Robert O’Hara Burke and William John Wills died from starvation in an area of abundant native foods on a mission to explore lands that were already named and already mapped.


They were inexperienced, ignorant and made a series of rash decisions which lead to the avoidable deaths of seven members of their exploration party.

The Yandruwandha people at Coopers Creek offered fish, nardoo and other foods to Burke, Wills and King. Burke felt insecure about receiving help from the Yandruwandha and shot at them instead.

“When Yandruwandha people in 1861 found the poor men who were the remnants of the Burke and Wills party roaming around apparently aimlessly, they felt they were lost either in mind or spirit. The Burke and Wills party did not know how to communicate effectively with their surrounds, utilise the resources at their fingertips or share their intentions with the native people with whom they came into contact.”  —Aaron Pateron (Yandruwandha descendant).

With the Metro Tunnel project under construction the Burke and Wills statue has retreated into storage. Upon the completion of the tunnel, do you think it deserves a place on the streets of our city centre?

“There was nothing the public celebrated more than a dead hero” – Sarah Murgatroyd.

 

“The barriers that have for so long kept Indigenous perspectives out of the Burke and Wills story were based not on lack of material but rather on perception and choice.” – Ian D. Clark and Fred Cahir

 

“When Yandruwandha people in 1861 found the poor men who were the remnants of the Burke and Wills party roaming around apparently aimlessly, they felt they were lost either in mind or spirit. The Burke and Wills party did not know how to communicate effectively with their surrounds, utilise the resources at their fingertips or share their intentions with the native people with whom they came into contact.” – Aaron Pateron (Yandruwandha descendant)

 

 Robert O’Hara Burke, the leader of the ill-fated Burke and Wills expedition across the so-called Australian continent 157 years ago, was inexperienced, incapable, and rash. These were the qualities which led to the avoidable deaths of seven party members.

 

The avoidable deaths of party members are ultimately what led to the expedition’s fame and place in Australian historical consciousness (though informed observers have been critical of celebrating the expedition or “expensive mistake” all along).

 

The Yandruwandha people at Coopers Creek offered fish, nardoo and other foods to Burke, Wills and King – the stragglers of the starving upward march, only to be treated with disrespect and violence.

 

Burke shot over the heads of the Yandruwandha people when they sought a meagre piece of cloth in return for the copious amounts of food they had given the entitled explorers, prolonging their survival. Just days before this shooting incident, a man nicknamed Pitchery, out of concern for the lone-wandering Wills, took him to a camp and fed him until he was ‘unable to eat anymore’.

 

Burke struggled with the idea of being dependent for life on people he saw as inferior. Had he not jeopardised the relationship with Yandruwandha people, Burke and Wills could have survived. After they both died avoidable deaths, the Yandruwandha people saved King, the remaining party member in the area, from the same fate.

 

One of the party’s two Indigenous guides, Dick, at one point saved the lives of two party members – Lyons and McPherson. Peter was the other Indigenous guide to the group who has received little historical recognition.

 

Burke and Wills were part of a disorganised and disruptive expedition through lands that were already named, and already mapped. If you don’t think they deserve to be honoured and celebrated via the returning of their statue to the corner of Swanston and Collins St, sign the petition at historyskips.com.au

 

 

 Photos for backgrounds:

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fupload.wikimedia.org%2Fwikipedia%2Fcommons%2F0%2F05%2FBurke_and_wills_painting_by_longstaff-2.jpg

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hordern.com%2Fpictures%2F2311343.jpg

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fburkeandwills.slv.vic.gov.au%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fimages%2Fb28534.jpg

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fburkeandwills.slv.vic.gov.au%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fplate99_0.jpg%3F1280447678

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=william+strutt+burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fuploads0.wikiart.org%2Fimages%2Fgeorge-washington-lambert%2Fburke-and-wills-on-the-way-to-mount-hopeless-1907.jpg

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=william+strutt+burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fburkeandwills.slv.vic.gov.au%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fplate100.jpg%3F1280447834

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Yandruwandha+1861&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nma.gov.au%2F__data%2Fassets%2Fimage%2F0006%2F3867%2Fbasedow-tree_w480.jpg

 

ORRRR

Departure 1860

ROYAL PARADE, unsuited (reason) how they chose, packing, opinion Argus of group. Get as far as essendon 19 people

2

Menindee, everyones resigned quote why?

