GIS.  All four course offerings are 1-semester courses.  The first two courses are normally for grades 9-10; the last two courses are for grades 11-12 only.  

Bible Study Methods     RS110 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Bible Study Methods is a single-semester course that prepares and engages students in the discipline of interpreting and applying the Bible. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to various interpretive tools that will enable them to “rightly handle the word of truth” (2 Tim 2:15). Students will gain first-hand experience reading the Bible and using various interpretive tools to arrive at Scripture’s meaning (the ‘what’ of the text) and significance (the ‘so what’ of the text). This course also enables students to discover Jesus Christ through Christianity Explored - an evangelistic DVD series that is based on Mark’s Gospel. Each student will read the Gospel of Mark over the course of seven weeks and spend class time discussing and exploring the biblical text together. Finally, as a part of the course, students will learn about the history of how we got the Bible and why it is important to study the Bible in its historical context.

Theology     RS310 (offered 2nd semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: none

Grades: 9-12

Theology is the vocation of every Christian because we are all called to “grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Pet. 3:18). In this course, students will first explore theology in general, by defining its nature and purpose as well as its importance, benefits, and broader significance. The second section of the course focuses on biblical theology where we will discuss in depth the four main stages of the story of the Bible: creation, fall, redemption, and new creation. The third section of the course we will discuss systematic theology or Christian doctrine. Here we will use the Nicene Creed as our guide in investigating some of the core teachings of the Christian faith and their significance in the Christian life. In the final part of the course, we will investigate various “everyday” aspects of life such as (sports, music, technology, sleep, leisure, etc.) and attempt to think theologically about how we as Christians should engage in these activities. In summary, this course seeks to introduce students to the basics of biblical theology and Christian doctrine while also encouraging students to begin to think theologically about all aspects of life and reality.

Comparative Religions     RS 400 (offered 2nd semester only)

Credit:  One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite:  none

Grades: 11-12

Comparative Religions is a course in major religions and worldviews. Students will learn the early history and main tenets of Buddhism and Islam alongside Postmodernism, Secularism and New Spirituality. Analyzing each worldview through Socratic discussion, movies, and articles, students will be equipped by this class to answer ultimate questions and be ready to give a reason for the hope they have. (1 Peter 3:15) The course also seeks to employ the talents and experiences of local missionaries who have expertise in various areas. Our textbook is Understanding the Times (Summit Ministries)

Ethics     RS420 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5

Prerequisite: none

Grade: 11-12


This course explores biblical and classical ethical theories while providing students with critical thinking tools necessary to form their own opinions on ethical dilemmas. Thus, enabling students to stand upon their own opinions and present them in a Godly manner, rooted in Biblical truths, when in discussions with those who hold differing, sometimes worldly opinions. Rather than using ethics as a means of pointing out shortcomings in others, we will consistently be involved in self-examination. Students in this course would be able to demonstrate that Biblical truths have concrete answers and solutions to modern ethical dilemmas. The course uses Christian Ethics: Contemporary Issues and Options by Norman L. Geisler as its primary text.


Science

Science Sequence Options

The following charts are designed to show the availability of science courses at each grade level.

See the notes below the charts for further details.

 

Grades 9-12

COURSE OPTIONS

GRADE LEVELS

Grades 9-12

9

10

11

12

Biology

 X

X

X

X

Chemistry

X

X

X

Physics

X

X

X

Anatomy & Physiology

X

X

AP Biology

X

X

AP Chemistry

X

X

AP Physics 1

 X*

X

X

AP Physics 2

X

X

AP courses require an application and teacher approval.
*This accelerated choice will require additional teacher approval.

Biology     SC200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None
Grades: 9-12

Biology is an introductory laboratory course that develops an understanding and appreciation of the nature of scientific inquiry applied to the study of living things. Students will study major units in ecology, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and physiology. These units are interrelated to develop a comprehensive understanding of the living world. After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to take higher level life sciences courses like AP biology and anatomy & physiology.

