Central Cambria SD

District Level Plan

07/01/2018 - 06/30/2021


District Profile

Demographics

208 Schoolhouse Rd

Ebensburg, PA 15931

(814)472-8870

Superintendent: Jason Moore

Director of Special Education: Melissa Shaffer

Planning Process

An initial district-wide planning team met in August, 2012 to review the comprehensive planning tool and begin the process of developing a plan for using the online resource to develop a comprehensive plan for the Central Cambria School District. A timeline was developed by the district-wide planning team to meet again in October 2012. In addition, comprehensive district-wide planning meetings were scheduled for January, March, June, and August 2013 so that comprehensive plan development would continue throughout the school year to ensure that the District comprehensive plan would be fully developed and prepared for submission to PDE by the Fall Semester of 2013. Individual school administrators were instructed to begin the comprehensive planning process for their schools during the August 2012 comprehensive planning meeting. Individual school building principals are responsible for coordinating and developing their individual building plans. In addition, the Director of Special Education was identified as the person responsible for developing the special education areas of the district-wide comprehensive plan. Each school principal identified Comprehensive Planning Members that were invited to meet, collaborate and initiate the process of individual school building comprehensive plan development in the Fall of 2012. Each school principal met with their school comprehensive planning team members to review their building-level comprehensive plans during the Fall of 2012 and the Spring of 2013 to communicate updates on the plan development, seek feedback, and make adjustments as necessary. The district-wide comprehensive planning team will meet in August, 2013 to review the final document before submitting it to the Pennsylvania Department of Education by the submission deadline.

For the 2017 update of the plan, a few changes to the planning committee were made.  The committee met during the summer of 2016 to review the comprehensive plan and update it as need.  A vast majority of the work was updating statuses of items that were listed as "in progress" are now firmly developed.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Central Cambria School District is to accept, hear, and value all in the school community and to provide a safe environment that fosters achievement and success.

Vision Statement

Upon graduation, all students will be able to articulate realistic career options. All students will graduate with a post secondary-ready transcript that includes a program of rigorous studies. All students and staff will be aware of healthy lifestyle choices. All students and staff will be effective communicators and collaborators.

A Commitment to Quality

The CCSD recognizes the importance of quality and the impact it has on the education of our students. It is throughout continuous improvement efforts that we effectively and efficiently impact  student achievement.

Shared Values

Shared Values:

1. Foster a positive learning culture that

promotes tolerance, cooperation, and

success.

2. Provide varied opportunities for personal

development that encourage individuality,

creativity, and logical thinking.

3. Develop skills, attitudes,and knowledge

necessary for success in a global society.

4. Support all members of the school

community to be lifelong learners.

Educational Community

Central Cambria School District is one of twelve school districts in Cambria County.

There are currently 1646 students enrolled at Central Cambria School District in grades K-12.

The attendance area encompasses the communities of Ebensburg, Colver, Revloc, Mundy’s Corner and Vinco as well as Cambria and Jackson Townships.

The city of Ebensburg with a population of a little over 3,000 is situated in the central part of Cambria County and serves as the County Seat. The school district encompasses a total population of 14,233.

The area offers many resources and strengths. It is in close proximity to Saint Francis University, Mount Aloysius College,  the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown and Pennsylvania Highlands Community College. The area offers diverse employment opportunities including the L. Robert Kimball Engineering Firm,, Cambria County Courthouse, and several service industries. Many recreational activities are available to those living in the area.

There are 131 teachers and 7 administrators in the Central Cambria School District. The average class size is 23.

The Executive Summary Report of the Cambria County Comprehensive Plan Update written in October, 2011 by the Cambria County Planning Commission for Community, Environmental, and Economic Sustainability 2010-2030 reports the following issues regarding demographics for the region surrounding the Central Cambria School District (CCSD): 1.The county has continuously lost population over the last 70 years, with economy-related losses of the family-forming and middle-aged family maintaining age group but increases in the 65+ age group. 2. While more County residents are finishing high school, overall increases in those attaining post-secondary degrees have not been as significant. One of the primary issues pertaining to demographics reported by the Community Action Partnership of Cambria County (CAPCC) is poverty. Of the children served by the PA Pre-K Counts program within the CCSD 71.1% are living in economically at-risk families, up to 300% of poverty. The following information is reported for the children served through the CAPCC Head Start program: 87% are at or below 100% of poverty, 9% are at 101 – 130% of poverty, 4% are 131 – 300 % of poverty: a child in this income bracket would be identified as a child with a special education need.

CCSD demographic data reflects similar issues reported by CAPCC. Through a close analysis of the school demographic data it was determined that of the total enrollment for the district, 1773 students, over 35% of the population qualifies for free and reduced lunch. This would indicate a high level of need for students and their families enrolled in the CCSD. The percentage of free and reduced lunch increases to 42% at Jackson Elementary and 38% at Central Cambria Middle School. Cambria Elementary reports 41% free and reduced lunch population while Central Cambria High School reports 31%.

Although our percentage of English Language Learners is small our population of students with IEPs for the school district is 14%. This percentage is increased at Central Cambria Middle School where 16% of the student population has an IEP, while 15% at Central Cambria High School. Both Jackson Elementary and Cambria Elementary report an 11/12% IEP student population.

 

Planning Committee

Name

Role

Jason Moore

Administrator : Professional Education Special Education

Chris Santini

Administrator : Professional Education

Joe Strittmatter

Administrator : Professional Education Special Education

Scott Magley

Board Member : Special Education

Jennifer Mesoras

Building Principal : Professional Education Special Education

Tricia Murin

Building Principal : Professional Education Special Education

Robb Long

Business Representative : Professional Education

Randy  Seymour

Business Representative : Professional Education

Rich Bauer

Community Representative : Professional Education

Al Boring

Community Representative : Professional Education

Susan Dixon

Ed Specialist - School Counselor : Professional Education

Kirsten  Stiffler

Ed Specialist - School Psychologist : Professional Education Special Education

Diane Lucas

Elementary School Teacher - Special Education : Professional Education Special Education

Ashley  Miller

Elementary School Teacher - Special Education : Professional Education Special Education

Heather  Niebauer

High School Teacher - Regular Education : Professional Education

Stephanie Reese

High School Teacher - Regular Education : Professional Education

Ken Krott

Instructional Technology Director/Specialist : Professional Education Special Education

Lisa Asashon

Middle School Teacher - Regular Education : Professional Education

Barri  Dziack

Middle School Teacher - Regular Education : Professional Education

Carleen Ball

Parent : Professional Education Special Education

Lee Ann Krumenacker

Parent : Professional Education Special Education

Alysia Wirfel

Parent : Professional Education Special Education

Melissa  Shaffer

Special Education Director/Specialist : Professional Education Special Education

Jason Moore

Student Curriculum Director/Specialist : Professional Education Special Education


Core Foundations

Standards

Mapping and Alignment

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Standards

Mapping

Alignment

Arts and Humanities

Accomplished

Accomplished

Career Education and Work

Developing

Developing

Civics and Government

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Developing

Developing

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Accomplished

Accomplished

Economics

Non Existent

Non Existent

Environment and Ecology

Developing

Developing

Family and Consumer Sciences

Non Existent

Non Existent

Geography

Accomplished

Accomplished

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Accomplished

Accomplished

History

Accomplished

Accomplished

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Accomplished

Accomplished

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Developing

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Developing

Developing

American School Counselor Association for Students

Developing

Developing

Early Childhood Education: Infant-Toddler⟶Second Grade

Accomplished

Accomplished

English Language Proficiency

Developing

Developing

Interpersonal Skills

Developing

Developing

School Climate

Developing

Developing

Explanation for standard areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent":

Economics and Family Consumer Sciences are not currently being taught at the primary level.

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Standards

Mapping

Alignment

Arts and Humanities

Accomplished

Accomplished

Career Education and Work

Developing

Developing

Civics and Government

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Accomplished

Accomplished

Economics

Non Existent

Non Existent

Environment and Ecology

Developing

Developing

Family and Consumer Sciences

Non Existent

Non Existent

Geography

Accomplished

Accomplished

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Accomplished

Accomplished

History

Accomplished

Accomplished

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Accomplished

Accomplished

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Developing

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Developing

Developing

American School Counselor Association for Students

Developing

Developing

English Language Proficiency

Developing

Developing

Interpersonal Skills

Developing

Developing

School Climate

Developing

Developing

Explanation for standard areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent":

Economics and Family Consumer Sciences are not currently being taught at the intermediate level.

Middle Level

Standards

Mapping

Alignment

Arts and Humanities

Accomplished

Accomplished

Career Education and Work

Needs Improvement

Needs Improvement

Civics and Government

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Accomplished

Accomplished

Economics

Developing

Developing

Environment and Ecology

Developing

Developing

Family and Consumer Sciences

Accomplished

Accomplished

Geography

Accomplished

Accomplished

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Accomplished

Accomplished

History

Accomplished

Accomplished

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Developing

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Developing

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Developing

Developing

American School Counselor Association for Students

Developing

Developing

English Language Proficiency

Developing

Developing

Interpersonal Skills

Developing

Developing

School Climate

Developing

Developing

World Language

Non Existent

Non Existent

Explanation for standard areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent":

We currently do not offer a world language program at the Middle School level.  This is something we are beginning to explore with possible cyber/blended options. 
 

High School Level

Standards

Mapping

Alignment

Arts and Humanities

Accomplished

Accomplished

Career Education and Work

Developing

Developing

Civics and Government

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Accomplished

Accomplished

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Developing

Developing

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Accomplished

Accomplished

Economics

Accomplished

Accomplished

Environment and Ecology

Accomplished

Accomplished

Family and Consumer Sciences

Non Existent

Non Existent

Geography

Non Existent

Non Existent

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Accomplished

Accomplished

History

Accomplished

Accomplished

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Accomplished

Accomplished

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Developing

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Developing

Developing

American School Counselor Association for Students

Developing

Developing

English Language Proficiency

Developing

Developing

Interpersonal Skills

Non Existent

Non Existent

School Climate

Developing

Developing

World Language

Developing

Developing

Explanation for standard areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent":

These areas are addressed at other levels and are not currently included in the high school curriculum:  FCS, Geography.  Interpersonal Skills are addressed in various subject areas but not in any specific course.

Adaptations

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Checked answers

        None.

Unchecked answers

        None.

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Checked answers

        None.

Unchecked answers

        None.

Middle Level

Checked answers

        None.

Unchecked answers

        None.

High School Level

Checked answers

        None.

Unchecked answers

        None.

Explanation for any standards checked:

This narrative is empty.

Curriculum

Planned Instruction

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Curriculum Characteristics

Status

Objectives of planned courses, instructional units or interdisciplinary studies to be achieved by all students are identified for each subject area.

Accomplished

Content, including materials and activities and estimated instructional time to be devoted to achieving the academic standards are identified.

Accomplished

The relationship between the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies and academic standards are identified.

Accomplished

Procedures for measurement of mastery of the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies are identified.

Accomplished

Processes used to ensure Accomplishment:

Teachers will work together within Professional Learning Community (PLC) Teams to continue to develop curriculum characteristics required to ensure Accomplishment in these four areas. Principals and curriculum director will monitor written and delivered curriculum. 

Explanation for any standards areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Curriculum Characteristics

Status

Objectives of planned courses, instructional units or interdisciplinary studies to be achieved by all students are identified for each subject area.

Accomplished

Content, including materials and activities and estimated instructional time to be devoted to achieving the academic standards are identified.

Accomplished

The relationship between the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies and academic standards are identified.

Accomplished

Procedures for measurement of mastery of the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies are identified.

Accomplished

Processes used to ensure Accomplishment:

Teachers will work together within Professional Learning Community (PLC) Teams to continue to develop curriculum characteristics required to ensure Accomplishment in these four areas. Principals and curriculum director will monitor written and delivered curriculum. 

Explanation for any standards areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

Middle Level

Curriculum Characteristics

Status

Objectives of planned courses, instructional units or interdisciplinary studies to be achieved by all students are identified for each subject area.

Accomplished

Content, including materials and activities and estimated instructional time to be devoted to achieving the academic standards are identified.

Accomplished

The relationship between the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies and academic standards are identified.

Accomplished

Procedures for measurement of mastery of the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies are identified.

Accomplished

Processes used to ensure Accomplishment:

Teachers will work together within Professional Learning Community (PLC) Teams to continue to develop curriculum characteristics required to ensure Accomplishment in these four areas. Principals and curriculum director will monitor written and delivered curriculum. 

Explanation for any standards areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

High School Level

Curriculum Characteristics

Status

Objectives of planned courses, instructional units or interdisciplinary studies to be achieved by all students are identified for each subject area.

Accomplished

Content, including materials and activities and estimated instructional time to be devoted to achieving the academic standards are identified.

Accomplished

The relationship between the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies and academic standards are identified.

Accomplished

Procedures for measurement of mastery of the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies are identified.

