J4

 

 

 

 

Curriculum Guide

 


Contents

Mission and Guiding principles

2

Teaching and learning at UNIS

3

Home Study

4

Module 1 Language arts and Humanities

5

Module 1 Mathematics

6

Module 1 Specialists

7

Module 2 Language arts and Humanities

8

Module 2 Mathematics

9

Module 2 Specialists

10

Module 3 Language arts and Humanities

11

Module 3 Mathematics

12

Module 3 Specialists

13

Reading

14

Library Program

15

UNIS Benchmarks

16

Mission & Guiding Principles

                                                

Under the auspices of the United Nations and guided by its ideals, UNIS provides an inclusive and diverse learning environment in which rigorous international programs foster academic excellence, innovation, creativity and cross­cultural communication to educate and inspire its students to become an active force in shaping a better world: peaceful, compassionate and sustainable.

                                                

Within this context we believe that:

UNIS students are committed to the spirit of the UN Charter by:                                                

●  Demonstrating respect for human rights

●  Demonstrating respect for the principle of equal rights irrespective of race, sex, language or religion

●  Developing skills for the peaceful resolution of conflict

●  Practicing tolerance and living together in peace

●  Understanding individual responsibilities within society

●  Understanding the relationship between rights and responsibilities

●  Acquiring knowledge of universal ethics

●  Providing leadership that demonstrates awareness of ethical and moral issues

UNIS students benefit from an international education whereby they:

●  Gain historic and contemporary knowledge and understanding of the world through intellectual endeavor

●  Acquire international understanding through interaction with the uniquely diverse school community and by studying and experiencing other cultures and belief systems

● Maintain the fluency of their mother tongue while valuing the acquisition of other languages

UNIS students strive for academic excellence by:

●  Learning how to learn

●  Discovering the joy of learning

●  Attaining depth and breadth of academic knowledge and understanding

●  Acquiring the skills that support intellectual endeavor and academic success

●  Solving problems independently and in cooperation with others

●  Acquiring aesthetic appreciation

●  Understanding modern technologies and using them wisely and effectively

●  Preparing themselves for the demands of higher education

UNIS students must be part of a caring community which encourages them by example to:

●  Share, cooperate, and contribute responsibly to a global society

●  Develop sensitivity to appropriate work and social relationships consistent with the principle of equal rights, including gender equality

●  Display sound decision ­making skills by reflecting on choices and consequences

●  Think and act critically, creatively, and independently

●  Lead a positive, healthy life

●  Care for others, as they would have others care for them

●  Share resources

●  Build understanding and trust

UNIS students, being individually and culturally diverse, appreciate the significance of

●  Developing personal values

●  Respecting the values of others

●  Valuing one’s own culture

●  Understanding and demonstrating respect for the culture of others

●  Understanding multi­culturalism within a global society

●  Being able to make a difference

Teaching and Learning at UNIS

Teaching and learning is at the heart of a school, and successful schools place the student at the heart of their learning environment.  Teachers systematically plan, use evidence to inform their practice and employ a range of teaching strategies and methods to support and improve student learning.  Learning involves students making sense of the world.  It is not simply about absorbing information, but it is an active process of constructing meaning.

At UNIS we recognize that students making sense of their learning will help them become independent learners.  UNIS’ learning targets and outcomes, and supportive inclusive environment, foster opportunities for students to develop a lifelong love of learning where skills in critical thinking, communication, collaboration, creativity, and adaptability, are developed and honed as our students move continuously and seamlessly from Junior A through Tutorial House graduation.

Moreover, teaching and learning is most effective when there is commitment to continuous improvement, collective responsibility, and goal alignment.  As such, we believe that the learning experience at UNIS offers a unique opportunity for each child to engage in a coherent curriculum that is developmentally appropriate and has clear learning outcomes for each stage of the learning experience. Through integration, innovative and research-proven teaching strategies, modern learning technologies, and real world resources and contexts, the UNIS curriculum goals help students understand their place and role in their learning. Moreover, timely informative feedback on their learning helps students develop the skills, attitudes, and dispositions necessary to systematically improve the quality and understanding of their learning experience in an international context.

