Chicago Homeless Management Information System (HMIS)

Data Quality Plan

Approved by: HMIS Committee

Date: May 17, 2019

Version: 1.7.1

Introduction

Development Process

Definition of Data Quality

What is Data Quality Plan?

What is a Data Quality Monitoring Plan?

HMIS Software

HMIS Help Desk and Knowledge Base

Section 1

1.1 Timeliness

1.2 Completeness

1.2.1 All Clients Served

Universal Data Elements (UDE)

Program Specific Data Elements (PDEs)

1.2.2 Bed/Unit Utilization Rates

1.3 Data Accuracy and Consistency

1.3.1 Consistency

1.3.2 Anonymous and Naming Conventions:

1.4 Data Plan Monitoring

Section 2

Data Quality Monitoring Plan

2.1 Roles and Responsibilities

2.2 HMIS Lead Timelines

2.3 Timelines for Data Quality Reports

2.4 Compliance and Monitoring Frequency

2.5 Data Quality Reports and Outcomes

Section 3

Version Updates:

Section 4

Appendix A: Universal and Program-Specific Data Elements

Exhibit 1: Universal Data Element Collection Summary

Exhibit 4-1 HHS: PATH Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

Exhibit 4-2 HHS: RHY Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

Exhibit 4-3 HUD: CoC Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

Exhibit 4-4 HUD: ESG Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

Exhibit 4-5 VA Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

Section 5

Appendix B: Terms and Definitions

Appendix C: Acronyms

Introduction

All Chicago, known as the Homeless Management Information System Lead Agency (“HMIS Lead”), administers HMIS on behalf of Chicago Continuum of Care (“CoC”), and is governed by the CoC Board of Directors (“BoD”) through the “HMIS Committee”. The CoC is a local body comprised of various stakeholders invested in ending homelessness in Chicago, and may include but is not limited to: nonprofit homeless providers, victim service providers, faith based organizations, local government, businesses, advocates, public housing agencies, school district and city colleges, social service providers, mental health agencies, hospitals, universities, affordable housing developers, law enforcement, organizations that serve homeless and formerly homeless veterans including the Veterans Administration (VA), and homeless and formerly homeless persons and families.

Throughout the CoC, there are certain agencies, usually the service provider agencies that are directly interacting with homeless clients, that actively use and contribute to the HMIS. Any agency with access to the HMIS is required to sign an Agency Partnership agreement and is known as a “participating agency”. Collectively, the HMIS Lead and all participating agencies make up the Chicago HMIS Collaborative (“Collaborative”, “we”, or “us”).

Development Process

The HMIS data quality plan was developed through a collaborative effort across service providers, the Department of Family & Support Services (DFSS), HMIS Lead, and was spearheaded by the Data Quality Steering Committee (DQSC), a subcommittee of the HMIS Committee.

Definition of Data Quality

Data quality is a term that refers to the reliability and validity of client-level data collected in the HMIS. It is measured by the extent to which the client data in the system reflect actual information in the real world. With good data quality, the Chicago CoC can “tell the story” of the population experiencing homelessness. The quality of data is determined by assessing certain characteristics such as timeliness, completeness, and accuracy.

To assess data quality, DQSC has thought about what data quality means to the Chicago implementation and has documented this understanding in this data quality plan.

What is Data Quality Plan?

A data quality plan is a community-level document that facilitates the ability of the Chicago CoC to achieve statistically valid and reliable data. A data quality plan sets expectations for both the community and the end users to capture reliable and valid data on persons accessing the homeless assistance system.

What is a Data Quality Monitoring Plan?

A data quality monitoring plan is a set of procedures that outlines a regular, ongoing process for analyzing and reporting on the reliability and validity of the data entered into the HMIS at both the project and aggregate system levels. A data quality monitoring plan is the primary tool for tracking and generating information necessary to identify areas for data quality improvement.

HMIS Software

The WellSky software product, ServicePoint, has been adopted by the Chicago Continuum of Care (CoC) as the official HMIS for CoC providers. For the purposes of this document, HMIS refers to ServicePoint and all modules, assessments, and reporting capacities, standard or customized, contained therein.