Accomplished

Processes used to ensure Accomplishment:

Teachers will work together within Professional Learning Community (PLC) Teams to continue to develop curriculum characteristics required to ensure Accomplishment in these four areas. Principals and curriculum director will monitor written and delivered curriculum. 

Explanation for any standards areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

Modification and Accommodations

Explain how planned instruction contains modifications and accommodations that allow all students at all mental and physical ability levels to access and master a rigorous standards aligned curriculum.

The district has embarked upon an aggressive curriculum review process that includes the observation of teachers as required under Act 82. In addition, the district has placed an emphasis on "Best Instructional Practice" for all teachers. The emphasis on a standards aligned curriculum and an emphasis on best practice will enable teachers to adjust their instructional strategies to meet the needs of all learners. The district has already instituted a differentiated instruction approach to bolster the ability to modify curriculum to meet the needs of all learners. The district will make the necessary physical improvements and modifications of the learning environment to meet the needs of physically challenged students and staff as required by law.

Instruction

Instructional Strategies

Checked Answers

Regular Lesson Plan Review

Checked Answers

Unchecked Answers

Provide brief explanation of LEA's process for incorporating selected strategies.

The administrative staff has been extensively trained in the Danielson Framework.  A mixture of formal observations and brief, focused walkthroughs as tools used by administrators to measure the quality of instructional delivery.  Additionally, administrators use supervision to compare the written curriculum with the delivered curriculum. 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how the LEA plans to address their incorporation.

We do not have department supervisors in the elementary schools. Instructional coaches will not/do not evaluate their peers.
Secondary teachers are led by department chairs for curriculum and assessment.

Responsiveness to Student Needs

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Instructional Practices

Status

Structured grouping practices are used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

Flexible instructional time or other schedule-related practices are used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

Differentiated instruction is used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

A variety of practices that may include structured grouping, flexible scheduling and differentiated instruction are used to meet the needs of gifted students.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

If necessary, provide further explanation. (Required explanation if column selected was

This narrative is empty.

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Instructional Practices

Status

Structured grouping practices are used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

Flexible instructional time or other schedule-related practices are used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

Differentiated instruction is used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

A variety of practices that may include structured grouping, flexible scheduling and differentiated instruction are used to meet the needs of gifted students.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

If necessary, provide further explanation. (Required explanation if column selected was

This narrative is empty.

Middle Level

Instructional Practices

Status

Structured grouping practices are used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Flexible instructional time or other schedule-related practices are used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Differentiated instruction is used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

A variety of practices that may include structured grouping, flexible scheduling and differentiated instruction are used to meet the needs of gifted students.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

If necessary, provide further explanation. (Required explanation if column selected was

This narrative is empty.

High School Level

Instructional Practices

Status

Structured grouping practices are used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Flexible instructional time or other schedule-related practices are used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Differentiated instruction is used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

A variety of practices that may include structured grouping, flexible scheduling and differentiated instruction are used to meet the needs of gifted students.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

If necessary, provide further explanation. (Required explanation if column selected was

Students are able to pursue areas of academic rigor and advanced placement through multiple scheduling options.

Recruitment

Describe the process you implement to recruit and assign the most effective and highly qualified teachers in order to meet the learning needs of students who are below proficiency or are at risk of not graduating.

Secondary teachers must meet certification guidelines for highly qualified in their content area. The district strives to match teachers with particular strengths in working with low performing students to those identified students. 

Assessments

Local Graduation Requirements

Course Completion

SY 18/19

SY 19/20

SY 20/21

Total Courses

24.00

24.00

24.00

English

4.00

4.00

4.00

Mathematics

4.00

4.00

4.00

Social Studies

3.00

3.00

3.00

Science

3.00

3.00

3.00

Physical Education

1.00

1.00

1.00

Health

1.00

1.00

1.00

Music, Art, Family & Consumer Sciences, Career and Technical Education

0.00

0.00

0.00

Electives

9.00

9.00

9.00

Minimum % Grade Required for Credit (Numerical Answer)

70.00

70.00

70.00

Graduation Requirement Specifics

We affirm that our entity requires demonstration of proficiency or above in each of the following State academic standards: English Language Arts and Mathematics, Science and Technology and Environment and Ecology, as determined through any one or a combination of the following:Checked answers

  1. Alignment with the following State academic standards: English Language Arts (Literature and Composition); Mathematics (Algebra I) and Environment and Ecology (Biology).
  2. Performance level expectations and descriptors that describe the level of performance required to achieve proficiency comparable to that used for the Keystone Exams.
  3. Administration of the local assessment to all students, as a requirement for graduation, except for those exempted by their individualized education program under subsection (g), regarding special education students, or gifted individualized education plan as provided in ? 16.32 (relating to GIEP).
  4. Subject to appropriations provided by law, the cost to validate local assessments shall be evenly divided between the school district, AVTS or charter school, including a cyber-charter school, and the Department. If the Department does not provide sufficient funding to meet its share, local assessments submitted for validation shall be deemed valid until a new validation is due to the Department.
  5. The Department will establish a list of entities approved to perform independent validations of local assessments in consultation with the Local Assessment Validation Advisory Committee as provided in ? 4.52(f).
  6. School boards shall only approve assessments that have been determined to meet the requirements of this subsection by an approved entity performing the independent validation. If a school district, AVTS or charter school, including a cyber-charter school, uses a local assessment that has not been independently validated, the Secretary will direct the school entity to discontinue its use until the local assessment is approved through independent validation by an approved entity.

Unchecked answers

Local Assessments

Standards

WA

TD

NAT

DA

PSW

Other

Arts and Humanities

X

X

X

Career Education and Work

X

Civics and Government

X

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

X

X

X

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

X

X

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

X

X

X

Economics

X

Environment and Ecology

X

Family and Consumer Sciences

Geography

Health, Safety and Physical Education

X

X

History

X

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

X

World Language

X

X

Methods and Measures

Summative Assessments

Summative Assessments

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

PSSA Results, End of Unit Tests, Cumulative Assessments

X

X

X

Keystone Exams, AP Exams

X

X

Benchmark Assessments

Benchmark Assessments

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Fountas and Pinnel Benchmark Assessment, Running Records

X

X

STAR Reading

X

Formative Assessments

Formative Assessments

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

DIBELS, Classroom Inventories, on-line resources

X

X

Diagnostic Assessments

Diagnostic Assessments

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Running Records, Fountas and Pinnel, on-line resources

X

X

CDT's

X

X

Validation of Implemented Assessments

Validation Methods

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

External Review

X

X

X

Intermediate Unit Review

LEA Administration Review

X

X

X

X

Building Supervisor Review

X

X

X

X

Department Supervisor Review

X

Professional Learning Community Review

X

X

X

Instructional Coach Review

X

X

Teacher Peer Review

Provide brief explanation of your process for reviewing assessments.

PLC Teams meet weekly and discuss plans for formative assessment development. In addition, recommendations are made by team members to either continue use of specific assessments or elimination. Adjustments are made based on feedback from all stakeholders.
At the high school level, assessments are determined by requirements of state exams, dual-enrolled courses, and AP course enrollment.

Development and Validation of Local Assessments

If applicable, explain your procedures for developing locally administered assessments and how they are independently and objectively validated every six years.

Our PLC teams work collaboratively to develop and administer assessments. This process is in the infancy stage and considered the "next steps" for our PLC Team development. A plan for objectively validating every six years will need to be created and/or developed.
Our IU assists in the creation of local assessments when needed.

Collection and Dissemination

Describe your system to collect, analyze and disseminate assessment data efficiently and effectively for use by LEA leaders and instructional teams.

ELA and Math teacher utilize STAR Math and STAR Reading assessments.  Additionally, those teachers and science teachers may also administer the CDT assessments.  All assessments are analyzed by the teachers during PLC meetings as well as by the curriculum director and building principals.  Item analyses are completed, and it is expected to drive instruction.  Utilization of data to change instruction is monitored in the supervision process.  Additionally, data are uploaded to Skyward, the student information system, in order for teachers to have easy access to all relevant data for students. 
Administrators and teachers access various data sites, including eMetric and PVAAS.

Data Informed Instruction

Describe how information from the assessments is used to assist students who have not demonstrated achievement of the academic standards at a proficient level or higher.

Assessment information is used by PLC Teams and Multi Tiered System of Support Teams to remediate and select supplemental instructional resources that are age and developmentally appropriate based on individual student needs.
Assessment data is used to identify individuals or groups who are in need of additional support or intervention strategies.  This information is then used by classroom teachers, special education teachers, child study teams, and Intervention/Assistance teachers. 

Assessment Data Uses

Assessment Data Uses

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Assessment results are reported out by PA assessment anchor or standards-aligned learning objective.

X

X

X

Instructional practices are identified that are linked to student success in mastering specific PA assessment anchors, eligible content or standards-aligned learning objectives.

X

X

X

Specific PA assessment anchors, eligible content or standards-aligned learning objectives are identified for those students who did not demonstrate sufficient mastery so that teachers can collaboratively create and/or identify instructional strategies likely to increase mastery.

X

X

X

Instructional practices modified or adapted to increase student mastery.

X

X

X

X

Provide brief explanation of the process for incorporating selected strategies.

Teachers spend time during in-service days reviewing and analyzing the PSSA data including PA assessment anchors and eligible content. In addition, they collaborate during vertical team planning sessions and routinely scheduled PLC Team meetings at both elementary schools.

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

EEP was not included since PSSA data is not applicable to the primary classrooms.

Distribution of Summative Assessment Results

Distribution Methods

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Course Planning Guides

X

X

X

X

Directing Public to the PDE & other Test-related Websites

X

X

X

X

Individual Meetings

X

X

X

X

Letters to Parents/Guardians

X

X

X

X

Local Media Reports

X

X

X

X

Website

X

X

X

X

Meetings with Community, Families and School Board

X

X

X

X

Mass Phone Calls/Emails/Letters

X

X

X

X

Newsletters

X

X

X

X

Press Releases

X

X

X

X

School Calendar

X

X

X

X

Student Handbook

X

X

X

X

Provide brief explanation of the process for incorporating selected strategies.

All of the distribution methods listed help make the process of informing the public consistent, effective, and timely.

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how the LEA plans to address their incorporation.

This narrative is empty.

Safe and Supportive Schools

Assisting Struggling Schools

Describe your entity’s process for assisting schools that either do not meet the annual student achievement targets or experience other challenges, which deter student attainment of academic standards at a proficient level or higher.

If your entity has no struggling schools, explain how you will demonstrate continued growth in student achievement.

Growth mindset is a philosophy held and reinforced by all of the PLC groups.  Academic growth is actively monitored for all students through the use of regular benchmark assessments.  Teachers work with the curriculum director to complete item analyses after the assessment.  Additionally, teacher conference with individual students to discuss individual strengths and areas for concern.  Students in need of extra assistance are identified through a formalized MTSS program. 

Programs, Strategies and Actions

Programs, Strategies and Actions

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Biennially Updated and Executed Memorandum of Understanding with Local Law Enforcement

X

X

X

X

School-wide Positive Behavioral Programs

X

X

X

X

Conflict Resolution or Dispute Management

X

X

Peer Helper Programs

X

X

X

Safety and Violence Prevention Curricula

X

X

X

X

Student Codes of Conduct

X

X

X

X

Comprehensive School Safety and Violence Prevention Plans

X

X

X

X

Purchase of Security-related Technology

X

X

X

X

Student, Staff and Visitor Identification Systems

X

X

X

X

Placement of School Resource Officers

X

X

X

X

Student Assistance Program Teams and Training

X

X

X

X

Counseling Services Available for all Students

X

X

X

X

Internet Web-based System for the Management of Student Discipline

X

X

X

X

Explanation of strategies not selected and how the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

Screening, Evaluating and Programming for Gifted Students

Describe your entity’s awareness activities conducted annually to inform the public of the gifted education services and programs offered (newspaper, student handbooks, school website, etc.)

CCSD conducts annual awareness activities primarily based within the annual notice that is posted on the CCSD website, within local newspaper, within student handbooks for elementary students, within the electronic student handbook at the middle school and high school levels. and is made available in the entryway of each school building.  In addition, screening surveys are distributed to teachers to help identify students who may have been missed by other methods.

Describe your entity’s process for locating students who are thought to be gifted and may be in need of specially designed instruction (screening).

Every spring, teacher recommendation forms are distributed district wide.  These forms cover a wide spectrum of characteristics of gifted and ask teachers to collect data including informational observational data for each student.  These forms are collected and reviewed by the building guidance counselor, teacher of the gifted along with the school psychologist.  At that point of the referral process, an abbreviated assessment of intelligence is administered to the potential candidates after parent notification. After results of both the teacher recommendation form and abbreviated assessment of intelligence are completed, a final decision is made (along with parent input) on whether or not to issue a permission to evaluate.

Describe your entity’s procedures for determining eligibility (through multiple criteria) and need (based on academic strength) for potentially mentally gifted students (evaluation).

