English/Language Arts 10                                                                                         Page  of

Units:

Unit 1 - Ourselves and Others

Unit 2 - Responses to Change

Unit 3 - How We See Things

Unit 4 - Absolute Power

Unit 5 - Hard Won Liberty & Dystopian Literature



Unit Title

Unit 1 - Ourselves and Others

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

“We, as human beings, must be willing to accept people who are different from ourselves.”-Barbara Jordan

 In this unit, students will be examining topics such as society, community, tolerance, and acceptance by closely analyzing narrative, informational, documentaries, and seminal texts. Students will use informational texts, selections for the unit, as well as, literature circle books to create both personal and world inquiry based questions. The inquiry based essay as well as argumentative writing will be the focused writing for this unit.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How do our relationships with other people shape who we are?

  • How do we accept others who are different from ourselves?
  • What is cultural identity and how does my culture influence identity?
  • How do visions and elements of culture influence my life?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • how and why we interact in certain ways with other people-family, enemies, neighbors, strangers, and those with whom we disagree.
  • You are a product of your time and culture. The year you were born, the places you've lived, the people in your life—all these things affect the person you become.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • Story elements and complex characters, theme, tone, structure, character motivation, and word choice.
  • Media Analysis
  • Vocabulary in Context
  • Historical documents
  • Speeches
  • Steps involved in creating an inquiry based essay and implementation of these steps into an essay.
  • Author’s Purpose.
  • Elements of an inquiry based/ argumentative essay such as a claim, reasons, evidence, etc...

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Analyze and make inferences about the characters motivations and the themes of a story using textual evidence.
  • Analyze impact of cultural background on point of view.
  • Analyze a writer’s choices in terms of pacing, word choice, tone, and mood.
  • Support inferences about theme.
  • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view.
  • Describe and evaluate the author’s claim by assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient.
  • Analyze and reflect on the practical knowledge and historical context in documents of historical and literary significance.
  •  Analyze a Supreme Court opinion.
  • Compare tone in two texts by analyzing the impact of word choice.
  • Cite evidence used to make inferences.
  • Conduct an inquiry based essay that will answer a self-generated question; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely and logically.
  • Make strategic use of digital media in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence to add interest.
  •  Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases.
  •  Engage effectively in collaborative discussions.
  •  Write a mini- argumentative essay.
  • Compose an original question and write an inquiry based essay.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Placemat activity
  • Graphic organizers
  • Analyzing text questions
  • Journal writing
  • Blogging
  • Flipgrid
  • Quizzes

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Inquiry Based Essay
  • Argumentative Essay (Focus on certain argumentative elements)
  • Unit Based Test (The Lottery)
  • Benchmark Assessment I

Alternative Assessments

After researching about cultural identity and how it influences the way we view the world,  create an in-depth inquiry based project/collage created from a self-generated question(s) that explains how we interact a certain away with people . What conclusions or implications can you draw? Cite at least 3 different sources such as informational articles, excerpts from Collections, while  pointing out key elements from each source. In your collage, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of our research topic. Identify any gaps or unanswered questions.

Alternate Assignment can be done using Capzles, Mural.ly, Padlet, Smore, Thinglink, or VoiceThread etc…

Learning Activities

Short Stories/Speech/Media Analysis:

  • Read short stories and/or listen to audio of text.
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Character Motivations (Goldfish) Tone/Mood (The Lottery) (Use Google Map, Mindmapping or Padlet CRP11
  • Collaborative Discussions CRP12 & Cooperative Group work (Placemats etc..,)
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing through YouthVoices.live and Flipgrid, blogging CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word SPlash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed.
  • Writing Activity: Passage Link & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.12.A.2 CRP2
  • Close reading screencasts and modeled discussions
  • Level Up Tutorials
  • Writing Activity: (“The Lottery”): Editorial: Write your own letter following these steps: 1 Support your explanation of your reaction and interpretation with specific evidence from the story.  2. Conclude by relating what you have discussed to the broader issue of whether the story should have been published?

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Informational Texts:

  • Read informational texts/views accompanying videos/listen to audio of text.
  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Creative tasks, Journal writing through YouthVoices.live and Flipgrid, blogging CRP4
  • Student created graphic organizers: Author’s Purpose & Point Of View, Citing Evidence, Word Choice/Tone, Rhetoric, Central Idea/Details (Google Apps, YouthVoices.live, flipgrid)
  • Collaborative Discussion CRP12 & Cooperative Group Work (ex. Placemats)
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word SPlash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed.
  • Writing Activity The Supreme Court determines whether official actions follow the Constitution. In texas v. Johnson, the court’s ruling centered on the First Amendment. Compare ideas/tone in the decisions and the amendment.  (Provide First Amendment excerpt pg. 17) Identify concepts that are discussed in both documents. In a paragraph decide which side of the arguments is more effective. Provide examples from the texts.
  • Speaking Activity: Argument (My So-Called Enemy) CRP4, CRP8 Do you think that face-to-face interactions can help resolve conflicts? Prepare to discuss ideas with a small group and debate. Groupings will be based on blog comments in Flipgrid/Youthvoices.live. Deliver your argument in a short speech in small groups and then discuss.

Writing:

  • Inquiry Based Essay/ Media Project
  • Compose an inquiry based research essay by developing inquiry questions, refining inquiry questions into research topics, exploring research databases and various other sources related to the research topic, determining credibility related to research information, and synthesizing information related to research question.
  • Mini-Lessons & Use of Mentor Texts
  • Complete an outline, and rough and final drafts utilizing Google docs to conduct peer editing and teacher-led editing sessions
  • Compose essay on topic of choice
  • Resource: *Kelly Gallagher’s Write Like This

Transcript and TED Talk Sheikha Al Mayassa’s Globalizing the Local, Localizing The Global

http://resources.cowin.com/writingrewired

Katie Soe’s “The Great Cultural Divide: Multi-ethnic Teens Struggle With Self-Identity, Others Perceptions”

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Short Story by Etgar Keret, Translated by Nathan Englander, “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?”

