Get Out F18 Plan / Bethany Holmstrom

Date

What the hell we’re doing

Th 9/13

Objectives: intro to class, academic writing, close reading

AGENDA

Introductions & Syllabus

Tech Set-Up

Intro to academic writing

“This is America”

Informal Writing 1

Intro

Questionnaire: name, nickname, phone, email, pronouns, something that might help me remember you, question about syllabus

Introduce GoogleDrive, get folks on Slack

Syllabus & Grading Contract

Review LaGuardia’s Declaration of Pluralism

Overview of what what we mean when we say “Academic Writing:” (5 minutes)

They Say / I Say; Balance of conversation

SO, WHAT?

Need to summarize before entering discussion: need for close reading

Screening & Discussion

“This is America,” Childish Gambino

*Questions to keep in mind while watching “This is America”:*

What are the most striking elements of the video?

What moments, words, gestures, or scenes stand out? Is there any repetition?

What are the most notable images or symbols?

What is happening in the background of the video? How does that contrast with what’s going on in the foreground?

Are there any unusual pauses or transitions?

What “happens” in the video?

Re-watching the video: where does it “get to”? How does that compare to where it begins? How does the video “get there”?

Think Pair Share on Video

Informal Writing 1:

What do you think “This is America” is saying about race, power, and violence in the United States? What’s a possible take-away from the video, as viewers? What’s the “so, what”? Be sure and use your own words, and if you Google or search for any additional sources, put their words in quotes and tell me where you got the information from.  (150 words minimum)

*Questions to keep in mind when reading Audre Lorde’s “Power”:*

What are the most striking elements of the poem?

What words or phrases stand out? Are there any repeated sounds or words?

What are the most notable images or symbols?

Are there any unusual pauses or pacing or punctuation? What do these do to the poem? Why are they there, do you think?

Who is speaking/narrating? How do they shape your reading?

What “happens” in the poem?

Re-read the ending of the poem: where does it “get to”? How does that compare to where it begins? How does the poem “get there”?

What’s the title? How does it connect to the poem?

*Questions to keep in mind when reading Andrea Smith’s “Heteropatriarchy and the Three Pillars of White Supremacy:”

Why, according to Smith, is it sometimes hard for communities of color to organize?

What are the three pillars of white supremacy?

Why do you think Smith chose “pillars” as a way to explain these things? How do people end up “trapped” in these pillars (69)?

Why is it dangerous, according to Smith, to only think about what’s happening in the US (hint: see page 71)?

Why does Smith think heteropatriarchy is a problem (hint: see pages 71-3)?

To be done before our next class meeting (Thursday 9/20):

1. Read Audre Lorde’s poem “Power” (posted in #readings and also in your course packet). Review the questions in the #reading_guides channel on the poem and take notes/mark up the text.

2. Read Andrea Smith’s essay “Heteropatriarchy and the Three Pillars of White Supremacy” (posted in #readings and also in your course packet). Review the questions in the #reading_guides channel on the poem and take notes/mark up the text. Make sure you note down any passages you had difficulty understanding so we can discuss them.

3. Read and review our class contract (posted in the #syllabus) channel, and add any comments if you think it’s necessary.

Exit ticket (3 minutes): On scrap piece of paper or back of questionnaire (should be signed): What is one question (or more) that you still have about the class or what we watched and discussed today?

9/20

Th

Objectives: Close readings, work on summary skills, verbs for summary, quotation sandwiches

AGENDA

Close reading & discussion of “Power” and “Three Pillars”

Quotation Sandwiches & in-text citation

Informal Writing 2

Homework: W.E.B. Du Bois, Chapter 1 from The Souls of Black Folk, “Of Our Spiritual Strivings;” Frantz Fanon, excerpt from chapter 5 of Black Skin / White Masks, pp. 89-top of 98

Close Reading

Lorde, “Power” (1978) (30 minutes)

Read poem out loud twice

Whole-group discussion of “Power”

What are the most striking elements of the poem?