Anatomy & Physiology     SC290

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite:  Biology or Honors Biology
Grades: 11-12

This course provides a consideration of the design (anatomy) of the human body as well as an exploration of how the human body meets the demands of everyday living (physiology). Anatomy & physiology contains units in cell biology, histology, exercise physiology, and the following body systems: integumentary, nervous, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, and circulatory. The course is ideal for students with an interest in medicine, nursing, physical therapy, athletics, and overall wellness. Anatomy & physiology requires memorization of body structures and functions. Students with strong study skills and good note-taking abilities will find the course to be interesting and engaging.

Chemistry         SC300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Algebra 2 recommended

Grades: 10-12

This course creates a foundation of understanding of the major concept areas in chemistry. Chemistry is a laboratory oriented course and will require students to think through the uses of chemistry in the real world. Major topics include atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, solution chemistry, and thermodynamics. In addition, it will look at the applications of chemistry in society. This course is rigorous and will suit students with strong mathematical and analytical minds.

Physics         SC400

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry, Algebra 2 recommended

Grades: 10-12

This course will consider the topics of force and motion, work and energy, electricity and magnetism, waves/optics, thermal energy, radioactivity, and quantum and relativistic effects. This course is for students who are keen to understand how and why things work the way they do in the physical world. The course is designed to emphasize the ideas of physics rather than the possibly daunting mathematics. Students are then better equipped to understand the equations and formulas of physics, and to make connections between the concepts of physics and their everyday life. Students should be comfortable applying first year algebra and geometry knowledge and skill.

AP Biology     SC510

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology and 1 additional science (preferably Chemistry)
Grades: 11-12

AP biology students must have an understanding of the basics of both biology and chemistry to be successful. Thus, successful completion of Chemistry or Honors Chemistry is suggested in addition to the completion of Biology or Honors biology. AP biology is the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year in university. It will include topics regularly contained in a high quality college program in introductory biology, such as biochemistry, cells, metabolism, enzymes, photosynthesis, respiration, cellular energetics, molecular genetics, protein production, heredity, evolution, ecology, as well as an overview of physiology. The aim of the course is to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytic skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.

AP Chemistry         SC520

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry or Biology and Chemistry – A average, Algebra 2 – B average

Grades: 11-12

AP chemistry is the equivalent of a college introductory chemistry course usually taken by chemistry majors during their first year. AP chemistry emphasizes the ability to apply chemical understanding to new situations and expects a broad understanding of the interconnections present throughout chemistry. Main topics include atomic structure, bonding, gases, solutions chemistry, states of matter, kinetics, equilibrium and acids/bases, thermodynamics as well as organic chemistry. Students will need to have an interest in the material and strong background in both mathematics and chemistry.  Laboratory skills are emphasized, but due to time constraints, will require lab time outside normal school hours.


AP Physics 1     SC530        

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry (A grade in both) and  Algebra 2 (may be concurrent)
Grades: 10-12


This course is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics, designed to develop deep understanding of the content and to apply that knowledge through inquiry-based labs. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electrical circuits. It may be taken as a stand-alone course without Physics 2. Students prepare for the AP Exam at the end of the year.

AP Physics 2     SC540         

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: AP Physics 1, Algebra 2 – B average
Grades: 11-12

This course is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics. Students prepare for the AP Exam at the end of the year.

Social Studies

World Geography and Cultures      SS100

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-10 (Required for 9th graders unless excused by Secondary Administration)

This course focuses on the impact physical geography has on the culture, social interactions, politics, economics, and history of regions throughout the world.  It uses the five themes of geography – movement, region, human-environment interaction, location, and place – to structure content. Each unit relies on the framework of a Biblical perspective to understand and evaluate how and why people interact with others and their environment.

World History     SS200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This survey course encompasses the social, cultural, religious, political, technological, and economic history of the ancient world to modern nations. In addition, students will study major historical events, interactions, and movements such as the Renaissance and Enlightenment. This course will also use a variety of sources to illuminate different perspectives on the material, as well as different methods of approaching the study of history.