Short Story by Ursula K. Le Guin, “The Wife’s Story”

Short Story by Andrea Dubus, “The Fat Girl”                      

Short Story by Shirley Jackson, “The Lottery”

 

Poem by Diane Glancy, “Without Title”

 

Movie Trailer from a Film Directed by Lisa Gossels, “My So-Called Enemy”

 

Court Opinion by William J. Brennan, from Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion

(*Due to text complexity and high Lexile, teachers should be prepared to use differentiation/modification strategies as needed.)

Editorial by Ronald J. Allen, “American Flag Stands for Tolerance”

 

From The Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the UN Commission on Human Rights

From Towards a True Refuge, by Aung San Suu Kyi

 

Transcript and TED Talk Sheikha Al Mayassa’s “Globalizing the Local, Localizing The Global”

Katie Soe’s “The Great Cultural Divide: Multi-ethnic Teens Struggle With Self-Identity, Others Perceptions”

Literature Circle Book Options:

  • The Help- Kathryn Stockett
  • All We Have Left- Wendy Mills
  • The Lines We Cross- Randa Abdel-Fattah
  • Don't Eat This Book - Morgan Spurlock
  • Marcelo in the Real World - Francisco X. Stork
  • Sold - Patricia McCormick
  • The Serpent King- Jeff Zentner
  • Everything I Never Told You- Celeste Ng
  • SlumDog Millionaire- Vikas Swarup
  • The Glass Castle- Jeannette Walls

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazine, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180448-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-10

https://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2015/dec/02/how-well-do-you-really-know-your-country-take-our-quiz

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/25/protest-symbols-2014_n_6297818.html?

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-rural-americans-poll-urban-divide-20170617-story.html

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. 

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RI.9-10.3:                                                         

  • Understand the relationship between a series of ideas or events that are connected
  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of how a series of ideas or events are connected and contribute to meaning
  • Analyze how the author presents the ideas or events and how the ideas are introduced, sequenced, and developed to contribute to the overall purpose of the text
  • Identify and analyze word choice  that comprise a series of events or ideas and how these key words advance the tension or events

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

RI.9-10.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view or purpose.

RL.9-10.6:

  • Recognize and understand a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text from outside the United States
  • Read multiple texts from world literature
  • Analyze how a particular point of view or cultural experience is reflected in a text
  • Analyze how culture impacts a particular point of view

RI.9-10.6:

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance the purpose
  • Identify rhetorical devices and text structures that advance the purpose of the piece

RI.9-10.8. Describe and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning an author uses is logical/ legitimate and if the evidence that is used is relevant to the argument or provides enough proof
  • Pinpoint any statements that are false and judge if any of the author’s reasoning is misleading.
  • Understand what a reliable source is and what makes one questionable

RI.9-10.9. Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) documents of historical and literary significance, (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, etc.), including how they relate in terms of themes and significant concepts.

  • Study and evaluate influential U.S. documents
  • Evaluate the theme and significant concepts as these are relevant to the historical context and background knowledge

W.9-10.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.9-10.1.A. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

W.9-10.1.B. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims avoiding common logical fallacies, propaganda devices, and using sound reasoning, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

W.9-10.1.C. Use transitions (e.g. words, phrases, clauses) to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

W.9-10.1.D. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.9-10.1.E. Provide a concluding paragraph or section that supports the argument presented.

  • Understand how much evidence is needed to satisfactorily support a point
  • Learn how to introduce argument(s) clearly and accurately with regard to counterclaims
  • Structure arguments so that there is an association and correlation between the claim(s), counterclaim(s), reasons, and evidence
  • Treat claims and counterclaims equitably taking into account what their audience knows as well as what concerns they might have
  • Develop unity and consistency in the essay  with words and structure, paying attention to the relationships created between the claims, counterclaims, evidence, and reason
  • Maintain an appropriate style and tone for the task – omitting personal bias
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding statement that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Determine how many facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information are needed        
  • Use text evidence to develop analysis and enhance content of argument

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.7. (Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally), evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

  • Listen to and evaluate multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media
  • Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source

SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any false reasoning or distorted evidence.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Identify false statements or evidence, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Move from passive listener to active participant

SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically. The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

  • Formulate a clear and concise perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.9-10.5.  Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.9-10.6.  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

  • Adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose
  • Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English as necessary

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

L.9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media: Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme through a short film clip.

History: Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers, including a Supreme Court decision.

(See Resource List.)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.12.F.1 Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel



Unit Title

Unit 2 - Responses to Change

Timeframe 

6 weeks

Unit Summary

“When the wind of change blows, some build walls, while others build windmills.”- Chinese Proverb

 In this unit, students will be examining topic that change is inevitable; how we respond to it reveals who we are.  Students will focus on citing text evidence to support inferences, analyzing representations in different mediums, using cause-and-effect to make connections. They will also be analyzing language and making inferences about the theme of a poem, analyzing the development of ideas in a documentary and multiple genres of texts in both fiction and nonfiction. Students will be applying language conventions in writing in this unit.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What are the ways in which people either do or do not adapt to change?
  • Why are people resistant to change?
  • What are the positive and negative aspects of change?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • change is inevitable; how we respond to it reveals who we are.
  • There are positive and negative aspects of change. People either do or do not adapt to change.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • Poetry analysis
  • Story elements and complex characters, theme, tone, structure, character motivation, and word choice.
  • Central ideas of texts and cause and effect relationships
  • Vocabulary in context
  • Media and science writing analysis
  • Author’s purpose