Teaching and Learning in the Junior School

From the very first year, the social, intellectual, aesthetic, emotional and physical needs of the student are central to the curriculum, so that the classroom becomes a world in which the acquisition of skills and conceptual understanding goes hand in hand with the freedom to inquire, explore and create. The integrated learning that characterizes school life in the early grades builds a deep understanding of who the children are as inquiring independent critical thinkers and learners in an international environment.

Every day our children have the opportunity of experiencing a safe and secure inclusive learning environment to work, learn and play with peers from different countries and cultures from around the world. The connections made between subjects, people, times and places, characterize the interdisciplinary nature of the Junior School curriculum.


Home Study

In the Junior School home study is a tool and process used to reinforce skills and concepts learned in the classroom.  We use home study to consolidate and extend knowledge of a subject area.  home study provides an opportunity for students to share with their parents what they have learned in class.

Weekday work:

The duration of time spent on home study assignments increases as a child progresses through the Junior School and is incorporated into the daily time allowed to home study by each grade level.

Project work may be increasingly a part of children’s classroom work as they move through the Junior School.

Time allocation:

Junior 4 home study focuses on all core subject area reinforcement of skills as well as long Module project work.   In J4 there is an additional focus on time-management and planning for project work.  J4 home study will take approximately 1 hour daily Monday - Thursday.

The time allocated for Mother Tongue Language, Modern Language and ELL home study is incorporated into the noted time above and is not in addition.

J4 approximately: 15 minutes per day for French and Spanish 10/15 minutes for Mother Tongue

Weekend work:

While we recognize that home study is a valuable tool to implement the UNIS curriculum, we are also committed to developing the whole child. We view weekends as important time for children to be with their families developing other areas of interest and solidifying social skills through play and interaction.    

home study during absence from school:

At times children are out from school either for illness or due to family circumstances.  During these absences, students are expected to read daily and write a travel or daily journal. Teachers will not create make-up work or home study packets for these time periods.

 

What Does Home study in J4 look like?

As part of the preparation for students to move into middle school next year, students have access to home study electronically in J4. There are several reasons for this and many benefits. These include:

- The quick feedback that the students can receive, depending on the task.

- Preparation for middle school next year (as all correspondence will be electronic)

- Ease of pair/group/whole class collaboration.

- Teacher/student conversation and collaboration.

- Parents can see the learning that has happened during the day and talk to their child about it.

- The enormous environmental advantages in going paperless.

- home study in J4 includes a combination of paper print outs and technology each week

- J4 teachers assign home study via schoology

- Students use a google doc to record their daily reading as it allows for familiar feedback

- Whilst some home study assignments will be given out across the grade, others may be specific to a particular class to allow for individualities and differentiation.

- Home study includes reading, math, writing, integrated unit, and project work. During each week students will be assigned at least one of each subject area.

Module 1 September - December

Language Arts & Humanities

Communities

Students in J4 will explore and inquire into what a world/global citizen is and the responsibilities of citizenship, that define and lead to taking and creating sustainable action within communities. Our goal is that by studying and living through the character strand and the IB Learner Profile, students will develop the attributes of becoming a global citizen.  

At first they will consider the concept of citizenship within the communities in which they belong (UNIS and one other of choice) and their responsibilities within these communities. They will consider what actions can be taken in this community and how to create action that is sustainable.    

On a global level they will begin to explore how they can have a sustainable impact on those around them and in their lives how their choices and actions have an affect, impact and change world.