United States History     SS300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 11-12

This course is a chronological survey of events and people that characterize each of the major eras in U.S. history. The eras include: the colonial era, the revolutionary era, nation building, the expanding nation, civil war and reconstruction, westward expansion, turn of the century, the 1920s, the depression and the new deal, World War II and postwar United States, and contemporary US history. The course is designed to be an introduction to US History and provide exposure to the establishment and flow of US history. The course analyzes political, social, economic, religious, and military issues.  All U.S. Citizens must include U.S. History or AP U.S. History.

Economics     SS320

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 11-12

This is an introductory course in economics designed to enable students to achieve a basic understanding of fundamental economic concepts and how these concepts relate to their personal goals, and to the world in which they live. The course will focus on both micro and macroeconomic concepts.

Media Literacy     SS340

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12

Media Literacy is an in-depth study of the media environment that surrounds us. The objective of the course is that students will gain the media literacy skills needed to effectively navigate the media centric cultures in which they live. Students will learn how to interact with and critically think about media from the perspective of God’s truth. Media topics covered in the course include: news media, bias in the media, propaganda, advertising, social issues, movies and TV, music, and the internet. Throughout the course students will learn how to access, understand, analyze, evaluate, and create media.

U.S. Government     SS400

*Note: U.S. Government is encouraged for American Citizens in the class of 2020 and requirement for American citizens in the class of 2021 and beyond.

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: US History (or currently enrolled in US History)

Grades: 11-12

This course focuses on the legal and historical foundations and major institutions of the United States government, contrasted with other forms of government.  Students are acquainted with the function of democracy by an in-depth study of the three branches of the government, political activity, political parties, and political events. This course enables the student to understand the functions of US national government and how citizens can access the decision making process.  

AP World History     SS450  

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: World Geography or World History or US History and teacher approval

Grades: 10-12

The AP World History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of world history from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. The course has students investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Oceania.


AP US History     SS500

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: World History or US History and teacher approval

Grades: 11-12

The AP U.S. History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of U.S. history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides seven themes (American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places. AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. History course.

AP Psychology      SS550  

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: World Geography or World History, B+ in previous English classes,  and teacher approval

Grades: 11-12

AP Psychology focuses on the student's ability to actively explore and research major theories, concepts, and themes relevant to the field. The course will focus on the seven themes from the American Psychological Association’s National Standards for High School Curriculum. Content emphasis will be aligned with the expectations set by the College Board. Major areas of study will include the history of psychology, research and statistics, bio‐psychology, cognition, memory and intelligence, personality and development, motivation and emotion, learning theories, abnormal psychology, treatment, and social psychology. Students will have the benefit of teacher‐directed lessons, peer‐to‐peer facilitated learning, and consistent use of the internet.

AP European History        SS460

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: World Geography or World History or US History and teacher approval

Grades: 10-12

AP European History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university European history course. In AP European History, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods from approximately 1450 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course also provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; individual and society; and national and European identity.

AP Seminar                SS560                

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: World Geography or World History or US History and teacher approval

Grades 11-12

AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

Technology, Art, and Design (TAD)

Digital Technology

Technology and Digital Skills 1     CS100

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course will emphasize the collaboration, communication, critical thinking, and creativity through the use of applied digital skills, computational thinking, and Digital Citizenship that will be useful throughout a student’s high school, college, and future careers. Students will learn fundamental concepts of technology and software by focusing on a variety of applications, web design, coding, problem solving, app development, and web/cloud technologies.

 

Technology and Digital Skills 2    CS200

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Technology and Digital Skills 1

Grades: 9-12

This course provides a working knowledge and ability to utilize Google Apps, an intermediate approach to computer science and programming skills, and an understanding of what it means to be a modern Digital Citizen by empowering “students to think critically, behave safely, and participate responsibly in our digital world. These 21st-century skills are essential for students to harness the full potential of technology for learning.” Students will learn fundamental concepts of technology and software by focusing on a variety of applications, such as word-processing, spreadsheets, multimedia presentations, coding, and web/cloud technologies.

