Published using Google Docs
Syllabus: HIST 4400/5152: Digital History (Fall 2020)
Updated automatically every 5 minutes

Syllabus

HIST 4400/HIST 5152: Digital History

Fall 2020, Temple University

Course Information & Policies | Assignments | Schedule

Course Information & Policies

Instructor Information

·      Name: Cynthia Heider

·      Office address: Gladfelter Hall

·      Office hours: Mondays 4-4:45PM or by appointment

·      Email: cynthia.heider@temple.edu

·      Telephone: 703-507-8091

Course Information

·      Course number: HIST 4400/HIST 5152

·      Course title: Digital History

·      Course Canvas site: https://templeu.instructure.com/courses/77336

·      Course syllabus:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1a0cl9TS9nQ5wNrZcMkMcrwqgqxoiRj6qspwzZ1-PF84/edit?usp=sharing

·      Course time: Mondays 5:00-7:30pm, from 8/24/20 to 12/19/20

·      Course location: Online

Course Materials

Required Textbooks & Materials

All course materials are available free-of-cost online, or otherwise will be provided to students by the instructor. Class readings are accessible through the course’s Canvas site.

Course Overview and Goals

The use of digital methods to enhance and streamline the study, interpretation, and presentation of historical topics (the so-called "digital turn") has gained a good bit of traction within the discipline in the recent past. This class will explore digital history methodologies, tools, and practices including digital mapping, data visualization, textual and social network analysis, interactive exhibitions, augmented and virtual reality, digital editions/publications, podcasts and oral history, the incorporation of digital pedagogy in the classroom, and more. In addition to gaining familiarity with various tools and technologies, students will discuss major issues in the field, including questions of narrative, audience, shared authority, ethics, accessibility, preservation, data integrity, and other considerations pertinent to the historical method. This course is eligible for credit toward the Graduate Certificate in Cultural Analytics.

Course goals include:

·      Examine evolving theory and major debates within digital humanities and digital history, including issues of transparency, ethics, accessibility, authority, and legitimacy

·      Discover how to use digital projects to engage with multiple stakeholders and audiences and encourage conversations and collaborations

·      Evaluate and critically assess digital methodologies and tools through hands-on technical experimentation and skillbuilding

·      Determine how methods of digital history might contribute to the advancement of research interests, scholarship, and professional goals

Key Questions:

  1. What is digital history? How do methods of the so-called digital turn intersect with the work of doing history?
  2. What are some of the pros and cons of using digital tools in the production of historical scholarship?
  3. How can I do cool things with digital tools and resources? Who else in the field is currently doing cool things?
  4. Where can I go for help if I have questions or need guidance, instructions, or inspiration for my projects? How do I keep updated on developments in the field?

Temple and COVID-19

Several sections of this syllabus contain language specifically pertaining to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic that is mandated by the university. Those sections are demarcated with a pushpin symbol and accompanying COVID-19 text label, like so: 📌 COVID-19

Temple University’s motto is Perseverance Conquers, and we will meet the challenges of the COVID pandemic with flexibility and resilience. The university has made plans for multiple eventualities. Working together as a community to deliver a meaningful learning experience is a responsibility we all share: we’re in this together so we can be together.

Course Policies

Student Support

Your success in this class is important to me. If there are circumstances that may affect your performance in this class – including personal, health-related, family-related, or any other type of difficulty - please let me know as soon as possible so that we can work together to develop strategies for adapting assignments to meet both your needs and the requirements of the course. You don't need to disclose or discuss anything that you don't feel comfortable with.

Additionally, I care about your well-being. Students experience any number of challenging circumstances that make it hard to make learning a first priority. Temple University has financial, medical, and technological resources that may help and which you are entitled and encouraged to use when or if you need them. Please reach out to me, or the kind folks on the CARE Team, if you need support or guidance connecting to these resources or others. See the Resources for Well-Being page for more information.

Accommodations & Disability Disclosure Statement

📌 COVID-19 | Please bear in mind that COVID-19 may result in a need for new or additional accommodations.

Additionally, any student who may have a need for accommodation based on the impact of a documented disability has the right to guidance and resources made available free-of-cost by Temple University Disability Resources and Services. For example, DRS can arrange for use of assistive technology, provide alternate format materials, and help determine appropriate and reasonable classroom accommodations. If applicable, please get in touch with DRS to initiate the formal accommodation process. DRS is located in 100 Ritter Annex and can be reached at 215-204-1280 or online at https://disabilityresources.temple.edu/contact.

How This Course Will Be Taught

📌 COVID-19 | Until November 20, 2020:

This course will be taught online.