What words or phrases stand out? Are there any repeated sounds or words?

What are the most notable images or symbols?

Are there any unusual pauses or pacing or punctuation? What do these do to the poem? Why are they there, do you think?

Who is speaking/narrating? How do they shape your reading?

What “happens” in the poem?

Re-read the ending of the poem: where does it “get to”? How does that compare to where it begins? How does the poem “get there”?

What’s the title? How does it connect to the poem?

Smith, “Heteropatriarchy & the Three Pillars of White Supremacy” (30 minutes)

Review your notes & the questions:

Why, according to Smith, is it sometimes hard for communities of color to organize?

What are the three pillars of white supremacy?

Why do you think Smith chose “pillars” as a way to explain these things? How do people end up “trapped” in these pillars (69)?

Why is it dangerous, according to Smith, to only think about what’s happening in the US (hint: see page 71)?

Why does Smith think heteropatriarchy is a problem (hint: see pages 71-3)?

Think-Pair-Share on Smith
Think Pair Share slide & discussion

Introducing Quotations

Slides on Quotation sandwiches & in-text citations

Selecting relevant quotations

Reminder on poetry: How to use in-text citations for a poem, slash for line break

*Informal Writing 2:*

Choose one image, phrase, or moment from the poem “Power.” Explain this image, phrase, or moment: what is it? What’s happening? Why is it important to the poem? How does this image, phrase, or moment tie into what the poem is “about,” overall? Be sure and use your own words, and if you Google or search for any additional sources, put their words in quotes and tell me where you got the information from. Include at least one quotation from the poem, and use a quotation sandwich to integrate this quote. (150 words minimum)

OR

What was your biggest take-away from Andrea Smith’s “Heteropatriarchy and the Three Pillars of White Supremacy?” Be sure and use your own words, and if you Google or search for any additional sources, put their words in quotes and tell me where you got the information from. Include at least one quotation from the essay, and use a quotation sandwich to integrate this quote. (150 words minimum)

*Questions to focus on while reading Du Bois & Fanon:*

Include textual support (quotations, phrases, page #s)

When and where are each of these men writing? (country, their own background, and time period)

How do Du Bois and Fanon describe being watched by white people?

How does the white gaze impact them?

How do they feel their bodies and race?

How do they construct their sense of identity?

How do they describe moving and living as black men?

9/25

T

Objectives: Close readings, work on quotation sandwiches

Reading due: W.E.B. Du Bois, Chapter 1 from The Souls of Black Folk, “Of Our Spiritual Strivings;” Frantz Fanon, excerpt from chapter 5 of Black Skin / White Masks, pp. 89-top of 98

AGENDA

Close/reading discussion of Du Bois and Fanon

Finding evidence/quotations to support answer

Informal Writing 3

Reading the texts / Questions for small group discussion

Include textual support (at least one quote from each author, with a page number)

How do Du Bois and Fanon describe being watched by white people?

How does the white gaze impact them?

How do they feel their bodies and race?

How do they construct their sense of identity?

How do they describe moving and living as black men?

Share out, write on board/document (have a class GoogleDoc for notes), groups read quote and explain why they chose it to answer question

MLA CITATION WORKSHOP

*Informal Writing 3:*

How do W.E.B. Du Bois and Frantz Fanon describe what it is like to live as black men? Even though they are writing from different historical and geographical perspectives, how can you connect their experiences and what they describe? Use sandwich quotations and in-text citation methods in your response. (150 words minimum, as a Google Doc named Informal Writing 3, or write by hand)

The slides on how to write quotation sandwiches are in the #slides channel.

*Questions to focus on while reading Baldwin & Coates:*

Who is the stated audience for Baldwin and Coates?

Why do they feel the need to write these letters?

What are the major lessons, take-aways, and advice they provide?

How does emotion play into these letters?

What did you find to be the most powerful moments or passages?