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Accurately cite strong and thorough text evidence to support inferences (specifically about characters/theme)
  • Analyze representations in different mediums
  • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed
  • Produce written reflections; practice writing in a myriad of situations
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
  • Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner
  • Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in a text
  • Use provided texts to identify and use various types of phrase and clauses
  • Use cause and effect relationships to make connections between ideas and events
  • Write an informative essay
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage, standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Placemat activity
  • Graphic organizers
  • Analyzing text questions
  • Journal writing
  • Blogging
  • Flipgrid
  • Quizzes

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Informative Essay
  • Metamorphosis Assessment- focus on POV, characterization, symbolism, and motif, and citing evidence -http://www.learnc.org/lp/pages/3564
  • Benchmark Assessment 2: Includes poetry analysis from pages 188-189 of my.hrw.

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of essay topics

Learning Activities

Short Stories/Media Analysis:

From the Metamorphosis:

Speaking Activity 1: Discussion

What can you infer about the kind of person Gregor is based on how he responds to the change he has undergone?

Describe him based on your inferences and using textual details about his thoughts and actions.

Does being changed into a “horrible vermin”really change Gregor? Why or why not?

Write a summary of your group’s discussion.

Speaking Activity 2: Comparison

How does the graphic novel expand on the ideas in Kafka’s version of The Metamorphosis? Choose one page of the graphic novel to compare with the source text in a short speech.

-Identify the page of the graphic novel that is closest to or furthest from what you visualized as you read the novella. Complete a venn diagram comparing the page you chose with the same part of the written story.

-Explain how Kuper interprets an idea from Kafka’s story and evaluate how effectively the page you chose communicates Kafka’s ideas (Pairs or small groups).

From Rivers and Tides: Media Activity- IMovie

  • Mini lesson on FIlm elements.
  • Take photographs, make video recordings, or organize a collection of existing images of a meaningful change. Record an audio track to accompany your visuals that tells what change they show and how that change is a good metaphor for a specific life change.

Activities (w/Integration of Technology):

  • Read short stories and/or listen to audio of text.
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Character Analysis (Use Google Map, Mindmapping or Padlet CRP11
  • Collaborative Discussions CRP12 & Cooperative Group work (Placemats etc..,)
  • Differentiated Group work: http://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/4-strategies-implementing-learning-stations-classroom/
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed.
  • Writing Activity: Passage Link & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.12.A.2 CRP2
  • Close reading screencasts and modeled discussions
  • Level Up Tutorials

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Informational Texts:

From Simplexity:

Written response: How humans respond in crisis situations. Students will research a current events crisis and use cause and effect to determine the response individuals had during this crisis.

Life After People:

  • Close reading activities
  • Cause and Effect activities
  • View and analyze History Channel Video: “Life After People”

Writing Activity: Informational/Explanatory Essay

Mini-Lessons & Use of Mentor Texts

Complete an outline, and rough and final drafts utilizing Google docs to conduct peer editing and teacher-led editing sessions

Compose essay on topic of choice

Resource: *Kelly Gallagher’s Write Like This

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Novella by Franz Kafka, Translated by David Wyllie, from The Metamorphosis

     (Excerpt in Collections Text, Full version: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/5200/5200-h/5200-h.htm)

     Teaching Ideas:  http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/3564

Graphic Novel by Peter Kuper, from The Metamorphosis

Texts to Pair with The Metamorphosis:

Simply Psychology article by Saul McLeod, “Self-Concept” https://www.commonlit.org/texts/self-concept

Poem by John Dunne, “No Man Is an Island” https://www.commonlit.org/texts/no-man-is-an-island

Poem by Anne Sexton, “The Starry Night”

Painting by Vincent Van Gogh, The Starry Night (Video HISTORY Channel: Vincent Van Gogh: A Stroke of Genius)

Science Writing by Jeffrey Kluger, from Simplexity (recommended for advanced readers based on high Lexile level)

Documentary Film by Thomas Riedelsheimer, from River and Tides

Science Writing by Delores Vasquez, Life After People (Video HISTORY Channel: Life After People)

Literature Circle Books:

Marcelo In The Real World-Francisco X-Stork

The Secret Side Of Empty- Maria E.Andreu

All We Have Left- Wendy Mills

Papertowns- John Green

She, Myself, and I- Emma Young

Outrun The Moon-Stacey Lee

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier- Ishamel Beah

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazines, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180448-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-10

Simply Psychology article by Saul McLeod, “ Self-Concept” http://www.commonlit.org/texts/self-concept

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RI.9-10.3:                                                         

  • Understand the relationship between a series of ideas or events that are connected
  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of how a series of ideas or events are connected and contribute to meaning
  • Analyze how the author presents the ideas or events and how the ideas are introduced, sequenced, and developed to contribute to the overall purpose of the text
  • Identify and analyze word choice  that comprise a series of events or ideas and how these key words advance the tension or events

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

RL.9-10.6:

  • Recognize and understand a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text from outside the United States
  • Read multiple texts from world literature
  • Analyze how a particular point of view or cultural experience is reflected in a text
  • Analyze how culture impacts a particular point of view

RI.9-10.7. Analyze various perspectives as presented in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.