The class is scheduled for Mondays, 5-7:30PM. Our class meetings will be synchronous, meaning that they will meet at the regularly scheduled time (although, please note that they will adjourn at 6PM rather than 7:30).

In-person activities and instruction for the fall 2020 semester will end Nov. 20, at the start of the fall break. The remaining week of classes, study period and finals will be conducted remotely.

Class Conduct

📌 COVID-19 | In order to maintain a safe and focused learning environment, we must all comply with the four public health pillars: wearing face coverings, maintaining physical distancing, washing our hands and monitoring our health.

Treat your classmates and instructor with respect in all communication, class activities, and meetings. You are encouraged to comment, question, or critique an idea but you are not to attack an individual. Please consider that sarcasm, humor and slang can be misconstrued in online interactions and generate unintended disruptions. Profanity should be avoided as should the use of all capital letters when composing responses in discussion threads, which can be construed as “shouting” online. Remember to be careful with your own and others’ privacy. In general, have your behavior mirror how you would like to be treated by others.

Privacy considerations

📌 COVID-19 | A major theme embedded in this class is the duty to be wary of the tech-positivism ubiquitous in our society. New tools don’t always make our lives better. In many circumstances, our livelihoods are dependent upon hardware and software that collect data about us for commercial gain. It is very difficult to “opt out” of this data collection because it is built into infrastructures and systems we are required to use in all aspects of our lives, including those used for this course. You should be aware that Canvas will track your activity, specifically how and when you use the site. Zoom is not a secured system, although I have put safeguards into place to prevent intrusion. Any number of other web applications and sites that you use may also track your data, sometimes in ways that you are unaware of.

I greatly respect your right to privacy (and my own), and for that reason I pledge the following:

Attendance and Tardiness

📌 COVID-19 | If you feel unwell, you should not come to campus, and you will not be penalized for your absence. [My note: Please, your health is the highest priority and if you are not well, you do not need to be concerned about your performance in this class. We’ll figure it out. -CH] Instructors are required to ensure that attendance is recorded for each in-person or synchronous class session. The primary reason for documentation of attendance is to facilitate contact tracing, so that if a student or instructor with whom you have had close contact tests positive for COVID-19, the university can contact you. Recording of attendance will also provide an opportunity for outreach from student services and/or academic support units to support students should they become ill. Faculty and students agree to act in good faith and work with mutual flexibility. The expectation is that students will be honest in representing class attendance.

Due Dates for Assignments

Due dates for all assignments are listed in the syllabus and on the course Canvas website. This semester, I’ve opted to make all assignments in the “Reflections” and “Practica” categories due on or before 4:00PM November 30. Please work on them at your own pace over the course of the semester, although please be aware that I’ll probably be best able to provide troubleshooting and guidance to you earlier in the semester, when there is (presumably) less demand. “Preparation” and “Group Work” assignments should be completed, to the best of your ability, by specific dates for the benefit of your own learning process as well as that of your classmates.

Incomplete Grade Policy

Temple University guidelines for incompletes maintain that an instructor may file a grade of “I” (Incomplete) for a student only if a student has completed the majority of the work of the course at a passing level and only for reasons beyond the student’s control. Please consult the Bulletin for the details of the formal process governing the distribution of incomplete grades (Policy #02.10.13).

Academic Honesty/Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined in the TU Bulletin as “the unacknowledged use of another person's labor, another person's ideas, another person's words, and another person's assistance.” Academic cheating, generally defined, means engaging in behavior that gives a student or students an unfair academic advantage- including but not limited to fabrication of data, resubmission of work already submitted for another academic assignment, or doing the work of another person.

Plagiarism and academic cheating are serious infractions of the Academic Honor Code. Suspected instances may be referred to the University Disciplinary Committee; I also reserve the right to assign a grade of “F” for the given assignment.

Statement on the Student and Faculty Academic Rights and Responsibilities Policy

Freedom to teach and freedom to learn are inseparable facets of academic freedom. The University has a policy on Student and Faculty and Academic Rights and Responsibilities (Policy #03.70.02).

Continuity of Instruction in Event of Emergency

Students are to register for the TUAlert System to be made aware of University closures due to weather or other emergency situations and follow all additional university-wide emergency instruction. Students can register for this system on the Campus Safety Services website. In the event of an emergency, class materials/instructions will be provided in a web-based format via Canvas or Zoom. Students registered for the class will be alerted to any alternate testing procedures and submission of assignment requirements from the instructor via email.