                                                                     

Language focus: Narrative

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:         

Show evidence of a strong personal voice

Write fiction with a clear beginning, middle, and end

Write effectively in both first and third person

Describe characters and events to create specific effects in literary texts

Use, with guidance, strong verbs, interesting language, and dialogue

Begin to select vocabulary to create precise meaning

Use figurative language appropriately

Attempt to involve the reader with poetic devices

Discuss how metaphor and personification enhance their own writing

Use a varied range of sentence beginnings when writing

Write dialogue to enhance writing

Plan writing through discussion with others and by making notes

Use a range of editing strategies more independently during the writing process

Recognize most misspelled words and attempt corrections

Use correct punctuation

Apply a wide range of strategies to spell words

Write using cursive handwriting in a fluent and legible style

                                

                                

                

Module 1 September - December

Mathematics

Mathematics focus: Place value and number sense

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:

Recognize and demonstrate place value of whole numbers up to hundred millions

Add and subtract up to nine-digit numbers with and without regrouping using physical models and algorithms

Identify and write number symbols to hundred millions

Order and compare numbers up to hundred millions using =, < and >

Round and estimate numbers up to millions.

Represent whole number in flexible ways including sums and differences, products and quotients.

Recognize prime and composite numbers.

Recognize odd and even numbers up to hundred millions

Mathematics focus: Multiplication and division

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:

Show the connection between repeated addition and multiplication for whole numbers

Demonstrate fluency with multiplying single digits

Multiply whole numbers up to three digits by two-digit conceptually and algorithmically

Divide a three-digit dividend by a one-digit divisor with or without a remainder conceptually and algorithmically


Module 1 September - December

Specialists

Art

Symmetry, radial design, scale confusion, color contrast, and basic perspective, overlapping, drawing, painting, cutting, gluing and composing, art history and mythological animals from the past

Technology

Global Digital Citizenship, Cardboard Circuit Statements, Art Bots

Science

Ecology

P.E.

Invasion Games - Target Games - Swimming and Aquatic Activities

* Depending on the class section and the day of the week, the activity may change. However, all units will be covered throughout the year.

French

Introduce oneself and a friend, talk about friends, school supplies; create and describe a video game character  

Spanish

Introduce myself and my family, Peace day: Essential agreements of the class, Spanish speaking countries UN day (CLIL), my classroom, my school.

Music / Theatre arts

J4 Students are helping to build a brand new music/theatre program.  Students will utilize musical skills as well as develop new methods to achieve performance based culminating tasks.  These tasks will include a fusion of both theatre and music with which students can compose, perform, act, and produce their own concerts.   Technology as well as cross curricular connections will be established to further enhance the inquiry cycle.

Module 2 January - March

Language Arts & Humanities

Resources, culture and sustainability

Over time natural resources have attracted people to new places. What was it about certain places that facilitated life there? How did this change over time? Will this continue to change in the future? What were the available resources and how did this influence the employment, recreation and travel of the people who lived there? As learners conduct this investigation they will consider the city in which they live (New York) and the reasons why people lived there at certain points and today. They will consider how this has changed over time as well as comparing the development of New York with other global cities.

As learners investigate these ideas they will further develop their ability to use maps and locate specific information in relation to land use over time. They will identify appropriate sources and use these to compare specific places. Learners will develop the ‘competencies necessary to write in the information genre, thus enabling them to explain and present their ideas in clear and informative ways. This module will offer specific opportunities for students to develop empathy for people and all living things as they consider the implications for the use of resources available in the future.

                                                                     

Language focus: Informative

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:

Organize paragraphs logically

Write effectively in both first and third person

Write facts, details, definitions, observations, and comparisons to teach about a given topic

Include specific vocabulary to enhance meaning and suit the intended audience and purpose

Use a varied range of sentence beginnings when writing

Plan writing through discussion with others and by making notes

Use correct punctuation

Use less common punctuation marks such as the hyphen and colon

Begin to apply spelling generalizations

Write using cursive handwriting in a fluent and legible style

Write fluently with appropriate size, slope, and spacing

                                        

                                

                        

                

         

                                        

                                

Module 2 January - March

Mathematics

Mathematics focus: 2d Geometry and measurement

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:

Identify plane and solid

Reviews attributes of geometric shapes and solids

Identify, differentiate and draw angles, points, lines, line segments and rays

Identify and illustrate lines that intersect, are diagonal, parallel or perpendicular

Recognize and analyze rectangles and squares with a given number of square units without the use of a formula