  • Evaluate the similarities and differences between various accounts of a subject are told in multiple different mediums
  • Critically examine how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message

RL.9-10.9. Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

•        Use strong textual support to analyze when an author draws on and then transforms source material (such as a theme or topic) from another text

•        Identify allusions

•        Compare and contrast use of common ideas/topics between texts or allusions within texts

W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2.B. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2.C. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

W.9-10.2.E. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • Develop a strong formal style appropriate for the task
  • Maintain a tone that is free of bias
  • Integrate multimedia when appropriate and effective
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding paragraph or section that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone                        
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Incorporate facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information as needed

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.7. (Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically. The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

  • Formulate a clear and concise perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.9-10.5.  Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.9-10.6.  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

  • Adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose
  • Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English as necessary

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

L.9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media:  Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme by analyzing clips from a documentary film, analyzing literature in graphic novel form, and comparing literature to a painting.

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context, philosophy, and importance of specific texts and writers.

Science:  Students will read and discuss various informational texts relating to scientific reasons for how humans respond to change.

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.12.F.1 Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel



Unit Title

Unit 3 - How We See Things

Timeframe 

6 weeks

Unit Summary

“ The question is not what you look at, but what you see.”- Henry David Thoreau

 In this unit, students will be examining how human beings perceive the world. Students will focus on citing text evidence to support inferences, analyzing representations in different mediums, using cause-and-effect to make connections. They will also be analyzing language and making inferences about the theme of a poem, analyzing the development of ideas in a documentary and multiple genres of texts in both fiction and nonfiction. Students will be applying language conventions in writing in this unit. The focus of writing will be narrative. Honors students will also be composing original responses to past AP tests.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How do we perceive the world around us?
  • Why is it important to recognize that others may perceive the world differently than we do?
  • What influences the way we perceive the world?
  • Why is it difficult for people to adapt to change and to accept both the positive and negative aspects of change?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Our view of the world depends not only on our five senses, but also on technology and surprising insights.
  • People can perceive things differently.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • Poetry analysis
  • Story elements and complex characters, theme, tone, structure/style, character motivation, and word choice
  • Central ideas of texts and how humor is used to portray society’s beliefs/values
  • Vocabulary in context
  • Steps involved in creating a narrative piece and implementation of these steps into a short story
  • Author’s purpose
  • Elements of a literary analysis essay

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Accurately cite strong and thorough text evidence to support inferences (specifically about characters/theme)
  • Analyze representations in different mediums
  • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed
  • Produce written reflections; practice writing in a myriad of situations
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
  • Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner
  • Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in a text
  • Use provided texts to identify and use various types of phrase and clauses
  • Use author’s style, tone, mood etc… to make connections between ideas and events
  • Write an informational piece
  • Write a short literary analysis (Honors: using AP Exam prompts)
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage, standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Placemat activity
  • Graphic organizers
  • Analyzing text questions
  • Journal writing
  • Blogging
  • Flipgrid
  • Quizzes

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Test on Emily Dickinson poems
  • Poetry Multi-media Project (Analysis of student selected poems, song lyrics with student choice of presentation
  • Narrative piece
  • Literary Analysis Essay (Honors)
  • Short project on the senses

Alternative Assessments

  • Student choice of writing topics

Learning Activities

Poetry Analysis:

Poems by Emily Dickinson: “ We grow accustomed to the Dark,” “ Before I got my eye put out,” and others  

Writing Activity: Explore the metaphor of sight in Dickinson’s poems by writing an analytical response. (Collections page 159)

Science Essay:

“Coming To Our Senses” by Neil DeGrasse Tyson (Recommended for honors)

“Whale Sharks Use Geometry to Avoid Sinking” (Recommended for honors)

Speaking Activity: In lines 102-143, Tyson imagines how our world and history might be different if we had been born with the super senses that scientific tools give us. Review this section.

In a small group, discuss how the author presents this idea, inviting the reader to imagine life with super senses. Discuss how this technique helps shape the author’s central idea.

Write a one page summary of the discussion, including all relevant points. CRP4, CRP12.

Short Stories:

“Night Face Up”- Focus on parallel plots and tension, foreshadowing, pace.

    -View History Channel Video: Culture of Art and Death

The Open Window: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-open-window

The Necklace: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-necklace

Storyboard Creation using tech tools-

         -Bitstrip, Storyboardthat, etc…

Writing Activity: Analysis of Night Face Up- A central message or idea that an author wants to communicate through a story is its theme. The theme is usually something about human nature or the human experience. Usually, the theme of the story is not explicitly stated; it is the reader’s job to infer the theme through the analysis of characters, plot, setting, tone, and imagery.

Think about “The Night Face Up”. Write a one-page analysis of the story in which you consider: the theme of the story, how the characters, plot, imagery, tone, and setting help convey the theme. Support your discussion of the story’s theme with the evidence from the text, and write using the conventions of standard English. 8.1.12.A.2 CRP4, CRP8

The Importance Of Being Earnest (Honors Text)

Short response on “Beauty Is…”

Various activities on background of Victorian age, society, morals, and values etc…

Focus on:

Character Analysis, Humor in Writing, Thematic Analysis and Parallel Structure relating to theme.

Exploring a Play as a “work of art”

Activities (w/Integration of Technology):

  • Read short stories and/or listen to audio of text.
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Character Analysis, Parallel Plots/Tension (Use Google Map, Mindmapping or Padlet CRP11
  • Collaborative Discussions CRP12 & Cooperative Group work (Placemats etc.)
  • Differentiated Group work: http://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/4-strategies-implementing-learning-stations-classroom/
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed.
  • Writing Activity: Passage Link & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.12.A.2 CRP2
  • Close reading screencasts and modeled discussions
  • Level Up Tutorials

-------------------------------------------------------------

Writing:

Mini-Lessons & Use of Mentor Texts

Conduct research of topic that presents an original and inspired creation or adaptation CRP7

Complete a narrative outline, and rough and final drafts utilizing Google docs to conduct peer editing and teacher-led editing sessions