 

The district employs the following criteria to determine eligibility and needs of potentially mentally gifted students:

 

Describe the gifted programs* being offered that provide opportunities for acceleration, enrichment or both. *The word "programs" refers to the continuum of services, not one particular option.

Central Cambria School District offers a wide continuum of services for mentally gifted students.  Services are based upon individual student need.  Gifted students, district wide,  are also grouped with like minded peers from a minimum of 30 minutes per day at the elementary level to a maximum of 84 minutes per day at the middle school/high school level.

Developmental Services

Developmental Services

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Academic Counseling

X

X

X

X

Attendance Monitoring

X

X

X

X

Behavior Management Programs

X

X

X

X

Bullying Prevention

X

X

X

X

Career Awareness

X

X

X

X

Career Development/Planning

X

X

X

X

Coaching/Mentoring

X

X

X

X

Compliance with Health Requirements –i.e., Immunization

X

X

X

X

Emergency and Disaster Preparedness

X

X

X

X

Guidance Curriculum

X

X

X

X

Health and Wellness Curriculum

X

X

X

X

Health Screenings

X

X

X

X

Individual Student Planning

X

X

X

X

Nutrition

X

X

X

X

Orientation/Transition

X

X

X

X

RTII/MTSS

X

X

Wellness/Health Appraisal

X

X

X

X

Explanation of developmental services:

RTII implementation planned for Middle School ( 2017-18 SY) and the high school ( 2018-19 SY).

Diagnostic, Intervention and Referral Services

Diagnostic, Intervention and Referral Services

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Accommodations and Modifications

X

X

X

X

Administration of Medication

X

X

X

X

Assessment of Academic Skills/Aptitude for Learning

X

X

Assessment/Progress Monitoring

X

X

X

X

Casework

X

X

X

X

Crisis Response/Management/Intervention

X

X

X

X

Individual Counseling

X

X

X

X

Intervention for Actual or Potential Health Problems

X

X

X

X

Placement into Appropriate Programs

X

X

X

X

Small Group Counseling-Coping with life situations

X

X

X

X

Small Group Counseling-Educational planning

X

X

X

X

Small Group Counseling-Personal and Social Development

X

X

X

X

Special Education Evaluation

X

X

X

X

Student Assistance Program

X

X

Explanation of diagnostic, intervention and referral services:

This narrative is empty.

Consultation and Coordination Services

Consultation and Coordination Services

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Alternative Education

X

X

X

X

Case and Care Management

X

X

X

X

Community Liaison

X

X

X

X

Community Services Coordination (Internal or External)

X

X

X

X

Coordinate Plans

X

X

X

X

Coordination with Families (Learning or Behavioral)

X

X

X

X

Home/Family Communication

X

X

X

X

Managing Chronic Health Problems

X

X

X

X

Managing IEP and 504 Plans

X

X

X

X

Referral to Community Agencies

X

X

X

X

Staff Development

X

X

X

X

Strengthening Relationships  Between School Personnel, Parents and Communities

X

X

X

X

System Support

X

X

X

X

Truancy Coordination

X

X

Explanation of consultation and coordination services:

The elementary schools are involved with Learning Lamp, Inc. which provides before and after school child care and tutoring services. The Cambria County Head Start offers Pre-K services to students and their families for preschool opportunities and transitioning issues. The Parent/Teacher Organizations provide communication and positive home/school communication. Communities in Schools also provide extra remedial assistance to the students at the elementary level.

Communication of Educational Opportunities

Communication of Educational Opportunities

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Course Planning Guides

X

X

X

X

Directing Public to the PDE & Test-related Websites

X

X

X

X

Individual Meetings

X

X

X

X

Letters to Parents/Guardians

X

X

X

X

Local Media Reports

X

X

X

X

Website

X

X

X

X

Meetings with Community, Families and Board of Directors

X

X

X

X

Mass Phone Calls/Emails/Letters

X

X

X

X

Newsletters

X

X

X

X

Press Releases

X

X

X

X

School Calendar

X

X

X

X

Student Handbook

X

X

X

X

Communication of Student Health Needs

Communication of Student Health Needs

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Individual Meetings

X

X

X

X

Individual Screening Results

X

X

X

X

Letters to Parents/Guardians  

X

X

X

X

Website

X

X

X

X

Meetings with Community, Families and Board of Directors

X

X

X

X

Newsletters

X

X

X

X

School Calendar

X

X

X

X

Student Handbook

X

X

X

X

Frequency of Communication

Elementary Education - Primary Level

Elementary Education - Intermediate Level

Middle Level

High School Level

Collaboration for Interventions

Describe the collaboration between classroom teachers and individuals providing interventions regarding differing student needs and academic progress.

The elementary teachers and staff work to meet the needs of all students ranging from medical needs with 504 plans and individualized education plans for academic assistance and enrichment.  There are weekly professional learning community (PLC) team meetings to discuss best practices utilized and there are Child Study Team Meetings held on a regular basis for students of concern.
Middle level teachers communicate on a daily basis about needs and progress of students.  Communication occurs between teachers and the school counselor, within PLC meetings, at IEP, 504, SAP, and Child Study Team meetings, and with the building principal.
 
Secondary teachers meet as needed through department meetings, child study meetings, IEP and 504 meetings, SAP meetings, Meet the Teacher, Parent Conferences, and Parent/Gifted Advisory meetings.

Community Coordination

Describe how you accomplish coordination with community operated infant and toddler centers, as well as preschool early intervention programs. In addition, describe the community coordination with the following before or after school programs and services for all grade levels, including pre-kindergarten, if offered, through grade 12.

  1. Child care
  2. After school programs
  3. Youth workforce development programs
  4. Tutoring

The Learning Lamp, Inc provides before and after school child care at the elementary level. They also provide tutoring services. The Cambria County Head Start provides a Pre-K classroom for students and services for transitioning issues. The Community In Schools programs also offer remedial help at the elementary level.

Preschool Agency Coordination

Explain how the LEA coordinates with agencies that serve preschool age children with disabilities.

  1. Address coordination activities designed to identify and serve children with disabilities and the supports and accommodations available to ensure both physical and programmatic access.
  2. Address pre-kindergarten programs operated directly by the LEA and those operated by community agencies under contract from the LEA.
  3. Describe how the LEA provides for a smooth transition from the home setting and any early childhood care or educational setting the students attend, to the school setting.

There is a Life Skills Classroom at the elementary level that provides services for students with disabilities. The teachers work together with the regular education teachers to make the school setting the most optimal for each students. Students are included in the regular classroom with the co-teaching and RtII methods. Pre-K transition meetings are held at the end of every year to provide a smooth transition for all students. Home visits are incorporated at the beginning of the school year for all Pre-K students. The Pre-K classroom is lead by the Cambria County Head Start and based in one of the elementary schools.

Materials and Resources

Description of Materials and Resources

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Material and Resources Characteristics

Status

Aligned and supportive of academic standards, progresses level to level and demonstrates relationships among fundamental concepts and skills

Developing

A robust supply of high quality aligned instructional materials and resources available

Developing

Accessibility for students and teachers is effective and efficient

Developing

Differentiated and equitably allocated to accommodate diverse levels of student motivation, performance and educational needs

Developing

Provide explanation for processes used to ensure Accomplishment.

The elementary teachers continue to work on demonstrating relationships among fundamentals concepts and skills, aligning instructional materials and resources, and differentiating instruction through professional development and SAS trainings and utilizing the SAS portal. Many PA Core Standards-aligned materials and resources have been acquired.  However, the process is still ongoing as we evaluate alignment to new standards and assessments. 

Explanation for any row checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Material and Resources Characteristics

Status

Aligned and supportive of academic standards, progresses level to level and demonstrates relationships among fundamental concepts and skills

Developing

A robust supply of high quality aligned instructional materials and resources available

Developing

Accessibility for students and teachers is effective and efficient

Developing

Differentiated and equitably allocated to accommodate diverse levels of student motivation, performance and educational needs

Developing

Provide explanation for processes used to ensure Accomplishment.

The elementary teachers continue to work on demonstrating relationships among fundamentals concepts and skills, aligning instructional materials and resources, and differentiating instruction through professional development and SAS trainings and utilizing the SAS portal.  Many PA Core Standards-aligned materials and resources have been acquired.  However, the process is still ongoing as we evaluate alignment to new standards and assessments.

Explanation for any row checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

Middle Level

Material and Resources Characteristics

Status

Aligned and supportive of academic standards, progresses level to level and demonstrates relationships among fundamental concepts and skills

Accomplished

A robust supply of high quality aligned instructional materials and resources available

Accomplished

Accessibility for students and teachers is effective and efficient

Accomplished

Differentiated and equitably allocated to accommodate diverse levels of student motivation, performance and educational needs

Accomplished

Provide explanation for processes used to ensure Accomplishment.

Through regular PLC and departmental meetings, teachers have been very successful in reviewing vendor materials and selecting the most aligned, engaging resources.

Explanation for any row checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

High School Level

Material and Resources Characteristics

Status

Aligned and supportive of academic standards, progresses level to level and demonstrates relationships among fundamental concepts and skills

Developing

A robust supply of high quality aligned instructional materials and resources available

Developing

Accessibility for students and teachers is effective and efficient

Developing

Differentiated and equitably allocated to accommodate diverse levels of student motivation, performance and educational needs

Developing

Provide explanation for processes used to ensure Accomplishment.

Professional development activitiesand day-to-day interactions are designed to ensure effective teaching practices are aligned to available resources.

Explanation for any row checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

This narrative is empty.

SAS Incorporation

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Standards

Status

Arts and Humanities

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Career Education and Work

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Civics and Government

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Full Implementation

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Full Implementation

Economics

Not Applicable

Environment and Ecology

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Family and Consumer Sciences

Not Applicable

Geography

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

History

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Full Implementation

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Full Implementation

American School Counselor Association for Students

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Early Childhood Education: Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

English Language Proficiency

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Interpersonal Skills

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

School Climate

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Further explanation for columns selected "

The Economics and Family and Consumer courses are not offered at the elementary level. However, many of the standards are covered during social studies courses. 

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Standards

Status

Arts and Humanities

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Career Education and Work

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Civics and Government

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Full Implementation

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Full Implementation

Economics

Not Applicable

Environment and Ecology

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Family and Consumer Sciences

Not Applicable

Geography

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

History

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

American School Counselor Association for Students

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

English Language Proficiency

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Interpersonal Skills

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

School Climate

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Further explanation for columns selected "

The Economics and Family and Consumer courses are not offered at the elementary level. However, many of the standards are covered during social studies courses. 

Middle Level

Standards

Status

Arts and Humanities

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Career Education and Work

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Civics and Government

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Full Implementation

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Full Implementation

Economics

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Environment and Ecology

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Family and Consumer Sciences

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Geography

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

History

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

American School Counselor Association for Students

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

English Language Proficiency

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Interpersonal Skills

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

School Climate

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

World Language

Not Applicable

Further explanation for columns selected "

At this time, there is no world language program at the middle school level.
 

High School Level

Standards

Status

Arts and Humanities

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Career Education and Work

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Civics and Government

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Full Implementation

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Full Implementation

Economics

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Environment and Ecology

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Family and Consumer Sciences

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Geography

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

History

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

American School Counselor Association for Students

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

English Language Proficiency

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Interpersonal Skills

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

School Climate

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

World Language

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Further explanation for columns selected "

Although all teachers are expected to access and utilize the SAS materials and  resources, many secondary content area teachers are frustrated with the lack of resources at this level.

Early Warning System

The free PA Educator Dashboard Early Warning System and Intervention Catalog (PA EWS/IC) utilizes the metrics of Attendance, Behavior and Course grades to identify students who may be on a path to dropping out of school. Please indicate your selection of the following options.

Professional Education

Characteristics

District’s Professional Education Characteristics

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Enhances the educator’s content knowledge in the area of the educator’s certification or assignment.

X

X

X

X

Increases the educator’s teaching skills based on effective practice research, with attention given to interventions for struggling students.

X

X

X

X

Increases the educator's teaching skills based on effective practice research, with attention given to interventions for gifted students.

X

X

X

X

Provides educators with a variety of classroom-based assessment skills and the skills needed to analyze and use data in instructional decision making.

X

X

X

X

Empowers educators to work effectively with parents and community partners.

X

X

X

X

District’s Professional Education Characteristics

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Provides the knowledge and skills to think and plan strategically, ensuring that assessments, curriculum, instruction, staff professional education, teaching materials and interventions for struggling students are aligned to each other, as well as to Pennsylvania’s academic standards.

X

X

X

X

Provides the knowledge and skills to think and plan strategically, ensuring that assessments, curriculum, instruction, staff professional education, teaching materials and interventions for gifted students are aligned to each other, as well as to Pennsylvania's academic standards.

X

X

X

X

Provides leaders with the ability to access and use appropriate data to inform decision making.

X

X

X

X

Empowers leaders to create a culture of teaching and learning, with an emphasis on learning.

