Instructor:

Trask Colby

Contact Information

tcolby@pps.net or 503-916-6120

School:

Learning and Credit Options: Virtual Scholars

School Year:

2018-19

Course number: 2730OR

Course title: Government (.5 credits only)

Subject: Social Studies

Grade Level(s): 12

Course Description:

Responsible citizenship, including civil and political participation, is essential to maintain a representative government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights, preserving the freedoms that students experience daily. Students will examine the processes of each branch of government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy. The media, interest groups and influential citizens provide examples of how the government can be affected by informed and active participants. Students will examine the U.S. Court system, and become a part of the process by participating in the judicial decision-making process. They will also discover ways the United States interacts with countries around the world, through domestic policy, foreign policy and human rights policy. Completion of this course will allow you to act as an informed citizen who is ready to participate in the American democracy!

Prerequisites: n/a

Priority Standards and Final Proficiencies:

This course is a standards-based course. All students will be exposed to CCSS or Oregon state 12 standards--below are the standards that mastery must be shown in order to earn credit.

SS.CS.H.3
SS.WHST.11-12.8
HS.28
SS.CS.CG.15
SS.HS.CS.RH.26
SS.HS.CG.27
SS.RH.11-12.10
SS.HS.CG.32

Schedule of Units Covered:

Unit One:

Rule of Law
Representative Government
Naturalization process
Rights & Responsibilities of citizens
Ideals of the Revolution

Unit Two:

Articles of Confederation
The US Constitution
Federalism
Individual Rights

Unit Three

The Legislative Branch
Public Policy
The Executive Branch
Elections and Voting
Media and Politics

Unit Four

The Judicial Branch
US Civil Rights
US Foreign Policy
Government systems around the world
 

Academic Vocabulary

Abolition
Absolute
Accountability
Accountable
Ad hoc committee
Advocate
Amoral
Anarchy
Appeal
Appellate Court
Apportionment
Appropriation
Arable Land
Aristocracy
Authoritarian
Authority
Authorization bill

Ballot
Bench trial
Bias
Bicameral legislature
Bill of Attainder
Burden
Bureaucracy

Cabinet
Campaign
Caucus
Censor
Census
Chaos
Charter
Charter
Civil Case
Civil Liberties
Civilian
Class-action Lawsuit
Closed primary
Cloture
Coalition
Common Good
Compensation
Complacent
Concurrent powers
Concurring Opinion
Confederation
Conference committee
Connotation
Consent
Constituent
Constitution
Controversial
Criminal Case

Delegate
Delegated powers
Democratization
Demographics
Deportation
Diplomacy
Disenfranchise
Dissenting Opinion
Diversity
Diversity Case
Double Jeopardy
Dual sovereignty
Due process

Elastic clause
Electoral College
Enlightenment
Evaluate
Ex post facto law
Exclusionary rule
Executive Privilege
Export
Expressed powers
Externality
Extremism

Faction
Federal district court
Federal-question case
Federalism
Filibuster
Foreign policy
Founding Era

Genocide
Gerrymander
Good faith exception
Green Card
Gross Domestic Product

Holocaust
Human Trafficking

Impeach
Imperialism
Implied powers
Import
In forma pauperis
Incorporation
Independent
Indoctrinate
Infrastructure
Initiative
Institution
Interdependence
Interest Group
Interstate commerce
Interventionism
Isolationism

Japanese-American Internment
Joint committee
Judicial Review
Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
Jury
Justice

Labor union
Legislation
Legitimacy
Legitimacy
Libel
Literate
Litigation

Majority Opinion
Maritime
Market Economy
Media
Mediation
Midterm election
Militia
Monarchy
Monopoly
Municipality

Nanking Massacre
Natural Rights
Naturalization
Nonprofit organization
Nullify

Obsolete
Open primary
Ordinance
Original Jurisdiction
Oversight

Parliament
Per capita
Per curiam decision
Permanent resident
Petition
Philadelphia Convention
Platform
Political action committee
Political ideology
Political Party
Poll
Popular Sovereignty
Popular vote
Precedent
Prerequisite
President Pro Tempore
Presidential Succession
Primary election
Probable cause
Prosecution
Public Policy
Pure Democracy

Qualitative data
Quantitative data
Quota

Ratification
Rational
Red tape
Referendum
Reflection
Regulation
Remedy
Renewable Resource
Reparations
Representative Government
Republic
Republicanism
Reserved powers
Resident alien
Roving Wiretap
Rule of Law

Scrutinize
Self Incrimination
Separation of Powers
Service
Slander
Social Contract
Socioeconomic trait
Sovereign
Speaker of the House
Special Purpose District
Standing committee
Stare decisis
State Legislature
State Militia
Subpoena
Suffrage
Supremacy
Supremacy clause
Sustainable
Swing state

Tariff
Third party
Trial
Trust fund
Tyranny

U.S. Constitution
Unalienable
Unconstitutional
Unfunded mandate
Universal human rights
Universal suffrage

Venture
Visa
Voter fraud
Voter turnout

Warren Court
Watchdog
Writ of certiorari
Writ of habeas corpus

District-Adopted Materials

vs.pps.net

Supplemental Resources

As needed

Differentiation/Accessibility Strategies and Support (TAG, ELL,SpEd, other):

Accommodations based on IEP and 504 will be adhered to with guidance from case manager. Case manager approval is required for a student to take a VS course.

 

Instruction and assessments are created and delivered with a mind to multiple learning styles; it is with active cognition that teachers build material for students who learn in many different ways.

Career-Related Learning Experiences

N/A

Essential Skills and Required Work Samples:

Being a standards-based course, work will need to be scored at “Successful” or higher in order to earn credit.

Assessment/Evaluation/Grading Policy

Students are expected to submit work in each course weekly. Students can learn at their own pace; however, students must follow their course calendar and make progress in the course every week. Students are required to complete self-checks, practice lessons, multiple choice questions, projects, discussion-based assessments, and discussions. Students are expected to:

  • Make regular progress (follow course calendar)
  • Maintain regular contact with teachers

When teachers, students, and families work together, students are successful.

 

This course is a standards-based course.

Course lessons and assessments are targeted to a specific set of CCSS/Oregon state standards. Students will be expected to score at the “Successful” level or higher in order to be marked proficient in each assessment. Students are expected to complete all assessments in the course.

 

If a student scores “Work In Progress” on an assessment, they will be able to revise and resubmit it for re-scoring.

Final grades in Virtual Scholars are determined using the VS Proficiency Matrix.

Behavioral Expectations:

PLAGIARISM is strictly monitored.

 

From the PPS Student Acceptable Use Guide:

Students will not plagiarize works that they find on the Internet. Plagiarism is taking the ideas or writings of others and presenting them as if they were original to the student.

Students will respect the rights of copyright owners. Copyright infringement occurs when an individual inappropriately reproduces a work that is protected by a copyright. If a work contains language that specifies appropriate use of that work, the student should follow the expressed requirements. If the student is unsure whether or not they can use a work, they should request permission from the copyright owner.

 

Students will adhere to the regulations outlined in the PPS Student Acceptable Usage guide

Safety Issues and Requirements

N/A