3

Coopers creek yarunwandah mistake, left a party

4

5

  1. “Burke, Wills and 17 other men set off to cross the so-called Australian continent 157 years ago, from Melbourne to the Gulf of Carpentaria, something never before done at that time by a white person. In search of new grazing land and an inland sea, for fame, for glory, and to beat John Stuart of Adelaide, they set off on their ill-fated expedition through lands that were already named, and already mapped.
  2. (Who are they what are their accreditations?
  3. ( a large parade gathered in Royal park to watch them depart.) it was a ridiculously packed troupe, they had determined to bring!

    On its first day, 20 August 1860, the Victorian Exploring Expedition, later to be known as the ‘Burke and Wills Expedition’, travelled just 11 kilometers from Royal Park to the outskirts of Essendon, Wurundjeri land. Among the party were 26 camels, 23 horses, 19 men, 6 wagons, 6 tonnes of firewood, two years’ worth of food, a cedar oak table and chairs, flags, rockets, a chinese gong and a bathtub.

    From the beginning this was a calamitous, and poorly organised affair. One wagon broke down before it had left Royal Park, and a further two in Essendon. The load was heavy - 20 tonnes in total.

  1. There was bad travelling weather in the first weeks of the trip - a lot of rain - and there would be no break-times allowed. The packing and unpacking became unbearable each night and the horses and camels were strained. From the unneccessary supplies, brought by an inconsiderate policeman too Burke the leader then decided to sell off some valuable equipment in ‘the middle of nowhere’.

4. Robert O’hara Burke, the leader of the expedition had no previous explorational or navigational experience. He was a cop in Beechworth who was notorious for getting lost on his way home from the pub. Why had he been chosen for such an expedition by the Royal society, An institution determined not to grasp the realities of the colonised landscape

And why had he gone? A certain travelling actor in Melbourne, Julia Matthews, had captivated Burke before the expedition was planned. But, despite proposing to her before ever having had a conversation with her, she had declined. Maybe she’d fall in love with a travelling hero? - unneccessary BEELINE?

  1. By the time the party reached Swan Hill, a lot of reshuffling had taken place. Burke had discharged one party member who had become too ill to work. He sacked four men he had spontaneously and enthusiastically hired near Bendigo a few days earlier, and hired some four more near Swan Hill. He discharged 6 men at Balranald but as characteristic of a poor leader he didn’t have the courage to tell them, or perhaps a justification for his decision - so told some to wait here, we’ll come back for you. A few of them followed up and he said nothing.
    Burke didnt keep a diary?
  2. By the time the party reached Menindee, Burke felt overburdened by the entourage of straggling pack animals and breaking wagons. He feared the Stuart might beat them on the upward race. So he left with Wills, King and Gray in the advance party and left William Wright, a man he’d met in a pub en route, in charge of bringing up the supply party.
  3. The advance party arrived at Coopers Creek,  

  1. On 16 December 1860, Burke, Wills, Charles Gray and John King left Cooper Creek to make a dash for the northern shoreline. Burke and Wills eventually encountered salty marshes and a shifting tide, and could proceed no further. They had reached their goal, even though they could not see the open water.
  2. The return journey proved fatal. Charles Gray died and the others limped back to the Cooper Creek camp only to find that rest of the depot party had departed just hours earlier. Burke and Wills died attempting to reach Mount Hopeless. King, near death, was cared for by the Yandruwandha people until a relief expedition rescued him.

  3. As they progressed northward, Burke found the expedition overburdened and the wagons unreliable. Furthermore, he feared that South Australian explorer John McDouall Stuart, who was also heading for the Gulf, might get there first. At Menindie, Burke appointed William Wright to be in charge and left for Cooper Creek. Wright was to bring up the party and supplies. Burke grew impatient waiting for Wright to arrive and decided to leave Depot Camp 65 for the Gulf.



What do people think of this?  Make any edits or suggestions direct in the text.

This text could be over 6 or seven paste-ups all in order, and with eye-catching images/ designs eg my crap photoshop attempt below.

Would be cool write it up like poetry too? Re: quotes at start - Which one/ones are best? Has anyone come across any other good ones?

 ____________________________________________________________________________

“There was nothing the public celebrated more than a dead hero” – Sarah Murgatroyd.