X

X

X

X

Instructs the leader in managing resources for effective results.

X

X

X

X

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

The district provides specific hours for staff development purposes. All staff ( Administrative, support and instructional) ar involved in these specified staff development activities.These are included in the collective bargaining agreement as well as the Act 93 agreement for administrators. The Act 93 agreement also encourages on-going professional development for administrators. Specific budgetary allotments are provided annually for these purposes and provide for continuity.

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

NA

Educator Discipline Act 126, 71

Provides educators with mandated reporter training, totaling 3 hours, every 5 years as outlined in Act 126.

Questions

The LEA has conducted the required training on:

8/23/2013 Initial training provided by FSA

1/16/2015 Update and refresher provided by IU8

The LEA plans to conduct the required training on approximately:

8/22/2018

Provides educators with four (4) hours of professional development in youth suicide awareness and prevention every five (5) years for professional educators in grades six through twelve as outlined in Act 71.

Questions

The LEA has conducted the training on:

1/15/2016 Initial training

The LEA plans to conduct the training on approximately:

8/22/2018 Refresher

Provides educators with four (4) hours of professional development every five (5) years for professional educators that are teaching the curriculum in which the Child Exploitation Awareness Education program is incorporated as outlined in Act 71.

Questions

The LEA has conducted the training on:

8/23/2013

1/16/2015

The LEA plans to conduct the training on approximately:

8/22/2018

Strategies Ensuring Fidelity

Checked answers

Unchecked answers

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

The Leadership team meets on a regular basis to plan and organize staff development activities. These meetings address areas of need and ensure that the above characteristics are found in each staff development activity.

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

Not k-12, not comprehensive needs assessment,

Induction Program

Checked answers

Unchecked answers

        None.

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

District induction program is delivered via a hybrid of online and face-to-face meetings and was developed with the above stated characteristics.Topics include: Planning and Classroom Management, Code of Ethics, Reading in the Content Area, Teaching Strategies for Motivating/Engaging Students, Differentiated Instruction, and Teacher Evaluation.  Inductees learn the components of the Danielson Framework as well as the 7Cs of Effective Teaching. 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

NA

Needs of Inductees

Checked answers

Unchecked answers

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

Building level principal are charged with the supervision of new teachers. This includes observations and portfolio development  based upon the Charlotte Danielson's Framework of Effective Teaching.

Provide a brief explanation for strategies not selected and your plan to address their incorporation.

There are no plans in the foreseeable future to incorporate these characteristics.

Mentor Characteristics

Checked answers

Unchecked answers

        None.

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

Mentors are selected from interested candidates who share similar responsibilities and backgrounds so they can provide an optimal environment for teacher success. 

Provide brief explanation for characteristics not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

The limited number of staff members places increased responsibility for mentorship on all veteran teachers. The mentors are drawn from a poll of teachers who have been evaluated as effective and who have expressed a willingness to serve.

Induction Program Timeline

Topics

Aug-Sep

Oct-Nov

Dec-Jan

Feb-Mar

Apr-May

Jun-Jul

Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators

X

X

Assessments

X

X

Best Instructional Practices

X

X

Safe and Supportive Schools

X

X

Standards

X

X

Curriculum

X

X

Instruction

X

X

X

Accommodations and Adaptations for diverse learners

X

X

X

Data informed decision making

X

X

Materials and Resources for Instruction

X

X

If necessary, provide further explanation.

This narrative is empty.

Monitoring and Evaluating the Induction Program

Identify the procedures for monitoring and evaluating the Induction program.

New inductees evaluate the induction program on a yearly basis. The local administrators query new inductees as to the impact of the Induction Program on their professional development for the first three years of the program. Teacher walk-thoughs and evaluations also provide another valuable method of evaluating effectiveness of the program

Recording Process

Identify the recording process for inductee participation and program completion. (Check all that apply)Checked answers

Unchecked answers

None.

Special Education

Special Education Students

Total students identified: 240

Identification Method

Identify the District's method for identifying students with specific learning disabilities.

At Central Cambria, Specific Learning Disabilities are identified using the ability-achievement discrepancy model.  Both at the elementary and secondary levels, this model is used to determine whether a student is achieving at academic levels predicted for his/her cognitive ability.
It is noted that Central Cambria has attempted to implement components of the Response to Instruction and Intervention (RTII) model within each of the four school buildings.  Both Jackson Elementary and Cambria Elementary utilize small flexible groupings for reading intervention.  The Middle School and High School are also implementing a few components of RTII such as using data to drive instruction, implementing universal screenings and beginning the implementation of the PA Common Standards.  The RTII model was never used at Central Cambria to determine Specific Learning Disabilities, however data is used by Multiple Disciplinary teams for this decision making.  Central Cambria needs to continue to work on implementing and refining the three-tiered model district-wide, before it would look to utilizing RTII to identify students with Specific Learning Disabilities.

Enrollment

Review the Enrollment Difference Status. If necessary, describe how your district plans to address any significant disproportionalities.

The data is publicly available via the PennData website. You can view your most recent report. The link is: https://penndata.hbg.psu.edu/PublicReporting/DataataGlance/tabid/2523/Default.aspx

Special Education Data Report

School Year 2013-2014

Enrollment (School Age)

Source: December 1, 2013 Child Count

Total Enrollment

          *based on the 2012-2013 school year

LEA

State

Total Special Ed Enrollment

1,698

1,753,536

Percent of Special Ed Enrollment by Disability

14.6%

15.4%

Autism           

6.9%

9.4%

Deaf-Blindness

---

0.0%

Emotional Disturbance

6.9%

8.4%

Hearing Impairment Including Deafness

---

1.0%

Intellectual Disability (Mental Retardation)

5.2%

6.7%

Multiple Disabilities

---

1.1%

Orthopedic Impairment

---

0.3%

Other Health Impairment

11.3%

12.3%

Specific Learning Disability

41.5%

44.3%

Speech or Language Impairment

25.4%

15.8%

Traumatic Brain Injury

---

0.3%

Visual Impairment Including Blindness

---

0.4%

 
Where this symbol (---) appears, the PDE is not displaying these data on this report to guard against improper statistical comparisons due to small group sizes (n=10 or less), and to protect the confidentiality of those students with disabilities who comprise this category

 
After review of the above data, Central Cambria has no significant disproportions to address.

Non-Resident Students Oversight

  1. How does the District meet its obligation under Section 1306 of the Public School Code as the host District at each location?
  2. How does the District ensure that students are receiving a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE)?
  3. What problems or barriers exist which limit the District's ability to meet its obligations under Section 1306 of the Public School Code?

Central Cambria serves as the host district for two programs that house students who are eligible under the 1306 section of the Public School Code.  The two programs include the Appalachian Youth Service (AYS) and Cambria County Detention Home (CCDH).  AYS is a facility whose students' placements are determined by multiple state and federal agencies.  The CCDH is a facility whose student placements are typically a result of the Cambria County Juvenile Judicial System.   However, at times,  these students may also be housed at the CCDH as a direct result of decisions made within other local and state agencies in collaboration and coordination with the Cambria County Juvenile Justice System.  Central Cambria School District works with officials at both of these locations, along with contracting educational services from Intermediate Unit 08, in order to meet its obligation under the 1306 section of the Public School Code. 

Under Section 1306 of the Pennsylvania School Code, Central Cambria School District is required to allow a nonresident student in a children's institution to attend the public schools of the host school district until the student receives a diploma or completes the school term in which they turn 21. Central Cambria School District is also responsible for providing the educational program for students, including students with disabilities who are placed in that facility, and for ensuring the provision of a “free appropriate public education” for eligible children with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and for “qualified handicapped students” with Service Agreements in accordance with § 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and 22 PA Code Chapter 15.
It is also noted that Central Cambria School District cannot refuse to educate a student in a regular or special education program in a regular public school unless the student living in these institution may not be appropriate to be educated within the regular school because of the terms of the institutionalization or because of the particular educational needs of the student.  For a child with a disability with an IEP or Service Agreement, when not prohibited by court order, Central Cambria must consider the educational placement options to educate the student within its public school buildings. If the host district and parent through the IEP or Service Agreement process determine that an alternative educational setting will appropriately address the student’s educational needs, the host school district is responsible for providing the student with a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) and any needed special education or services consistent with 22 PA Code Chapter 14 and the IDEA or with 22 PA Code Chapter 15 and §504 of the Rehabilitation Act.  For students eligible for services under Chapter 14, this means the host school district is responsible for making IEP decisions regarding all aspects of the student's IEP, through the IEP Team process. Similarly, the host school district is responsible for conferring or meeting with the family and for developing a Service Agreement for a “qualified handicapped student” pursuant to Chapter 15.

Child Find Responsibility

In addition to ensuring that an appropriate educational program is provided, the Central Cambria School District has Child Find responsibility for children “thought-to-be” eligible for special education services and/or accommodations within the host school district’s jurisdiction. This responsibility includes locating, identifying, and evaluating all §1306 students with suspected disabilities, including but not limited to evaluating students for whom a request for an evaluation has been made. In fulfilling the Child Find obligation, the Central Cambria School District working along with the Intermediate Unit cannot rely entirely on information from the facility, but must make independent efforts to ascertain whether eligible students are present. If a host school district suspects that a child may be eligible for special education or for a Service Agreement under 22 PA Code Chapter 15, the Central Cambria School District working along with the Intermediate Unit must seek informed consent to initiate evaluation procedures from an individual who meets the definition of parent in the IDEA, a surrogate parent appointed by the host district, or a person appointed by a court to provide such consent. If a child who is “handicapped” under Section 504 or is identified by a school district as thought-to-be disabled and in possible need of specially designed instruction under IDEA and Chapter 14, the host school district should procedurally move forward with a special education evaluation under IDEA and Chapter 14. One indication that a child is thought to-be-eligible may include a determination by the host district, parent, or a professional that the child’s educational needs cannot be met in a regular public school setting.
For children suspected as IDEA eligible students, the Central Cambria School District working along with the Intermediate Unit is responsible for maintaining contact with the student’s district of residence for the purpose of keeping the district of residence informed of its plans for educating the student and seeking the advice of that district with respect to the student.

Educational Decision-makers

If neither the parent of a child who is eligible or thought-to-be- eligible for special education nor an individual who meets the definition of parent in the IDEA can be located, the Central Cambria School District working along with the Intermediate Unit must appoint a surrogate parent.

Ensuring FAPE within the LRE

During the §1306 student’s tenure at either children’s institution listed above, the Central Cambria School District working along with Intermediate Unit 08 ensures that: all students have access to education; students with disabilities receive FAPE in accordance with their IEPs or Service Agreements; and all mandated procedural protections are provided.  Central Cambria and the student's district of residence may agree in writing to a different arrangement for the division of educational and procedural responsibilities for students identified as IDEA eligible, but they must receive approval by PDE after notice to and an opportunity for comment by the parents of the student. 
If the student has an IEP from the previous school district, the Central Cambria School District working along with Intermediate Unit 08 does convene, within a reasonable amount of time, an IEP meeting to determine whether the child’s IEP should be revised, whether the student can be educated in the public schools of Central Cambria, or whether some other placement option is appropriate for the child. If the child’s parent cannot attend the IEP meeting in person, Central Cambria School District along with the Intermediate Unit takes steps to ensure that the parents are included in the IEP meeting.  This includes informing parents that they can participate through a teleconference call or other appropriate means in the same way Central Cambria and the Intermediate Unit would facilitate the participation of the parents of its resident children.
Until a new IEP is developed for the child by the IEP team including the parent, the child receives services comparable to those in the existing IEP.  Central Cambria School District while working along  with Intermediate Unit 08 is responsible for monitoring the educational progress and reviewing educational services for the student on a continuous basis and at least one time per marking period. Central Cambria School District working along with Intermediate Unit 08  is also responsible for maintaining contact with the resident school district with respect to the student’s placement and progress.
The parent and Central Cambria School District working along with Intermediate Unit 08 will, if feasible, make a decision as to the appropriate educational placement of the child before the student arrives at the facility. However, in any case, the student attends a school program. If the information or an individual necessary to make an informed decision about the appropriate educational placement of the child is not available within the 5-days, and if the parent agrees, the Central Cambria School District working along with Intermediate Unit 08 arranges for authorization of  the child’s education at a school program located at the facility until the Central Cambria School District working along with Intermediate Unit 08  and parent make a formal decision regarding the student’s educational placement. If no parent can be identified, the child is temporarily educated at the facility, only if there is a clinical recommendation that the child should not attend public school. In either case, the final decision regarding the child’s education placement is made without delay.
In order to facilitate a smooth transition, if the residential facility provides notice that a student is to be released from the facility, the Central Cambria School District working along with Intermediate Unit 08 attempt to work with the resident school district to prepare for the student’s discharge from the institution at least 2 weeks prior to the student’s planned discharge from the residential program, if possible. If, instead of returning home, the student is moving to a residential facility in another school district, these contacts should be made with the new host district. 
In making a decision about where to educate a student, consideration is given to the courses that would be available to the child in the proposed program, the qualifications of the staff, the program’s ability to provide FAPE and comply with the other requirements of IDEA and Chapter 14 or §504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Chapters 15 or 16 of Title 22 of the Pennsylvania Code (as applicable to the individual child), and whether the program will prepare the student to meet any applicable promotion and/or graduation requirements.
At this time, there are no problems or barriers that exist which limit the District's ability to meet its obligations under Section 1306 of the Public School Code.