Find the perimeter and area of squares and rectangles with missing information

Classify shapes in Modules of congruence and symmetry

Classify triangles according to their angles (acute, obtuse, 90 degree) and identifies their attributes

Solve complex word that include plane and solid shapes problems with geometric models

Investigate the relationships between and among points, lines, line segments and rays

Draw scalene, isosceles and equilateral triangles

Recognize the intervals of a whole unit of measurement up to 1/16 of an inch and 1/10 of a centimeter/millimeter

Convert units of measurements to fractions, mixed numbers and decimals

Find the perimeter and area of complex shapes including surface area of cubes and rectangular prisms (metric and customary)

Relate weight to objects in metric and customary units

Mathematics focus: Divisions to fractions

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:

Divide a three-digit dividend by a one-digit divisor with or without a remainder conceptually and algorithmically

Recognize and represent parts of a whole as fractions, mixed numbers as parts of a collection, and location on a number line

Recognize and represent parts of a collection as fractions

Recognize and convert improper fractions to mixed numbers and vice versa

Identify and write proper and improper fractions

Recognize and identify mixed numbers

Write and convert improper fractions to mixed numbers and vice versa

Add and subtract fractions (proper and improper) and mixed numbers with like denominators conceptually and algorithmically

Simplify equivalent fractions

Module 2 January - March

Specialists

Art

Working with text, researched imagery, and landscape the students create a large travel poster for a country of their choice using pencil, oil pastel, marker and watercolor paint.

Technology

Design/Engineering

Science

Geology

P.E.

Net & Wall Games / Swimming and Aquatic Activities Creative Movement - Dance,  Gymnastics, Acro Sport and Circus

* Depending on the class section and the day of the week, the activity may change. However, all units will be covered throughout the year.

French

Sports and leisure - the city and means of transport - CLIL Francophonie - weather, time and daily activities

Spanish

Sustainability CLIL: Healthy and sustainable habits: nutrition, sports, routine and free time activities.

Music / Theatre arts

Students will be developing aiding in developing a musical production for the spring.  Students will inquire about multiple roles involved in producing, directing, staging, sound, lights, rehearsals, and so much more involved in creating a show.  We will also be exploring how shows differ from around the world and how we can integrate global perspectives into our performances


Module 3 April - June

Language Arts & Humanities

Causation, Continuity and Change

Students in J4 will be introduced to the concept of change through the story of a 10 year old boy or girl whose life was dramatically altered by the introduction of the New York City Subway system. They will consider how this change impacted his/her standard of living, mortality, social mobility - background, power, scarcity and abundance of resources, etc. After this students will be introduced to a range of possible significant events in which they can consider how a ten year old's life was changed. They will attempt to answer the same question as when they looked at the subway student. Once they have researched about this significant event, they will work collaboratively or independently to create their own TV show about this significant event in time and its impact on 10 year old students.

Learners understand that by recognizing and describing patterns in the world around us, we can both come to understand the world better and harness that understanding to predict and manage our environment.

Learners understand the ways in which the arts can influence societal development by challenging commonly held perspectives with creative ideas.

                                                            

Language focus: Persuasive

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:

Express a well ­reasoned point of view

Write about feelings and opinions

Craft persuasive texts to express ideas

Organize paragraphs logically

Write convincing reasons to support an opinion with specific examples

Begin to select vocabulary to create precise meaning

Use a range of editing strategies more independently during the writing process

Use a variety of editing marks to improve writing

Show evidence of careful revision, editing, and proofreading in published text

Understand how accurate punctuation influences their writing and apply that knowledge to texts

Recognize misspelled words and attempt corrections

                                        

                                

                        

                

         

                                        

                                

                        

                

         

Module 3 April - June

Mathematics

Mathematics focus: Divisions to fractions (continued)

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:

Divide a three-digit dividend by a one-digit divisor with or without a remainder conceptually and algorithmically

Recognize and represent parts of a whole as fractions, mixed numbers as parts of a collection, and location on a number line