HMIS Help Desk and Knowledge Base

In order to provide support to HMIS projects, the HMIS lead uses the Zendesk customer support ticketing tool for the purposes of tracking and addressing provider issues and concerns. This software also hosts a knowledge base which contains workflow and administrative information for providers to utilize. This suite of services are known to the greater community as the Help Desk and can be found at HMIS.AllChicago.org.

Section 1

The Data Quality Standards for Chicago’s Continuum of Care (CoC) outlined in this plan are applicable to all projects participating in HMIS, with exceptions as noted under each standard. Unless otherwise noted, all participating projects are expected to achieve and maintain the data quality standards; this also includes those projects that are not funded by HUD or other governmental funding bodies.

For the Chicago CoC, the definitions for the different Program Types will follow the Program Models Chart (PMC). Providers are expected to review the PMC to identify the appropriate program for their projects and comply with the requirements outlined in this plan.

1.1 Timeliness

Entering data in a timely manner can reduce human error that occurs when too much time has elapsed between the data collection/service transaction and the data entry. Entering data as close as possible to the incident or activity is also essential to the effectiveness of the Coordinated Entry System (CES). It is important for the By Name List generated from HMIS to have accurate data on individuals and households experiencing homelessness and those who have entered permanent housing.

Data entry is required within two calendar days of event to allow for the appropriate individuals to be added to the By Name List, connected to a Skilled Assessor, or removed from the process of connection to permanent housing as appropriate. This expectation is for the following types of data entry:

When a client is exited from a project in HMIS, they should be exited as of the date they last utilized the bed/services provided by the project. (For example, if a client last received services from a project on 1/10/2019, they should be exited from the project on 1/10/2019, even if the user is doing the data entry on a future date.)


Clients can often disappear from a project for several days or weeks before returning again for services.

This helps ensure clients are not perpetually enrolled in a project in HMIS despite no longer being served, which assists in providing exact locations for clients when trying to house them through Coordinated Entry.
If a client returns to a project, a new Entry record should be created.

One element that falls outside of the two day rule is that of housing move-in dates. Movement into housing at Permanent Housing projects (“Housing Move-in Dates”) should be documented within two business days of the client moving into their unit. This is not applicable to non-permanent housing projects.

For further clarification, if a client enters a project on a Wednesday, the Entry record should be created in HMIS on or before Friday. The time of day the data is created in HMIS is irrelevant.

The complete assessment should be entered as close to the Entry creation as possible. However, the expectations for adding the remaining assessment responses are listed below, with special emphasis on submitting responses to Housing Status and the Chronic Homeless questions (ie. client’s living situation, length of stay, approximate start date of homelessness, etc.) as quickly as possible.

An exception is made for clients born into or joining a family already enrolled in a project. For children joining households, this only applies to children under the age of 18 who are being reunified with their guardian(s), this does not apply to children over the age of 18.  These entry records should be created within one month of the child’s enrollment/birth. 

The acceptable threshold for compliance is 90% for all program types. Every program must follow the timeframe outlined in the plan.

1.2 Completeness

The purpose of completeness is to ensure sufficient data on clients, their demographic characteristics, and service use to facilitate confident reporting and analysis on the extent and characteristics of the homelessness including the following:

1.2.1 All Clients Served

All projects participating in HMIS are required to comply with the data standards. Data entered needs to be valid and accurately represent information on the clients being served.

Universal Data Elements (UDE)

The purpose of the UDEs is to ensure that all service providers participating in the City of Chicago HMIS are documenting the data elements necessary to produce Continuum-wide unduplicated count of clients served. This provides accurate counts for various reporting requirements, including the Annual Performance Report (APR) and the Longitudinal System Analysis (LSA) collected by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) , plus other reporting requirements. This also ensures that the CoC has sufficient client data to conduct basic analysis on the extent and characteristics of the populations they serve.

Providers enter UDEs as part of the Entry Assessment. This assessment is available to users following their submission of the client’s Entry information that includes which Household Members are participating in the program, the Entry Type, and the Entry Date.

As indicated in Section 2.1, Entry Dates and the associated information should be entered within an expected time frame and should accurately reflect the entrance of the client(s) into each project. The Entry Date should be the date the client(s) begin their participation in a program, either their participation in an intake assessment, their receipt of services, their outreach by program staff member, or their receipt of a night of shelter. The Entry Assessment is completed with information obtained at this Entry Date.

