CPCT Research Seminar 2017-18:

Women on the Verge of a Philosophical Breakdown

Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought, Goldsmiths, University of London

Time: Wednesdays, 4:00-6:30pm

Room: PSH 305 [**Note room change.]

** The session on June 6 will take place in RHB 307. **

** The final session on June 27 will take place in RHB 258. **

Dates:

Informational Meeting: 4 Oct

Autumn: 18 Oct; 1 Nov; 15 Nov; 29 Nov; 13 Dec

Spring: 24 Jan; 7 Feb; 21 Feb; 7 Mar; 21 Mar

Summer: 25 Apr; 9 May; 23 May; 6 June; 27 June

Description:

CPCT’s annual research seminar meets on a bi-weekly basis and is open to centre members, graduate affiliates, and other interested staff and students. It aims to serve as a forum for philosophical work and dialogue at Goldsmiths.

This year’s seminar is dedicated to women in the history of philosophy, broadly understood, around whom questions of materialism and embodiment have pivoted from antiquity to the near present. We hope in particular to see how the confrontation with forms of inquiry such as fragments, letters, visions and pamphlets compels us to rethink the categories that are customarily used to identify a legibly philosophical, because paradoxically disembodied corpus. Selections range from natural philosophy, the interstices between logic and rhetoric, philosophy of mind, mysticism, critiques of democracy and rights, and psychoanalysis. Throughout we will explore the challenges and provocations posed by these texts to debates on the union of mind and body, reason and madness, vision and idea, reform and revolution, and the ‘woman question’.

 

Co-convened by Julia Ng (Autumn), Marina Vishmidt, Alberto Toscano, Svenja Bromberg, Stefan Nowotny

General resources: 

Feminist History of Philosophy page on SEP 

Diversity Reading List in Philosophy [link]

Fricker (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy, Cambridge UP 2006 [PDF]

Waithe, Mary Ellen, A History of Women Philosophers [Volume 1] [Volume 2] [Volume 3] [Volume 4]

Session Plan and Readings:

As far as possible we have sought out electronic copies and links to the various texts and secondary readings for each session. We would nevertheless encourage that you purchase the (very affordable) Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Margaret Atherton, ed., Indianapolis and Cambridge: Hackett, 1994, from which five of the early sessions are drawn.

Amongst the Further readings we have indicated with asterisks ** those texts that we particularly recommend for discussion.

Informational meeting — 4 October 2017        3

Sappho — 18 October 2017        3

Hildegard von Bingen — 1 November 2017        3

Teresa of Avila — 15 November 2017        4

Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia — 29 November 2017        5

Margaret Cavendish — 13 December 2017        6

Anne Viscountess Conway — 24 January 2018        7

Damaris Cudworth, Lady Masham — 7 February 2018        7

Emilie du Châtelet — 21 February 2018        8

Catherine Trotter Cockburn — 7 March 2018        9

Olympe de Gouges | Mary Wollstonecraft — 21 March 2018        9

Rahel Varnhagen | Hannah Arendt — 25 April 2018        10

Eleanor Marx | Alexandra Kollontai — 9 May 2018        11

Rosa Luxemburg — 23 May 2018        12

Melanie Klein — 6 June 2018        12

Simone Weil — 20 June 2018        13

AUTUMN

Informational meeting — 4 October 2017

Suggested reading

Susan James, “Feminism in philosophy of mind: the question of personal identity,” in Fricker (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy, Cambridge UP, 2006 [PDF]

Sappho — 18 October 2017

Presented by Marina Vishmidt

Editions

Carson, Anne (trans.) If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho. New York: Vintage, 2002, 2-99; ‘Notes’, 357-66. [PDF] NB: this is a facing-page translation, and many of the fragments are several words only - so do not be intimidated by the page count.

‘Appendix’, in Sappho: A New Translation of the Complete Works. Ed. and trans. by Diane J. Rayor and André Lardinois. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2014, 155-64. [PDF]

Campbell, David (ed.). Greek Lyric I: Sappho and Alcaeus (Loeb Classical Library 142). Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1982. [PDF] NB: for reference / comparison with the selection above

Further reading

Burris, Simon; Fish, Jeffrey; Obbink, Dirk (2014). "New Fragments of Book 1 of Sappho". Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik. 189.