Technology Usage Policy

Since technology is a focus in this class, we’ll be using computers each week for the lab portion of that class. If it’s an option for you, you may bring your own computer to class, or I can arrange for the use of university-issued laptops. Please note that consistent access to a computer and an internet connection is necessary for the completion of assignments for this course. More information about responsibilities related to use of Temple University’s technological networks and equipment can be found in the Technology Usage policy (Policy #04.71.11).

📌 COVID-19 | Limited resources are available for students who do not have the technology they need for class. Students with educational technology needs, including no computer or camera or insufficient Wifi-access, should submit a request outlining their needs using the Student Emergency Aid Fund form. The University will endeavor to meet needs, such as with a long-term loan of a laptop or Mifi device, a refurbished computer, or subsidized internet access.

Assignments & Course Requirements

Time required to complete activities related to and required for this course is estimated at 142 total hours over the course of the fall 2020 semester (or, roughly 11 hours per week).

This includes:

·      13 hours of class time (1 hour per week x 13 weeks)

·      39 hours engaging with course readings and materials (3 hours per week x 13 weeks)

·      90 hours completing other course work (6 hours per week x 15 weeks)

Collegiality & Care (5% of final grade)

There are so many reasons why this semester will likely be tough on any and all of us. There is so much uncertainty and precarity and grief and loneliness and anxiety. You, me, or any of your classmates may be struggling with any of those at any given moment. So what I am asking of you is that you do your best to show yourselves, and each other, kindness, understanding, and generosity for the next few months. Help somebody out with a technical issue if you can. Maybe drop a TikTok in the Slack channel once in a while. Do something nice for yourself. This is an assignment, and I’m giving you an A+ up front trusting that you’ll try your best to complete it. I promise to do my best, too.

Class Preparation Assignments (15% of final grade)

These assignments are intended to fulfill the course goal:

·      Examine evolving theory and major debates within digital humanities and digital history, including issues of transparency, ethics, accessibility, authority, and legitimacy

Readings, Annotations, and Discussion

Readings are assigned weekly and should be completed before each class. We won’t have an extensive discussion of the assigned material during class time; instead, the class will work to collaboratively annotate the readings through Canvas using the Hypothes.is tool. We will discuss more about Hypothes.is on the first week of class. Readings and annotations will help you prepare for class, understand the stakes and possibilities of various methods and tools in digital scholarship, and deeply engage in dialogues with your classmates. For this reason, they are worth 15% of your grade (or, 1% each week). Occasionally you will be assigned material that is not possible to annotate (like videos, an entire book, etc.) and in these cases you will be asked to contribute to a discussion board prompt on Canvas.

Grading Rubric for Class Preparation (per week)

I would like every student to have the opportunity to participate and share their reactions to a reading or discussion. Quality is more important than quantity. While an individual’s participation will naturally vary from class to class, students are encouraged to improve their participation each class and contribute to class discussion every week. Class preparation will be assessed according to the following rubric:

 
A– Prepared for every class and familiar with readings and sites for review, contributes questions and discussion points that are not simple reiterations of statements from the readings, makes connections between readings for this class and previous classes, responds to other students’ comments and extends the analysis, analyzes and challenges readings and class discussion in a respectful, evidence-­based manner.


B–Prepared for most classes, engaged listener who contributes but requires occasional prompting, analyzes readings but comments may focus more on restating author’s opinions rather than building upon them with unique statements, respectfully listens to other student comments but does not respond directly to issues they raise.


C–Minimally prepared for classes, does not volunteer comments or questions, provides comments indirectly or not at all connected to the topic when called upon, inattentive listener


D–No evidence of preparation, cannot provide comments on the subject matter when called upon, disrespectful to other students’ comments, inattentive listener

Skillbuilding & Practica Assignments (30% of final grade)

These assignments are intended to fulfill the course goal:

·      Evaluate and critically assess digital methodologies and tools through hands-on technical experimentation and skillbuilding

I want you to gain practical DH experience in this class. I also recognize that you may be more interested in some topics than others. We’ll walk through some methods together in class. For others, I will provide tutorials, walkthroughs, and other forms of guidance so that you can explore them on your own. Each practica will involve differing amounts of work. I’ve categorized them as “mild,” “medium,” and “spicy” depending on the level of “sweat” required to complete them, which in turn affects their point value.