Similarly, Providers enter specific Data Elements as a part of the Exit Assessment once the clients have completed and/or left the program. This assessment becomes available to users once they have indicated the household members who are leaving the program, the reason for leaving, the destination, and the Exit Date. The Exit Assessment should be completed on the final day in which the clients receives a service or remain sheltered or housed within a program. Clients with an “unknown” reason for leaving often do not return to the program as expected. These clients should have their Exit information recording as close to their last date of participation in the program as possible and should include information collected on or relevant to the date of the Exit Assessment.

Our community is evaluated regularly by HUD on it’s collection of UDEs. As such, all clients who receive services and have their information entered into HMIS should have complete data for all UDEs. The percentage of all clients served with “null/missing” UDEs or without full and valid responses in the Chicago CoC HMIS should be no higher than 5%.

Program Specific Data Elements (PDEs)

As outlined in the HUD Data standards, which Program Specific Data Elements are required is dictated by the reporting requirements set forth by each Federal partner for each of their projects. For the purposes of consistency, elements in the Entry Assessment are required for all projects participating in HMIS in Chicago. This is to ensure all service providers participating in the City of Chicago HMIS are documenting the data elements necessary to produce the Annual Performance Report, the HUD CoC Outcome Measures, and to ensure the CoC has sufficient client data to conduct analysis on the extent and characteristics of the populations they serve.

All PDEs in the Entry Assessment as listed below are to be entered for all clients served.

  1. Housing Status
  2. Income and Sources
  3. Non-cash benefits
  4. Disability type
  5. Domestic Violence
  6. Health Insurance

Please refer to Exhibit 1.3 in Appendix A for a listing of all PDEs. Note that elements 3 through 8 are drop-down options for disability type in the Disability sub-assessment.

The percentage of all client served with null/missing PDEs as listed in the Entry Assessments or without full and valid responses in the Chicago CoC HMIS should be no higher than 5%.

Exception: The Homelessness Prevention Call Center (HPCC) currently enters data in a HPCC customized assessment. HPCC is required to only be in compliance with the UDEs.

1.2.2 Bed/Unit Utilization Rates

One of the primary features of an HMIS is the ability to record the number of client stays or bed nights at a homeless residential facility. Case managers or shelter staff enter a client into HMIS and will be trained to assign the clients to a bed and/or a unit. The client remains there until he or she exits the program. When the client exits the program, he or she is also exited from the bed or unit in HMIS.

Low utilization rates could indicate that the residential facility was not very full, but it could also mean the HMIS data elements are not being entered for every client served. High utilization rates could mean the bed provider was over capacity, but it could also mean the program staff have not properly exited clients from the system.

The utilization rate is determined by comparing the amount of clients entered into the project versus what the project’s unit and bed inventory.

Acceptable range of bed/unit utilization rates:

1.3 Data Accuracy and Consistency

The purpose of accuracy is to ensure that the data in the City of Chicago HMIS are the best possible representation of reality as it relates to homeless persons and the programs that serve them.

Staff entering information into the HMIS database must enter information as stated by the client. Every project must enter data on clients in the same way over time, regardless of which staff person is recording the data in HMIS. Recording inaccurate information is strictly prohibited.

1.3.1 Consistency

To ensure that data collected and entered into HMIS are consistent across all projects:

  1. Every HMIS user will have to complete a new user training on the system, policies, procedures, and protocols prior to receiving access to the system. Current users are required to take an annual recertification course. .
  2. A standardized intake assessment as specified by the HMIS Lead must be used by all providers to collect data in a consistent manner.
  3. New agencies that join the CoC are required to review and understand all policies and procedures including data quality requirements.
  4. Providers will make every effort to record accurate data.

1.3.2 Anonymous and Naming Conventions:

Providers will comply with all applicable federal and state laws regarding protection of client privacy.

Entering anonymous clients impacts an accurate aggregate count of client information in Continuum-wide reports. Anonymous entry of clients will not be allowed into the Chicago CoC database. In lieu of creating an anonymous record for a client, providers can instead lock that client’s record in order to adhere to a client’s privacy preference.

1.4 Data Plan Monitoring

The Chicago Continuum of Care (CoC) recognizes that data from HMIS are critical to meet the reporting and compliance requirements of individual agencies and the CoC as a whole.