9/27 Th

Reading due:  James Baldwin, “My Dungeon Shook” from The Fire Next Time; excerpt from Coates’s Between the World & Me

AGENDA

Writing/discussing texts

PIE paragraphs

Writing paragraphs & peer review

Informal Writing 4

Reading the texts / Questions for small group discussion
Questions they were assigned while reading:

Who is the stated audience for Baldwin and Coates?

Why do they feel the need to write these letters?

What are the major lessons, take-aways, and advice they provide?

How does emotion play into these letters?

What did you find to be the most powerful moments or passages?

Where can you draw connections between the two texts? At what points do they differ?

Overview of context in which they are writing, major argument/lessons

3 minute essay on moments/passages you really liked

Share in small groups with each other

Whole class share-out

PIE paragraphs & Sandwich Quotations

Review 2 work samples (1 strong, 1 weak) on sandwich quotations

Slides on PIE paragraphs (showing how PIE and sandwich quotations use same logic)

Unity & Development, building towards larger ideas

Transition words between paragraphs (commonly used transitions in They Say/I Say 321-322)

*Informal Writing 4*: Write at least one PIE paragraph comparing the major lesson(s) in Coates and Baldwin, using textual evidence and quotation sandwiches (check out the #slides channel if you need a reminder about Quotation Sandwiches or how PIE paragraphs work).  If you write two paragraphs, think about which paragraph logically should come first, and use an appropriate transition word to move from one paragraph to the next. Include a Work(s) Cited section.

*Questions to focus on while reading Michelle Alexander:*

Focus on 178-190, “The Symbolic Production of Race” on 197-200, bottom of 215-end of chapter on 220

Where are the “missing fathers” that Obama and the media talk about (178-80)?

Why does Alexander claim we are in denial about mass incarceration (181-3)?

How is structural racism like a “birdcage” according to Iris Marion Young (184)?

What has happened to the door of the birdcage, according to Alexander (185)?

What makes up the “invisible punishment” after sentencing (186)?

What demographic is impacted the most by mass incarceration, and why (190)?

What does mass incarceration define the “meaning of blackness to be” in the US (197)?

Why does Alexander bring up “white crime” and the “white criminal” (198)?

Why, according to Alexander, is the “current racial caste system” not voluntary? What does she say we all have done (215-16)?

Why is marginalization so dangerous, in Alexander’s view (219)?

10/2 T

Objectives: Close Viewing of Film & Discussion

AGENDA

Screening in class: I Am Not Your Negro

Discussion/Writing about film

Informal Writing 5: In 100-150 words, reflect on the film. Share one image, idea, or scene that really struck you, or one connection you made to something else we encountered in class.

For next class: 

Reminder: paper 1 is simply expanding your analysis on one of our readings, or connecting two of them, in a 600 word response. This is a rolling deadline: you can submit as early as you like to get feedback, but all drafts need to be in to me by the time we start screening Get Out. I urge you to do this sooner rather than later this semester.

10/4 Th

Objectives: Close reading and discussion, summary skills

Reading due: Chapter 5 of New Jim Crow

Screening in class: 13th

Reading the texts

Discussion: Quick-write in response to 13th, broader discussion

Questions to focus on while reading Anderson’s “White Rage:”

What major argument is Anderson making?

 Where is that argument most clearly stated (mark this in the text)?

How does Anderson shape her argument?

What evidence does she use to make her point?

10/9 T

Objectives: Close reading, summary skills, PIE paragraphs, examining structure in building an argument, identifying thesis; MLA bootcamp

Reading due: Carol Anderson’s “White Rage”

Discussion/Small Group Work

What major argument is Anderson making?

Where is that argument most clearly stated (mark this in the text)?

How does Anderson shape her argument?

What evidence does she use to make her point?

(tracking the legal arguments of Anderson)

(Track the legal arguments of Anderson, the many bodies in Rankine: identify thesis in both)

MLA Bootcamp

Paper 1 Lab

*Questions to focus on while reading Rankine:*

For the essay: What major argument is Rankine making?

