Rush City

 High School

2018-2019

Course Directory

Students:

Planning your selection of classes needs to be done in conjunction with your personal learning plan. You are encouraged to think about what you may do following graduation and how you can maximize the educational opportunities at Rush City High School. During your high school years you can explore several areas of interest, however, it is important to develop your talents and abilities that will provide you the background necessary to follow through with your plans after graduation from high school. In effect, the decisions you make now, to a large extent, determine what you will be able to do following high school.

Parents:

You are encouraged to discuss career options with your son or daughter and with their teachers and counselor. It is important to encourage exploration and investigations of alternatives consistent with areas of interest, talents, abilities and career plans. Since you are your child’s first and most influential teacher, your child’s ideas about education and its significance begin with you. You must be an example of what you expect your children to honor and emulate. You have a responsibility to actively participate in your child’s education and nurture those qualities that you deem important for success. You should encourage diligent study and discourage satisfaction with mediocrity. You should encourage good study habits and time management, encourage your child to take more demanding rather than less demanding classes. Nurture your child’s curiosity, creativity, confidence and self-esteem. Your encouragement and approval or disapproval are critical to your child’s success now and in the future. Be an active participant with school staff and support your son or daughter, the teaching staff, and others. You can contribute to ensuring the best preparation for the opportunities in your child’s future.

In the registration process, all courses that are offered will not be provided due to minimum enrollment needed to offer a class. We intend to offer all classes where there is student interest, and if necessary we will rotate offerings in alternate years wherever students’ interest can best be served. Also, please note that schedule requests are only “requests” students will get the courses if they work with their core classes needed for graduation

        

We at Rush City High School request your involvement in your son’s or daughter’s registration for the next school year and as tentative plans are made for the future. We will not accept a registration without a parental signature. Take some time to discuss and choose a career path and the appropriate courses with your son or daughter. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the school counselor or principal.

We are confident that if parents, students, and school personnel work together, students will not only have an interesting, rewarding, and enjoyable experience, but a learning environment that will be one of the very best that can be found anywhere.

Rush City Schools are large enough to provide a comprehensive curriculum and extracurricular program, but small enough so that all students have an identity and can explore the development of their talents and abilities.

Rush City Public Schools ISD #139 does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, nationality,  origin, sex or disability.

REGISTRATION GUIDELINES

1.        This curriculum registration guide was prepared to aid parents and each student to  plan a selection of studies

that best fits his or her individual needs, whether he/she plans to go to college, business, technical, vocational

training or enter the world of work upon graduation from high school. Careful planning is essential since changes

will be very difficult to make once school closes this spring. Study this information thoroughly so you can select

your courses intelligently. Changes will be allowed only when you are notified by the counselor that you have a

conflict of classes.

2.        To complete your registration, you should discuss your career plans and courses with your parents, teachers,  counselor and people in the occupational field(s) you are considering. It is important to plan a sequence of courses that may be required or are recommended for your future career choices.

3.        All students are required to register for seven classes.

4.        With several single section electives, there may be unresolvable conflicts and then your first or second alternative will be scheduled. However, every effort will be made to schedule the classes you choose insofar as possible.

5.        Some elective classes will not be offered if there is insufficient enrollment. Therefore, alternative choices are required in the registration process.

6.        Course changes may be made only until the end of the first week of each semester. No dropping of courses will be permitted after that time unless special circumstances necessitate a course change. ITV courses cannot be changed after August 1st.

7.        Students who want to drop a year long elective course may do so only at the end of the first semester and under extreme circumstances as determined by the teacher, parent and counselor/principal.        

8.        Complete the registration form listing all the classes for which you wish to register.

9.        Each student must take the required classes for their particular grade level. Those are listed following the introduction. You may then elect other courses from this registration booklet, keeping in mind the prerequisites for those courses and the grade levels that they are suggested for. The registration form must be completed with the classes the student is requesting as WELL AS  ALTERNATE SELECTIONS. If you are unable to get some of your primary requests because of scheduling conflicts, substitutions will be selected from the alternate list-so choose carefully.

10.        When registering, you are reminded to look closely at when the class will be offered again. In some cases, classes are offered only every other year. In those situations, if you plan on taking the class, you must be sure that it will be offered again before you graduate, if you do not register for it this coming school year.

11.        Post high school education programs all have certain requirements for entrance into their particular programs. Students interested in these programs must reach out to the college they are interested in.

12.        Students must meet certain requirements to get into a study hall: IEP, 504, PST referral, parent permission                

through the counselor, and/or taking college courses.

13.        Students will be limited to 1 of the following: Career Link,  Peer Tutoring, and Teacher’s Aide.

14.        No student will be denied entrance to a course on the basis of sex, race, or religion.  However, some classes may not be available because of size, prerequisites or scheduling problems. If you do not get the classes you have registered for as a sophomore, do not be overly concerned. You will have further opportunities to get those classes. Every effort is made to insure that students registering for their senior year have received the courses that they need first, then juniors, followed by sophomores.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION FROM RUSH CITY HIGH SCHOOL

REQUIRED CLASSES FOR:

**9th Grade**

Civics............................................Full Year

English..........................................Full Year

Math..............................................Full Year

Physical Science...........................Full Year

Physical Education.......................Full Year

Choose up to 2 hours of electives

**10th Grade**

English..........................................Full Year

Math..............................................Full Year

Biology..........................................Full Year

American History..........................Full Year

Health............................................1/2 Year

Choose up to 2 hours of electives

**11th Grade**

English..........................................Full Year

World History................................Full Year

Math.............................................Full Year

Chemistry or Physics....................Full Year

Choose up to 3 hours of electives

**12th Grade**

English.........................................Full Year

Am. Gov’t/Soc. Problems.............Full Year

Choose up to 5 hours of electives

**1 Fine Art credit is required for graduation.

Minnesota Graduation Requirements are as follows:

*        4 credits of language arts sufficient to satisfy all of the academics standards in English language arts.

*        3 credits of mathematics, including a Geometry credit, an Algebra II credit or its equivalents, and                 one math elective credit sufficient to satisfy all of the academic standards in mathematics.