To ensure that all projects are in compliance with the requirements and expectations outlined in this plan, the Data Quality Steering Committee will monitor the process on a quarterly basis to identify and resolve any issues that affect the timeliness, completeness and the accuracy of data. The results will also be shared with the HMIS Committee and All Chicago on a quarterly basis. All monitoring will be done in accordance with the Data Quality Monitoring Plan.

Section 2

Data Quality Monitoring Plan

The Data Quality Monitoring Plan entails a set of procedures that outlines a regular, ongoing process for analyzing and reporting on the reliability and validity of the data entered into the HMIS at both the project and aggregate system levels. This plan serves as the primary tool for tracking and improving data quality for the Chicago continuum.

The following sections are covered under this monitoring plan:

  1. Roles and Responsibilities
  2. HMIS Lead Timelines
  3. Timelines for Data Quality reports
  4. Compliance and Monitoring frequency
  5. Data Quality Reports and Outcomes

2.1 Roles and Responsibilities

HMIS Committee: The HMIS Committee provides authorization for, and oversight of, the Data Quality Steering Committee. They will support the efforts of the Committee by enforcing the incentives described in the data quality plan.

Data Quality Steering Committee: The Committee—a sub-committee of the HMIS Committee—is responsible for the oversight of the HMIS Lead for data quality. They will review data quality reports, work with the HMIS Lead to identify steps necessary to correct data/data collection levels and to identify training needs, review the benchmark and goals spreadsheets, and report progress to the HMIS Committee and All Chicago.

Contributing HMIS Organizations: Providers are responsible for entering and correcting client data. It is the Agency Technical Administrator (ATA)’s role to oversee the process. It is recommended that each project run data quality reports on a monthly basis to meet the required HUD benchmarks. The CEO/Executive Director is ultimately responsible for all activity associated with agency staff access to and use of HMIS.

2.2 HMIS Lead Timelines

It is the responsibility of the HMIS Lead to submit two important reports on behalf of the Chicago Continuum of Care (CoC)

  1. Longitudinal System Analysis (LSA): The LSA contains the data used to write the Annual Homeless Assessment Report. LSA data can also be used to support other purposes.  The period for the LSA begins on October 1 and ends on September 30 of the following year.
  2. CoC Annual Performance Report (APR): The HMIS Lead is to submit a CoC APR annually at the end of the HUD grant period. The HUD grant each year begins on May 1 and ends on April 30 of the following year

All data quality reports will follow the above HUD reporting timelines to achieve compliance, completeness and accuracy of data for submission.

2.3 Timelines for Data Quality Reports

While it is highly recommended that every project run the reports on a monthly basis, each of the projects are required to be in compliance and submit the results of the reports to the HMIS Lead on a quarterly basis. Specific timeliness and guidelines for submission will be communicated each quarter to the ATAs. The data quality process will be administered four times annually, generally during the months of January, April, July and October.

2.4 Compliance and Monitoring Frequency

It is the responsibility of the Agency’s CEO and/or Executive Director along with the staff to ensure compliance with all data quality requirements and will be notified if their program does not meet any or all of the requirements. The Committee and the staff understands that imposing multiple changes and expecting providers to comply with the changes can be challenging. Providers may be allowed to work on an alternative timeline for compliance if such challenges are communicated to the Lead in a timely manner.

Approval of such requests to work on an alternative timeline will be made on a case by case basis and communicated by the Lead. To ensure integrity, the Committee will provide oversight and monitor these requests on a quarterly basis.

For all HUD-funded projects, lack of compliance with data quality requirements may result in forfeiting points in the annual local NOFA Evaluation Instrument, as determined annually by HUD McKinney Vento (HMV) Committee. Similar negative impact may occur on DFSS evaluations and grants which requires the use of HMIS reporting. If, for unforeseen reasons, data issues arise during important reporting periods (such as AHAR, CoC Competition etc.), it will be the agency’s responsibility to determine an alternative plan to ensure data are entered and corrected in the system to meet reporting deadlines and be in compliance.

2.5 Data Quality Reports and Outcomes

HUD requires as a part of the data quality plan that a set of standard reports be created. For the Chicago CoC, there will be standard reports for all Program Types and some Program Type specific reports. Report details along with submission criteria and deadlines will be communicated every quarter by the Lead to the ATA. All reports will comply with the HUD Data Standards and their requirements.