Yearbook     CS350

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Photoshop is recommended; teacher approval required if no Photoshop

Grades: 10-12 (Grade 10 with teacher recommendation)

Journalism yearbook is year-long course which produces and publishes the yearbook for Grace International School.  Students will be responsible for writing, designing, editing, and photographing those events and activities which define the school year. Students will learn journalistic writing, design, and publishing techniques. Students will be trained in the use of desktop publishing software.

Visual Arts

Drawing     FA115

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course is an introduction to visual communication and the language of art through 2D media such as pencil and pen. The student is exposed to the elements of art as well as various artistic styles. Students learn the five perceptions of art, which is a sequential learning process that teaches them how to “see” in order to draw. Art projects include portraiture, still life, value drawings, and positive/negative space among others. Drawing students participate in class critiques of their work, and they display their work in the annual student art show held in May.

Painting     FA220

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Drawing

Grades: 10-12

The student will explore various paint methods including watercolor, acrylic, pastel, and mixed media.  They will move through the genres of realism, impressionism, abstract, monochromatic and pop art.   Critiques involve students in reacting to their own works and the works of their peers both in oral and written form. Painting students participate in the annual Art Chapel where they create artworks based around a Biblical theme and present them in chapel as a way to lead their peers in worship. All 12th grade students who complete Painting are eligible to have an individual display at the annual art show.

Honors Studio Art     FA300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: Drawing and Painting

Grades: 11-12

The Honors Studio Art course is for students interested in learning advanced techniques in drawing and painting. Honors students will explore a variety of techniques, compositions, and genres. Students are introduced to advanced drawing techniques. The course will include experiences in a variety of media such as colored pencil, pastel, charcoal, watercolor, pen and ink, scratchboard, collage, acrylic and mixed media.  Students are given instructions but have room for creative individual expression. This course is intended to be a stepping stone towards the rigorous level of AP Studio Art. Honors Studio Art students participate in peer critiques and the annual Art Chapel where they create artworks based around a Biblical theme and present them in chapel as a way to lead their peers in worship. All 12th grade students who complete advanced art are eligible to have an individual display at the annual art show.

AP Studio Art      FA400

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: Drawing, Painting, and Honors Studio Art

Grades: 11-12

AP Studio Art in Drawing or 2D Design is a program for those serious art students who wish to participate in a rigorous program designed as a first year college course. In May students submit 24 pieces to the College Board for an AP rating. Students complete 12 projects in the first semester which cover a wide variety of techniques, compositions and genres. During the second semester students complete a set of 12 projects following a theme and showing growth in their art. The course requires almost one project every week or week and a half. All AP Studio Art students are eligible to have an individual display at the annual art show their senior year.

World Languages

Thai

National Thai         Grades 9-12

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Thai national or non-Thai student who passes a placement test with approval of the Thai teachers

Grades: 9-12

Students in national Thai experience a four year cycle of curriculum topics that develop communication skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Topics offered throughout the course are varied which include Thai literature, basic Thai laws, news and current events,  non-fiction, Thai history in depth, Thai geography, natural resources and conservation, research and independent study. Students will write stories, essays, journals, simple poems, news and reports and presents their work in a variety of ways. Cultural activities are included and a field trip is offered every other year.

9th Grade      LS100                                                11th Grade     LS300

10th Grade    LS200                                                12th Grade     LS400

Thai 1      LS110                

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course is designed for students new to the Thai language. This course is an introduction to listening, reading, writing, and speaking the Thai language. Thai culture is explored along with language learning. Short field trips are offered for students to have hands on experience with Thai culture and Thai way of life outside of school.

Thai 2      LS210

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Grade 7 & 8 Thai 3 and pass the placement test, or High School Thai 1

Grades: 9-12

In this course students will continue to develop in their skills of listening, reading, writing and speaking Thai. They will learn more in depth with Thai writing system. More vocabulary and sentence structures will be added  in their speaking and writing skills as they experience opportunities to develop their Thai in all areas. Thai culture is explored and experienced along with language learning.