*        3 credits of science, including at least one credit of biology, one credit of chemistry or physics, to satisfy                 all chemistry or physics standards, and all other science standards.

*        3.5 credits of social studies, encompassing at least United States history, geography, government

and citizenship, world history and economics sufficient to satisfy all of the academic standards in

social studies.

*        1 credit of the arts sufficient to satisfy all of the state or local academic standards in the arts.

*        7 elective credits minimum

Total Credits Required to Graduate = 21.5

MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM HIGH SCHOOL PREPARATION REQUIREMENTS

WHAT HIGH SCHOOL COURSES ARE REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION TO A MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY? The following pattern of courses must be completed in grades 9-12 by students seeking admission to a Minnesota State University:

English: 

Four years (including composition, literature and speech)

Math: 

Three years (including two years of algebra, of which one is intermediate or advanced algebra, and one year of geometry).  Many universities now require four years of math for example all University of Minnesota Universities.

Science: 

Three years (including one year each of a biological and physical science, all with significant lab experience. Must also have chemistry or physics. May choose from the available options)

Social Studies:

Three years (including one year each of geography and US history)

Other:        

Two years of a single foreign language, one year of arts (visual arts and the performing arts of theater, music, dance and media arts)

AGRI-SCIENCE/INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

SMALL ENGINES MAINTENANCE & REPAIR I

1 semester

1/2 credit

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  None

This course is designed to give students the skill and knowledge to enter the small engine industry. This course also gives the basic information needed in the Ag Power course. The major units included in the course are career and education opportunities, shop layout and safety, principles, operation, maintenance, and repair of 2 and 4 stroke engines. Much of this course is in the shop so that the students have an opportunity to practice what they learn in the classroom on actual engines. This course is an excellent opportunity for those people interested in the small engine industry or those that want these skills for their own home use.

SMALL ENGINES II

1 semester

1/2 credit

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Small Engines

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles, operation, maintenance, and repair of a single-cylinder and multi-cylinder engines and electric motors. The course is for those students who are thinking of a career in mechanics or those that want to improve their mechanical skills for their own use. Units in the various areas will have a balance of classroom and shop activities for the overall hands-on learning.

SMALL AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS I

1 semester

1/2 credit

Grades 9-12

This course is designed to acquaint students with the management and care practices associated with small and domestic animals. The course focuses primarily on the study of animals which most people (from city or farm) deal with on a regular basis. Major units of study include dog care, cat care, horse science, rabbit care, and other various pet care studies. Care studies include: selecting, feeding, breeding, training, and general health of the animals being studied. This course will greatly interest animal and pet owners, horse enthusiasts, and general animal lovers.

SMALL AND DOMESTIC ANIMAL SCIENCE II

1 semester

1/2 credit

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite:  Small and Domestic Animal Science I

This course is designed as a supplement to small and domestic animal science. The emphasis will be placed more in grooming, training, health care and cover some general care of species not already covered such as rabbits, hamsters and tropical fish. The course will be taught with as much hands-on experience as possible. This course is an excellent start for those students wanting to enter a career in animal science and/or training.

LARGE WILDLIFE MAMMALS/NATURAL RESOURCES

1 semester

1/2 credit

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to acquaint the students with the skills and knowledge needed by workers in many areas of conservation and natural resources. The course will focus on the following areas: environmental concerns, historical developments, populations, harvest and post-hunt management of large mammals in Minnesota. Course emphasis will be placed on the management principles and practices associated with each of these areas and along with the career and educational opportunities available to the students. The students will have a balance of classroom and laboratory experiences available to achieve as much hands-on learning as possible.

HOT AND COLD METALS TECHNOLOGY

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

Industrial technology in this course stresses metalwork as applied to the structure of industry and its related associations. Welding including arc, and oxyacetylene along with practice applications, basic machine tool, sheet metal, and foundry areas are also explored.

ADVANCED METAL TECHNOLOGY

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Hot and Cold Metals Technology

This semester course will cover advanced work in the metals area. We will explore the machine tool area in more depth, study blueprint reading skills, and work on computer numerical control milling and CNC lathe work. Advanced welding processes (wire feed and heil-arc welding) will also be included.

DRAFTING

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

This course is designed to introduce the student to the area  of basic drafting and drafting processes. Topics that will be introduced include the theory of drafting, lettering dimensioning, isometric views, 3-dimensional views, and instruments used in the drafting process. Students will also use drafting equipment to create various drawings.

WOOD TECHNOLOGY I

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

This semester course will include the study of basic design principles related to furniture construction, materials used in construction, and a unit on basic drawing. Each student will be required to build a project of their own design or from a prepared plan.

WOOD TECHNOLOGY II

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Wood Technology I

This course is a continuation of Wood Tech with the major emphasis on designing and building a major woodworking project.

ART

 

INTRO TO ART

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

This class is designed to introduce various methods of creating art. Throughout the semester we will explore drawing, painting, sculpture, basic clay processes, one point and two point perspective. You will also be exposed to many artists through presentations. These artists have made a great impact on the art world. You will learn art appreciation through visual critique and exploration while creating art. We will study the elements and principles of art and design through a series of projects and learn to execute our ideas and thoughts using a variety of media to create a visually organized composition. It is the instructor’s hope that you will be inspired to explore your creativity further by taking another art class.

CERAMICS

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Intro to art

This class is designed to teach the basic properties of clay. You will gain an understanding of the stages of clay including leather-hard, green-ware, bisque-ware and glaze-ware. Students will also gain knowledge of materials used in creating three-dimensional works of art with low-fire white clay and assorted glazes. Students will learn pinch, slab, coil, wedging, slipping and scoring, basic glaze mixing, and other hand-building techniques as well as an introduction to the wheel-throwing techniques and processes. Students will create projects ranging from masks to instruments and many things in between.

ADVANCED CERAMICS (Pottery)

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Ceramics

In this class students will further explore the potter’s wheel. Students will also have an opportunity to explore independent projects. Students will create mugs, cups, bowls, plates. As well as assorted hand building projects. During the course of the semester students will be expected to explore different glazing techniques as well as advanced surface decoration.