Incarcerated Students Oversight

Describe the system of oversight the District would implement to ensure that all incarcerated students who may be eligible for special education are located, identified, evaluated and when deemed eligible, are offered a free appropriate public education (FAPE).

Central Cambria has the Cambria County Prison located within it's boundaries.  As a result Central Cambria is the LEA for the Cambria County Prison.  Central Cambria contracts with Intermediate Unit 08 to provide and meet the educational requirements of this institution.  The following is an overview of the procedures followed as inmates enter the Cambria County Prison.

Upon arrival at the County Prison, the receiving officer and / or the prison counselor interview(s) each inmate.  Information obtained in this interview includes:  name, date of birth, last school attended, last grade completed, name and address of parents, special education programs provided while in school, and whether the student has graduated or received a GED.  This information, for inmates less than 21 years of age, is given to the Alternative Education Teacher, assigned to the prison.  

The teacher reviews this information and then interviews each potential student to verify the information given and to determine whether or not the student is required to participate or wishes to voluntarily participate in the educational program as clarified within
Brian B. v. Commonwealth of PA.   Inmates of compulsory school-age, 16 and younger, are required to attend the educational program.  If a student indicates past participation in special education programs, an immediate attempt is made to verify that they are eligible for special education services.  Upon verification, a NOREP is issued to the student’s parent / guardian, along with the Procedural Safeguards Notice.  Depending on the status of the student’s Evaluation Report, a Permission to Re-Evaluate form may be sent to the parent / guardian as well.  After registering into school, the student begins to receive special education services, based on the most recent IEP and the re-evaluation is started, if needed.  Due to the student’s change in placement and other variables with regard to educational services within the prison system, a new IEP is written at the start of the program for each student who receives special education services.  If a re-evaluation is needed, a new IEP will be developed upon completion of the re-evaluation.  Upon request, the Correction Education Records Center or the student’s home school district provide records and current data related to the student's educational program in order to help ensure their success in the program offered. If a student has not previously been identified as being in need of special education, but the prison personnel or teacher believe that an evaluation should be conducted, a referral is submitted in accordance with school district procedures.  Child Find notices are also posted in the county prison to inform students that special education services are available to them.

When student records are received from the Records Center or directly from a school district, they are reviewed to verify the correct placement of each student and become the source documents for the instructional program. 

An annual review of county prison child find activities is conducted by the IU8 program supervisor to determine the effectiveness of the activities for the school year.

Least Restrictive Environment

  1. Describe the District procedures, which ensure that, to the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including those in private institutions, are educated with non-disabled children, and that removal from the regular education environment only occurs when education in that setting with supplementary aids and services, cannot be achieved satisfactorily.
  2. Describe how the District is replicating successful programs, evidence-based models, and other PDE sponsored initiatives to enhance or expand the continuum of supports/services and education placement options available within the District to support students with disabilities access the general education curriculum in the least restrictive environment (LRE). (Provide information describing the manner in which the District utilizes site-based training, consultation and technical assistance opportunities available through PDE/PaTTAN, or other public or private agencies.)
  3. Refer to and discuss the SPP targets and the district's percentages in the Indicator 5 section - Educational Environments. Also discuss the number of students placed out of the district and how those placements were determined to assure that LRE requirements are met.

This section will begin by answering questions 1 and 2.

1. Describe the District procedures, which ensure that, to the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including those in private institutions, are educated with non-disabled children, and that removal from the regular education environment only occurs when education in that setting with supplementary aids and services, cannot be achieved satisfactorily.

2. Describe how the District is replicating successful programs, evidence-based models, and other PDE sponsored initiatives to enhance or expand the continuum of supports/services and education placement options available within the District to support students with disabilities access the general education curriculum in the least restrictive environment (LRE). (Provide information describing the manner in which the District utilizes site-based training, consultation and technical assistance opportunities available through PDE/PaTTAN, or other public or private agencies.)

Central Cambria is dedicated to building and providing a continuum of services to meet the needs of students with disabilities within the district's regular education buildings. Central Cambria recognizes the regular education environment as the first option for all students, including those in private institutions.  Students with disabilities are integrated with regular education students to the maximum extent possible with the use/support of supplementary aids and services.  All supplementary aids and services needed by the student are determined by the IEP Team.  After determination of which services are appropriate to meet student needs, consideration is given to determine where the services will be provided.  Careful consideration is made to meet the needs of the student satisfactorily within the regular education environment prior to consideration of other outside placements.  This process is also discussed and reviewed periodically for students currently placed within educational settings outside of the school district buildings including those in private institutions. These reviews include progress of the student and assess how the student is able to interact with their own same age peers or members of the community with supplementary aids and services.  Central Cambria consults the resources from PaTTAN including the Supplementary Aids and Services Toolkit (developed for use by Pennsylvania schools) and the four areas of Collaborative, Instructional, Physical, and Social-Behavioral (Etscheidt & Bartlett, 1999) as listed in the
Framework for Considering the Full Range of Supplementary Aids and Services as published for IEP teams when considering individualized supports for students.  Some examples (not an inclusive list) of supports used at CCSD are as follows:

It should be noted that great efforts have been made over the past  years to provide programming to bring students with disabilities, previously educated outside of the district, back into the district.  The majority of these efforts included bringing back students in need of Life Skills Supports formerly educated within outside placements.  Prior to bringing these students back, the district dedicated funding, resources and professional development in order to make this transition successful for these students.  In addition, the district sought out and met with the parents of these students in order to gain their perspective on how to make this programming successful.  The district has also developed programs to bring back students in need of emotional support programming or alternative education back into the district.  Although the district continues to be dedicated into providing programming to meet the needs of these students, this is a work in progress and has not been completely successful in satisfactorily meeting the needs of these students within the district.  The district does take every student's case individually.  

All Central Cambria students with disabilities educated within the district buildings are included with non-disabled peers for participation in the following (including but not limited to): homeroom, lunch, assemblies, field trips, art, music, physical education, extra-curricular activities and any and all other regular classes deemed appropriate.   The majority of students with disabilities in grades K-12 are included in the general education classes for Science and Social Studies.  Participation in Language Arts and Math are addressed according to the placement that can appropriately address student needs. All students in grades 9-12 may choose electives for their educational programs appropriate for their needs and in line with their transitional goals. Furthermore, all students with disabilities are also encouraged to participate in non-academic and extra-curricular activities.  Examples of activities in which students are currently participating include but are not limited to:  track, football, basketball, clubs, volleyball, drama, forensics and ski club. Necessary accommodations are made for students with disabilities as needed. IEP teams decide what services and accommodations are needed.  In all of these cases, appropriate services are provided with Central Cambria School District with neighborhood peers.
According to the Pennsylvania State Data Center website, our number of students served on an itinerant basis receiving support within the general education classroom has increased from 51.7% in 2008 December 1st Child Count to 74.3% for the 2013 December 1st count.  District staff members are continually discovering new ways to encourage and support inclusive practices.  Some examples in having brought in a nationally recognized author/professor from out of the district to help us with the development of a master schedule at the Elementary and Middle School levels.  These schedules have opened up additional opportunities for special education teachers or para-educators to participate in Language Arts, Math, Science and Social Studies at all grade levels.  These schedules also take into consideration the need for planning between co-teachers to the greatest extent possible.  Teachers have been trained in co-teaching and have had the opportunity to attend co-teaching workshops from IU 08.  It should be noted that the district has created and implemented its own co-teaching training and accountability.  This new program has been implemented at the middle school level and will be utilized at Jackson Elementary for the 2016-17 school year.  It should also be noted that the district continues to work with staff on topics such as Differentiated Instruction, Assessments, using data to make educational planning decisions, STEM initiatives, and new technology initiatives.  Given the fiscal restraints placed upon all districts in Pennsylvania, Central Cambria continues to strive to in our efforts, thoughts and ideas to educate students with disabilities.
Central Cambria identifies training needs for staff and students through needs assessments, revised Federal and State mandates, staff discussion and district initiatives.  Trainings are provided through PaTTAN, IU08, district managed in-service, conferences outside the district, outside presenters and agency representatives.  Opportunities are provided for regular and special education professional and paraprofessional personnel as well as related service providers and parents. CCSD teachers, administrators and staff are continuously thinking of new and creative ways to meet student needs within the regular education environment.  There has been tremendous progress toward eliminating the concept of "those are your kids" and" these are my kids".  The goal is to have all staff buy into the "paradigm shift" that Central Cambria students are the responsibility of all staff. In order to help with this movement, the following trainings have been offered (this are just some of the examples of staff development activities)  include
Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, De-escalation Training,  Inclusionary Practices, Sensory Integration Training, Adapted Physical Education training,  occupational and fine motor training, Co-Teaching, Confidentiality, LETRS, continued formative assessment training, technology trainings and Progress Monitoring. Additional individual in-services specific to student need are also scheduled.  Child/teacher ratios are appropriate for meeting the needs of all children. Para-educators are available to assist within classrooms and with individual students as needed. Effective practices, materials and technology to improve student performance are researched and upgraded continually. 
3. Refer to and discuss the SPP targets and the district's percentages in the Indicator 5 section - Educational Environments. Also discuss the number of students placed out of the district and how those placements were determined to assure that LRE requirements are met.

Special Education Data Report

School Year 2013-14

Educational Environments (Ages 6-21)

Source: December 1, 2013 Child Count

Educational Environment

LEA

State

SE Inside Regular Class 80% Or More

74.3 %

62.4%

SE Inside Regular Class < 40%

4.9%

8.9%

SE in Other Settings

------

4.8%

Central Cambria continues to move in the right direction when references are made to Indicator 5- Educational Environments of the SPP targets.  The data indicates that in 2013-2014 Special Education Data Report, Central Cambria reached 74.3% for the number of students within the regular education environment more than 80% of their school day.  This number shows an increase from 68.8% taken from the data collected from the 2010-2011 school year.  When discussing the students provided Special Education in Other Settings, Central Cambria's percentage was at 6.6% for 2011-2012.  Fortunately, this number has decreased over time.

Behavior Support Services

  1. Provide a summary of the District policy on behavioral support services including, but not limited to, the school wide positive behavior supports (PBS).
  2. Describe training provided to staff in the use of positive behavior supports, de-escalation techniques and responses to behavior that may require immediate intervention.
  3. If the district also has School-Based Behavioral Health Services, please discuss it.

CCSD Board policy number 113.2 references behavior support services at Central Cambria.  This policy outlines the positive behavior support program including:

Procedures on the use of positive behavior management support techniques being utilized as the least intrusive method as necessary.
Restraints are used to control acute or episodic aggressive or self-injurious behavior may be used only when the student is acting in a manner as to be a clear and present danger to himself or others when less restrictive measures and techniques have proven to be or are less effective.
Use of restraints to control aggressive behavior may trigger a meeting of the IEP team within ten school days  unless the parent/guardian agree to waive this right in writing.
The use of restraints may not be included for the convenience of staff, as a substitute for an educational program, or employed as punishment.
Staff Training:

Groups of teachers, staff and administrators from each CCSD building are trained each year in de-escalation and non-violent crisis intervention.  If there is a situation in need of immediate intervention, the administrators at each building are immediately contacted and the crisis trained teams from each building can then be summoned if necessary.
Each building also provides training and information to teachers and staff regarding the positive school wide behavioral supports that are differentiated by building.  Building Principals and Assistant Principals are flexible, fair and consistent when behavioral concerns arise.
It should also be noted that CCSD also provides annual public notice to identify, locate and evaluate children with disabilities who require special education and related services.  Once a child is found to be eligible and in need of specially designed instruction, a plan is developed to meet the individual learning needs of the child with a disability.  The supports and services listed within this plan are provided at no cost to the parent.
The following is a listing of School Wide Positive Behavior Supports that are utilized.  In addition, for each building there is a summary of actions being taken at each building:  
Jackson Elementary:

Positive Behavioral Supports/Programs currently implemented at Jackson Elementary:

Jackson Elementary continues to look for ways to increase positive school climate for students and teachers.  Jackson Elementary Principal and Cambria Elementary Principal continue to work together to create school buildings that have similar and parallel ways to address behavioral concerns and to be proactive with schoolwide positive behavioral support programs.
Cambria Elementary:

Positive Behavioral Supports/Programs currently implemented at Cambria Elementary:

It should be noted that there has been a new Principal in place since 2013-14.   Cambria Elementary in coordination with Jackson Elementary continue to trial and error schoolwide positive behavioral support programs.  
Middle School:

Positive Behavioral Supports/Programs currently implemented at Middle School:

The Middle School continues to work on programming and training for both staff and students to increase positive relationships between students.  
High School
:
Positive Behavioral Supports/Programs currently implemented at High School:

There is a new Assistant Principal who has been hired for the 2014-15 school year at CCHS. This individual has worked to develop an after school detention program for students.  This program is helping to decrease the needs of in-school suspensions for students.  It is also a program that has very clear expectations and rules.  
*** Discipline policies are printed in student planners and on the District website.
School based Behavioral Health Services

It should also be noted that CCSD does utilize School-Based Behavioral Health Services.  Our Guidance Counselors (who have an additional counseling license) and our School Psychologist work diligently to provide counseling services to help meet the emotional and social needs of all students within our district.  Our School Psychologist has a small caseload of special education services who receive counseling services within their IEP.    Additionally, CCSD does contract with the Alternative Community Resource Program (ACRP) to provide a licensed counselor to meet with CCSD students.  Regular education and special education students can utilize this service.  Students are referred for this service as part of the CST process or when a situation or event occurs to elicit the need for such services.  This collaboration between ACRP and CCSD has proven to be an effective way to meet the emotional/social needs for many of our students.  It should be noted that this service is not used to delay any additional special education referral or programming that a student may require.  ACRP ensures that the family’s insurance provider is charged and the students can be seen on the CCSD campus instead of having to travel into other parts of the community.  At times, this service has also lead to more help for students families in the way of family based services or "hooking up" students and families with various other community resources.