I think it’s better to really understand a few concepts than to feel only kind of comfortable with a whole bunch of them. On the other hand, you may prefer to get a basic idea of the spectrum of DH projects without delving in too deeply just yet. I’ve tried to create a system that allows for flexibility and choice in this regard. I do encourage you to step outside of your comfort zone -- you’ll have a support system in this class to take on any challenges -- but you should make this course work for you. Pick and choose what assignments work for you, as long as they add up to 30%. All assignments in this category must be turned in by 4:00PM on November 30 but may be completed at your own pace throughout the semester.

🌶 “Mild” category assignments (6% each)

These practica won’t require a lot of preparation work and can be completed within a short time span. You will use pre-provided source material (a dataset, corpus, group of artifacts, etc.), plug that into a tool with a user interface, and play around with analysis until you find something interesting or significant. Then you’ll reflect upon your findings and optionally share a brief summary with the class.

🌶🌶 “Medium” category assignment (10% each)

These will take more time and effort to complete, possibly up to a couple of weeks. You can create new source material, or use pre-provided sources that may require some reformatting or alteration. You may need to install an app or tool on your computer. You’ll share a brief summary with the class of your process and findings.

🌶🌶🌶 “Spicy” category assignments (30% each)

These assignments will require you to create or repurpose a suitable set of source material in a particular structure. You will likely need to install an app or tool on your computer, set up a local server, and/or play around with a programming language. This category of assignment may take you multiple weeks or even months to complete, and you may not be able to finish the assignment before the end of the semester. Regardless of your progress, you’ll share a brief summary, in layman’s terms, of your initial idea, process, and findings before the final week of class.

Grading Rubric for Skillbuilding and Practica (per assignment)

A–Successful achievement/creation of (all of the) intended end-product(s) of an assignment OR a critical assessment of why it didn’t turn out the way you intended. Substantive reflection on the process, tools used, data/sources involved, and result. Insight into how this experience can be applied in the future. Sought guidance from classmates and instructor via the Slack channel if difficulties or confusion arose while working on the assignment.


B–Successful achievement/creation of only part of the intended end-product(s) of an assignment, little assessment of why it didn’t turn out the way you intended. Substantive reflection on the process, tools used, data/sources involved, and result. Insight into how this experience can be applied in the future. Sought some guidance from classmates and instructor via the Slack channel if difficulties or confusion arose while working on the assignment, but did not follow through.


C–Successful achievement/creation of only part of the intended end-product(s) of an assignment, no critical assessment of why it didn’t turn out the way you intended. Surface-level reflection on either the process, tools used, data/sources involved, or result. Minimal insight into how this experience can be applied in the future. Did not seek guidance from classmates and instructor via the Slack channel if difficulties or confusion arose while working on the assignment.


Revise & resubmit–No evidence of any of the above criteria. I will ask you to revise and resubmit the assignment.

Group Project Assignments (35% of final grade)

These assignments are intended to fulfill the course goal:

·      Discover how to use digital projects to engage with multiple stakeholders and audiences and encourage conversations and collaborations

Collaboration is key to work in digital history. Your classmates have a wealth of skills, subject knowledge, and experiences to draw upon, and you will work with two of them to develop an “MVP” final project for the course. You will reach several milestones of digital project management along the way, including:

The entirety of this portion of your individual final grade will be determined by you and your group members with the completion of Peer Evaluation Forms toward the end of the semester.

Reflection Assignments (15% of final grade)

These assignments are intended to fulfill the course goal:

·      Determine how methods of digital history might contribute to the advancement of research interests, scholarship, and professional goals

Every student in this class has different educational interests, needs, and priorities to fulfill. I’d like you to have the freedom to tailor this class to your own, as much as is possible. Choose what works for you. Additionally, the assignment list here is not exhaustive. You are welcome to come up with your own idea for an assignment that involves reflection on how work in the field might relate to you and pitch it to me.

You will complete one assignment in this category. Some possible projects include:

Individual rubrics and assignment descriptions can be found on the course Canvas site. All assignments in this category must be turned in by 4:00PM on November 30 but may be completed at your own pace throughout the semester.

Grading of Assignments

The grade for this course will be determined according to the following formula:

Assignments/Activities

% of Final Grade

Class preparation assignments

15%

Skillbuilding & Practica

30%

Group final project

35%

Reflections

15%

Collegiality & Care

5%

Letter Grades

Letter grades for the entire course will be assigned as follows:

Letter Grade

Points

Percent

A

4.00

Example: 92.5% and higher

A-

3.67

Example: 90.0 – 92.49%

B+

3.33

Example: 87.5% - 89.99%

B

3.00

Example: 82.5% - 87.49%

B-

2.67

Example: 80% - 82.49%

C+

2.33

Example: 77.5% - 79.99%

C

2.00

Example: 72.5% - 77.49%

C-

1.67

Example: 70% - 72.49%

D+

1.33

Example: 67.5% - 69.99%

D

1.00

Example: 62.5% - 67.49

D-

.67

Example: 60% - 62.49%

F

.00

Example: 59.99% and lower

About this Syllabus

This is a living document! Please feel free to add your comments or questions, as they will allow the syllabus and the work of the class to grow and change if needed. On that note: Dates, assignments, readings, or lab tutorials are subject to change throughout the semester. I will make every effort to contact you by email at least a week prior to the affected class if I make a change in the syllabus. Realistically, although I've tried to prepare for the unexpected, the class may change shape and form over the course of the semester due to a number of unpredictable factors. I understand that this might be exasperating for everyone involved; please be patient with your classmates and myself. We're all trying to do our best.

You may redistribute, remix, reuse, or borrow from this syllabus under a Creative Commons 4.0 license (CC-BY-4.0)

To give credit where credit is due: I am indebted to the expertise of many scholars who came before me. This iteration of the syllabus borrows ideas from other DH practitioners including Abby Mullen, Fred Gibbs, Trevor Owens, Shannon Mattern, and Ben Schmidt.

Course Schedule

Week 1:

August 24

Welcome to the Past, Present, and Future

This is a class about possibilities: What happened? What will happen? Where do we fit into the scheme of things? This is a history course, but it's also about the future. This week, we'll set the stage for the semester to come.

Topics

  • Overview of the course & syllabus
  • Introductions
  • Tech set-up

Assignments

Tech set-up checklists: Hypothes.is, Slack, Screencast-O-Matic

Week 2:

August 31

Defining Digital History

Historians have used computational analytics methods in their scholarship for decades, but only with the advent of the internet and the robust capabilities of modern computing technology did “digital history” and its broader counterpart “digital humanities” begin to enter the mainstream. Still, however, ambivalence lingers among many scholars about what exactly it means to “do history” digitally or in the digital age. How do we look forward and backward at the same time? We’ll begin to examine these questions in the context of a larger scholarly debate, as well as through the lens of the genre of science fiction (SF).

Topics

  • Overview of digital avenues for humanistic and historical inquiry
  • Debates over definitions in the field
  • Teleology, progress, and computational thinking

Discuss

Wells, H.G. “Wanted: Professors of Foresight!” From Slaughter, R. (ed) Studying the Future, Australian Bicentennial Authority/Commission For the Future, Melbourne, 1989, pp 3-4.

Ayers, Edward L. "The Pasts and Futures of Digital History." History News, 56:4 (2001): 5-9.

Mullen, Lincoln, and Stephen Robertson. "Digital History and Argument." Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, November 2017, https://rrchnm.org/argument-white-paper/

Noiret, Serge. “Digital Public History,” in A Companion to Public History, 2018.

Gibbs, Frederick, and Trever Owens, “The Hermeneutics of Data and Historical Writing,” in Writing History in the Digital Age, 2013, https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctv65sx57.7

Assignments

Groups: Meet your project partners and begin writing a Team Charter (draft due 4PM September 14)

Week 3:

September 7

LABOR DAY
NO CLASS

Evidence & Tools

Historians put things together and take things apart. They reassemble the bits, in different orders, with varying forms of synthesis, with varying amounts of emphasis. They then evaluate the results, take notes, and start the process over. Along the way, they consider theoretical and methodological questions of narrative form, audience, authority, evidentiary integrity, humanistic ethics, accessibility, and sustainability. This is the foundation of the historical method, and it already incorporates concepts like experimentation, iteration, source evaluation and corroboration, situated knowledge, and critical analysis. Digital history scholarship builds upon these same familiar processes, but using different tools and forms of evidence.

Topics

  • Evidence and argument in DH
  • Choosing methods, tools, and data for specific outcomes
  • Bias, ambiguity, and transparency
  • Working collaboratively

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

*Atwood, Margaret. "Historical Notes on 'The Handmaid's Tale'," in The Handmaid's Tale, 1985.

*Posner, Miriam. “Humanities Data: A Necessary Contradiction.” Miriam Posner’s Blog, 2015. http://miriamposner.com/blog/humanities-data-a-necessary-contradiction/

Owens, Trevor. “Defining Data for Humanists: Text, Artifact, Information, or Evidence?" Journal of Digital Humanities 1:1 (Winter 2011). http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-1/defining-data-for-humanists-by-trevor-owens/

Klein, Lauren F. “The Carework and Codework of the Digital Humanities,” 2015. http://lklein.com/archives/the-carework-and-codework-of-the-digital-humanities/

White, Hayden. "Introduction: Historical Fiction, Fictional History, and Historical Reality," Rethinking History 9:2/3 (June/September 2005), 147-157.