J. Bremmer, From Sappho to de Sade (1989) [PDF]

Page DuBois, ‘Sappho, Tithonos and the Ruin of the Body’, European Review of History: Revue européenne d'histoire, 18:5-6, 663-672 [PDF]

Ellen Greene (ed.), Reading Sappho: Contemporary Approaches. Berkeley: U of California Press, 1996. [http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view?docId=ft3199n81q;brand=ucpress]

DeJean, Joan. "Fictions of Sappho." Critical Inquiry 13 (1987) 787-805. [PDF]

Plato, Phaedrus. [PDF]

Hildegard von Bingen — 1 November 2017

Presented by Julia Ng

Editions

Hildegard von Bingen, Selected Writings, Mark Atherton (trans.), Penguin Classics, 2001.

Illuminations of Hildegard’s visions [link to images]

Further reading

Hollywood, Amy, 2002. “Introduction,” Sensible Ecstasy: Mysticism, Sexual Difference, and the Demands of History. Chicago: U Chicago Press. [PDF] **

Corrigan, V. J., 2012. “Hildegard of Bingen,” Icons of the Middle Ages: Rulers, Writers, Rebels, and Saints, Vol 1, Greenword Publishing: 355. [PDF]

Milem, B., 2002. “Hildegard of Bingen,” A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages, Jorge JE Gracia and Timothy B Noone (eds.), Wiley-Blackwell: 318–319. [PDF]

Newman, Barbara, 1998. Sister of Wisdom. St. Hildegard’s Theology of the Feminine. U California Press. [PDF]

Dailey, Patricia, 2013. Promised Bodies: Time, Language, & Corporeality in Medieval Women's Mystical Texts. New York: Columbia UP. [PDF]

Hildegard von Bingen, Hildegard’s Healing Plants. From her medieval classic Physica. Trans. Bruce W. Hozeski. Boston: Beacon Press, 2001. [PDF]

Teresa of Avila — 15 November 2017

Presented by Julia Ng

Editions

Teresa of Avila, Chapter 29, “The Life of the Holy Mother Teresa of Jesus,” Complete Works of St. Teresa of Avila, Vol 1, translated and edited by E. Allison Peers, London: Burns & Oates, 2002, pp. 187-193. [PDF]

Teresa of Avila, Books 6 and 7, The Interior Castle, edited and translated by E. Allison Peers, New York: Dover Thrift Editions, 1946. [PDF]

Further reading

Julia Kristeva, “The Passion according to Teresa of Avila,” Carnal Hermeneutics, edited by Richard Kearney and Brian Treanor, New York: Fordham University Press, 2015, pp. 251-262. [PDF] **

Julia Kristeva, Teresa, My Love: An Imagined Life of the Saint of Avila. Trans. Lorna Scott Fox. New York: Columbia UP, 2008. [PDF]

René Descartes, “Second Meditation,” Meditations on First Philosophy, edited by John Cottingham, Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996, pp. 16-23. [PDF]

Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia — 29 November 2017

Presented by Svenja Bromberg

Editions

‘Selections from Her Correspondence with Descartes’, in Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Margaret Atherton, ed., Indianapolis and Cambridge, Hackett Publishing, 1994, pp. 9-21 [PDF]

Further reading

Shapiro, Lisa, 2006, The Correspondence Between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [PDF]

Alanen, Lilli, 2004. “Descartes and Elisabeth: A Philosophical Dialogue?” in Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy, Lilli Alanen and Charlotte Witt (eds.), New York/Dordrecht: Kluwer, 193–218. [PDF]

Atherton, Margaret, 2002, 'Cartesian Reason and Gendered Reason', in Louise M. Antony and Charlotte Witt, eds. A Mind of One's Own, Avalon Publishing, pp. 69-83. [PDF]

Garber, Daniel, 2001. “Understanding Interaction: What Descartes Should Have Told Elisabeth,” in Descartes Embodied: Reading Cartesian Philosophy through Cartesian Science, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 168–88. [PDF] **

Mattern, Ruth, 1978. “Descartes's Correspondence with Elizabeth: Concerning Both the Union and Distinction of Mind and Body,” in Descartes: Critical and Interpretive Essays, Michael Hooker (ed.), Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. [PDF]

Shapiro, Lisa. “Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The union of soul and body and the practice of philosophy,” in British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7.3 (1999): 503-520. Reprinted in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 182–203. [full text] **