 

“The barriers that have for so long kept Indigenous perspectives out of the Burke and Wills story were based not on lack of material but rather on perception and choice.” – Ian D. Clark and Fred Cahir The Aboriginal Story of Burke and Wills : Forgotten Narratives

** Rain 

“When Yandruwandha people in 1861 found the poor men who were the remnants of the Burke and Wills party roaming around apparently aimlessly, they felt they were lost either in mind or spirit. The Burke and Wills party did not know how to communicate effectively with their surrounds, utilise the resources at their fingertips or share their intentions with the native people with whom they came into contact.” – Aaron Pateron (Yandruwandha descendant) **second fave (Tori)**

 

 ____________________________________________________________________________

 

  1. On its first day, 20 August 1860, the Victorian Exploring Expedition, later to be known as the ‘Burke and Wills Expedition’, travelled just 11 kilometers from Royal Park to the outskirts of Essendon. Among the party were 26 camels, 23 horses, 19 men, 6 wagons, 6 tonnes of firewood, two years’ worth of food, a cedar oak table and chairs, flags, rockets, a chinese gong and a bathtub. One wagon broke down before it had left Royal Park, and a further two in Essendon. The load was heavy - 20 tonnes in total.

  1. Burke had no previous exploration experience,

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nicholas_Chevalier_-_Memorandum_of_the_Start_of_the_Exploring_Expedition_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

2. By the time the party reached Menindee on 23 September, several party members had resigned. The quest to the Gulf of Carpentaria continued.

3. Robert O’Hara Burke, the leader of the ill-fated expedition across the so-called Australian continent, was inexperienced, incapable, rash and in a rush. These were the qualities whic h led to the avoidable deaths of seven party members.

 

4. The avoidable deaths of party members are ultimately what led to the expedition’s fame and place in Australian historical consciousness (though informed observers have been reluctant to celebrate the expedition or “expensive mistake” all along).

 

5. The Yandruwandha people at Coopers Creek offered fish, nardoo and other foods to Burke, Wills and King – the stragglers of the starving upward march, only to be treated with disrespect and violence.

 

6. Burke shot over the heads of the Yandruwandha people when they sought a meagre piece of cloth in return for the copious amounts of food they had given the ‘explorers’. Just days before this shooting incident, an Indigenous man nicknamed Pitchery, out of concern for the lone-wandering Wills, took him to a camp and fed him until he was ‘unable to eat anymore’.

 

7. Burke struggled with the idea of being dependent for life on people he saw as inferior. Had he not jeopardised the relationship with Yandruwandha people, Burke and Wills could have survived. After they both died avoidable deaths, the Yandruwandha people saved King, the remaining party member in the area, from the same fate.

 

8. One of the party’s two Indigenous guides, Dick, at one point saved the lives of two party members – Lyons and McPherson. Peter was the other Indigenous guide to the group who has received little historical recognition.

 

9. Burke and Wills were part of a disorganised and disruptive expedition through lands that were already named, and already mapped. If you don’t think they deserve to be honoured and celebrated via the returning of their statue to the corner of Swanston and Collins St, sign the petition at www.historyskips.com.au

 

 ____________________________________________________________________________

Map of expedition

Website

Leave Burke and Wills behind

Permanently remove ? Sumner’s Burke and Wills  statue from the Melbourne CBD

NEW TEXT::::::::??????


1.        Burke, Wills and 17 other men set off to cross the so-called Australian continent 157 years ago, from Melbourne to the Gulf of Carpentaria. In search of new grazing land and an inland sea, for fame, for glory, and to beat John Sturt of Adelaide, they set off on their ill-fated expedition through lands that were already named, and already mapped.


2.        They consisted 19 men chosen by the Royal Society, which had a preference for Englishmen over men with experience.

3.        On its first day, 20 August 1860, the Victorian Exploring Expedition, later to be known as the ‘Burke and Wills Expedition’, travelled just 11 kilometers on Wurundjeri land, from Royal Park to the outskirts of Essendon. Among the party were 26 camels, 23 horses, 19 men, 6 wagons, 6 tonnes of firewood, two years’ worth of food, a cedar oak table and chairs, flags, rockets, a chinese gong and a bathtub. A parade of 15,000 people gathered in Royal park to watch them depart.

From the beginning this was a calamitous, and poorly organised affair. One wagon broke down before it had even left Royal Park, and a further two in Essendon. The load was heavy - 20 tonnes in total.

4. Robert O’hara Burke, the leader of the expedition, had no previous explorational or navigational experience. He was a cop in Beechworth who was notorious for getting lost on his way home from the pub.