Intensive Interagency/Ensuring FAPE/Hard to Place Students

  1. If the LEA is having difficulty ensuring FAPE for an individual student or a particular disability category, describe the procedures and analysis methods used to determine gaps in the continuum of special education supports, services and education placement options available for students with disabilities.
  2. Include information detailing successful programs, services, education placements as well as identified gaps in current programs, services, and education placements not available within the LEA. Include an overview of services provided through interagency collaboration within the LEA.
  3. Discuss any expansion of the continuum of services planned during the life of this plan.

At this time, the Central Cambria School District has no student or disability category for which it is having difficulty ensuing FAPE at this time.  If the school district was having difficulty ensuring FAPE for a student in a particular disability category, the IEP team would reconvene to evaluate strengths, concerns and needs for the particular student.  The district makes every effort to serve students within our school district buildings.  There are times when the district does need to utilize educational placements outside of district walls.  If the team is looking toward other additional sites, the team would analyze the educational program, benefits and services available at the outside placement.  This is done to ensure that the placement decision ensures FAPE.  Following determination of an appropriate placement, the IEP serves as a plan of appropriate education reasonably designed to meet the individual needs of the student and ensure FAPE.  The district will utilize an interagency approach to resolve and locate educational placements and services for hard to place students with disabilities.
The school district has available, through the Intermediate Unit 08, if needed, the services of an interagency coordinator who can be contacted when needed and is available to provide training and consultation as to outside services and agencies.
The LEA will identify and report to the PA Department of Education all students for whom we are experiencing difficulty providing appropriate educational services.  In the event the interagency team is not able to identify an appropriate placement, program or services, and the barriers involve funding or policy issues, the Regional Interagency Coordinator will request assistance from the Bureau of Special Education and the Department of Public Welfare.
The school district collaborates with all local child servicing systems that assist in providing supports of programming for students with disabilities.  Interagency and/or CASSP meetings are scheduled as needed to coordinate services.  District guidance counselors collaborate with Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disabilities, Children and Youth Services and other county agencies as needed.  A mental health counselor is available to provide assessments and assist with additional referrals to outside services.  Student assistance programs function within the district.  Involved agencies are invited to attend IEP meetings and other meetings when appropriate.
The school district collaborates with all county child service agencies to provide supports and programming for students.  These agencies are invited to attend IEP meetings and other meetings with appropriate.  The Special Education Director,  building principals and/or guidance counselors attend agency meetings when appropriate.  Students may receive services from multiple agencies both during the school day and after hours.  Student assistance programs, probation, Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disabilities, CYS and social service agencies are examples of collaborative relationships the LEA has developed to better serve students and families within the school district.  We have also been networking with our neighboring school districts to share services and programs so that programs and services can be provided locally to defray costs for all involved.
 

Strengths and Highlights

Describe the strengths and highlights of your current special education services and programs. Include in this section directions on how the district provides trainings for staff, faculty and parents.

Central Cambria School District (CCSD) has approximately 1681 students and provides Special Education services to approximately 15% of these students.  The district employs nineteen special education teachers and twenty-one para-educators.  In addition, the district contracts with Intermediate Unit 8 (IU) for  Blind and Visually Impaired Support (BVIS), Social Work and  Deaf and Hearing Impaired Support (DHIS). Central Cambria also partners with two local districts for a transition coordinator.  The district continues to work on developing new programming within district buildings to meet the needs of all special needs students here within the district.  Student needs are diverse and ever-changing.  Although our population of students in need of special education remains rather consistent numerically, the needs of our students have changed.  CCSD continues to make every effort to educate all students within the district building walls.  Flexibility and “out of the box” thinking are vital when developing programs and services to meet educational needs of students with disabilities. The district's administration and school board are committed to the work of new program development in efforts to increase our own continuum of services.  The following paragraphs will highlight strengths of the current special education program including supports in place for students prior to an evaluation, and goals for the future.
Strengths of the current special education program

Central Cambria employs highly qualified paraprofessionals for classroom assistance.  Some of these paraprofessionals work one-on-one with students, while others offer classroom support.  All paraprofessionals attend a minimum of 20 hours of training per school year.  All para-professionals have and will continue to participate in the learning modules offered as collaboration between PATTAN, the IU 8 and Central Cambria. 
Central Cambria continues to look for ways to involve and inform our parents.  We continue to provide information to parents via Parent Advisory Groups, planners, journals, phone calls, emails and our new SKYWARD student management system. This system allows parents to have 24 hour access to their child’s grades, attendance, and to be aware of upcoming assignments and tests.  This system is new to Central Cambria for the 2015-16 school year, and all of its full potential has not yet been reached.  SKYWARD has increased the ability to communicate with parents of special needs students.  With just a couple of clicks, the special education department is able to send out information to parents.  Currently, this system is being utilized to better inform parents of upcoming trainings and resources.  In the future, this system has the potential to automatically remind parents of upcoming IEP meetings and allow them 24 hour access to their child’s IEP.  It is recognized that not all parents have or want internet access.  Parents will continue to have the option of receiving paper copies of documents.   
The district continues to employ a Transportation Coordinator position.  Since the creation of the Transportation Coordinator position, incidents occurring on vans/buses transporting students with Special Needs have decreased. The coordinator also provides quick responses and actions as needed by our students and carefully monitors which students ride on which vans.
Program creation and resources

Central Cambria has been working for approximately six years to bring students who were educated outside of the district walls back into the district.  We had numerous students who were receiving Emotional Support and Life Skills support in various local placements.  While we have trialed many ways to create programming within our district, some have been successful and others continue to be works in progress.  These next paragraphs will emphasize our Life Skills Support and Alternative Setting classrooms which have been our recent focus for programming.  Furthermore, this section will feature what supports, services, materials and resources have been implemented to help students be successful within these programs.
It should be noted that bringing our students in need of Life Skills support back into the district has been very successful.  We have opened two classrooms that provide various levels of supports and services to our students.  While we are very fortunate to have this group of students back in the district with us, we have not stopped finding and creating resources to help better meet the needs of these students and make them feel welcome within our walls. 
One example of an incredible resource for our all of our students is the new Regional Inclusive Playground that has been built at Cambria Elementary School.  This playground is a $400,000.00 project that was created out of regional, state and local funding sources.  This playground is currently the only playground of its kind in a four county area. Each component of the playground was designed to help students of all ability levels to play together.  The playground has an electronic component that encourages students to work together and brings video gaming outdoors.  The playground also hosts several pieces that encourage students to play on the outside of the equipment.  Fortunately, we were able to include a solid surface for the playground to allow easy access for students with mobility issues.   Furthermore, this playground is open to the public and allows students from other areas to come and have a place to play.  It should be noted that there hopefully soon be an addition of a wheelchair accessible swing.  This project was a huge undertaking but is one that brought our community together working toward a common goal.
Another example of a resource that has been created is the sensory room.  This room is not yet complete but contains multiple items for our students with sensory needs.  We have partnered with local agency resource providers in the areas of occupational therapy and physical therapy to develop this room.  Our local university representatives have consulted on this space and our high school students have also “chipped in” to create a fantastic mural.
A third example of a resource that has been created for Central Cambria is our investment in technology for all of our students including those with the special needs.  Within the past two years, our district administration and school board have supported our much needed advancement in technology by supporting with money and resources technology initiatives.  Since that time our district has established Google classrooms, continued to allow professional development to increase knowledge and resource for Assistive Technology evaluations, purchased software programs with remediation components such as PLATO, Study Island, Education City, USA Test Prep and FASTT Math, increased bandwidth and wireless access points throughout all of our district buildings, purchased over 150 electronic devices, passed a bring your own device school board policy, hosted multiple technology conferences and workshops for teachers, and hired a Director of Technology who is able to work one on one with teachers and students. 
Our Director of Technology is devoted to helping all students have greater access to the curriculum, specifically our students with special needs.  To illustrate his investment in students with special needs, it is worthy to mention just one case in point of his dedication to students.  On his own volition, our Director of Technology researched a device called the
Swivel for a student with a rare medical condition.  This student desperately wanted to come to school but due to the complications of her illness was unable to attend.  This Swivel device allowed teachers to video tape their lessons for this student to watch at home. 
An additional example of a resource that was created for our students with the most significant needs is adapted specials (gym, music, and art) at the elementary level.  An important note is that these adapted specials are held in addition to the regular specials classes with their peers.  Some of our students were in need of additional, more individualized programming.  As a result, our teachers researched, gathered materials, collaborated with other local agencies, and created additional classes for our students.
A fifth example of a resource that continues to be utilized for our students of transition age is the Practical Assessment Exploration System (PAES) Lab.  This work development transition curriculum is available to our students with complex needs at Admiral Peary Vocational Technical School (APVTS).  Currently this program allows our students hands-on career exploration and assessment.  It provides the student and the teacher an opportunity to rate the student’s skills in one of five (business/marketing, consumer services, computer technology, construction/industrial, and processing production) areas, as well as, note level of independence.  This program has also served as an opportunity for our students to participate in shop try-outs related to their areas of strength.  Fortunately, many of our students who may otherwise have been unable become completers in their areas of interest.  Other students, who may not have the skills necessary for entering into programs at APVTS, continue to build their work skills and help adults working with them understand their potential strengths for the work force.
A final example of a resource for students has been our involvement with Project MAX.  We have a strong classroom and scheduling structure in place for including students with complex learning needs.  It is now time to refine the components of this structure.  Project MAX offers us an incredible opportunity for our teachers to gain skills and knowledge to continue to help students have maximum access to the PA common core curriculum.  2015-16 marks our first year as participants in Project MAX.  This project continues to encourage us to continue to increase our expectations for students with complex learning needs. 
Despite all of our successes in the areas of program creation and resources, perhaps our greatest challenge in programming for students occurs with the students who have poor decision making skills, have mental health diagnoses and/or are in need of emotional support services.  Our district has multiple counseling and school wide positive behavior supports and bullying reduction programs in place for all students.  These programs are highlighted in the behavior section of this document and are in place from kindergarten through twelfth grade.  Furthermore, these programs have helped with encouraging students to work on building their positive character traits and coping skills.  Central Cambria, as a district, has teachers, staff and administrators who understand that we are molding our youth to be successful functioning members of the community.  Our staff is aware that students make mistakes and is tolerant of poor choices and decisions that students make; as these mistakes help our children learn and grow.
In efforts to support our students who sometimes make poor choices while at the same time holding students accountable, we have created an “alternative setting” classroom at the middle school/ high school level.  This room is open to all students (special education and regular education) and serves multiple functions and helps us to provide programming for all service levels.  This classroom now employs a district teacher but has not always been staffed by a district employee.  This program has been a work in progress that has evolved from being an AEDY placement operated by an outside agency.   We have finally had some great success with this classroom for being able to keep students here at the district.  There are times, however, that despite our efforts students are in need of more intense programming and services that leads to placements outside of our district. 
Supports for students who are at-risk