Sievert, Don, 2002. “Elizabeth and Descartes on the Possibility of Mind-Body Interaction,” Southwest Philosophy Review, 18: 149–54. [PDF]

Tollefsen, Deborah, 1999. “Princess Elisabeth and the Problem of Mind-Body Interaction,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 14(3): 59–77. [PDF]

Wartenburg, Thomas, 1999. “Descartes's Mood: The Question of Feminism in the Correspondence with Elisabeth,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press. [PDF]

Yandell, David, 1997. “What Descartes Really Told Elisabeth: Mind-Body Union as a Primitive Notion,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 5: 249–73. [PDF]

Zedler, Bernice, 1989. “The Three Princesses.” Hypatia, 4(10): 28–63. [PDF]

Margaret Cavendish — 13 December 2017

Presented by

Editions

‘Selections from Philosophical Letters’, in Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Margaret Atherton, ed., Indianapolis and Cambridge, Hackett Publishing, 1994: 22-45. [PDF]

‘An Argumental Discourse’, in Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, Eileen O’Neill, ed., Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003: 23-43 [PDF]

Further Reading

David Cunning, ‘Cavendish on the Intelligibility of the Prospect of Thinking Matter’, History of Philosophy Quarterly, 23: 2, (2006): 117–136. [PDF]

David Cunning, Cavendish, New York, Routledge, 2016

Jonathan Goldberg, The Seeds of Things: Theorizing Sexuality and Materiality in Renaissance Representations, New York: Fordham University Press, 2009 [PDF]

Sarah Hutton, ‘Anne Conway, Margaret Cavendish and Seventeenth-Century Scientific Thought’, in Lynette Hunter, and Sarah Hutton, eds., Women, Science and Medicine 1500-1700: Mothers and Sisters of the Royal Society, Stroud: Alan Sutton, 1997, pp. 218-34. [PDF]

Susan James, ‘The Philosophical Innovations of Margaret Cavendish’, British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 7 (1999): 219–44 [full text]

Lisa T. Sarasohn, ‘A Science Turned Upside Down: Feminism and the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish’, Huntington Library Quarterly 47, 1984, 299-307 [full text]

Londa Schiebinger, The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science,

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1989 [in Goldsmiths Library: 306.45082 SCH]

Lisa Walters, Margaret Cavendish: Gender, Science and Politics, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2014 [PDF]

SPRING

Anne Viscountess Conway — 24 January 2018

Presented by Deirdre Daly

Editions

‘Selections from The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy’, in Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Margaret Atherton, ed., Indianapolis and Cambridge, Hackett Publishing,1994, pp. 46-76 [PDF]

Further Reading

Louise D. Derksen, ‘Anne Conway’s Critique of Cartesian Dualism’, The Paidea Project

http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Onto/OntoDerk.htm 

Jane Duran, ‘Anne Viscountess Conway: a Seventeenth-Century Rationalist’, Hypatia: a Journal of Feminist Philosophy. 4 (1989): 64-79. [PDF]

Sarah Hutton, ‘Anne Conway, Margaret Cavendish and Seventeenth-Century Scientific Thought’, in Lynette Hunter, and Sarah Hutton, eds., Women, Science and Medicine 1500-1700: Mothers and Sisters of the Royal Society, Stroud: Alan Sutton, 1997, pp. 218-34 [full text] [PDF]

Sarah Hutton, ‘The Cambridge Platonists,’ in Steven Nadler, ed., Blackwell Companion to Early Modern Philosophy, Oxford: Blackwell, 2002 [PDF]

Carolyn Merchant, ‘The Vitalism of Anne Conway: its Impact on Leibniz’s Conception of the Monad’, Journal of the History of Philosophy, 27 (3), 1979, 255-70 [full text]

Damaris Cudworth, Lady Masham — 7 February 2018

Editions

‘Selections from Her Correspondence with Leibniz’, in Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Margaret Atherton, ed., Indianapolis and Cambridge, Hackett Publishing, 1994, pp. 77-95 [PDF]

Further Reading

Lois Frankel, ‘Damaris Cudworth Masham: A Seventeenth Century Feminist Philosopher’, Hypatia, 4:1 (1989): 80-90 [PDF]