Compose essay on topic of choice

Peer Review & Teacher Conferences

Resource: *Kelly Gallagher’s Write Like This

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Poems by Emily Dickinson, “We grow accustomed to the Dark,” “Before I got my eye put out”

Poems by Billy Collins, “The Trouble with Poetry,” “Today”

Short Story by Julio Cortazar, Translated by Paul Blackburn, “The Night Face Up” (Video HISTORY Channel: Culture of Art and Death)

Short Story by Saki, “The Open Window” https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-open-window

Poem by W. H. Auden, “Musee des Beaux Arts”

Painting by Pieter Breughel the Elder, Landscape with the Fall of Icarus

Science Essay by Neil deGrasse Tyson, “Coming to Our Senses” (recommended for advanced readers due to high Lexile; modifications needed)

Math Essay by Ketih Devlin, “The Math Instinct”

Science Writing from ScienceDaily, “Whale Sharks Use Geometry to Avoid Sinking” (recommended for advanced readers due to high Lexile)

Newsela.com Article, “Scanners give scientists pictures of genius: this is your brain on math” Adapted from Scientific American

https://newsela.com/articles/math-brain/id/16674/

Newsela.com Article, “Humans see evidence of alien life on Mars in pictures, or do they?” Adapted from Washington Post

https://newsela.com/articles/brain-tricks/id/12049/

Newsela.com Article, “The Great Dress-Color Debate of 2015” Adapted from Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

https://newsela.com/articles/dress-color/id/7727/

Honors Text: The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazines, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180448-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-10

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RI.9-10.3:                                                         

  • Understand the relationship between a series of ideas or events that are connected
  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of how a series of ideas or events are connected and contribute to meaning
  • Analyze how the author presents the ideas or events and how the ideas are introduced, sequenced, and developed to contribute to the overall purpose of the text
  • Identify and analyze word choice  that comprise a series of events or ideas and how these key words advance the tension or events

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

RL.9-10.6:

  • Recognize and understand a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text from outside the United States
  • Read multiple texts from world literature
  • Analyze how a particular point of view or cultural experience is reflected in a text
  • Analyze how culture impacts a particular point of view

RI.9-10.7. Analyze various perspectives as presented in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.

RI.9-10.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view or purpose.

RL.9-10.6:

  • Recognize and understand a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text from outside the United States
  • Read multiple texts from world literature
  • Analyze how a particular point of view or cultural experience is reflected in a text
  • Analyze how culture impacts a particular point of view

RI.9-10.6:

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance the purpose
  • Identify rhetorical devices and text structures that advance the purpose of the piece

RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each work (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

  • Evaluate the similarities and differences between various accounts of a subject are told in multiple different mediums
  • Critically examine how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message

(Honors) W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2.B. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2.C. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

W.9-10.2.E. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • Develop a strong formal style appropriate for the task
  • Maintain a tone that is free of bias
  • Integrate multimedia when appropriate and effective
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding paragraph or section that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone                        
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Incorporate facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information as needed

W.9-10.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.9-10.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.9-10.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.9-10.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent, complete, and comprehensive piece.

W.9-10.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.9-10.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

•        Convey experiences, real or imagined

•        Use time as the deep structure of the narrative

•        Form or structure based on a progression of events that build upon each other

•        Use effective details using precise language

•        Create clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation

•        Apply narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures

•        Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.7. (Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically. The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

  • Formulate a clear and concise perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

L.9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Arts/Media:  Students will explore the portrayal of the unit theme by comparing literature to art.

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.

Science:  Students will read and discuss various informational texts relating to scientific reasons for how humans perceive the world.

(See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.12.F.1 Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel



Unit Title

Unit 4 - Absolute Power

Timeframe 

6 weeks

Unit Summary

“Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn The power of man.”- Macbeth, Act IV, Scene 1

In this unit, students will explore the theme of “Absolute Power” through texts that present ideas about people’s relationships with ambition, power, success, failure, and control. Students will be analyzing the use of rhetoric in an argument, interactions between characters and theme, and representations of a scene and historical text.  Students will research and examine human ambition and the possibility of power becoming corrupt through Shakespeare’s Macbeth along with various informational articles. Students will also read multiple genres of texts in both fiction and nonfiction. The focus in writing will be analytical and argumentative.  

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What are some pros and cons of ambition and the quest for power?
  • Is human ambition timeless?
  • How do the elements of literature work together to point out the essential characteristics of humanity?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • ambition can lead to power, but how we handle this power determines our character.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • Dramatic presentations
  • Story elements and complex characters, theme, tone, structure/style, character motivation, and word choice
  • Central ideas of texts and how characters interact with the theme
  • How to analyze:

                  -the use of rhetoric in an argument  

                  -interactions between characters and theme

                  -representations of a scene

                  -historical text

                  -how an author draws on Shakespeare  

                  -making and supporting inferences

                  -multiple genres of texts

  • Vocabulary in context
  • Elements of a literary analysis essay
  • Author’s purpose

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Accurately cite strong and thorough text evidence to support inferences (specifically about characters/theme)
  • Analyze representations in different mediums
  • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed
  • Produce written reflections; practice writing in a myriad of situations
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
  • Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner
  • Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in a text
  • Use provided texts to identify and use various types of phrase and clauses
  • Use author’s style, tone, mood etc… to make connections between ideas and events
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage, standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  • Create a literary analysis essay

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Placemat activity
  • Graphic organizers
  • Analyzing text questions
  • Journal writing
  • Blogging
  • Flipgrid
  • Quizzes

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Literary analysis essay
  • Mini-argumentative responses

Alternative Assessments

  • Project option to replace essay

Learning Activities

Play:

The Tragedy of Macbeth- Focus on character interaction and its relationship to theme, tension and suspense.