Recognize and represent parts of a collection as fractions

Recognize and convert improper fractions to mixed numbers and vice versa

Identify and write proper and improper fractions

Recognize and identify mixed numbers

Write and convert improper fractions to mixed numbers and vice versa

Add and subtract fractions (proper and improper) and mixed numbers with like denominators conceptually and algorithmically

Simplify equivalent fractions

Convert units of measurements to fractions, mixed numbers and decimals

Mathematics focus: Data & Probability

Specific UNIS focused benchmarks:

Analyze, describe and record the likelihood of an event

Collect, organize and represent data graphically (line graphs, bar graphs, pie charts and line plots)

Formulates questions to conduct a poll or research to collect data        

Generates and analyze data from different sources

Recognize median, mean and range from a set of numerical data


Module 3 April - June

Specialists

Art

Working with scale confusion and inspired by the artist Claus Oldenburg, as a final challenge J4 students create “Giant Watch” designs employing a variety of materials and skills in order to complete a unified work of art.

Technology

Design/Engineering

Science

Evolution

P.E.

Striking & Fielding Games / Outdoor and Adventure Activities /  Swimming and Aquatic Activities

* Depending on the class section and the day of the week, the activity may change. However, all units will be covered throughout the year.

French

Family members – Means of transport – CLIL Solidarity (Part 2) - Express the characteristics of a country (gender) – Moments of a day, Months – Telling/Asking time - Making vacation plans – CLIL Technology (electronic game connected with the means of transport)

Spanish

Don Quijote: physical description- Don Quijote in NYC

Music / Theatre arts

Students will be developing aiding in developing a musical production for the spring.  Students will inquire about multiple roles involved in producing, directing, staging, sound, lights, rehearsals, and so much more involved in creating a show.  We will also be exploring how shows differ from around the world and how we can integrate global perspectives into our performances


Reading

The philosophy of the reading program in the UNIS Junior schools begins with a belief that reading is a key foundation to accessing the curriculum. Teachers at UNIS are committed to delivering the best possible differentiated instruction in reading based on the individual needs of the learners in their classrooms.

A JS teacher’s work with reading begins with a commitment to giving students large chunks of time engaged in reading books of their own choosing, when possible, and always ones that they can read with fluency, accuracy and comprehension.

Teachers begin the year by assessing their students to learn the level of text complexity that each child can handle (on an A-Z scale) and then channeling kids towards texts they can read. Students are able to select these books from the leveled library; which is set out in each of the Junior School classrooms. Students read in school and continue reading at home, carrying books between home and school. Home reading expectations are laid out in the UNIS Junior School Home Study document.

Junior School teachers spend time in class providing explicit instruction in the skills and strategies of proficient reading, following the gradual release of responsibility model. Time is divided into small group instruction, whole group mini-lessons, one-on-one instruction and read-aloud time.        


Library Program

                                        

The Junior School Library fosters a community of learning and literacy that leads to high academic achievement, independent reading and learning, integration and collaboration.

                                        

The Library is a powerful intellectual and social space where students and teachers gather ideas, exchange points of view, and learn together. Under the guidance of certified school library media specialists, the Junior School Library promotes learning within and beyond the library walls by:

                                        

• provoking the intellectual, social and personal development of all students to become motivated and independent learners.

                                        

• providing physical and intellectual access to information, in a warm, stimulating, and safe environment.

• providing instruction, learning strategies, and practice in using ideas and information for effective learning. • integrating the library program throughout every student’s education through collaboration and advocacy.

                                        

Students from JA to J4 develop and employ information literacy, technology and critical thinking skills in integrated and collaboratively taught learning experiences. Students are engaged in independent reading and inquiry-based learning.

                        

                                                                                           

Junior 4

                                        

Students select and use multiple appropriate print, non-print, electronic, and human sources to answer questions and evaluate these sources for usefulness, relevance, and accuracy. Students use various note-taking strategies and cite all sources used. Students are familiar with all genres in the library and are able to compare, contrast, and critically discuss works of literature.

Ms. Iwasykiw, School Library Media Specialist Ms. Barrer, School Library Media Specialist