As previously mentioned, Central Cambria administrators, teachers and staff work diligently to serve the academic, emotional and social needs of all students.  In these fiscally stressful times, Central Cambria has been creative in attempting to find ways to help all students achieve a minimum of one year’s growth.  If students are struggling Central Cambria has initiated several strategies to “catch” students prior to them falling behind and prior to moving to a Special Education evaluation.  It should be noted that although the district attempts to intervene prior to an evaluation for Special Education being needed, this does not mean that parent and student rights to request a Special Education Evaluation are ignored.  The District has procedures in place for parents who request for their child tested verbally and/or in writing. 
One strategy that the district utilizes to intervene prior to an evaluation includes having Child Study Teams (CST) in all buildings.  The Child Study Teams (CST), work with students who are identified by staff members or parents, to be at-risk academically, socially and/or emotionally. All district buildings have a referral system in place for identifying students who are at-risk.  These CST programs ensure that students being referred are given prompt support and that their progress is being tracked and monitored on a timely basis. In addition, all of the CST programs district-wide work in collaboration and meet periodically with students and their families.  The Director of Special Education and the School Psychologist work collaboratively as part of these building teams.
Another strategy that the district is participating in to support all students includes the implementation of some of the components of RTII/MTSS.  At the elementary level in both district buildings, all students participate in universal screenings.  Examples of universal screening measures used within the elementary include 
DIBELS, 95% Phonics, Fountas and Pinnell, and Read Naturally.  Results of these screenings along with PSSA scores from grades 3-5 are reviewed and students are placed into small flexible groupings.  All students at the elementary level are exposed to the common core and provided with additional instruction according to need and at their level in the area of reading.  Data is then reviewed periodically by grade level teams and students are moved if data indicates that they need to be moved.  The district has begun to use Classroom Diagnostic Tools at the elementary level. 
A third strategy to assist struggling learners is in our educational programming for our hands on learners.   2014-15 marked the completion of an Investing in Innovation, federal grant that had been awarded to Central Cambria.  The purpose of the grant was to embark on a 5 year professional development plan that focused on the following areas:  assessment, inquiry, science and literacy and mathematics.  All K-5 teachers in both elementary schools attended 5 day summer institutes with Achieving Students Success through Excellence in Teaching (ASSET STEM) education in Pittsburgh, PA.  In addition, the teachers also attended content enrichment sessions throughout the school year, as well as 3 day leadership academies in the spring.  All teachers, including regular education and special education teachers, continue to work collaboratively to develop action plans that they implement following each summer institute.  Teachers were held accountable by being required to report out on their action plans during the spring session.  ASSET STEM education is a non-profit organization supported by major corporations throughout the Pittsburgh area that focuses on providing high quality professional development opportunities for classroom teachers.  In summary ASSET STEM education provides teachers with high quality professional development which involves hands on, minds on inquiry based learning for students.  Special education students within Central Cambria are also being provided these hands-on-activities within the regular education classroom. 
In collaboration with the professionals at ASSET, Central Cambria’s administrative team was able to attend a series of workshops directed at helping the district to set goals to continue to develop its initiatives in the area of STEM education.  The emphasis was that Central Cambria needs to be committed to developing lifelong learners who have the 21st century skills.  As a result, the district has invested in programming and has created new class opportunities for students at every level.  5th graders in both elementary buildings are able to work in programming robots.  High school teachers are team teaching courses in STEM, and students have the opportunity to develop their skills in the areas of game design and programming.  All students at CCSD have had the opportunity to participate in the Hour of Code.
Goals for the future

It is anticipated that a new elementary autistic support program will be created for the 2016-17 school year.  Needs of students at the elementary level, specifically the needs on the incoming kindergarten students have increased.  Additionally, there has been an increase in the number of students in need of autistic support within our elementary settings. 
As with our programming for students in need of Life Skills Support (LSS), it is understood that we must first develop the structure and schedule for these students.  Our experience in developing LSS programs will certainly help us to provide a solid structure and schedule.  It is recognized that more professional development and training need to be provided to the staff who are targeted to work with these students.  The district will continue to search for and provide training in the areas of verbal behavior, and non-violent crisis intervention for students with Autism. There are individuals within the district who have been trained in Applied Behavior Analysis, but we need more. 
We are excited to enter into pilot professional development collaboration with staff at St. Francis University and the IU. The emphasis for this collaboration is to support staff and teachers working directly with students on the Autistic Spectrum.  We are working together to create a series of workshops and training sessions to support individual teachers.  The idea is this will not be a once and done training but an opportunity for individual teachers to work with professionals on a one to one basis.  Central Cambria teachers have participated in a survey to determine their needs in working with students on the spectrum.  This survey was shared with the staff at St. Francis and IU.  The program looks to begin during the 2016-17 school year.
The final goal that will be mentioned in this section is to continue to bring students back into the district.  The new focus will be for students in need of Multiple Disability Supports. The district currently has several high school aged students receiving education in a neighboring district.  Possibly for the 2016-17 school year, the district will be able to bring these students back to our buildings.   


Assurances

Safe and Supportive Schools Assurances

The LEA has verified the following Assurances:

Special Education Assurances

The Local Education Agency (District) has verified the following Assurances:

24 P.S. §1306 and §1306.2 Facilities

Facility Name

Facility Type

Services Provided By

Student Count

Cambria County Detention Home-- This facility is closing on July 1st, 2016

Incarcerated

Intermediate Unit 8

2

Cambria County Prison

Incarcerated

Intermediate Unit 8

8

Appalachian Youth Services

Nonresident

Intermediate Unit 8

23

Ebensburg Center

Nonresident

Appalachia Intermediate Unit 08

1

Least Restrictive Environment Facilities

Facility Name

Type of Facility

Type of Service

Number of Students Placed

Pressley Ridge

Other

AS

1

Cambria Heights School District- IU Classroom

Neighboring School Districts

MDS

1

IU 8 Apartment Program Students ages 18-21

Other

LSS

2

Appalachia Youth Services (AYS)

Other

ES/LS

2

Special Education Program Profile

Program Position #1 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class and Position

Implementation Date: August 24, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Emotional Support

14 to 18

10

0.5

Locations:

Central Cambria High School--EM

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Emotional Support

14 to 14

1

0.4

Locations:

Central Cambria High School- EM

A Junior/Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Autistic Support

14 to 14

1

0.1

Locations:

Central Cambria High School-EM

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #2 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Autistic Support

15 to 17

9

0.75

Locations:

CCHS- LK

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Autistic Support

14 to 14

3

0.25

Locations:

CCMS- LK

A Junior/Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #3 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Speech and Language Support

14 to 18

9

0.15

Locations:

CCHS- KU

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Speech and Language Support

11 to 14

17

0.3

Locations:

CCMS- KU

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Speech and Language Support

5 to 11

22

0.35

Justification: Speech and Language sessions are conducted in a small group of similiar age peers or on an individual basis.  

Locations:

JES-KU

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Speech and Language Support

19 to 19

1

0.05

Locations:

BRIDGE APT. PROGRAM- KU

A Senior High School Building

A special education Center in which no general education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Speech and Language Support

9 to 9

1

0.15

Locations:

Cambria Elementary-KU

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #4 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Autistic Support

5 to 10

4

0.4

Justification: Autistic Support sessions are held individually with students.  As a result there is not a need for an age waiver.  

Locations:

Jackson Elementary -JES- DL

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

5 to 8

5

0.6

Locations:

Jackson Elementary-JES-- DL

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #5 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Life Skills Support

6 to 11

5

0.5

Justification: This is a Life Skills Support Class.  Age waivers are in place.

Locations:

Cambria Elementary=-KM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Full-Time Special Education Class

Life Skills Support

7 to 10

2

0.5

Justification: This is a Life Skills Support class.  Age waivers are in place

Locations:

Cambria Elementary -KM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #6 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

9 to 11

4

0.5

Locations:

Jackson Elementary -JES-JS

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

9 to 9

1

0.2

Locations:

- Jackson Elementary JES-JS

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Emotional Support

6 to 10

2

0.3

Justification: Emotional Support sessions are held individually and there is not a need for an age waiver for either of these students.

Locations:

JES-JS

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #7 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Speech and Language Support

5 to 11

62

1

Justification: Speech and Language sessions occur either in same grade peer groups (peer groups across 2 connected grade levels i.e. 1st and 2nd grader together) or on an individual basis.

Locations:

Cambria Elementary -MM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #8 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

5 to 7

8

0.6

Locations:

Cambria Elementary CES-AM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

7 to 7

2

0.4

Locations:

CES-AM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #9 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

9 to 11

10

0.6

Locations:

Cambria Elementary- CES- JM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

10 to 11

4

0.4

Locations:

Cambria Elementary-CES- JM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #10 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

11 to 12

5

0.4

Locations:

CCMS-JG

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

11 to 12

4

0.6

Locations:

CCMS-JG

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #11 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

12 to 14

4

0.4

Locations:

CCMS-NM

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

12 to 14

5

0.6

Locations:

CCMS- NM

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #12 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

13 to 14

5

0.4

Locations:

CCMS-DM

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

13 to 14

4

0.6

Locations:

CCMS-DM

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #13 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Life Skills Support

11 to 17

4

0.3

Justification: Age Waiver statements are included in student's IEP's.

Locations:

CCHS-DR

A Junior/Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Full-Time Special Education Class

Life Skills Support

12 to 18

8

0.7

Justification: Age waiver statements included within students' IEP's.

Locations:

CCHS-DR

A Junior/Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #14 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

17 to 18

12

0.7

Locations:

CCHS-SS

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

17 to 18

2

0.3

Locations:

CCHS-SS

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #15 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

14 to 15

6

0.5

Locations:

CCHS-CC

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

14 to 15

4

0.5

Locations:

CCHS-CC

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #16 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

15 to 17

8

0.5

Locations:

CCHS-JI

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

15 to 16

4

0.5

Locations:

CCHS-JI

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #17 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

16 to 17

11

0.6

Locations:

CCHS-GT

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

16 to 17

3

0.4

Locations:

CCHS-GT

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #18 - Proposed Program

Operator: Intermediate Unit

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Blind or Visually Impaired Support

10 to 10

1

0.05

Locations:

Jackson Elementary-JES-MN

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Blind or Visually Impaired Support

17 to 17

1

0.07

Locations:

Cambria Heights Middle/High School-MN

A Junior/Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Blind or Visually Impaired Support

7 to 10

2

0.1

Locations:

Cambria Elementary-CES- MN

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #19 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Learning Support

8 to 9

8

0.25

Locations:

Cambria Elementary-CES-MM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

8 to 9

4

0.25

Locations:

CES- Cambria Elementary-MM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Autistic Support

7 to 9

3

0.5

Locations:

Cambria Elementary-CES-MM

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #20 - Proposed Program

Operator: Intermediate Unit

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for classroom design (for instruction) was marked as inappropriate.

Explain any unchecked boxes for facilities questions: Our DHIS teacher who was contracted has since retired.  This is not a new position, but one that we are now contracting with our IU. This teacher works, on an itinerant basis, individually with students.  At times, this teacher meets with students in areas that are designated more as office space than an area designed for instruction.  

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Deaf and Hearing Impaired Support

11 to 11

1

0.02

Locations:

Jackson Elementary- JES- KS

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Deaf and Hearing Impaired Support

11 to 12

2

0.04

Locations:

CCMS-KS

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Deaf and Hearing Impaired Support

17 to 17

1

0.07

Locations:

Central Cambria High School- KS

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Deaf and Hearing Impaired Support

8 to 10

2

0.13

Locations:

Cambria Elementary- KS

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #21 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Position

Implementation Date: August 31, 2015

Justification: Compliance for classroom design (for instruction) was marked as inappropriate.

Explain any unchecked boxes for facilities questions: This teacher works, on an itinerant basis, individually with students.  At times, this teacher meets with students for one on one sessions that are in areas that designated more as office space than an area designed for instruction.  This position is an additional position in the district and was began in August of 2015 due to another teacher moving into our alternative setting classroom.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Emotional Support

9 to 11

3

0.3

Locations:

Cambria Elementary School-CES-SE

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Emotional Support

12 to 14

6

0.6

Locations:

CCMS-SE

A Middle School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Autistic Support

10 to 10

1

0.1

Locations:

CES- Cambria Elementary

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #22 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class and Position

Implementation Date: August 24, 2016

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Life Skills Support

8 to 11

4

0.6

Locations:

Cambria Elementary- OL

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Itinerant

Autistic Support

6 to 8

2

0.2

Locations:

Cambria Elementary- OL

An Elementary School Building

A special education Center in which no general education programs are operated

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Full-Time Special Education Class

Life Skills Support

10 to 10

1

0.2

Locations:

Cambria Elementary-OL

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Program Position #23 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class and Position

Implementation Date: August 24, 2016

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Type of Support

Level of Support

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Multiple Disabilities Support

14 to 16

2

1

Locations:

Central Cambria High School

A Senior High School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Special Education Support Services

Support Service

Location

Teacher FTE

Director of Special Education

CCHS

1

School Psychologist

CCHS

0.85

Para-Professional- 4

CCSD

1

Paraprofessionals- 19

CCSD

0.84

Transition Support Teacher

CCSD MS and HS

0.4

Assistive Technology

District Wide

0.1

Special Education Contracted Services

Special Education Contracted Services

Operator

Amt of Time per Week

Social Worker

Intermediate Unit

2 Hours

CAMCO Physical Therapy

Outside Contractor

2 Days

CAMCO Occupational Therapy

Outside Contractor

4 Days

Association for the Blind and Handicapped- work experience

Outside Contractor

4 Days

Goodwill Services- coaching and work tryout

Outside Contractor

10 Hours


Needs Assessment

Record School Patterns

Question:

After reviewing school level accomplishments and systemic challenges, what patterns can you identify among your schools?