Featured Projects

Assignments

Groups: Continue drafting Team Charter (draft due 4PM September 14)

Part 1: The Archaeology of Knowledge

Week 4:

September 14

Ways of Reading

Topics

  • Close and distant forms of reading texts
  • Computational textual analysis tools
  • Historians, perspective, and (technological) positivism

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

*Asimov, Isaac. Foundation, 1951. (at least Parts I and II)

*So, Richard Jean and Edwin Roland. “Race and Distant Reading," PMLA 135:1 (January 2020), 59-73.

Klein, Lauren. “Distant Reading After Moretti.” Arcade, 2018. https://arcade.stanford.edu/blogs/distant-reading-after-moretti

Hitchcock, Tim. “Big Data for Dead People: Digital Readings and the Conundrums of Positivism.” Historyonics, 2013 http://historyonics.blogspot.com/2013/12/big-data-for-dead-people-digital.html

Supplemental Reading

Dinsman, Melissa. “The Digital in the Humanities: An Interview with Richard Jean So,” Los Angeles Review of Books (April 28, 2916), https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/the-digital-in-the-humanities-an-interview-with-richard-jean-so/.

Howard, Josh, "Talk-Back Boards and Text Mining: New Digital Approaches in Museum Visitor Studies," Current Research in Digital History 1 (2018), https://crdh.rrchnm.org/essays/v01-17-talk-back-boards-and-text-mining/.

Featured Projects

Assignments

Due: Draft of Team Charter

Groups: Begin work on your Project One-Pager (draft due 4:00PM September 28)

Week 5:

September 21

Ways of Seeing

Topics

  • Understand the basic principles of data visualization.
  • Identify challenges of data integrity, ambiguity, situatedness, and "normalization."
  • Charts, graphs, networks, and quantitative visualization

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

*Johnson, Jessica Marie. "Markup Bodies: Black [Life] Studies and Slavery [Death] Studies at the Digital Crossroads," Social Text 36:4 (2018), https://doi.org/10.1215/01642472-7145658.

*Klein, Lauren, and Catherine D'Ignazio, "The Numbers Don't Speak for Themselves," in Data Feminism (2020), https://data-feminism.mitpress.mit.edu

Battle-Baptiste, Whitney and Britt Rusert, "Introduction," in W.E.B. Du Bois's Data Portraits: Visualizing Black America, 2018. (As well as a number of full-color plates from Du Bois's "The Georgia Negro: A Social Study")

Schmidt, Ben. "Two Volumes: The Lessons of Time on the Cross" (2019), https://benschmidt.org/post/2019-12-05-totc/2019-aha/.

Watch (optional)

Ruha Benjamin, “Data & Society Databite No.124: Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code," 2019.

Supplemental Reading

Dinsman, Melissa. "The Digital in the Humanities: An Interview with Jessica Marie Johnson,” Los Angeles Review of Books (July 23, 2016), https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/digital-humanities-interview-jessica-marie-johnson/.

Rettberg, Jill Walker, "Situated Data Analysis: A New Method for Analysing Encoded Power Relationships in Social Media Platforms and Apps," Humanities and Social Sciences Communications 7:5 (2020), https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-020-0495-3.

Featured Projects

Assignments

Groups: Continue to work on your Project One-Pager (draft due 4:00PM September 28)

Week 6:

September 28

Traversing Space-Time

Topics

  • Spatial/temporal knowledge and representation
  • Linearity, causality, and progress
  • Maps, timelines, and imagination

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

Whyte, Kyle P. “Indigenous Science (Fiction) for the Anthropocene: Ancestral Dystopias and Fantasies of Climate Change Crises.” Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space 1:1-2 (2018), 224-242.

*Cowley, Kendra, and Kateryna Barnes, “Unsettling Colonial Mapping: Sonic-Spatial Representations of amiskwaciwâskahikan,” HASTAC (February 18, 2019), https://www.hastac.org/blogs/kcowley/2019/02/18/unsettling-colonial-mapping-sonic-spatial-representations.

*Anderson, Benedict. “Census, Map, Museum,” in Imagined Communities (Second Edition), 2006, https://hdl-handle-net.libproxy.temple.edu/2027/heb.01609.

Fisher, Gregory. “Behind the Scenes of GIS at The Woodlands,” (November 21, 2019), https://www.woodlandsphila.org/blog/gis-at-the-woodlands.