Various writing activities.

Assessment: Menu of choices will be provided for students.

                      -Literary Analysis choices will include:

Is Macbeth a tragic hero?

How does one aspect of Macbeth’s character represent a universal human trait?

Media Analysis:

Macbeth On The Estate- Focus will be on tone and mood.

Short Story:

The Macbeth Murder Mystery: Analysis of how authors draw from Shakespeare to create a narrative.

Performance Activity: Narrative: Can characteristics of one genre be applied to another for a different interpretation?

With a partner, choose a familiar fable or fairy tale. Note its elements.

Think about the conflict or characters in the story. In what different genre might the conflict or characters appear?

Rewrite your story so that it maintains the same events but contains the characteristics of the new genre.

Exchange your story with another pair and try to identify the fairy tale or fable your classmates used as their source.

Activities (w/Integration of Technology):

  • View dramatic performance.
  • Read and/or listen to audio of text.
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Character Analysis, Theme Analysis (Use Google Map, Mindmapping or Padlet CRP11
  • Collaborative Discussions CRP12 & Cooperative Group work (Placemats etc..,)
  • Differentiated Group work: http://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/4-strategies-implementing-learning-stations-classroom/
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed.
  • Writing Activity: Passage Link & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.12.A.2 CRP2
  • Close reading screencasts and modeled discussions
  • Level Up Tutorials

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Argument by Michael Mack, from “Why Read Shakespeare?”

Drama by William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Macbeth

Film by Penny Woolcock, from Macbeth on the Estate

Short Story by James Thurber, “The Macbeth Murder Mystery”

CommonLit, Newsela, HMHFYI, Think CERCA Macbeth Informational Texts

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazines, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180448-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-10

https://www.commonlit.org/texts/on-tragedy

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RI.9-10.3:                                                         

  • Understand the relationship between a series of ideas or events that are connected
  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of how a series of ideas or events are connected and contribute to meaning
  • Analyze how the author presents the ideas or events and how the ideas are introduced, sequenced, and developed to contribute to the overall purpose of the text
  • Identify and analyze word choice  that comprise a series of events or ideas and how these key words advance the tension or events

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RI.9-10.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view or purpose.

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance the purpose
  • Identify rhetorical devices and text structures that advance the purpose of the piece

RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each work (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

  • Evaluate the similarities and differences between various accounts of a subject are told in multiple different mediums
  • Critically examine how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message

RI.9-10.8. Describe and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

•        Evaluate whether the reasoning an author uses is logical/ legitimate and if the evidence that is used is relevant to the argument or provides enough proof

•        Pinpoint any statements that are false and judge if any of the author’s reasoning is misleading.

•        Understand what a reliable source is and what makes one questionable

RL.9-10.9. Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

•        Use strong textual support to analyze when an author draws on and then transforms source material (such as a theme or topic) from another text

•        Identify allusions

•        Compare and contrast use of common ideas/topics between texts or allusions within texts

W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2.B. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2.C. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.2.D. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

W.9-10.2.E. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • Develop a strong formal style appropriate for the task
  • Maintain a tone that is free of bias
  • Integrate multimedia when appropriate and effective
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding paragraph or section that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone                        
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Incorporate facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information as needed

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.7. (Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically. The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

  • Formulate a clear and concise perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.9-10.5.  Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.9-10.6.  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

  • Adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose
  • Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English as necessary

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

L.9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History: Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.12.F.1 Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 5 - Hard Won Liberty & Dystopian Literature

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

“There is no easy walk to freedom anywhere.”- Nelson Mandala

In this collection, students will explore themes revolving around “Hard-Won Liberty” through texts that discuss struggles for freedom. The unit will begin with historical figures who sacrificed their lives to help create a better world; a world that consists of freedom for all people. Next, students will delve into the world of dystopia by participating in literature circles using their chosen novel.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What constitutes true freedom?
  • How have people from around the world acheived social justice and won freedom from oppression?
  • What is the essence of freedom and why is it valuable?
  • What are the characteristics of dystopian literature and why is it so popular?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • what constitutes true freedom.
  • throughout history, people have won their freedom from oppression around the world.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know:

  • Theme
  • Central idea
  • Seminal document
  • Rhetorical devices ethos, pathos, logos fallacious reasoning exaggerated/distorted evidence
  • Parallel structure
  • Semi-colon
  • Claim/counterclaim
  • Planning, drafting, revising research format (MLA)

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Analyze argument in a seminal document and evidence and ideas in a functional document
  • Analyze argument and rhetoric
  • Compare accounts in different mediums
  • Analyze interactions between character and theme
  • Analyze how a shift in tone contributes to theme
  • Analyze multiple genres of texts in both fiction and nonfiction
  • Applying language conventions in writing
  • Accurate cite strong and thorough text evidence to support inferences (specifically about characters/theme)
  • Analyze representations in different mediums
  • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed
  • Produce written reflections; practice writing in a myriad of situations
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
  • Present information using sound, detailed, and relevant evidence in a coherent manner
  • Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in a text
  • Use provided texts to identify and use various types of phrase and clauses
  • Use cause and effect relationships to make connections between ideas and events
  • Write an argumentative essay
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage, standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Placemat activity
  • Graphic organizers
  • Analyzing text questions
  • Journal writing
  • Blogging
  • Flipgrid
  • Quizzes

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Argumentative Essay
  • Benchmark 4
  • Inquiry Based Essay/Project

Alternative Assessments

Learning Activities

Argument: Choice of one:

1.Letter From Birmingham Jail

2. From Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin

3. From Gandhi: The Rise to Fame

Writing Activity: Evaluate the strength of your chosen document’s argument.