Thai 3             LS310

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: High School Thai 2

Grades: 9-12

This course is a continuation of the basic listening, speaking, writing and speaking skills needed to be fluent in the Thai language. In this course includes Thai folktales, short stories, conversations, northern Thai music and dialect, health and sickness, Thai history and places.

Thai 4             LS410  

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: High School Thai 3

Grades: 10-12

This course is designed to develop students to be fluent in the Thai language and to have in depth knowledge about Thai culture and Thai language. This course includes Thai literature, Thai drama and Bible study.

Spanish

Spanish 1     LS120

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course introduces students to the basics of the Spanish language: present-tense, basic vocabulary and grammatical structure, expression of personal data. Students will investigate Spanish and Latin American culture through the “Food Project”, a South America geography emphasis and “In The News”.  Companeros Book 1 guides the sequence of instruction. Students learn from skits (both memorized and original), daily Spanish songs and practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Special projects and hands-on activities such as the “Pinata” project engage students' multiple intelligences as they work in pairs or groups.

Spanish 2     LS220

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or instructor approval

Grades: 10-12 (Grade 9 with permission)

This course focuses on developing the “three strands” of language acquisition (interpersonal/interactive, interpretative/receptive, and presentational/productive. The communicative use of all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) is pursued.  Focus is on the use of language already acquired as well as ongoing deepening of language skills.  Spanish 4 continues the “Vamos a Madrid” scenario experience in which real-life conversational skills are mastered. Materials used for preparing for the AP Spanish Language test will be used along with the use of authentic sources such as newspapers, recordings, flims, and magazines.  Students may choose to take the AP Spanish language test even though Spanish 4 is not listed as an AP course.

Spanish 3     LS330

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or instructor approval

Grades: 10-12

This course builds on Spanish 2 with an emphasis on improving grammatical skills, expanding vocabulary, promoting increased verbal fluency through conversation, and continuing the students’ historical and cultural knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world. Companeros Book 2 reviews core content from Spanish 1 and 2, and moves on to more advanced language skills (which will prepare for university-level placement tests). Students will participate in a variety of projects using internet research and multimedia presentations to share their knowledge with classmates. Spanish 3 builds to the “Vamos a Madrid” scenario experience in which real-life conversational skills are mastered.

Spanish 4     LS420  

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or instructor approval

Grades: 10-12

This course focuses on developing the “three strands” of language acquisition, interpersonal/interactive, interpretative/receptive, and presentational/productive. The focus is on the use of language already acquired as well as ongoing deepening of language skills. Materials used for preparing for the AP Spanish Language test will be used along with the use of authentic sources such as newspapers, recordings, films, and magazines. Students may choose to take the AP Spanish language test even though Spanish 4 is not listed as an AP course.

Mandarin

Mandarin 1    LS130

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Mandarin 1 is an introduction to Chinese language and culture for students who have little or no experience with the Chinese language.  Mandarin 1 covers all 4 facets of the Chinese language: speaking, listening, reading and writing.  The class will use pinyin (phonetics) to study correct pronunciation and Chinese characters to build reading and writing skills.  The class will provide opportunity for students to learn useful vocabulary for daily life.   Multimedia and native language guest speakers are also an integral part of the classroom experience.

Mandarin 2    LS230

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Mandarin 1 (or placement test)

Grades: 9-12

Mandarin 2 will build on vocabulary and writing learned in Mandarin 1.  The focus in class will be to increase mastery in the areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  The course will continue in the Discovering Chinese series, Volumes 3 and 4.  The course will be explore Chinese grammar and add to the character base from Mandarin 1.  Mandarin 2 will be predominantly in Hanzi.  By the time students have finished Mandarin 2, they will be prepared to take the SAT II Chinese subject exam. Students who have had previous Mandarin may ask for a placement test and, if passed, can take Mandarin 2.