Section 3

Version Updates:

Version No

Revised Section # :

Revised Date:

Revised By:

Comments, if any

1.1

Apendix A

08.04.2014

HMIS Lead

Changes to the Appendix tables and verbiage to align with the new HUD Data Technical Standards

2014.

1.1

2.2

08.04.2014

HMIS Lead

Added verbiage to align with the new ES and IH workflow with the use of ShelterPoint and SkanPoint.

1.2 & 1.3

Section 2

11.12.2014

HMIS Lead

Reviewed and approved by the DQSC Committee, verbiage changes to the DQ Monitoring Plan section

1.4

11.19.2014

Changes approved by the HMIS Committee.

1.5

2.1

08.12.2015

HMIS Lead

Data Quality Steering Committee recommends changing Timeliness thresholds from 48 to 72 hours (ES and IH) and from “1 week (5 business days)” to “7 days”; recommendation for changes approved by the HMIS Committee.

1.6

1, 2.1, 2.2.1, 3.4, Appendix A

08.09.2017

HMIS Lead

Branding and committee names were updated. Data Quality Steering Committee recommends changing timeliness thresholds to 2 days for all project types to create a client entry, keeping the thresholds for entering the remaining assessment information the same. Added language regarding a month timeline for clients born during family project enrollment. UDE and PDE tables in Appendix A were updated. Included language on Data Issues and unknown/client refusal to respond.

1.7

General Heading Structure, 1.1 (Timeliness), 1.2 (Completeness), 1.2.1 (All Clients Served), 1.2.2 (Bed/Unit Utilization Rates), 1.3.2 (Anonymous and Naming Conventions), 2.2 (HMIS Lead Timelines), 2.4 (Compliance and Monitoring Frequency), 3.6 (Incentives), 5 (Appendix B),

04.08.2019

HMIS Lead

The section headers for the plan were altered to start numbering after the introductory paragraphs.

Timeliness and Completeness sections were expanded for further clarification and guidance. Additionally, timeliness for housing move-in dates was added.

Language in the UDE section was updated to reflect the submission of the LSA instead of the AHAR.

The bed utilization rates for Interim Housing was removed as these projects fall into ES or TH in the system.

Language was removed from the section addressing Anonymous and Naming Conventions as we no longer host any clients who are anonymous in our system.

Language was added to the section on HMIS Lead Timelines to reflect the updated LSA process (removing mentions of the now deprecated AHAR process)

Redundant sections on Timeliness and Data Completeness and Accuracy were deleted as the majority of that content was consolidated earlier in the document.

A section on incentives was removed.

Several charts in Section 4 are updated to reflect collection of housing move-in dates.

1.7.1

Introduction, Appendix A, Appendix B, Creation of Appendix C

5/3/2018

HMIS Lead

Added clarification regarding the HMIS Help Desk in the introduction.

Added an acronym guide in the newly added Appendix C.

Replaced all Exhibits in Appendix A to reflect HUD’s 2018 data collection standards with links to their corresponding manuals.


Section 4

Appendix A: Universal and Program-Specific Data Elements

Exhibit 1: Universal Data Element Collection Summary

Data Element

Data Collected For

When the Data Is Collected

All Clients

HoH Only

HoH and Other Adults

Adult Clients Only

Record Creation

Project Start

At Occurrence

At Update

Annual Assessment

At Exit

3.1 Name

X

X

3.2 Social Security Number

X

X

3.3 Date of Birth

X

X

3.4 Race

X

X

3.5 Ethnicity

X

X

3.6 Gender

X

X

3.7 Veteran Status

X

X

3.8 Disabling Condition

X

X

3.10 Project Start Date

X

X

3.11 Project Exit Date

X

X

3.12 Destination

X

X

3.15 Relationship to Head of Household

X

X

3.16 Client Location

X

X

X (at time the client's location changes from one CoC to another, if applicable)

3.20 Housing Move-in Date

X

X (at time of move-in to PH, if applicable)

3.917 Living Situation

X

X

Further information regarding the universal data elements can be found in the 2017 HMIS Data Standards Manual - Version 1.3, April 2018

Exhibit 4-1 HHS: PATH Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

All PATH projects are required to collect all of the Universal Data Elements and the relevant Program Specific Data Elements. These elements should be collected for every member of the household.