Where is that argument most clearly stated (mark this in the text)?

How does Rankine shape her argument?

What evidence does she use to make her point?

For the poems: What is happening in each “scene”?

What is a common theme or strand that ties all these scenes together?

How does what’s happening in the poems connect to what Rankine’s talking about in the essay?

10/11 Th

Objectives: Close reading, summary skills, PIE paragraphs, examining structure in building an argument, identifying thesis

Reading due: Claudia Rankine’s “The Condition of Black Life is One of Mourning;” Part I of “Citizen”

Discussion/Small Group Work on essay

What major argument is Rankine making?

Where is that argument most clearly stated (mark this in the text)?

How does Rankine shape her argument?

What evidence does she use to make her point?

(the many bodies throughout the text)

Discussion/Small Group Work on “Citizen”

Close reading of each section of poem, establish overall theme of microaggressions, tie into the precariousness from essay

Informal Writing —> Paper 1 Lab

10/16 T

Objectives: watch and analyze Get Out

Reading due: Get Out prompt

Writing due: Informal writing response expanded to 600 words

Questions to keep in mind while watching:

While you’re watching the movie think about particular scenes that stand out to you. Why is this scene important to understanding the movie, overall, and its major themes and ideas? How does this scene connect to any readings we’ve done so far?

10/18 Th

Objectives: watch and analyze Get Out

Questions to keep in mind while watching (posted on board & on Slack):

While you’re watching the movie think about particular scenes that stand out to you. Why is this scene important to understanding the movie, overall, and its major themes and ideas? How does this scene connect to any readings we’ve done so far?

Towards end of class: Get Out paper topics, brainstorming connections with movie, possible topics for further exploration, begin doing research using #resources channel

10/23 T

Objectives: synthesizing former work into paper draft

Research Lab

Slack channel with #resources on relevant readings & websites (commentary on movie)

Re-visit Get Out paper topics, revisit slides

10/25 Th

Objectives: drafting, sharing student writing

Reminders: make sure Get Out appears in italics throughout, cite all essays/sources/movies, insert page numbers, have a heading and title, double-spaced, paper title capitalized, center, and nothing else; Works Cited centered, nothing else, with sources listed in alphabetical order, 2nd line onwards for each entry is indented

11/6

T

Midterm: responding to colleagues’ Paper 2 and connecting to own work

Homework: read final project prompt, student example packet (Jessica Jones, RuPaul’s Drag Race, American Gangster - 2 passing, one not); have idea for final project to share with us in class

11/8

Th

Objectives: final project preparation; reading student examples

What makes a good final project? Assess how students structure and use evidence against rubric, class discussion

Brief check-in: what are you thinking of focusing on?

11/13

T

Research lab: how to find legitimate sources using library resources (Lexis/Nexis Uni, Academic Search Complete, etc.), find approved first article

11/15 Th

Homework: read first article, identify author’s overall argument and major evidence they use

11/20

T

Objectives: reading and responding to sources; begin drafting paper 3 via freewriting

 

Final project free-write slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1QegGDaPIwb_UXr7Odjl3j1U50W9uEtoO-LBQNjq8TQs/edit?usp=sharing

11/22 TH

NO CLASS

11/27 T

Objectives: peer review

Peer review checklists and rubric: 2 strengths, 2 next steps

11/29 Th

Paper conferences with Bethany throughout day

Addressing feedback/comments on GoogleDoc draft

12/4 T

Objectives: student research pitches & swap

Elevator speeches on projects:

  • What is your pop culture item?
  • How/where can we find it?
  • Why is it socially/culturally/politically relevant?

Print out final project for Bethany & choose paper to focus on, commit to watch/listen to item and read paper

12/6 Th

Final Exam

12/11 T

Revision Lab

12/13 Th

Grading Conferences

5/24

Th

Objectives: peer discussions, final exam prep