Writing piece on explaining how your document explores people’s fundamental human rights and what the  author wants done to end the injustice. Students will debate which document has stronger evidence.

Memoir:

Revolution 2.0- Research current developments regarding one subtopic of this memoir, for example difficulties Egyptians face. In a speech/presentation conclude with your view of whether or not progress has been achieved by using documents as evidence and support.

Short Story:

“The Briefcase” by Rebecca Makkai

Excerpts From Graham Green’s “The Tenth Man”.

Writing Activity: Personal Letter CRP4, CRP6 Assume the identity of the main character and write a letter to a loved one in which you attempt to convince him that you could serve as the boy’s father or husband to The Tenth Man’s Wife. Base the letter on the evidence you have gathered from the text. Address the recipient using a voice and logic suited to the main character’s character, and mention events and relationships of which the main character would be aware.

Teacher Choice of Assessment: (Secondary/Support) Options include: Multiple Choice and Constructed response quiz, written responses/summaries, analysis questions, graphic organizers, recap APP Videos.

Dystopian Literature Circles:

Students will choose 1 of the following choices to read:

Lord Of The Flies

Ready Player One

Hunger Games

I Am Legend

1984

Unwind

Various literature circle mini lessons and student centered activities will take place throughout the unit.

Teacher choice of assessment throughout the unit.

Conduct research to answer and support created inquiry.

Inquiry Based Writing Assessment:

Option 1: Research specific individuals who have fought for freedom or social justice and how their impact has changed the world. Option 2: Draw from dystopian themes to research and support a modern day dystopia (women’s rights violations, caste systems, indentured servitude, human trafficking etc…)

Possible Assessments:

Create a video or Google slide to present to the class introducing inquiry, providing evidence, and explaining reasoning behind stance on the inquiry, explanation of POV, and the relation to marking period connection.

Create an inquiry based question by pieces read, discussions, and themes addressed throughout the marking period.

Create a document that answers and provides evidence and reasoning for inquiry complete with a MLA works cited page.

Activities (w/Integration of Technology):

  • Read short stories and/or listen to audio of text.
  • Close reading strategies & digital text annotation strategies CRP8
  • Graphic organizer: Character Analysis (Use Google Map, Mindmapping or Padlet CRP11
  • Collaborative Discussions CRP12 & Cooperative Group work (Placemats etc..,)
  • Differentiated Group work: http://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/4-strategies-implementing-learning-stations-classroom/
  • Analyzing the Text questions CRP8
  • Journal writing, dialogues, creative tasks, written reflections, blogging, etc. CRP4
  • Vocabulary TIP charts, Word Splash, Synetics, and other vocabulary activities as needed; Grammar review warm-ups and mini-lessons as needed.
  • Writing Activity: Passage Link & presentation in small groups (Google Apps) 8.1.12.A.2 CRP2
  • Close reading screencasts and modeled discussions
  • Level Up Tutorials

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Hard-Won Liberty Texts (5 weeks)

Argument by Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (A&E Video: Class of the 20th Century: 1963-1968)

Speech by Josephine Baker, Speech at the March on Washington (Video HISTORY Channel: America: The Story of Us: March on Washington)

Franklin Roosevelt’s seminal “Four Freedoms” speech (R22)

Short Story by Rebecca Makkai, “The Briefcase”

Short Story by Christine Lee Zilka, “Bile”

Dystopian Literature Circles:

Students will choose 1 of the following choices to read:

Lord Of The Flies

Ready Player One

Hunger Games

I Am Legend

1984

Unwind

Other Student Selections

Equipment

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, Commonlit.org, TED Talks, KQED Do Nows, Flipgrid, ThinkCERCA, Scholastic UpFront Magazines, and other online sources as needed

https://support.thinkcerca.com/hc/en-us/articles/232180448-Lessons-and-Resources-to-Support-Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Collections-Grade-10

“Understanding the Appeal of Dystopian Younf Adult Fiction” http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/v40n2/scholes.html

https://prezi.com/abap6w3vocyp/lesson-plan-dystopian-literature/

http://smago.coe.uga.edu/VirtualLibrary/Davis_2009.pdf

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxhZHlzdG9waWFuZnV0dXJlfGd4OjczNWNkYThmYWNmMGQ3YTU

http://teachers.yale.edu/curriculum/viewer/initiative_15.01.06_u#h1num-9

http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1197&context=educ_understandings

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/american-dystopia-more-reality-than-fiction/

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.9-10.1 Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.) and make relevant connections, to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain

  • Analyze the text for inferred and literal meanings
  • Make personal connections, make connections to other texts, and/or make global connections when relevant
  • Identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Use direct quotes, paraphrase, summarize objectively
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Analyze relationship between implicit and explicit text evidence and how it contributes to the meaning of the text    

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze how it is developed and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine a theme and central idea
  • Analyze how details develop the theme/central idea
  • Make inferences using explicit and implicit text evidence
  • Use the text to draw conclusions about the theme/central idea
  • Formulate an objective (free of personal bias) summary of the text
  • Determine how the theme/central idea emerges and is refined or strengthened by key details
  • Provide an objective summary of the text

RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RL.9-10.3:

  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of characterization
  • Evaluate multiple/conflicting character motivations through analysis of character dialog and actions
  • Analyze character interactions as they develop plot
  • Evaluate simple and complex relationships and/or events and the effects on plot development

RI.9-10.3:                                                         

  • Understand the relationship between a series of ideas or events that are connected
  • Use strong textual support to demonstrate deeper understanding of how a series of ideas or events are connected and contribute to meaning
  • Analyze how the author presents the ideas or events and how the ideas are introduced, sequenced, and developed to contribute to the overall purpose of the text
  • Identify and analyze word choice  that comprise a series of events or ideas and how these key words advance the tension or events

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

  • Identify key words and determine figurative meaning
  • Identify key words and determine connotative meaning
  • Understand how word choice impacts meaning (For example, how language evokes a sense of time and place)
  • Determine formal vs. informal tone        
  • Identify cumulative impact of word choice on meaning and tone        

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create specific effects (e.g. as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RL.9-10.5:

  • Understand and describe how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Analyze how the author’s choices to structure a text and manipulate time can create mystery, tension, or surprise for the reader

RI.9-10.5:

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it affect the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by particular sentences, paragraphs, or longer portions of a text

RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

RI.9-10.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that point of view or purpose.