DRAWING

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 9-12

Students will be using a variety of material including charcoal, pastels, colored pencils, pen and ink, and graphite pencils. They will experiment with a variety of erasers and “smudgers”. The goal is for students to come away with new ways to see and record what is around them. Students will be introduced to gesture drawing, and a number of techniques for figure drawing. Students will be expected to keep a sketch journal, which will include writings, drawing and artist’s statements.

PAINTING

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Intro to art

The emphasis of this class is learning techniques for manipulating paint on paper and canvas. We will explore acrylic, watercolor, and oil paints.. Students will learn how to build canvases, utilize gesso and underpainting to enhance works. We will also study painters and the techniques they use(d). The use of color and its symbolism will be studied as well as the elements and principles of design. Students will also be expected to add meaning to their works through artist’s statements.

GRAPHIC DESIGN AND MARKETING

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 10-12

Graphic Design and Marking is a course that will offer students the ability to combine artistic and business ambitions with real world application.  In the graphic design portion of the class, students will learn how to create effective advertising compositions, with units focusing on typography, photography, and the principles of design.  Students will also study the design strategies of real companies active in the world of marketing.  Projects will involve basic program skill exercises, photography and photo editing, a mock cd album/cd cover design, movie cover, and a capstone group project where students will create a company image for a mock client.  To accomplish this, students will learn how to use programs such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and Indesign. We will incorporate basic Marketing skills by creating basic flyers to portfolios of businesses.  While using the Five P’s of marketing and bringing in guest speakers to help students understand the world of business and how advertising works.  There is a huge demand for people interested in this career field.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

( New Business Classes Coming Soon )

BUSINESS LAW

Grades 10-12

1 semester = ½ credit  

The Business Law course content will consist of a detailed study of a valid contract and the legal system. Crimes and torts relating to business will be emphasized during the semester. Other topics covered will be Bailments, sale contracts, automobile purchasing, consumerism, insurance, credit buying and real estate. This class uses current cases that appear in the Star Tribune, other national publications and television. Current movies are also used to reinforce learning of business law concepts and principles. Classroom debates that discuss current legal issues are also a part of this course. We look at all laws and debate the validity of them as well as laws that have outdated themselves. The computer and research are key in this class.

COLLEGE FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE

1 Semester

½ Credit (2 College Credits through Pine Technical and Community College)

Grade 11-12

This course is designed to assist students in exploring and developing the academic skills necessary to succeed in college and as a self-directed, life-long learner as well as the personal skills to manage their college life and set them up for success in their future careers. Students will be introduced to college and community resources and tools for academic success, including skills in stress management, financial literacy, critical thinking and creative problem solving. They will develop their ability to articulate their long term goals; and they will demonstrate appreciation for diversity and understanding of self as civic and global citizens. This course is a common requirement at many colleges/universities.

ENGLISH

ENGLISH 9

1 Year

½ Credit per semester

Grade 9

English 9 is aimed to use and build on skills learned in middle school to prepare students for English classes in high school and beyond.  These skills include but are not limited to reading and comprehension, higher level thinking and independent problem-solving, vocabulary development, research, and public speaking.  

ENGLISH 10

1 Year

½ Credit per semester

Grade 10

English 10 is designed to help students improve their oral and written communication skills as well as understand and appreciate a wide variety of literary forms.  Students will read and analyze both classic and contemporary short stories, poetry, historical fiction, young adult literature, memoir, and Shakespearean drama.  Instruction in the class also focuses on preparing students for research tasks they will encounter in future classes and on developing independent learning skills. This is the essence of the I-Search project—questioning, locating, analyzing, evaluating, and communicating.

ENGLISH 11 or COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

COLLEGE ENGLISH PREP

1 Year

½ Credit per semester

Grades 11 & 12

11th grade students may take this course as a prerequisite for College Composition.

12th grade students may take this course to help prepare for college.

College English Prep will introduce to the college-bound students advanced techniques of essay writing, including critical analysis of literature, and the basic five paragraph essay in detail, as well as a review of the mechanics of English. Readings will include novels and essays from American and English literature.  Vocabulary and reading comprehension skills are emphasized throughout the year. Students will also write a well-documented analysis paper; in addition, students will learn to properly cite material and put together a works cited page in MLA format. Early second semester skills will focus on the components of the Reading, English, and Writing portions of the ACT test.  Critical thinking will be stressed along with continued emphasis on mechanics and reading and writing skills.  

ENGLISH 11

1 Year

½ Credit per semester

Grade 11

English 11 is focused on American literature (focusing on areas of short stories, historical documents, drama, poetry, and novels) as well as post-secondary skills, for both college and the workplace.  These skills include but are not limited to reading and comprehension, higher level thinking and independent problem-solving, vocabulary development, research, and public speaking.  

ENGLISH 12 or COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH or COLLEGE COMPOSITION(CIS)

ENGLISH 12

1 Year

½ Credit per semester

Grade 12

English 12 is focused on British literature (focusing on areas of drama, poetry, and novels, as well as understanding the historical perspective) as well as post-secondary skills, for both college and the workplace.  These skills include but are not limited to reading and comprehension, higher level thinking and independent problem-solving, vocabulary development, research, and public speaking.  

COLLEGE COMPOSITION (CIS)

1 Semester

½  Credit for semester (high school)

4 Credits for Semester (Pine Technical & Community College)

Prerequisite to receive college credit:

Students will learn the process of writing their ideas for an audience.  The course will focus on the generation, organization, and communication of ideas in expository essay forms based on experience, observation, and research, with an emphasis on argumentation, critical thinking, and rhetorical strategies.  Mechanics and writing style will also be integrated throughout the course. In addition, the course will provide extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking to explore ways to sharpen critical thinking skills. Concentration will be on library and empirical research methodology with an emphasis on finding, evaluating, and synthesizing various sources of information.  

INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH COMMUNICATION(CIS)

1 Semester

½ Credit for semester (high school)

3 Credits for semester (Pine Technical & Community College)

Prerequisite to receive college credit:

This course investigates the processes of interpersonal and small group communication, and the practices of public speaking.  Students will examine theories of communication and will participate in various forms of interpersonal, small group, and public communication.  Along with emphasis on communication skills, students will practice and heighten their skills of communicating with others directly, thinking critically, organizing ideas clearly, and speaking and listening effectively.

MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE

1 Semester

½ Credit for semester (high school)

3 Credits for semester (Pine Technical & Community College)

This course is a study of literature written by and reflecting the perspectives of writers from different ethnic backgrounds within the United States. The course includes text written by contemporary writers focusing on the experiences of various ethnic groups through poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and drama.

WORLD LANGUAGES

Many colleges and universities have foreign language requirements for acceptance or graduation. Students wishing to take a foreign language should be aware that it is a college preparation course.

SPANISH 1

1 year

1 credit

Grades 9-12

This course is the student’s first exposure to Spanish at Rush City High School. The purpose of Spanish 1 is to introduce students to basic skills of Spanish, emphasizing oral communication. Reading, writing, and listening skills will also be developed. Students will learn many of the cultures of the Spanish speaking world. The class includes group and pair oral work, journal and other writing, oral presentations and use of audiovisuals (for development of oral skills). The content includes basic vocabulary, grammar and culture. Some topics covered during the course include making introductions, school, family, foods, housing, and likes/dislikes.

SPANISH 2

1 year

1 credit

Grades 10-12

Spanish 2 is a continuation of Spanish 1. Students will reach an intermediate level of speaking, reading, writing and listening in Spanish. The students will increase their understanding of Hispanic culture. Communication is emphasized. The course includes a review of material covered in Spanish 1, group/pair oral work, written work, short story reading, and cultural activities. The content contains intermediate vocabulary, grammar, and culture. Some topics covered during the course include travel, daily routine, childhood activities, shopping, restaurant/cooking.

SPANISH 3

1 year

1 credit

Grades 11-12

Spanish 3 is an advanced Spanish course which continues Spanish 2. The course reviews basic material and introduces students to more advanced grammar concepts. The emphasis on communications, culture, and comprehension remains. The class will include oral and written work, audiovisual aids, group/pair work, and presentations. The content includes culture and intermediate to advanced vocabulary and grammar concepts. Some topics covered during the course include environment, careers, future plans, and vacations. Students will also read and analyze short stories in Spanish throughout the year. Field trips may be offered depending on the opportunities available.

COLLEGE SPANISH

1 year

1 high school credit

3 college credits (must be taken full year to earn credit)

Grades 12

Prerequisite to receive college credit: 78+ in the Reading portion of the Accuplacer

Spanish 4 is an advanced Spanish course which continues Spanish 3. During the 2018-2019 school year, it will be offered as a college credit through Pine Tech. More emphasis will be on writing and reading Spanish than in previous years. Aside from building on previous vocabulary and grammar concepts taught in Spanish 1-3, some topics covered during Spanish 4 include ancient civilizations, famous Hispanics, history, literature, and art. Students will also spend time studying Spanish speaking countries more in depth. Field trips may be offered depending on the opportunities available.

MATHEMATICS

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades 9-12

Since Algebra involves a great deal of arithmetic, the student planning to take this course should be proficient in the basic operation of arithmetic.  This course begins with a review of linear functions, then moves on to study polynomials, and non-linear functions.  As part of the Algebra sequence it provides a language and system of reasoning which serves as a basis for the study of higher math courses.  Prerequisite to the course is the completion of 8th grade Algebra 1.  (Staff will counsel students into the course).  Students need to have a scientific calculator.

GEOMETRY

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra

Geometry is one of the oldest known branches of mathematics. It is the study of properties of figures composed of points and lines. Various areas in plane and solid geometry are studied, plus introducing to the student the methods of coordinate geometry in which both algebra and geometry complement each other. Probably one of the most important values geometry has for the student is in the experience provided them wherein the student must build a logical system of thought in problem-solving. This course is intended for students who desire to expand their mathematical abilities by exploring new ideas/relationships. Any student taking this course should consider taking a math course each year for the remainder of their high school career. To be eligible for geometry in the 9th grade, you must meet the three requirements from Algebra I. Students need to have a scientific calculator.

ADVANCED ALGEBRA

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra and Geometry

Special emphasis is placed on the techniques of problem solving. Various techniques are shown to the student for handling exponents, quadratics, systems and equations, irrational and imaginary numbers and graphs.

This course is a continuation and expansion of Algebra. It is also required that geometry be completed before you enroll in this course. A graphing calculator is strongly encouraged for this course- talk to the math teachers about the best one.

PRE-CALCULUS

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades 11 -12

Prerequisite: Geometry & Advanced Algebra

This class is separated into two semesters and is designed for students who need to solidify their knowledge of functions and statistics before entering a college/upper level mathematics course. This course is for juniors and seniors only. First semester is focused on functions (linear, quadratic, polynomials, exponentials, etc). Second semester is focused on financial math, trigonometry, probability, and statistics. The purpose for this class to solidify mathematical concepts involving functions and statistics, with a bonus piece on financial math. (Prerequisites: Advanced Algebra, Intermediate Algebra, Geometry)

COLLEGE ALGEBRA

1 semester

.75 credit

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra & Geometry

Prerequisite to receive college credit:

This course is designed for students planning a post secondary education. The students will be offered an opportunity to receive credit from a community college while taking this college level course.

This course presents the student with solution methods and applications of linear, quadratic, rational and radical equations, basic complex numbers, functional graphs and transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations and inequalities. (Prerequisites: MATH 0450 Intermediate Algebra or placement determined by assessment score.)

3 college credits, equivalent to .5 high school credit

COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRY

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: College Algebra

Prerequisite to receive college credit:

This course is designed for students planning a post secondary education. The students will be offered an opportunity to receive credit from a  community college while taking this college level course.

This course introduces the concepts of trigonometry functions through both right-angle and unit circle approaches, and their inverse functions. Course content presented will include properties, graphs and identities, law of sine and cosine, and equation solution methods. In addition, other topics in the course include complex number, polar coordinate system, conic sections and basics of vector analysis. 2 college credits, equivalent to .5 high school credit

COLLEGE CALCULUS

1 year

1.25 credit

Grade 12

Prerequisite: College Algebra & College Trigonometry

Prerequisite to receive college credit:

This course is designed for students planning a post secondary education. The students will be offered an opportunity to receive credit from a  community college while taking this college level course.