What other information do you still need to assess?

Answer:

At all building levels, the district must address the development of a system within each school that ensures the early identification of at-risk students and the creation of effective interventions based upon their needs.These procedures will be monitored for effectiveness.
At the elementary level, the schools must be provided with adequate PA Core Standards-aligned instructional resources that allow for the development of effective instruction that results in improved student achievement.
At the secondary level, the schools employ a limited number of assessments of student achievement that are common across the curriculum. This lack of commonality make the assessment of student progress difficult to monitor.
There is a need at all levels to provide time for analysis of student achievement data on a regular and sustained basis. The high school level presents unique challenges given its time schedule and lack of common planning time.  

District Accomplishments

Accomplishment #1:

* School Performance Profile Scores have risen significantly between the 2016 assessments and 2014 in both middle and high school levels. 

* Student Achievement scores on the 2015 and 2016 ELA Assessments have placed Jackson Elementary or very near the top of Cambria County schools for the 2015 and 2016 administrations. 

*The Reading Competition Teams in the Elementary and Middle and High Schools place in every competition.

*The Central Cambria Cross Country Team has placed in the top three in the state competition in the last five years.

* CCSD was selected by the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) Foundation's Best Communities for Music Education

*Students participated in the Mega Moody Math Challenge. Our high school students conducted research, gathered data, and devised models to solve problems.

**Central Cambria high school students also participate in Forensics. This team consistently places at the individual regional meets.

Special Education Programs meet the needs of gifted children as well as those with a variety of disabilities in all buildings. *Two Alternative Education Programs and two Life Skills Classrooms meet the basic educational, emotional and social needs not currently being met in the regular school setting.  

* In partnership with Cambria County Head Start, the Pre-K Counts Classroom provides academic and social structure to 4 year old children. The classroom is located in the Jackson Elementary School and Cambria Elementary School.

*Students are given many opportunities to excel through participation in programs like Mock Trial, Mega Math Challenge, and ExploraVision.

 *Our Anti-Bullying Program: Atmosphere of Respect, Courtesy and Courage (ARCC) is implemented in all buildings under the School-wide Positive Behavior Framework. Appreciation of diversity is fostered at all grade levels. The CCSD Safe Schools Team supports these efforts and meets regularly to maintain and update policies and procedures.

*The CCSD Student Assistance Program helps at-risk students overcome obstacles and challenges associated with adolescents.

*Students that participate in the National Honor Society volunteered their time to raise money for Relay for Life. Through the district’s combined efforts, they were able to raise over $18,000.00 towards finding a cure.

 District Concerns

Concern #1:

Successful implementation of PA Core Standards-aligned curriculum units have shown to be hit or miss.  Although pockets of tremendous success have been apparent, considerably more attention will need to be paid to specific subjects and grade levels that have not shown significant progress.

Concern #2:

There is a continued need for collaborative time to focus on ongoing review of curriculum units, focusing on alignment to PA Core Standards.

Concern #3:

Significant investments have been made in instructional technology.  However, a great disparity exists in teachers' comfort level and expertise in utilizing technology as an instructional tool. 

Concern #4:

The need to address staffing when teachers or support staff leave service and are not replaced at the school level.This is a concern with the reduction of aide staff weekly hours predicted for the future.

Concern #5:

The district needs to improve its identification and focus on students who are less than proficient. At present, the district identifies  students at the elementary grades through the RTI process. The district will expand this process to the middle school in the 2016-17 school year and will be implemented at the high school within two years (2018). It is believed that this approach will enable at risk students to be identified early and placed upon a path to proficiency.

Prioritized Systemic Challenges

Systemic Challenge #1 (Guiding Question #3) Establish a district system that fully ensures staff members in every school use standards aligned assessments to monitor student achievement and adjust instructional practices.

Aligned Concerns:

Successful implementation of PA Core Standards-aligned curriculum units have shown to be hit or miss.  Although pockets of tremendous success have been apparent, considerably more attention will need to be paid to specific subjects and grade levels that have not shown significant progress.

Systemic Challenge #2 (Guiding Question #10) Establish a district system that fully ensures professional development is focused, comprehensive and implemented with fidelity.

Aligned Concerns:

Successful implementation of PA Core Standards-aligned curriculum units have shown to be hit or miss.  Although pockets of tremendous success have been apparent, considerably more attention will need to be paid to specific subjects and grade levels that have not shown significant progress.

There is a continued need for collaborative time to focus on ongoing review of curriculum units, focusing on alignment to PA Core Standards.

Significant investments have been made in instructional technology.  However, a great disparity exists in teachers' comfort level and expertise in utilizing technology as an instructional tool. 

The need to address staffing when teachers or support staff leave service and are not replaced at the school level.This is a concern with the reduction of aide staff weekly hours predicted for the future.

Systemic Challenge #3 (Guiding Question #7) Establish a district system that fully ensures students who are academically at risk are identified early and are supported by a process that provides interventions based upon student needs and includes procedures for monitoring effectiveness.

Aligned Concerns:

The district needs to improve its identification and focus on students who are less than proficient. At present, the district identifies  students at the elementary grades through the RTI process. The district will expand this process to the middle school in the 2016-17 school year and will be implemented at thr high school within two years (2018). It is believed that this approach will enable at risk students to be identified early and placed upon a path to proficiency.


District Level Plan

Action Plans

Goal #1: Establish a district system that fully ensures staff members in every school use standards aligned assessments to monitor student achievement and adjust instructional practices.

Related Challenges:

Indicators of Effectiveness:

Type: Interim

Data Source: Documentation of the adoption of standards based formative assessments that are both disciplinary and interdisciplinary.

Specific Targets: Creation of documents and administrator observation of actual usage.

Strategies:

Common Assessment within Grade/Subject

Description: WWC reports the effective use of data can have a positive impact upon student achievement; using common assessments to inform teacher practice is one such use of data. (Source: http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/pdf/practice_guides/dddm_pg_092909.pdf?) Teacher Moderation: Collaborative Assessment of Student Work and Common Assessments provide detailed looks at the development and use of common assessments. (Sources: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/Teacher_Moderation.pdf and Common Assessments: Mike Schmoker. (2006) Results Now: How We Can Achieve Unprecedented Improvements in Teaching and Learning. Alexandria, Va.: ASCD.) Resource: http://effectivestrategies.wiki.caiu.org/Assessment

SAS Alignment: Assessment, Instruction

Standards based Alignment and Instructional Unit Development

Description:

The most effective process that can be employed to develop a standards aligned approach is the alignment of the curriculum with the standards as well as the development of effective instructional units. The district has embarked on such a process in conjunction with the integration of applicable state standards.

SAS Alignment: Standards, Curriculum Framework, Instruction

Implementation Steps:

Formative Assessments

Description:

The development of formative assessments has and will continue to be a major anchor strategy, utilizing the work of Dr. Dylan Wiliam and his eponymous work "Embedded Formative Assessment."  Professional development will include specific strategies and IT tools.  Formative assessment will also be a focus of new teacher induction.  Additionally, informal and formal classroom observations, in addition to walkthroughs, will focus on the actual implementation of formative assessment and dynamic two-way feedback in the classrooms. 

Start Date: 7/1/2017       End Date: 6/30/2020

Program Area(s): Professional Education, Teacher Induction, Special Education, Gifted Education, Educational Technology

Supported Strategies:

Goal #2: Establish a district system that fully ensures professional development is focused, comprehensive and implemented with fidelity.

Related Challenges:

Indicators of Effectiveness:

Type: Annual

Data Source: Staff surveys of professional development

Increased understanding of the RTI process K-12 faculty

Specific Targets: Positive survey results indicating understanding

Increased identification of students at risk

Strategies:

PLCs - Professional Learning Communities

Description:

Richard DuFour, Barth, R. (1991). Restructuring schools: Some questions for teachers and principals. Phi Delta Kappan, 73(2), 123–128. Marzano, R. (2003). What works in schools: Translating research into action. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Learning Forward (2014). 3 Keys to Keep Learning Communities Focused on the Learning. (Sources: http://effectivestrategies.wiki.caiu.org/file/view/Transforming%20Professional%20Learning.pdf/543104478/Transforming%20Professional%20Learning.pdf, http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/may04/vol61/num08/What-Is-a-Professional-Learning-Community%C2%A2.aspx) Resources: http://effectivestrategies.wiki.caiu.org/Using+Data, http://effectivestrategies.wiki.caiu.org/Professional+Development

SAS Alignment: Assessment, Instruction

Implementation Steps:

Professional Development Review and Design

Description:

PLCs and Instructional Cabinet meetings will be utilized to identify areas of need for professional development.  Additionally, and annual survey will be given to staff members by the curriculum director to gauge needs. 

Start Date: 7/1/2017       End Date: 6/30/2020

Program Area(s): Professional Education

Supported Strategies:

Goal #3: Establish a district system that fully ensures students who are academically at risk are identified early and are supported by a process that provides interventions based upon student needs and includes procedures for monitoring effectiveness.

Indicators of Effectiveness:

Type: Annual

Data Source: District established protocol for at risk student referral

Specific Targets: Performance on progress monitoring K-12 for students

Strategies:

Response to Instruction and Intervention (RtII)

Description:

The Pennsylvania Department of Education strongly endorses the RtII model as the assessment and instructional framework to organize and implement Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System (SAS) to improve student achievement. RtII in PA is not viewed as a stand-alone strategy, product or program; rather it is a part of the state’s comprehensive system of continuous school improvement and provides a structure for schools to arrange and implement standards aligned instruction, core strategies, and interventions in the building to meet the academic and relational support needs of all students. (Sources: http://effectivestrategies.wiki.caiu.org/file/view/RtIIAnIntro.pdf/528272716/RtIIAnIntro.pdf) Resource: http://effectivestrategies.wiki.caiu.org/Safe+and+Supportive

SAS Alignment: Standards, Instruction, Safe and Supportive Schools

Implementation Steps:

MTSS Protocol

Description:

A district protocol will be established in order for teachers to refer students in need of additional supports.

Start Date: 7/1/2017       End Date: 7/1/2020

Program Area(s): Student Services

Supported Strategies:


Appendix: Professional Development Implementation Step Details

No Professional Development Implementation Steps have been identified for Central Cambria SD.


District Level Affirmations

We affirm that this District Level Plan was developed in accordance, and will comply with the applicable provisions of 22 Pa. Code, Chapters 4, 12, 16, and 49. We also affirm that the contents are true and correct and that the plan was placed for public inspection in the school district/AVTS offices and in the nearest public library until the next regularly scheduled meeting of the board or for a minimum or 28 days whichever comes first.

We affirm that the responses in the Professional Education Core Foundations and the Professional Development Implementation Steps focus on the learning needs of each staff member to enable all staff members meet or exceed the Pennsylvania academic standards in each of the core subject areas.

Affirmed by Scott Magley on 10/26/2017

Board President

Affirmed by Jason Moore on 10/11/2017

Superintendent/Chief Executive Officer


Special Education Affirmations

We also affirm our understanding that any requests for any deviations from the Chapter 14 regulations, standards, policies, and procedures must be made in writing to the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The school district understands that the Special Education Component of the District Level Plan will be approved by PDE in accordance with the following criteria as set forth in 22 Pa. School Code § 14.104 and as part of the District Level Plan:

  1. There are a full range of services, programs and alternative placements available to the school district for placement and implementation of the special education programs in the school district.
  2. The school district has adopted a child find system to locate, identify and evaluate young children and children who are thought to be a child with a disability eligible for special education residing within the school district's jurisdiction. Child find data is collected, maintained, and used in decision-making. Child find process and procedures are evaluated for its effectiveness. The school district implements mechanisms to disseminate child find information to the public, organizations, agencies, and individuals on at least an annual basis.
  3. The school district has adopted policies and procedures that assure that students with disabilities are included in general education programs and extracurricular and non-academic programs and activities to the maximum extent appropriate in accordance with an Individualized Education Program.
  4. The school district will comply with the PA Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education's revision notice process.
  5. The school district follows the state and federal guidelines for participation of students with disabilities in state and district-wide assessments including the determination of participation, the need for accommodations, and the methods of assessing students for whom regular assessment is not appropriate.
  6. The school district affirms the Pennsylvania Department of Education that funds received through participation in the medical assistance reimbursement program, ACCESS, will be used to enhance or expand the current level of services and programs provided to students with disabilities in this local education agency.

We affirm that the school district has completed a 28 day public inspection and comment period as required under 22 PA Code § 4.13 (d) prior to the school entity's governing board approval and submission to the Department of Education (Bureau of Special Education).

Affirmed by Scott Magley on 10/26/2017

Board President

Affirmed by Jason Moore on 10/26/2017

Superintendent/Chief Executive Officer