RL.9-10.6:

  • Recognize and understand a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a text from outside the United States
  • Read multiple texts from world literature
  • Analyze how a particular point of view or cultural experience is reflected in a text
  • Analyze how culture impacts a particular point of view

RI.9-10.6:

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance the purpose
  • Identify rhetorical devices and text structures that advance the purpose of the piece

RI.9-10.8. Describe and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

•        Evaluate whether the reasoning an author uses is logical/ legitimate and if the evidence that is used is relevant to the argument or provides enough proof

•        Pinpoint any statements that are false and judge if any of the author’s reasoning is misleading.

•        Understand what a reliable source is and what makes one questionable

RI.9-10.9. Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) documents of historical and literary significance, (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, etc.), including how they relate in terms of themes and significant concepts.

•        Study and evaluate influential U.S. documents

  • Evaluate the theme and significant concepts as these are relevant to the historical context and background knowledge

RL.9-10.10. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at grade level or above.

RI.9-10.10. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction (see Appendix A) at grade level text-complexity (see Appendix A) or above.

  • Closely read various forms of literature independently and fluently, including stories, dramas, and poems
  • Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text
  • Make connections among ideas and between texts
  • Consider a wider range of textual evidence
  • Become more sensitive to inconsistencies, ambiguities, and poor reasoning in texts
  • Monitor comprehension
  • Determine when comprehension is not occurring, and subsequently employ appropriate reading and note-taking strategies and/or ask for help in order to understand portions of a difficult text

W.9-10.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.9-10.1.A. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

W.9-10.1.B. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims avoiding common logical fallacies, propaganda devices, and using sound reasoning, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

W.9-10.1.C. Use transitions (e.g. words, phrases, clauses) to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

W.9-10.1.D. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.9-10.1.E. Provide a concluding paragraph or section that supports the argument presented.

  • Understand how much evidence is needed to satisfactorily support a point
  • Learn how to introduce argument(s) clearly and accurately with regard to counterclaims
  • Structure arguments so that there is an association and correlation between the claim(s), counterclaim(s), reasons, and evidence
  • Treat claims and counterclaims equitably taking into account what their audience knows as well as what concerns they might have
  • Develop unity and consistency in the essay  with words and structure, paying attention to the relationships created between the claims, counterclaims, evidence, and reason
  • Maintain an appropriate style and tone for the task – omitting personal bias
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Develop a topic
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding statement that supports the information presented
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Determine how many facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information are needed        
  • Use text evidence to develop analysis and enhance content of argument

W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • Determine  writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style

W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Develop and use appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and utilize revision techniques
  • Understand writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience

W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Choose and evaluate appropriate platform
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products

W.9-10.7. (Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information

W.9-10.8. (Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).  

  • Gather print and digital information
  • Assess credibility and accuracy of sources
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize quotes within writing to further claims
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.9-10.9. (Choice) Draw evidence from literary or nonfiction informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.A. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from mythology or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.B. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to nonfiction informational (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.A.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.B.Collaborate with peers to set rules for discussions (e.g. informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views); develop clear goals and assessment criteria (e.g. student developed rubric) and assign individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.C.Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.D.Respond thoughtfully to various perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and justify own views. Make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Collaborate with peers to set guidelines for class discussions
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in friendly discussions and decision-making activities
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas
  • Reflect, evaluate and respond to comments made by peers during discussion

SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally), evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

  • Listen to and evaluate multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media
  • Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source

SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically. The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

  • Formulate a clear and concise perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.9-10.5.  Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.9-10.6.  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

  • Adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose
  • Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English as necessary

L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.1.A. Use parallel structure.

L.9-10.1.B. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

  • Understand concepts of parallelism ( i.e.; repeated grammatical patterns, types of phrases, and types of clauses) and how to use effectively
  • Understand the differences between a phrase and a clause
  • Identify and use various types of phrases and clauses
  • Know sentence variety patterns
  • Understand how sentence variety (use of clauses and phrases) affects meaning and interest
  • Vary sentence structure to convey specific meaning and interest in writing and presentation

L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  

L.9-10.2.C.Spell correctly.

  • Know and use standard English spelling conventions

L.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning, or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading, writing, speaking or listening.

L.9-10.3.A. Vary word choice and sentence structure to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of language.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work

L.9-10.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy) and continue to apply knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

L.9-10.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., college-level dictionaries, rhyming dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

L.9-10.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words
  • Use context clues to derive word meaning ( connotation, denotation, word function and position)

L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word

relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex. saunter and walk)

L.9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History: Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.  
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

 By the end of 12th grade:

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel

Suggested Open Educational Resources

Reading

Writing & Language

Speaking & Listening

Critical Thinking

Technology Tools for Differentiation: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ihsTwYr1kFx9Jb08Z2w5i1MWoxYkRXZbTP4Gcbodp6I/htmlview?pli=1#gid=0

www.rewordify.com

Other Helpful Resources:

www.teachingchannel.org

www.theteachertoolkit.com