This is the first course in the two-semester sequence of Single Variable Calculus. Topics include functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, anti-differentiation, and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions with associated applications in each area. Instruction will be provided in the use of a scientific calculator. MnTC goal area #4. (Prerequisite: MATH 1260 College Algebra and MATH 2260 Trigonometry.) Offered Fall.

5 college credits, equivalent to 1.25 high school credits (must take entire year to earn college credit)

FUNCTIONS STATISTICS

1 year

1 credit

Grade: 12

This class is separated into two semesters and is designed for students who need to solidify their knowledge of functions and statistics before entering a college/upper level mathematics course. This course is designed for seniors only. First semester is focused on functions (linear, quadratic, polynomials, exponentials, etc). Second semester is focused on financial math, probability and statistics. The purpose for this class to solidify mathematical concepts involving functions and statistics, with a bonus piece on financial math. (Prerequisites: Algebra, Intermediate Algebra, Geometry)

*With many Universities requiring 4 years of High School Math, this class is an excellent opportunity to stay current with your math skills.

MUSIC

WIND ENSEMBLE

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades  8-12

The Wind Ensemble is the advanced instrumental music course at Rush City High School.  Placement in this ensemble is by audition only.  Students interested in Wind Ensemble must register for Concert Band, then after the spring auditions, selected students will have their registration moved to Wind Ensemble.  In this course, students will perform a variety of modern and classical band literature, and perform a minimum of three concerts per year.  Students in Wind Ensemble are also participants in Pep Band and Marching Band, and may also participate in Jazz Band.

CONCERT BAND

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades  8-12

The Concert Band is the instrumental music course open to all Rush City students grades 8-12.  No audition is required to participate in this course.  In this course, students will perform a variety of modern and classical band literature, and perform a minimum of three concerts per year.   Students in Concert Band are also participants in Pep Band and Marching Band, and may also participate in Jazz Band.

                                    

CONCERT CHOIR AND VOCAL JAZZ CHOIR

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades 9-12

The Concert Choir is open to all students in grades 9-12.  There is no audition requirement.  This choir performs three formal concerts per year.  In addition, the Concert Choir performs at the Homecoming Coronation, Minnesota Honor Society Induction Ceremony, the Minnesota State High School League Two Rivers Conference Large Group Contest, High School Commencement Ceremony and other shorter programs.  The Concert Choir performs a wide variety of choral music.  Members may participate in the All-Conference Honor Choir Festival conducted by the Minnesota State High School League Two Rivers Conference and perform solos or with small ensembles during concerts and at solo and ensemble contest(s).  Each choir member may receive two individual voice lessons each quarter.  These lessons may be scheduled prior to school or during a specified class period.  The Concert Choir studies once a week with a college professor of voice supported by a Legacy Amendment Grant.  Members of the Concert Choir are eligible for nomination to receive high school letters pursuant to standards set-forth in the Vocal Music Handbook.

Students in grades 9 through 12 may audition for the Vocal Jazz Choir.  This elite vocal ensemble performs music primarily from the American jazz tradition.  Members of this competitive small ensemble are eligible for nomination to receive high school letters.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION / HEALTH

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 9

1 year (required)

1 credit

Physical Education 9” provides a full-year physical education class for the ninth grade students of Rush City Public Schools.  The goal of the class is for students to attain the appropriate knowledge and skills necessary for them to live a healthy, active lifestyle.  The knowledge and skills that the students will learn will help them towards being physically active for their entire lifetime.

HEALTH 10

1 semester (required)

½ credit

This course provides a one-semester health education class for the tenth grade students of Rush City Public Schools.  The goal of the class is for students to attain the appropriate knowledge and skills necessary for them to live a healthy, active lifestyle.  The knowledge and skills that the students will learn will help them make their own informed, educated decisions in regards to their own personal health, and the health of the community they live in.

TEAM SPORTS

1 semester (elective)

1/2 credit

Grades 10th-12th

The class emphases are: (1) Life-long participation in physical fitness/activities and its importance to overall wellness;

 (2) Improving cardiovascular endurance, and (3) cooperation, responsibility, and good citizenship.

The class will be geared towards team and individual sports with a competitive tournament style atmosphere!

You can expect to do some type of fitness/cardiovascular exercises once or twice a week in addition to our activities.

Daily participation is REQUIRED and EXPECTED.

STRENGTH TRAINING

1 semester (elective)

½ credit

Grades 10th- 12th

This course is for those who want to gain knowledge in weightlifting and/or continue weightlifting for athletics and fitness programs. This class is also for those who want to work on cardiovascular fitness. The layout for the class will be 4 days of lifting and 1 day of cardiovascular fitness.

SCIENCE

Physical Science 9

Required

1 year

½  credit per semester

Physical Science 9 is a general science class with no need for previous science background.  The purpose of this course is to help students obtain understanding of force, motion, energy, and the properties of matter. This understanding will be achieved by student-performed experiments and teacher demonstrations as well as classroom discussions. Topics covered in the class include:

BIOLOGY

Required

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades 10-12

Biology is the study of living things. This course includes the following areas of study: ecology, anatomy, taxonomy, physiology, genetics and evolution.  The methods of study of the course will be through class work, class discussions, audiovisual presentations, projects, lab work, including dissections and work with microscopes. Evaluation of student’s progress will be made on a regular basis on the class work and laboratory work.

A background in biology may be valuable to:

1.          Fulfill entrance requirements for college.

  1. Have a better understanding of the world we live in.
  2. Understand how and why the human body works.

HEALTH AND DISEASES IN THE HUMAN BODY

1 year- ½ credit per semester

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite to receive college credit:

This course introduces students to the human anatomy and physiology. Students will learn the basic disease processes and body systems including: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine and reproductive. The laboratory component emphasizes lecture content and includes dissection and experiments in physiology.