The Program-Specific Data Elements to be collected by each PATH project are as shown below:

X = data collection required

∆ = data collection is not required but encouraged

Data Element

Street Outreach

Services Only

4.2 Income and Sources

X

X

4.3 Non-Cash Benefits

X

X

4.4 Health Insurance

X

X

4.5 Physical Disability

X

X

4.6 Developmental Disability

X

X

4.7 Chronic Health Condition

X

X

4.8 HIV/AIDS

4.9 Mental Health Problem

X

X

4.10 Substance Abuse

X

X

4.12 Contact

X

X

4.13 Date of Engagement

X

X

P1 Service Provided - PATH

X

X

P2 Referrals Provided - PATH

X

X

P3 PATH Status

X

X

P4 Connection with SOAR

X

X

Further information regarding the PATH program specific data elements can be found on page 11 of the PATH Program HMIS Manual.



Exhibit 4-2 HHS: RHY Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

Within HMIS, different funding sources and projects require collection of different program specific information. The Program Specific Data Elements are elements that are designed and managed by at least one of the HMIS federal partner programs. Some of program specific data elements are collected across most federal partner programs; these are called “Common” Program Specific Data Elements. The Common Elements used by RHY-funded projects are elements 4.2-4.13. These elements should be collected for every member of the household.

The table below shows all program specific elements in which at least one RHY program component is required to collect information.

X = data collection required


Data Element

BCP-es

BCP-p

MGH

SOP

TLP

DEMO

4.2 Income and Sources

X

X

X

4.3 Non-Cash Benefits

X

X

X

X

X

4.4 Health Insurance

X

X

X

X

X

X

4.5 Physical Disability

X

X

X

X

X

X

4.6 Developmental Disability

X

X

X

X

X

X

4.7 Chronic Health Condition

X

X

X

X

X

X

4.9 Mental Health Problem

X

X

X

X

X

X

4.10 Substance Abuse

X

X

X

X

X

X

4.12 Contact

X

4.13 Date of Engagement

X

R1 Referral Source

X

X

X

X

X

R2 RHY: BCP Status

X

X

R3 Sexual Orientation

X

X

X

X

X

X

R4 Last Grade Completed

X

X

X

X

X

R5 School Status

X

X

X

X

X

R6 Employment Status

X

X

X

X

X

R7 General Health Status

X

X

X

X

X

R8 Dental Health Status

X

X

X

X

X

R9 Mental Health Status

X

X

X

X

X

R10 Pregnancy Status

X

X

X

X

X

X

R11 Formerly a Ward of Child Welfare/Foster Care Agency

X

X

X

X

X

R12 Formerly a Ward of Juvenile Justice System

X

X

X

X

X

R13 Family Critical Issues

X

X

X

X

X

R14 RHY Service Connections

X

X

X

X

X

R15 Commercial Sexual Exploitation/Sex Trafficking

X

X

X

X

X

X

R16 Labor Trafficking

X

X

X

X

X

X

R17 Project Completion Status

X

X

X

X

R18 Counseling

X

X

X

X

X

R19 Safe and Appropriate Exit

X

X

X

X

R20 Aftercare

X

X

X

X

X

Further information regarding the RHY program specific data elements can be found on page 21 of the RHY Program HMIS Manual.

Exhibit 4-3 HUD: CoC Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

Common data elements are collected by most projects funded by a federal partner. CoC funded projects must collect most of the common data elements and are necessary to generate the Annual Performance Report. These elements should be collected for every member of the household.

The following chart indicates which elements are required for each of the CoC components:

X = data collection is required

CES = data collection is determined by how the CoC has structured the coordinated entry system in their area. Placement of the element would be required for any project that is conducting an assessment for the coordinated entry system. This may be across multiple projects or sited in a central access point or coordinated intake center.

Data Element

Homelessness

Permanent

Rapid

Supportive Services

Transitional

4.2 Income and Sources

x

x

x

x

x

4.3 Non-Cash Benefits

x

x

x

x

x

4.4 Health Insurance

x

x

x

x

x

4.5 Physical Disability

x

x

x

x

x

4.6 Developmental Disability

x

x

x

x

x

4.7 Chronic Health Condition

x

x

x

x

x

4.8 HIV/AIDS

x

x

x

x

x

4.9 Mental Health Problem

x

x

x

x

x

4.10 Substance Abuse

x

x

x

x

x

4.11 Domestic Violence

x

x

x

x

x

4.12 Contact

Only for SSO-Street Outreach

4.13 Date of Engagement

Only for SSO-Street Outreach

4.18 Housing Assessment Disposition

CES

CES

CES

CES

CES

W5 Housing Assessment at Exit

x

Further information regarding the CoC program specific data elements can be found on page 12 in the CoC HMIS Program Manual.

