CINOA is, this year, 81 years old, a more than respectable age for any organisation of such a wide ranging group of members. The changes that have happened in those years are too long to enumerate and furthermore, I wouldn’t know all of them – dealing is just a different world today.

What hasn’t changed, however, are the essentials of what CINOA stands for in its members, namely quality, integrity and connoisseurship. This is the most important element of any purchase that a collector, or anyone else for that matter, makes.

Our commitment to excellence remains unchanged, but the challenges we face are enormous. All the assumptions about how people buy have been altered as today our client base is being wooed by the internet. Look alike objects are for sale for a fraction of what the real object would sell for. That such sites are having success is because the educational process that dealers filled so ably for years in their galleries, has been greatly diminished as galleries have moved off of Main Street. The biggest surprise for everyone is that people often buy without even looking at an object!

How has CINOA reacted to this challenge? All of our dealers have realized how important personal contact is and to that end, many dealers are committing to shows. Of course, the Biennale in Paris, created by the French association, the Syndicat Nationale des Antiquaires (SNA) remains one of the great events of the antiques trade. There are many other fairs, however, that feature CINOA dealers and I strongly recommend them as a good place to meet them.

To learn more about us and what is happening in the world of art and antiques, I recommend repeat visits to www.cinoa.org. This is where you will find the dealer fairs that feature many of the CINOA members. You will find events and news listed and relevant information about laws and regulation facing the trade within all our member countries. There is also a link to our commercial partner, www.RubyLUX.com, where you will be able to find member goods for sale.

In conclusion, I would like to say that this “new” world is not that much different than the old. The primary difference is in how the message of who and what we are is conveyed. Electronically, or in person, the message is and will always be about quality, integrity and connoisseurship. To those ideals, we remain committed.

Sincerely,

Clinton Howell