Sarah Hutton, ‘The Cambridge Platonists,’ in Steven Nadler, ed., Blackwell Companion to Early Modern Philosophy, Oxford: Blackwell, 2002 [PDF]

Sarah Hutton, ‘Damaris Cudworth, Lady Masham: Between Platonism and Enlightenment’, British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 1 (1993): 29-54 [PDF]

Pauline Phemister, ‘“All the time and everywhere everything's the same as here”: the Principle of Uniformity in the Correspondence between Leibniz and Lady Masham’, in Paul Lodge, ed., Leibniz and his Correspondents, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2007 [PDF]

Emilie du Châtelet — 21 February 2018

Presented by Marina Vishmidt

Editions

‘Dissertation on the Nature and Propagation of Fire’ in Selected Philosophical and Scientific Writings, Judith P. Zinsser, ed., Isabelle Bour and Judith P. Zinsser, trans., Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 2009: 62-103 [PDF]

Further Reading

Karen Detlefsen (2014), ‘Du Châtelet and Descartes on the Roles of Hypothesis and Metaphysics in Natural Philosophy’ in Feminism and the History of Philosophy, Eileen O’Neill and Marcy Lascano, ed., Kluwer Academic Press, forthcoming [full text]

Esther Ehrman, Madame du Chatelet: Scientist, Philosopher, and Feminist of the Enlightenment, Leamington Spa: Berg, 1986

Ruth Hagengruber, ‘Emilie Du Châtelet between Leibniz and Newton: The Transformation of Metaphysics’, in Émilie Du Châtelet: Between Leibniz and Newton, Ruth Hagengruber, ed., London, Springer, 2011: 1-59. [PDF]

Carolyn Iltis, ‘Madame Du Châtelet's Metaphysics and Mechanics’, Studies in the History of Philosophy of Science, 8:1 (1977): 29–48 [full text]

Linda Gardiner Janik, ‘Searching for the metaphysics of science: the structure and composition of madame Du Châtelet's Institutions de physique, 1737–1740’, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, 201 (1982): 85–113. [PDF]

Paul Veatch Moriarty, ‘The principle of sufficient reason in Du Châtelet's Institutions’, in Émilie Du Châtelet: rewriting Enlightenment philosophy and science, Judith P. Zinsser and Julie Candler Hayes, eds., Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, 1 ( 2006): 203–25. [PDF]

Mary Terrall, ‘Emilie du Châtelet and the gendering of science’, History of Science,  33:101 (1995) : 283-310 [full text]

Judith P. Zinsser, ‘Volume Editor’s Introduction’ and ‘Volume Editor’s Bibliography’, in Selected Philosophical and Scientific Writings, Judith P. Zinsser, ed., Isabelle Bour and Judith P. Zinsser, trans., Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 2009: 1-33 [PDF]

Catherine Trotter Cockburn — 7 March 2018

Editions

‘Selections from A Defense of Mr. Locke’s Essay of Human Understanding’, in Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Margaret Atherton, ed., Indianapolis and Cambridge, Hackett Publishing, 1994, pp. 126-46 [PDF]

Further Reading

Martha Brandt Bolton, ‘Some Aspects of the Philosophical Work of Catharine Trotter Cockburn’, in Hypatia’s Daughters: Fifteen Hundred Years of Women Philosophers, Linda Lopez McAlister, ed., Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1996: 139–64. [PDF]

Jane Duran, ‘Early English Empiricism and the Work of Catharine Trotter Cockburn’, Metaphilosophy 44:4,  (2013): 485–495 [full text]

Jessica Gordon Roth, ‘Catharine Trotter Cockburn’s Defence of Locke’, The Monist, 98:1) (2015): 64–76 [full text]

Emily Thomas, ‘Catharine Cockburn on Unthinking Immaterial Substance: Souls, Space, and Related Matters’, in Philosophy Compass, 10:4, (2015): 255–263 [full text]

Olympe de Gouges | Mary Wollstonecraft — 21 March 2018

Presented by Louise Van Gheluwe

Editions

de Gouges, Olympe, 1994. “Black Slavery, or the Happy Shipwreck,” in Translating Slavery; Gender and Race in French Women's Writing, 1783–1823, Maryann De Julio (trans.), Doris Kadish and Franҫoise Massardiare-Kenney (eds.), Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 87–119. [PDF]

de Gouges, Olympe, 1791. “Declaration of the Rights of Women,” in Women in Revolutionary Paris, 1789–1795, D. G. Levy, H. B. Applewhite, and M.D. Johnson (eds.), Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1980, 87–96; hosted at American Studies Program website, City University of New York. [Link to the Declaration]