Outcomes:

  1. identify basic body structure, systems, and functions using appropriate terminology;
  2. describe common disorders associated with each body system;
  3. examine ethical and civic implications of current and emerging issues on health and disease;
  4. discuss societal issues as they relate to human health and disease;
  5. identify and apply the scientific method.

4 college credits, equivalent to 1 high school credit (must take entire year to earn college credit)

CHEMISTRY

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades 11-12

Chemistry is the science of the structure and composition of materials and the changes in composition of materials.  Topics covered include:

(A)        Atomic structure and its relationship to chemical  properties.

(B)        The periodic relationship of the elements.

(C)        Chemical composition and bonding.

(D)        Chemical reactions

(E)        The physical states of matter - gas laws - molecular composition.

(F)        Solution chemistry - ionization, acids, bases, salts.

(G)        Frequent laboratory sessions offer the opportunity to develop basic lab skills.

A high school experience in chemistry may be valuable to:

1)          Fulfill an entrance requirement to a college or nursing school.

2)        Anyone who wishes to pursue a scientific or technical study after high school. (Physics, Biology, Geology, etc.)

3)        Anyone who wishes to expand their understanding of the physical environment.

4)        Improve usage of Math and English

Benefits of the class include improvement of accuracy, and logical thought, and the opportunity to work with more demanding material as preparation for post-high school education.

COLLEGE CHEMISTRY

1 Year

½ Credit Per Semester

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite to receive college credit:

An introduction to the study of chemistry and its applications requiring a minimum of mathematics. The topics of this course include an introduction to stoichiometry, nomenclature, bonding, gas laws, and acids and bases. This course is intended primarily for those with no or a limited or outdated background in chemistry. MTC goal area: (3) Natural Sciences. This course is through Lake Superior College for 3 credits.

PHYSICS

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grades 11-12

Physics is the physical science which deals with the relation between matter and energy. The goal of physics is to use a small number of basic concepts, equations, and assumptions to describe the physical world.

In this physics class the following topics will be covered:

        1.        Motion in one and two dimensions

        2.        Forces

        3.        Work and Energy

        4.        Momentum

        5.        Circular motion and gravitation

        6.        Fluid Mechanics

        7.        Heat

        8.        Thermodynamics

        9.        Waves

Along with discussion on these topics in class, students will engage in meaningful lab exercises that allow them to experience these concepts and how they relate to students’ lives. Because problem solving is a large part of physics, students with a limited background in math may have difficulty in this class.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY

½ year

½ credit

Grades 11-12

This course introduces students to basic human anatomy. Body structures will be studied by organ systems covering the anatomical terminology for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

The laboratory component of the course will reinforce lecture concepts through the use of models, histological slides, and dissections.

The course is appropriate for students interested in delving deeper into human anatomy than their high school course typically have time for, and also for those interested in pursuing medicine or other health-care fields.

Prerequisites: Completion of a high school biology course is required.

SOCIAL STUDIES

AMERICAN CIVICS/ECONOMICS 9

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grade 9 (required)

The American Civics course provides a detailed background for understanding U.S. citizenship skills as well as the foundations and operations of each branch of our government system. This class will encourage civic participation by the students and prepare them to be informed, responsible citizens.

The economics course focuses on the basic principles of economics including supply & demand and consumer spending. The students will also learn how a business operates and how countries work to control their respective economies and its impact on the world market.

AMERICAN HISTORY (A & B)

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grade 10 (required)

American History traces American history from before Columbus to the present. This study organized under the theme in the textbook.

Students will study the course of American History dating back before Columbus all the way to present times, looking in depth into major conflicts in our history.

Students must pass both semesters to receive full credit.

AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH MASS MEDIA

1 Semester

½ credit per semester

Grades 10-12

This is an elective course designed to offer an in-depth look at American History from WWI to present day. We will look at big events from the perspective of music, movies, media, and other outside influences. This will be a hands on class with guest speakers, hollywood movies, music from each era, newscasts, and the effect of social media on these events.

WORLD HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY

1 year

½ credit per semester

Grade 11 (required)

This course is a study of history from ancient times to the present. This class will focus  on major themes, turning points and changes throughout history in continents other than North America. Areas and events studied include ancient civilizations, Asia, Africa and Europe in middle and modern ages.  Topics and themes that will be covered are revolutions, politics, war, and culture. The relationships between world events and geography will be explored. Students will be required to satisfactorily complete this course for graduation.

COLLEGE WORLD HISTORY

1 year

1 credit

Grade 11

Concurrent Enrollment Course:  Anoka Ramsey Community College: Cambridge & Coon Rapids

HIST 1141 Ancient and Medieval World Civilizations

4 College Credits (for whole year – must complete the full year in order to receive credit)

Survey of human pre-history, the agricultural revolution, the rise and fall of civilizations in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe from ancient times through the medieval period. This course will survey topics and themes concerning the areas and times above while increasing all levels of historical skills including reading, writing, interpreting and analyzing many readings and historical documents. Juniors- Need to be in Top 1/3 of class OR 3.5 or higher and Seniors need to be in Top 1/2 of class, OR 3.0 or higher.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

1 semester

½ credit

Grade 12 (required)

This course focuses on a more in-depth look into our federal government with examinations of the constitution and internal structure of the federal system. Comprehensive investigation of the political parties and elections is also covered during the semester. Students are required to satisfactorily complete this course for graduation.

SOCIAL PROBLEMS / SOCIOLOGY

1 semester

½ credit

Grade 12 (required)

A study of current social, economic, and political problems that concern Americans as people. Such examples of social problems discussed include discrimination and poverty/homelessness. Students will examine the complex nature of social problems and learn about origins as well as potential solutions. To promote awareness of social problems, a community service component is required for this course. Students are required to satisfactorily complete this course for graduation.

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 11-12

This is an elective course designed to offer a broad introduction to psychology. We will study the different theories of the major figures in psychology. We will also examine topics of interest including consciousness of the mind, senses & perception, personalities, abnormal psychology and other topics related to the brain and behavior.