4.        There was bad travelling weather in the first weeks of the trip - a lot of rain - and there would be no break-times allowed. The packing and unpacking became unbearable each night and the horses and camels were strained from the unneccessary supplies. Burke decided to sell off some valuable equipment in ‘the middle of nowhere’.


5.        By the time the party reached Swan Hill, a lot of reshuffling had taken place. Burke had discharged one party member who had become too ill to work. He sacked four men he had spontaneously and enthusiastically hired near Bendigo a few days earlier, and hired some four more near Swan Hill. He discharged 6 men at Balranald but, characteristically of a poor leader, didn’t have the courage to tell them, or a justification for his decision - so told some to wait here, we’ll come back for you. A few of them followed up and he said nothing. Burke didn’t keep much of a diary.

6.        By the time the party reached Menindee, Burke felt overburdened by the entourage of straggling pack animals and breaking wagons. He feared the Sturt might beat them on the upward race. So he left with Wills, King and Gray in an advance party and left William Wright, a man he’d met in a pub en route, in charge of bringing up the rest of the party and supplies.

The advance party arrived at Cooper’s Creek, home of four main groups of people – the Ngurawola, the Wangkamurra, the Yawarrawarrka and the Yandruwandha. Burke and Wills were mainly ‘exploring’ the lands and homes of the Yawarrawarrka and Yandruwandha people.

The Cooper became the base for the supply party too - Wright and his men. We see a lot of documented

5.        The Yandruwandha people at Cooper’s Creek offered fish, nardoo and other foods to Burke, Wills and King – the stragglers of the starving upward march, only to be treated with disrespect and violence.

6.        Burke shot over the heads of the Yandruwandha people when they sought a meagre piece of cloth in return for the copious amounts of food they had given the ‘explorers’. Just days before this shooting incident, an Indigenous man nicknamed Pitchery, out of concern for the lone-wandering Wills, took him to a camp and fed him until he was ‘unable to eat anymore’.
        
7. Burke struggled with the idea of being dependent for life on people he saw as inferior. Had he not jeopardised the relationship with Yandruwandha people, Burke and Wills could have survived. After they both died avoidable deaths, the Yandruwandha people saved King, the remaining party member in the area, from the same fate.

Coopers Creek became a base for the supply party too, so there were

DOTDOTDOT Y. Offer stuff /// leave them in peace.

“When Yandruwandha people in 1861 found the poor men who were the remnants of the Burke and Wills party roaming around apparently aimlessly, they felt they were lost either in mind or spirit. The Burke and Wills party did not know how to communicate effectively with their surrounds, utilise the resources at their fingertips or share their intentions with the native people with whom they came into contact.” – Aaron Pateron

7. BURKE AND WILLS GO UP TO THE TOP BUT SEE NO BEACH. (BLAH FILM WISHED A MORE SATISFACTORY PUNCTUATION MARK TO THEIR VICTORIOUS JOURNEY )

8. BURKE MAKES DUMB DECISION TO GO MT HOPELESS

8. SUPPLY PARTY KILL MR SHIRT

YANDRAWANDHA TRY TO SAVE EVERYONE

9.        On 16 December 1860, Burke, Wills, Charles Gray and John King left Cooper Creek to make a dash for the northern shoreline. Burke and Wills eventually encountered salty marshes and a shifting tide, and could proceed no further. They had reached their goal, even though they could not see the open water.
10.        The return journey proved fatal. Charles Gray died and the others limped back to the Cooper Creek camp only to find that rest of the depot party had departed just hours earlier. Burke and Wills died attempting to reach Mount Hopeless. King, near death, was cared for by the Yandruwandha people until a relief expedition rescued him.
11.        
12.        


13.        As they progressed northward, Burke found the expedition overburdened and the wagons unreliable. Furthermore, he feared that South Australian explorer John McDouall Stuart, who was also heading for the Gulf, might get there first. At Menindie, Burke appointed William Wright to be in charge and left for Cooper Creek. Wright was to bring up the party and supplies. Burke grew impatient waiting for Wright to arrive and decided to leave Depot Camp 65 for the Gulf.
14.        








What do people think of this?  Make any edits or suggestions direct in the text.



This text could be over 6 or seven paste-ups all in order, and with eye-catching images/ designs eg my crap photoshop attempt below.

Would be cool write it up like poetry too? Re: quotes at start - Which one/ones are best? Has anyone come across any other good ones?