Exhibit 4-4 HUD: ESG Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

Common elements are data collected by most projects funded by one of the federal partners. The following chart indicates which elements are required for collection for each of the ESG component types. These elements should be collected for every member of the household.

ESG projects must collect data according to the chart below to generate the CSV-CAPER Report.

X = data collection is required

CES = data collection is determined by how the CoC has structured the coordinated entry system in their area. Placement of the element would be required for any project that is conducting an assessment for the coordinated entry system. This may be across multiple projects or sited in a central access point or coordinated intake center.

Data Element

ES Entry/Exit

ES Night by Night

Homelessness Prevention

RRH

Street Outreach

4.2 Income and Sources

x

x

x

x

4.3 Non-Cash Benefits

x

x

x

x

4.4 Health Insurance

x

x

x

x

4.5 Physical Disability

x

x

x

x

x

4.6 Developmental Disability

x

x

x

x

x

4.7 Chronic Health Condition

x

x

x

x

x

4.8 HIV/AIDS

x

x

x

x

x

4.9 Mental Health Problem

x

x

x

x

x

4.10 Substance Abuse

x

x

x

x

x

4.11 Domestic Violence

x

x

x

x

x

4.12 Contact

x

x

4.13 Date of Engagement

x

x

4.14 Bed Night

x

4.18 Housing Assessment Disposition

CES

CES

CES

CES

CES

W5 Housing Assessment at Exit

x

Further information regarding the ESG program specific data elements can be found on page 13 of the ESG Program HMIS Manual.

Exhibit 4-5 VA Program Specific Element Visibility – Collection Requirements

All VA-funded projects participating in HMIS are required to collect and enter Universal Data Elements and relevant Program-Specific Data Elements. These elements should be collected for every member of the household. The Program Specific Data Elements to be collected by each VA- funded project are shown below:

X = data collection is required

O = Data collection optional at the discretion of grantee

Data Element

SSVF: RRH

SSVF: HP

HCHV: CRS EH/SH

GPD:All

3.1-3.917 Universal Data Elements

X

X

X

X

4.2 Income and Sources

X

X

X

X

4.3 Non-Cash Benefits

X

X

X

X

4.4 Health Insurance

X

X

X

X

4.5 Physical Disability

X

X

4.6 Developmental Disability

X

X

4.7 Chronic Health Condition

X

X

4.8 HIV/AIDS

X

X

4.9 Mental Health Problem

X

X

4.10 Substance Abuse

X

X

4.11 Domestic Violence

X

X

V1 Veteran’s Information

X

X

X

X

V2 Services Provided – SSVF

X

X

O

O

V3 Financial Assistance – SSVF

X

X

V4 Percent of AMI (SSVF Eligibility)

X

X

V5 Last Permanent Address

X

X

V6 VMAC Station Number

X

X

V7 SSVF HP Targeting Criteria

X

P4 Connection with SOAR

X

X

R4 Last Grade Completed

X

X

R6 Employment Status

X

X

Further information regarding the VA program specific data elements can be found on page 11 of the VA Program HMIS Manual.

Section 5

Appendix B: Terms and Definitions

By-Name List, also known as the One List – A real-time catalog of the names of existing clients within the homeless prevention system, the By-Name List is an important tool for coordinated entry as it supplements other tools used to track homelessness (such as the Point-in-Time count), aids in assessing existing clients’ needs, and helps in tracking individuals’ entry into and exit out of the homeless prevention system.

Coordinated Entry System – Chicago’s Coordinated Entry System serves as a front door to connect people facing homelessness to housing and supports in an accessible, equitable, transparent manner. This allows all partners in the Chicago Continuum of Care to collaborate to improve access and outcomes for people without permanent housing while delivering trauma informed services

Data Quality Benchmarks – Quantitative measures used to assess the validity and reliability of the data. These include measures for timeliness, completeness and accuracy.