‘On the pernicious effects which arise from the unnatural distinctions established in society’, Chapter 9, in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Eileen Hunt Botting, ed., New Haven and London, Yale University Press, pp. 170-9, 2014 [PDF]

Further reading

Brown, Gregory S., 2001. “The Self-Fashioning of Olympe de Gouges, 1784–89,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 34(3): 383–401. [PDF]

Vanpée, Janie, 1999. “Performing Justice: The Trials of Olympe de Gouges,” Theatre Journal, 51(1): 47–65. [JSTOR]

Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft, Claudia Johnson,ed., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002 [PDF]

Lena Halldenius, Mary Wollstonecraft and Feminist Republicanism: Independence, Rights and the Experience of Unfreedom, London: Pickering & Chatto, 2015

Gary Kelly, Revolutionary Feminism: The Mind and Career of Mary Wollstonecraft, London: MacMillan,1992: 107-39 [PDF]

Karen Offen, European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History, Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1999 [in Goldsmiths library: 305.42094 OFF]

Barbara Taylor, Wollstonecraft and the Feminist Imagination, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003 [in Goldsmiths library: 823.6 TAY]

SUMMER

Rahel Varnhagen | Hannah Arendt — 25 April 2018

Editions

Rahel. Ein Buch des Andenkens für ihre Freunde (1 Bd., Berlin 1833; Buchhandelsausgabe: 3 Bde., Berlin 1834) [link to digitized German edition of 3 volumes]

there are further editions, recent and historical, in German

Jennings, Kate Vaughan. Rahel: Her Life and Letters (H.S. King, 1876) [link to Google book]

contains some translations of her letters

Arendt, Hannah. Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman. Revised edition translated into English by Richard and Clara Winston. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1974. Critical edition edited by Liliane Weissberg. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997. [link to German edition PDF]

Further reading

Arendt, Hannah. “Rahel Varnhagen and Goethe.” Translated by Haun Saussy. Critical Inquiry 40.1 (Autumn 2013), pp. 15-24. [PDF]

Arendt, Hannah. “Writing Rahel Varnhagen. From a Letter to Karl Jaspers.” The Portable Hannah Arendt, New York: Penguin, 2000: 68-73. [PDF]

Saussy, Haun. “The Refugee Speaks of Parvenus and Their Beautiful Illusions- A Rediscovered 1934 Text by Hannah Arendt,” Critical Inquiry 40.1 (Autumn 2013), pp. 1-14. [PDF]

Benhabib, Seyla, 1995. “The Pariah and Her Shadow: Hannah Arendt's Biography of Rahel Varnhagen,” in Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, Bonnie Honig (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 83–104. [PDF] [PDF of Political Theory version]

Maslin, Kimberley. “Rahel Varnhagen: Arendt’s Experiential Ontology,” in New German Critique 119, 40.2 (2013): 77-96. [PDF]

Susman, Margarete. “Rahel,” in Frauen der Romantik [1931] (Insel Verlag 1960) [link to epub]

Rose, Gillian, 1992. The Broken Middle, Blackwell Publishing. Chapter 5: Love and the State, Varnhagen, Luxemburg and Arendt.  

Eleanor Marx | Alexandra Kollontai — 9 May 2018

Presented by Svenja Bromberg

Editions

Marx, Eleanor (1886) “The Woman Question” [online]

Kollontai, Alexandra (1909), “The Social Basis of the Woman Question” [online]

Further reading

Marx, Eleanor (1890), ‘Speech on the First May Day’ [online]

Thompson, E.P., “Eleanor Marx”, in: Persons and Polemics, Historical Essays, Merlin Press 1994, pp.66-76. [online]

Holmes, Rachel (2014), Eleanor Marx: A Life [EPUB] [Review]

Apter, Emily, “Biography of a translation Madame Bovary between Eleanor Marx and Paul de Man”, Translation Studies, 01 January 2008, Vol.1(1), p.73-89. [PDF]

Lissagaray P.-O., (2012) History of the Paris Commune of 1871, trans. by Eleanor Marx, London: Verso. [in Goldsmiths Library: Main 944.08 LIS]