Mandarin 3    LS320

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Mandarin 2 (or placement test)

Grades: 9-12

Mandarin 3 is for the intermediate to advanced Chinese student.  Students will engage in interactive learning that will cultivate the foundation that they built in Mandarin 1 and 2.  Mandarin 3 will continue to push students to not only use their Mandarin inside the classroom, but also use it with Chinese speakers in the community.  Students will be using Magical Tour of China textbooks by Better Chinese.  These books focus on learning Chinese through exploring Chinese culture.  Students who have had previous Mandarin may ask for a placement test for Mandarin 3.

Mandarin 4    LS430

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Mandarin 3 (or placement test)

Grades: 9-12

Mandarin 4 is for the advanced Chinese student.  Building on a foundation from the first 3 years of Mandarin, Mandarin 4 students will extend their knowledge of both practical and literary Mandarin.  Mandarin 4 will continue with the study of vocabulary and grammar, but students will also focus on Chinese culture and history.  Students will be using Magical Tour of China textbooks, volumes 3 and 4, by Better Chinese.  Mandarin 4 will also prepare students for the AP Mandarin exam offered in May. Students who have had previous Mandarin may ask for a placement test for Mandarin 4.

Non-Departmental

Student Aide/Teacher’s Assistant     ND100

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit as pass/fail

Prerequisite: Teacher and Counselor approval. It is recommended that the student has already taken the course or a similar course for which he or she is a TA. A student may not take more than one section of this class without prior approval.

Grades: 10-12

The student will assist a cooperating teacher or staff in their particular course or area of teaching. The student will be under the supervision of the cooperating teacher who will assign work and projects according to their needs and goals. This can include, but is not limited to: clerical work, tutoring, research, and assisting with teaching. Students will be responsible to document work accomplished and write an evaluation of their experience at the conclusion of the term.

Online Learning Request        ND200

Credit: Varies - Full year courses are worth 1.0 credit and semester long courses are worth 0.5 credits

Prerequisite: A complete Online Course Request Form and Online Course Enrollment Form and Counselor and Principal approval.

Grades: 10-12

A student who would like to enroll in an online class through NorthStar Academy will request this course. All students who are in this course will have class time during the school day supervised by a GIS staff member to work on the online course they are enrolled in. Additional time outside of class time might be required to complete the course on time.For AP courses, it is estimated that an additional 4 hours per week of work outside of class will be required to complete the course on time.

Grades 9-12 Educational/ESL Support

Courses listed under this section are available by special arrangement with the Educational Support (ES) Division and the Academic Counselor.  At this time, they will not appear as choices in the online Course Requests in GIS FamilyWeb.  If you feel your student might need to enroll in one or more of these courses in lieu of the equivalent high school course, please contact the Educational Support Division.  Those needing to enroll in one or more of these courses will be scheduled manually by the Academic Counselor.  For students requiring ESL support, tests for incoming and returning students will be used to determine appropriate level of support, and students will also be scheduled manually.

Math Foundations II--Algebra 1        SN096

Grades 9-12

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Written approval by parents, math department, and ES Division

Math Foundations is a math program for students in grades 9-12 who are identified as having a math disability, or for those who need more support for mathematics than can be provided in the regular classroom. This class uses grade-level standards while providing individualized pacing, a smaller class size, and extra teacher support. Grades for Math Foundations will be designated as a "modified grade" on transcripts and report cards only if the subject is modified.

Grades 9-12 ESL        SN101

Credit: None

Prerequisite: Recommendation of ESL Supervisor

Grades: 9-12

High School ESL is a course designed to support students’ English language development, specifically in the modality of writing. This class meets 2-3 times a week and is structured to provide direct instruction, opportunities for practice, and direct feedback on students’ writing, grammer, and academic vocabulary. Instruction will include: advanced English language grammar, the formation of complex sentences, incorporation of transition words and phrases, and strategies for composing academic writing in the English language.