Risam, Roopika. "Other Worlds, Other DHs: Notes Towards a DH Accent," Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 32:2 (June 2017),  377–384, https://doi-org.libproxy.temple.edu/10.1093/llc/fqv063.

Supplemental Reading

Mattern, Shannon. “Local Codes: Forms of Spatial Knowledge,” Public Knowledge (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, January 18, 2019), https://publicknowledge.sfmoma.org/local-codes-forms-of-spatial-knowledge/.

Corfield, Penelope J. “Time and the Historians in the Age of Relativity,” Geschichte und Gesellschaft. Sonderheft: Obsession der Gegenwart: Zeit im 20. Jahrhundert 25 (2015), pp. 71-91. http://www.jstor.com/stable/24770038.

Featured Projects

Assignments

Due: Draft of Project One-Pager

Part 2: Artifactualities

Week 7:

October 5

Surrogates

Topics

  • Digitization and digital archives
  • Limitations of structured knowledge databases
  • Labor

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

*Putnam, Lara. "The Transnational and the Text-Searchable: Digitized Sources and the Shadows They Cast." The American Historical Review, Volume 121, Issue 2, April 2016, Pages 377–402, https://doi-org.libproxy.temple.edu/10.1093/ahr/121.2.377

Klein, Lauren F. "The Image of Absence: Archival Silence, Data Visualization, and James Hemings," American Literature (2013) 85 (4): 661-688. https://doi-org.libproxy.temple.edu/10.1215/00029831-2367310

Gitelman, Lisa. "Searching and Thinking About Searching JSTOR," Representations 127:1 (Summer 2014), 73-82.https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/rep.2014.127.1.73

*Zeffiro, Andrea. "Digitizing Labor in the Google Books Project: Gloved Fingertips and Severed Hands," in Humans at Work in the Digital Age (2020).

Mayer, Allana. “Crowdsourcing, Open Data and Precarious Labor,” Model View Culture 33 (February 24, 2016), https://modelviewculture.com/pieces/crowdsourcing-open-data-and-precarious-labour

Featured Projects

Assignments

Groups: Begin project development

Week 8:

October 12

Mixed Materiality

Topics

  • 3D modeling and photogrammetry
  • Critical making
  • Simulacra & simulation

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

*Sayers, Jentery. “Before you Make a Thing,” https://jentery.github.io/ts200v2/notes.html

*Jungnickel, Kat. “Making Things to Make Sense of Things: DIY as Research and Practice,” in The Routledge Companion to Media Studies and Digital Humanities, 2018.

*Garfinkel, Susan. "Dialogic Objects in the Age of 3-D Printing: The Case of the Lincoln Life Mask" in Making Things and Drawing Boundaries: Experiments in the Digital Humanities, 2017, http://www.jstor.com/stable/10.5749/j.ctt1pwt6wq.27.

Wernimont, Jacqueline and Elizabeth M. Losh. "Wear and Care: Feminisms at a Long Maker-Table," in The Routledge Companion to Media Studies and Digital Humanities, 2018.

Watch (optional)

Shawn Graham on “Failing Productively,” 2016.

Supplemental Reading

Kraus, Kari. “Finding Fault Lines: An Approach to Speculative Design” in The Routledge Companion to Media Studies and Digital Humanities, 2018.

las, Zach. "Gay Bombs: User's Manual, Queer Technologies, http://zachblas.info/works/queer-technologies/.

Melo, Marijel. "Knotty Cartographies: Augmenting Everyday Looking Practices of Craft and Race," Craft Research 9:1 (2018), doi: 10.1386/crre.9.1.59_1. https://eitm.unc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Knotty-Cartographies_Melo.pdf.

Featured Projects

Week 9:

October 19

Curation & Interpretation

Topics

  • Categories, portals, and knowledge systems
  • Digital exhibits and interactives
  • Accessibility

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

Dick, Philip K. "The Preserving Machine," The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction 4:6 (June 1953).

*Christen, Kimberly. "Does Information Really Want to be Free? Indigenous Knowledge Systems and the Question of Openness," International Journal of Communication 6 (2012).

*Zaborowska, Magdalena. "Black Matters of Value: Archiving James Baldwin's House as a Virtual Writer's Museum," American Quarterly 70:3 (September 2018), https://muse.jhu.edu/article/704335/pdf.

Montfort, Nick. "World's Fairs and Exhibiting the Future" in The Future, 2017.

Supplemental Reading

Dinsman, Melissa. "The Digital in the Humanities: An Interview with Marisa Parham,” Los Angeles Review of Books (May 19, 2016), https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/digital-humanities-interview-marisa-parham/.