Jenny Marx Longuet, Laura Marx Lafargue, Eleanor Marx Aveling (1982) The daughters of Karl Marx: family correspondence 1866-1898 / introduction by Sheila Rowbotham, London: Deutsch. [in Goldsmiths Library: Reserve 335.42]

Rosa Luxemburg — 23 May 2018

Presented by Alberto Toscano

Editions

Luxemburg, Rosa (2004), “The Russian Revolution”, in: The Rosa Luxemburg Reader, Monthly Review Press, pp. 281-310. [PDF]

All texts also available at marxists.org

Further reading

Luxemburg, Rosa (2004) The Rosa Luxemburg Reader, Monthly Review Press.
Esp. Sections on the Women’s Question (‘Women's Suffrage and the Class Struggle’ (1912), ‘The Proletarian Woman’’ (1914)) and Slavery’ (pp. 111). 

Zetkin, Clara (2017 [1922]), Rosa Luxemburg’s Views on The Russian Revolution, Red Star Publishers.

Lukács, Georg (1971 [1923]), “The Marxism of Rosa Luxemburg” and “Critical Observations on Rosa Luxemburg’s ‘Critique of the Russian Revolution’, in History and Class Consciousness: Studies in Marxist Dialectics, Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, pp. 27-45 and 272-294.  

Michaël Löwy, ‘The Spark Ignites in the Action—The Philosophy of Praxis in the Thought of Rosa Luxemburg’, International Viewpoint Online Magazine, 162 (2 August 2011), p. 13 [online]

Delice, Engin (2015), “The Dialectic Whole Between Theory and Reality in Rosa Luxemburg”, Journal of Socialist Theory 43: 37-67. [PDF]

Dunayevskaya, Raya (1991), Rosa Luxemburg, Women's Liberation, and Marx's Philosophy of Revolution, Publisher: Humanities Press, Atlantic Highlands [PDF]

Melanie Klein — 6 June 2018

Presented by Stefan Nowotny

Editions

Melanie Klein, “Notes on Some Schizoid Mechanisms” (1946), in: The Writings of Melanie Klein, Vol. III: Envy and Gratitude and Other Works 1946–1963, New York: The Free Press 1975, pp. 1–24. [PDF]

—, “Envy and Gratitude” (1957), ibid., pp. 176–235. [PDF]  

Further reading

 

Julia Kristeva, Melanie Klein. Translated by Ross Guberman. New York: Columbia UP 2001. [PDF]

Sarah Richmond, “Feminism and Psychoanalysis: Using Melanie Klein,” in: Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy, Cambridge UP 2006, pp. 68-86. [PDF]

Jacqueline Rose, Why War? Psychoanalysis, Politics and the Return to Melanie Klein, Oxford and Cambridge (Ma.): Blackwell 1993.

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, “Translation as Culture”, in: Parallax, Vol. 6., No. 1, 2000, pp. 13–24. [PDF] 

Donald. W. Winnicott, “The Depressive Position in Normal Emotional Development”, in: Through Paediatrics to Psycho-Analysis, New York: Basic Books 1975, pp. 262–277. [PDF]  

Simone Weil — 20 June 2018

Presented by Alberto Toscano

Editions

Simone Weil, Rachel Bespaloff (2005) War and the Iliad, New York: New York Review of Books. [PDF]

Simone Weil (2015), “Essay on the Concept of Reading”, in Late Philosophical Writings, ed. Eric O. Springsted, University of Notre Dame Press. [PDF]

Simone Weil (2002), “The Mysticism of Work” in Gravity and Grace, London: Routledge. [PDF]

Further reading

Simone Weil (2001) The Need for Roots, London: Routledge.

Esposito, Roberto (2017) The Origin of the Political: Hannah Arendt or Simone Weil?, Fordham: Fordham University Press. [PDF]

Brueck, Katherine T.  (1995) The Redemption of Tragedy: The Literary Vision of Simone Weil, Albany: SUNY. [PDF]

Nye, Andrea (1994) Philosophia: The Thought of Rosa Luxemburg, Simone Weil and Hannah Arendt, London: Routledge.

Carson, Ann (2005) “Decreation: How Women Like Sappho, Marguerite Porete and Simone Weil Tell God”, in Decreation, New York: Vintage. [PDF]