Data Quality Monitoring Plan  A set of procedures that outlines a regular, on-going process for analyzing and reporting on the reliability and validity of the data entered into the HMIS at both the program and aggregate system levels. A data quality monitoring plan is the primary tool for tracking and generating information necessary to identify areas for data quality improvement.

Data Quality Plan – A community-level document that facilitates the ability of a CoC to achieve statistically valid and reliable data. A data quality plan is generally developed by the HMIS Lead Agency with input from community stakeholders, and is formally adopted by the CoC. At a minimum, the plan should:

Data Quality Standards – A national framework for ensuring that every Continuum of Care can achieve good quality HMIS data. It is anticipated that HUD will propose Data Quality Standards that 1) establishes administrative requirements and, 2) sets baseline data quality benchmarks for timeliness, completeness, and accuracy.

Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) – A Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) is the information system designated by a local Continuum of Care (CoC)to comply with the requirements of CoC Program interim rule 24 CFR 578. It is a locally-administered data system used to record and analyze client, service and housing data for individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

HMIS Data Quality – Refers to the reliability and validity of client-level data. HMIS data quality can be measured by the extent to which the client data in the system reflects actual information in the real world.

HMIS Reports

Program Specific Data Elements (PDEs) – Program Specific Data Elements differ from the Universal Data Elements in that no one project must collect every single element in this section. Which data elements are required is dictated by the reporting requirements set forth by each Federal partner for each of their programs. A Partner may require all of the fields or response categories in a data element or may specify which of the fields or response categories are required for their report.

Project Descriptor Data Elements (PDDE) – Project Descriptor Data Elements (PDDE) are completed within the HMIS for each project that is able to enter data into the HMIS. The PDDEs include information used to identify each organization using the HMIS and all of the projects associated with an organization.

Universal Data Elements (UDEs) – HMIS Universal Data Elements are elements required to be collected by all projects participating in HMIS, regardless of funding source. UDE’s establish the baseline data collection requirements for all contributing CoC projects. They are the basis for producing unduplicated estimates of the number of persons experiencing homelessness, accessing services from homeless assistance projects, basic demographic characteristics of persons experiencing homeless, and patterns of service use, including information on shelter stays and homelessness over time.


Appendix C: Acronyms

Acronyms

AHAR – Annual Homeless Assessment Report

HP – Homelessness Prevention

AIRS – Alliance of Information and Referral Systems

HPCC – Homeless Prevention Call Center

APR – Annual Performance Report

HUD – Housing and Urban Development

ATA – Agency Technical Administrator

LSA – Longitudinal System Analysis

BCP – Basic Center Program

MGH – Maternity Group Homes for Pregnant and Parenting Youth

BCP-es – Basic Center Program - Emergency Shelter

NOFA – Notice of Funding Availability PIT - Point in Time

BCP-p – Basic Center Program - Homelessness Prevention

PATH - Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness

CAPER – Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report

PDDE – Project Descriptor Data Element

CDBG – Community Development Block Grant CoC - Continuum of Care

PDE – Program Specific Data Element

CES – Coordinated Entry System

PPI – Personal Protected Information

CH – Chronically Homeless

PSH – Permanent Supportive Housing

CoC – Continuum of Care

RHY – Runaway and Homeless Youth

CRS – Contract Residential Services

ROI – Release of Information

DEMO – Demonstration Grants

RRH – Rapid Re-Housing

DOB – Date of Birth

SH – Safe Haven

DQSC – Data Quality Sub-Committee

SHP – Supportive Housing Program

DV – Domestic Violence

SOP – Street Outreach Program

ES – Emergency Shelter

SRO – Single Room Occupancy

ESG – Emergency Solutions Grant

SSI – Supplemental Security Income

EVHI – Ending Veteran Homelessness Initiative

SSN – Social Security Number

GPD – Grant and Per Diem

SSO – Supportive Services Only

HCHV – Healthcare for homeless veterans

SSVF – Supportive Services for Veteran Families

HMIS – Homeless Management Information System

TANF – Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

HoH – Head of Household

TLP – Transitional Living Program

Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing HIPAA - Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996

UDE – Universal Data Element

HOPWA – Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS

VASH – Veteran Affairs Supportive Housing

Chicago HMIS Data Quality Plan