SCHOOL TO WORK OPPORTUNITIES

Students can only do one of the following:

CAREER LINK

1 semester

½ credit per hour per semester

Grades 11-12

Career Link provides an opportunity for students to gain knowledge of a career or college academic area of interest while mentoring youth. Students will work 1 hour each day with a supervising teacher, or district staff member that is currently teaching or working in their specific career area or academic post-secondary major of interest. The maximum number of students who may enroll in Career Link is determined by the number of placements available. Students can only enroll in 1 of the following: Career Link, Teachers Aide and Peer Tutoring.

TEACHERS' AIDE

1 semester

Grade 12

Teacher’s Aide is an opportunity for Seniors that are making adequate progress toward graduation to help a teacher in their classroom. Students will receive credit for this opportunity but it will not be calculated into their GPA. Students will be graded with a pass/fail option and will be responsible for identifying the teacher that they will work with. Teachers will assign duties as needed. Students can only enroll in 1 of the following: Career Link, Teachers Aide and Peer Tutoring.

PEER TUTORING

1 semester

½ credit

Grades 11-12

This course is designed to match high school students up with other students for a one on one tutoring situation. After a training session, students are assigned to a classroom (to assist a teacher), a junior high study hall or to a specific student. Students can only enroll in 1 of the following: Career Link, Teachers Aide and Peer Tutoring.

WORK LINK

1 semester

½ credit per hour per semester

Grades 11-12

Work Link allows students to earn credit and practical experience in a job related to a career they are planning to enter. Work sites must meet certain criteria and be approved by the school Work Link supervisor. Employers must be willing to work with the Work Link supervisor and students must be working a certain number of hours each with along with proof. Students will practice and enhance on the job skills such as good attendance, performance, cooperation, and learning to work with a supervisor. Evaluation of students will be done by both school and work experience.

ITV COURSES

Rush City Schools are a member of East Central Minnesota Educational Cable Cooperative (ECMECC).  These programs offer interactive television and online learning opportunities.  Students must have at least a 3.0 to enroll in ITV and spots are given out to seniors 1st, juniors 2nd, sophomores 3rd and freshmen 4th. In addition, students can not register for classes already offered within the classroom at Rush City High School.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I

1 year

Grades 9-12

American Sign Language is the language used by approximately a half million Deaf and Hard of Hearing people in the United States and parts of Canada. This language differs from English in its grammar and structure. In this class you will be learning basic American Sign Language vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure. You will also be introduced to some of the unique social and cultural implications of deafness. This “hands-on” course is designed with opportunities to develop your receptive and expressive skill through dialogue practice and interaction activities. Portions of the course will be conducted non-verbally (voices are not allowed).

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II

1 year

Grade 10-12

ASL II is a continuation of ASL I. Students will continue to develop expressive and receptive skills while increasing understanding of more complex vocabulary and grammar. Conversational skills and appropriate sign choice will be emphasized. Further exploration of Deaf Culture is also included. At the completion of the course, students should be able to carry on extended conversations on a variety of topics, and will possess the cultural awareness necessary for successful interaction with members of the Deaf community. Portions of the class will be conducted in ASL, without spoken English.

COLLEGE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III

½ year Fall Semester

Grades 11-12

This course expands the communicative range developed in American Sign Language II to talk about people and places in a contextually-reduced framework. Students will learn to describe places, objects, and events. In addition, students will develop basic narrative skills to tell about past events. Through in-class discussions/demonstrations, media and course readings, students will be exposed to elements of the Deaf community and culture. This course is available for college credit through Pine Technical and Community College

COLLEGE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV

½ year Spring Semester

Grades 11-12

This course is a continuation of American Sign Language III and increases the emphasis on abstract and challenging conversational and narrative range.  Students will learn basic classifier usage; receptive and expressive coursework; broader sign vocabulary and grammatical structure; various aspects of Deaf culture and cultural behavior rules.

GERMAN I

1 year

Grade 9-12

This course introduces the beginning student to the language and culture of the German-speaking countries. Emphasis is placed on using German in everyday situations. Students will learn to use their new language in such situations as meeting new people, going to school, telling time, ordering in a restaurant, traveling by train, going to the movies, and participating in sports. Much of the language is acquired by classroom drill and practice, but learning also takes place through the use of games, songs and other projects. In addition, students will learn about the culture and customs of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Because a foreign language requires memorization and daily study, students should be prepared to spend 10-15 minutes each day studying outside of class. The basic text used is Genial.

GERMAN II

1 year

Grade 10-12

German II is a continuation of German I with Genial used as a text. Students will continue to develop their vocabulary and acquire new and more complex language skills. The end of the course will have exposed students to most of the common aspects of German grammar and should be able to carry on extended conversations on a variety of topics. Among the units covered in the course are travel, holidays, letter writing, animals, buying a car, and various types of food. As in German I, daily study is a must. Students should be prepared to spend 10-15 minutes daily on study outside of class.

COLLEGE GERMAN III

1 Year (University of Minnesota)

5 College Credits

Grade 11-12

This class will focus on improving proficiency and cultural understanding. The textbook Sprünge will be used and is divided into 4 chapters that focus on the multicultural aspects of German life, school, and work. It also focuses on the every changing face of Germany and its history. At the end of this year students are tested on their speaking, writing and reading skills with another German teacher. They are also expected to create a video with their class. Students should be prepared to spend 20 minutes daily on study outside of class.

FRENCH I

1 year

Grades 9-12

French I is a one-year course that emphasizes the foundation skills of speaking, listening, writing and reading, taught through the application of simple grammatical concepts. Students will be introduced to the target language, develop proficiency in communicative skills, and deepen appreciation of francophone culture The Standards for World Language are integrated into the course throughout the entire year and goals for each unit are posted in the classroom for students to view. Along with the textbook, Discovering French, students will be completing workbook pages, writing activities, viewing the text video series and popular animated films in the target language, as well as listening to music from the French-speaking world.

FRENCH II

1 year

Grade 10-12

French II is a one-year course that emphasizes the foundation skills of speaking, listening, writing and reading, taught through the application of simple grammatical concepts. Students will review materials from the first year to study, continuing to develop proficiency in communicative skills, and deepen appreciation of francophone culture. The Standards for World Language are integrated into the course throughout the entire year and goals for each unit are posted in the classroom for students to view. Along with the textbook, Discovering French, students will be completing workbook pages, writing activities, viewing the text video series and popular animated films in the target language, as well as listening to music from the French-speaking world.