Parham, Marisa. “Breaking, Dancing, Making in the Machine: Notes on .break .dance

Featured Projects

Part 3: The Possibilities of Representation

Week 10:

October 26

Reconception & Experimentation

Topics

  • Audio & video interventions
  • Collaborative meaning-making
  • Reimagining heritage as a tool for the future

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

*Eshun, Kodwo. “Further Considerations on Afrofuturism,” CR: The New Centennial Review 3:2 (Summer 2003), 287-302, http://www.jstor.com/stable/41949397.

*Perry, Sara, Maria Roussou, et al. “Shared Digital Experiences Supporting Collaborative Meaning-Making at Heritage Sites,” in The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Heritage Sites, 2020.

*Wheeler, Rachel, and Sarah Eyerly, “Singing Box 331: Re-Sounding Eighteenth-Century Mohican Hymns from the Moravian Archives.” The William and Mary Quarterly 76:4 (October 2019), 649-696. https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5309/willmaryquar.76.4.0649.

Benjamin, Walter. “Theses on the Philosophy of History,” in Illuminations, ed. Hannah Arendt, 1968.

Watch

The Last Angel of History (1995)

Supplemental Reading

Burton, Jazmyn. “Making Space for the Future,” Temple Now (February 27, 2017), https://news.temple.edu/news/2017-02-27/alumna-afrofuturism-north-philadelphia.

Neyrat, Frédéric, trans. Daniel Ross. “The Black Angel of History,” Angelaki: The Journal of Theoretical Humanities, 25:4 (2020), 120-134, DOI: 10.1080/0969725X.2020.1790841.

Featured Projects

Week 11:

November 2

ELECTION WEEK
NO CLASS

Vote, please.

Week 12:

November 9

Embodiment & Play

Topics

  • AR/VR/MR
  • Video and other digital games
  • Embodiment, affect, human-computer interaction

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

*Poole, Steve. “Ghosts in the Garden: Locative Gameplay and Historical Interpretation From Below,” International Journal of Heritage Studies, 24:3, 300-314,  https://doi.org/10.1080/13527258.2017.1347887.

Sullivan, Elaine, Angel David Nieves and Lisa M. Snyder. “Making the Model: Scholarship and Rhetoric in 3-D Historical Reconstructions,” in Jentery Sayers, ed. Making Things and Drawing Boundaries: Experiments in the Digital Humanities, 2017. http://www.jstor.com/stable/10.5749/j.ctt1pwt6wq.38.

Wood, Zebulon W., Albert William, Ayoung Yoon and Andrea Copeland. “Virtual Bethel: Preservation of Indiana’s Oldest Black Church,” in Levenberg, et al., eds. Research Methods for the Digital Humanities, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-96713-4_11.

*Huws, Sara, Alison John and Jenny Kidd. “Traces-Olion: Creating a Bilingual ‘Subtlemob’ for National Museum Wales,” in The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Museums, and Heritage Sites, 2020.

Featured Projects

Week 13:

November 16

Narrative

Topics

  • Storytelling
  • Representing contingency
  • Multi-modality and visual essays

Discuss

*If you’re short on time, prioritize these!

Montfort, Nick. “Batch/Interactive” in Burges and Elias, eds. Time: A Vocabulary of the Present, 2016.

Bush, Vannevar. “As We May Think,” The Atlantic (July 1945), https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1945/07/as-we-may-think/303881/.

*Mullen, Lincoln. “A Braided Narrative for Digital History,” in Gold and Klein, eds. Debates in the Digital Humanities: 2019, https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctvg251hk.34.

*Posner, Miriam. “What’s Next: The Radical, Unrealized Potential of the Digital Humanities,” 2015.

Watch

Ira Glass on Storytelling, “Part 1,The Building Blocks of a Good Story,” 2010.

Supplemental Reading

Rees, Amanda, and and Iwan Rhys Morus. “Presenting Futures Past: Science Fiction and the History of Science,” Osiris 34:1 (2019), https://doi-org.libproxy.temple.edu/10.1086/704131/

Risam, Roopika, et al. An Invitation Towards Social Justice in the Digital Humanities, http://criticaldh.roopikarisam.com/

Nuñez, David. "Choose Your Own Adventure," Soulful Computing (13 November 2020), https://davidnunez.com/newsletter/choose-your-own-adventure/

Featured Projects

Assignments

Due: Draft of MVP

Week 14:

November 23

Group Work Week

Week 15:

November 30

TBD