____________________________________________________________________________

“There was nothing the public celebrated more than a dead hero” – Sarah Murgatroyd.
“The barriers that have for so long kept Indigenous perspectives out of the Burke and Wills story were based not on lack of material but rather on perception and choice.” – Ian D. Clark and Fred Cahir The Aboriginal Story of Burke and Wills : Forgotten Narratives

** Rain

“When Yandruwandha people in 1f861 found the poor men who were the remnants of the Burke and Wills party roaming around apparently aimlessly, they felt they were lost either in mind or spirit. The Burke and Wills party did not know how to communicate effectively with their surrounds, utilise the resources at their fingertips or share their intentions with the native people with whom they came into contact.” – Aaron Pateron (Yandruwandha descendant) **second fave (Tori)**
____________________________________________________________________________


15.        On its first day, 20 August 1860, the Victorian Exploring Expedition, later to be known as the ‘Burke and Wills Expedition’, travelled just 11 kilometers from Royal Park to the outskirts of Essendon. Among the party were 26 camels, 23 horses, 19 men, 6 wagons, 6 tonnes of firewood, two years’ worth of food, a cedar oak table and chairs, flags, rockets, a chinese gong and a bathtub. One wagon broke down before it had left Royal Park, and a further two in Essendon. The load was heavy - 20 tonnes in total.

16.        
17.        Burke had no previous exploration experience,



https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nicholas_Chevalier_-_Memorandum_of_the_Start_of_the_Exploring_Expedition_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

2. By the time the party reached Menindee on 23 September, several party members had resigned. The quest to the Gulf of Carpentaria continued.

3. Robert O’Hara Burke, the leader of the ill-fated expedition across the so-called Australian continent, was inexperienced, incapable, rash and in a rush. These were the qualities which led to the avoidable deaths of seven party members.
4. The avoidable deaths of party members are ultimately what led to the expedition’s fame and place in Australian historical consciousness (though informed observers have been reluctant to celebrate the expedition or “expensive mistake” all along).
5. The Yandruwandha people at Coopers Creek offered fish, nardoo and other foods to Burke, Wills and King – the stragglers of the starving upward march, only to be treated with disrespect and violence.
6. Burke shot over the heads of the Yandruwandha people when they sought a meagre piece of cloth in return for the copious amounts of food they had given the ‘explorers’. Just days before this shooting incident, an Indigenous man nicknamed Pitchery, out of concern for the lone-wandering Wills, took him to a camp and fed him until he was ‘unable to eat anymore’.
7. Burke struggled with the idea of being dependent for life on people he saw as inferior. Had he not jeopardised the relationship with Yandruwandha people, Burke and Wills could have survived. After they both died avoidable deaths, the Yandruwandha people saved King, the remaining party member in the area, from the same fate.
8. One of the party’s two Indigenous guides, Dick, at one point saved the lives of two party members – Lyons and McPherson. Peter was the other Indigenous guide to the group who has received little historical recognition.
9. Burke and Wills were part of a disorganised and disruptive expedition through lands that were already named, and already mapped. If you don’t think they deserve to be honoured and celebrated via the returning of their statue to the corner of Swanston and Collins St, sign the petition at www.historyskips.com.au

____________________________________________________________________________

Photos for backgrounds:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fupload.wikimedia.org%2Fwikipedia%2Fcommons%2F0%2F05%2FBurke_and_wills_painting_by_longstaff-2.jpg

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hordern.com%2Fpictures%2F2311343.jpg

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fburkeandwills.slv.vic.gov.au%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fimages%2Fb28534.jpg

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fburkeandwills.slv.vic.gov.au%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fplate99_0.jpg%3F1280447678

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=william+strutt+burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fuploads0.wikiart.org%2Fimages%2Fgeorge-washington-lambert%2Fburke-and-wills-on-the-way-to-mount-hopeless-1907.jpg

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=william+strutt+burke+and+wills&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fburkeandwills.slv.vic.gov.au%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fplate100.jpg%3F1280447834

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Yandruwandha+1861&t=ffab&atb=v68-7__&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nma.gov.au%2F__data%2Fassets%2Fimage%2F0006%2F3867%2Fbasedow-tree_w480.jpg

Map of expedition

Website

Leave Burke and Wills behind

Permanently remove ? Sumner’s Burke and Wills  statue from the Melbourne CBD




WHAT DO WE MEMORIALISE
What national stories do we select and validate to create a sense of national history and identity?

How does these stories continue to serve a colonial agenda and myth of a erase the 65,000 year history that pre-dates white occupation

Creating space