HEALTHCARE ACADEMY

1 year

Grade 11-12

This course is a combination of four different college course… Please make sure you read all of the information.


HCCC 1215: INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CAREERS I                        

FALL SEMESTER - **2 COLLEGE CREDITS                 

This course will familiarize students with the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of various health care careers.  Students will explore career options within the fields of allied health.  Course content is designed to provide glimpses into a variety of aspects of health careers, to promote discussion, and to encourage critical reflection and self-exploration.  The major course topics will guide students in exploring the influences of legal and ethical influences on health careers and how these influences impact what is done in the profession today.


HCCC 1220: INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CAREERS II                        

SPRING SEMESTER - **2 COLLEGE CREDITS             


Prerequisites:  HCCC 1215 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CAREERS I

This course will familiarize students with the expected patient care for various health care careers. Students will explore client and staff diversity, client needs, and safety and standard precautions found in allied health careers.  Course content is designed to provide health care terminology, promote discussion, and to encourage critical reflection and self-exploration.

The following on-campus course, combined with HCCC 1215 Intro to Health Careers I and HCCC 1220 Intro to Health Careers II, and upon successful completion of the NATO examination, will qualify students for placement on the Nursing Assistant Registered (NA/R) with the state of Minnesota and employment in a healthcare facility under the direct supervision of a licensed nurse.


HCCC 1225: HEALTHCARE CAREERS SKILL SET        

SPRING SEMESTER - **2 COLLEGE CREDITS       Lecture hours per week TBD, Lab hours per week TBD


This course (taken on PTCC campus) is an introduction to basic nursing care skills and concepts necessary to prepare an individual to be eligible to take the Nursing Assistant Test-Out (NATO) examination.  


HPPC 1000: MEDICAL DOSAGES                                

FALL SEMESTER - **1 COLLEGE CREDIT

Course introduces students to medical dosages and terminology associated with medication orders. Theory and skills related to calculating medication dosages will be the focus of this course.


HPPC 1002: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY                        

SPRING SEMESTER - **1 COLLEGE CREDIT                 

This course reinforces correct word definitions, pronunciation, and spelling as studied in Medical Terminology.  Students will be introduced to additional terminology specific to all body systems is as well as abbreviations, eponyms, and common drug names.  Students will apply medical terminology to basic interpretation of focused Internet searches.  Medical terminology as it relates to basic anatomy and functions of the body systems will be further explored.

*HCCC 1215 Intro to Health Careers I (2 credits) and HPPC 1000 Medical Dosages (1 credit)

are a two course package taken Fall Semester.

*HCCC 1220 Intro to Health Careers II (2 credits) and HPPC 1002 Medical Terminology (1 credit are a second two course package taken Spring Semester.

* HCCC 1225 Healthcare Careers Skill Set (2 credits) is in separate class in addition to HCCC 1215 and HCCC 1220. It is taken on the PTCC campus and has an additional charge.

BUSINESS ACADEMY

The following classes, if all completed along with College Composition, will earn you the Pine Technical & Community College’s Business Essentials Certificate which provides you with the foundation to advance your professional skills or continue your business education. The curriculum provides the skills employers are seeking.


BUSN 1110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                   

FALL SEMESTER - **3 COLLEGE CREDITS                           Lecture hrs per week 1, Lab hours per week 4


Prerequisite: READ 0220 Reading Strategies and ENGL 0230 Writing Foundations or ENGL 0225 Critical Reading & Writing Concepts or ACP Read 78+ or ACT Read 21+

This course provides an overview of the world of business. Students will learn about the environment of business, including the economic, political/legal, socio-demographic, global, technological, and competitive aspects and how they impact organizations. The various functional areas of business (management, marketing, and finance) will be examined.


BUSN 1120 BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS                              

SPRING SEMESTER - **3 COLLEGE CREDITS                 Lecture hours per week 1, LAB hours per week 4


Prerequisite: READ 0220 Reading Strategies and ENGL 0230 Writing Foundations or ENGL 0225 Critical Reading & Writing Concepts or ACP Read 78+ or ACT Read 21+

Co-requisite: BUSN 1110 Intro to Business                                            MnTC Goals (if any): None

This course introduces computer terminology, hardware, and software related to the business environment. Students will learn business productivity software applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, databases and presentation graphics, as well as the principles of professional behavior in computing and business-oriented internet use.


BUSN 1130 HUMAN RELATIONS IN BUSINESS                                                          

FALL SEMESTER - **3 COLLEGE CREDITS                         Lecture hours per week 1, Lab hours per week 4


Prerequisites: READ 0220 Reading Strategies and ENGL 0230 Writing Foundations or ENGL 1276 College Comp or ENGL 0225 Critical Reading & Writing Concepts or ACP Read 78+ or ACT Read 21+

Co-requisite:          BUSN 1110 Intro to Business and BUSN 1120 Business Computer Applications                                                                                                                                           MnTC Goals (if any): None

This course introduces human relations principles, methods, and skills applicable to management effectiveness and career success. Students will learn about principles and methods of organizational communication, professionalism, motivation, team building, conflict resolution, leadership, negotiation, cultural differences, and personal communication. Practical application and development of skills in these areas are emphasized throughout the course.


BUSN 1140 BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS                                                          

SPRING SEMESTER - **3 COLLEGE CREDITS                  Lecture hours per week 1, Lab hours per week 4


Prerequisites: READ 0220 Reading Strategies and ENGL 0230 Writing Foundations or ENGL 0225 Critical Reading & Writing Concepts or ACP Read 78+ or ACT Read 21+

Co-requisite:         BUSN 1110 Intro to Business, BUSN 1120 Business Computer Applications & BUSN 1130 Human Relations in Business                                                                  MnTC Goals (if any): None

This course introduces students to computer-based information systems within business organizations. Students will learn the strategic and administrative roles of information systems in business and explore the applications of computers and information technology to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of individuals, groups, and organizations.